Happy Birthday, Omicron
One year after the variant ’s discovery, virologists are still scrambling to keep up with Omicron’s rapid evolution. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 26, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: Coronavirus Omicron Variant Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Immune System Biology and Biochemistry Evolution (Biology) your-feed-science Source Type: news

Pocket feature shared by deadly coronaviruses could lead to pan-coronavirus antiviral treatment
Scientists have discovered why some coronaviruses are more likely to cause severe disease, which has remained a mystery, until now. Researchers of the University of Bristol-led study, published in Science Advances today [23 November], say their findings could lead to the development of a pan-coronavirus treatment to defeat all coronaviruses — from the 2002 SARS-CoV outbreak to Omicron, the current variant of SARS-CoV-2, as well as dangerous variants that may emerge in future. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 23, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute, Institutes, Elizabeth Bl Source Type: news

Scientists reveal new lines of attack to raise cancer survival rate
Targeting non-cancerous cells in tumours could open up new frontiers in fight against the diseaseScientists hope to double the survival rate of people with advanced cancer within a decade by using new lines of attack to fight the disease.Speaking at the launch of a joint five-year research strategy by the Institute of Cancer Research (ICR) and the Royal Marsden NHS foundation trust in London, experts described how targeting non-cancerous cells within tumours could open up new frontiers in the fight against the disease, enabling more people to be cured and others to survive for far longer.Continue reading... (Source: Guardi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 22, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Source Type: news

University welcomes German Ambassador delegation to the UK
The German Ambassador to the UK, His Excellency Miguel Berger visited the University on Friday [11 November], to meet Professor Evelyn Welch, the University's Vice-Chancellor and President, to discuss opportunities for UK-Germany education and research collaboration. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Arts, School of Modern Languages, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Source Type: news

University welcomes German Ambassador to the UK delegation
The German Ambassador to the UK, His Excellency Miguel Berger visited the University on Friday [11 November], to meet Professor Evelyn Welch, the University's Vice-Chancellor and President, to discuss opportunities for UK-Germany education and research collaboration. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 14, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Arts, Faculty of Arts, School of Modern Languages, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol Source Type: news

100 years after his birth, Kurt Vonnegut is more relevant than ever to science
When American novelist Kurt Vonnegut addressed the Bennington College class of 1970—1 year after publishing his best-selling novel, Slaughterhouse-Five —he hit the crowd with his signature one-two punch. “I fully expected that by the time I was 21, some scientist … would have taken a color photograph of God Almighty and sold it to Popular Mechanics magazine,” he said. “What actually happened … was that we dropped scientific truth on Hiroshima.” This weary skepticism for the scientific endeavor rings through many of Vonnegut’s 14 novels and dozens of short stories. For what ...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 10, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

Top-of-class Ukrainian graduate will ‘ use degree skills to rebuild country ’
A Ukrainian student graduating top of his class from the University of Bristol plans to use the skills he has learnt to rebuild his country. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 10, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Alumni, Undergraduate, Student life; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

First ever clinical trial of laboratory grown red blood cells being transfused into another person underway
Red blood cells that have been grown in a laboratory have now been transfused into another person in a world first clinical trial led by a UK team including University of Bristol researchers. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 7, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute, Institutes; Press Release Source Type: news

Reprogramming of immune cells shown to fight off melanoma
A new way of reprogramming our immune cells to shrink or kill off cancer cells has been shown to work in the otherwise hard to treat and devastating skin cancer, melanoma. The University of Bristol-led discovery, published in Advanced Science today [31 October], demonstrates a new way to clear early stage pre-cancerous and even late-stage tumour cells. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 31, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Institutes, Institutes, Elizabeth Blackwell; Press Release Source Type: news

Racial and gender disparities in publishing start early for doctors and scientists
This study really highlights the need to take an intersectional lens”—referring to how multiple aspects of identity are overlapping and interconnected—“where we talk about students with all their identities.” Researchers agree that the solutions will be complex, but something needs to be done, not only to improve the science being generated, but also to work toward equity in medicine and science. In addition to more equitable funding by institutions like NIH, scholars suggest accrediting bodies for medical schools should consider aspects of equity and inclusion in research opportunities. “No more st...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 26, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

Possible target for treating and preventing osteoarthritis found in little-studied protein
Wear and tear on joints can lead to inflammation, breakdown of cartilage and development of osteoarthritis. Scientists at UF Scripps Biomedical Research have found a possible new target to fight this painful cascade. In a study published Thursday in the journal PLOS One,biochemist Patrick Griffin, Ph.D., and colleague Mi Ra Chang, Ph.D., describe a specific protein that manages activities within chondrocytes, a critical cell type that maintains healthy cartilage in joints. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 14, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Ratio shift of protein in brain cells causes changes underlying early cognitive decline, new discovery shows
Early cognitive decline may result from a shift in the ratio of a protein sub-type in our brain cells triggering cell-loss. This new study, published in Scientific Reports, shows how this might be caused. The discovery provides a new therapeutic target to prevent the onset of neurodegenerative diseases including dementia and Alzheimer ’ s. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 10, 2022 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Physiology, Pharmacology and Neuroscience; Press Release Source Type: news

Powerful physics tool could help scientists understand complex ecosystems
Your gut is home to microbial madness. Hundreds of trillions of bacteria belonging to countless species interact with one another in complex ways that can both keep you healthy and cause disease . Teasing out these interactions would seem an impossible task. Now, microbiologists have found help from an unlikely source: physics. A new experiment suggests a powerful concept known as a phase transition can predict how complex ecosystems—like those composed of the bacteria in your belly—behave. The finding could help us keep our guts healthy and even protect other complex ecosystems such as rainforests and ...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 6, 2022 Category: Science Source Type: news

LordsMed launches IVD manufacturing facility at near Mumbai
​​Spread over 20,000 sq ft area, the IVD manufacturing facility is equipped with state-of-the-art technologies and infrastructure of global standards and will manufacture a diversified range of IVD and point of care diagnostic solutions such as analysers, reagents for clinical biochemistry, haem atology, serology, immunology, rapid testing kits (ICMR approved antigen kit) and lab consumables. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - October 6, 2022 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news