Newly launched British biotech company pioneers ground-breaking potential treatments for COVID-19
A team of top scientists from the University of Bristol have announced the formation of a new biotech company that is developing ground-breaking and newly patented potential treatments for coronavirus. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 13, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Business and Enterprise, Health, Research, International; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Source Type: news

A multidimensional view of the coronavirus
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) What exactly happens when the corona virus SARS-CoV-2 infects a cell? In Nature, a team from the Technical University of Munich (TUM) and the Max Planck Institute of Biochemistry paints a comprehensive picture of the viral infection process. For the first time, the interaction between the coronavirus and a cell is documented at five distinct proteomics levels. This knowledge will help to gain a better understanding of the virus and find starting points for therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mechanism and dynamics of fatty acid photodecarboxylase
Fatty acid photodecarboxylase (FAP) is a photoenzyme with potential green chemistry applications. By combining static, time-resolved, and cryotrapping spectroscopy and crystallography as well as computation, we characterized Chlorella variabilis FAP reaction intermediates on time scales from subpicoseconds to milliseconds. High-resolution crystal structures from synchrotron and free electron laser x-ray sources highlighted an unusual bent shape of the oxidized flavin chromophore. We demonstrate that decarboxylation occurs directly upon reduction of the excited flavin by the fatty acid substrate. Along with flavin reoxidati...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sorigue, D., Hadjidemetriou, K., Blangy, S., Gotthard, G., Bonvalet, A., Coquelle, N., Samire, P., Aleksandrov, A., Antonucci, L., Benachir, A., Boutet, S., Byrdin, M., Cammarata, M., Carbajo, S., Cuine, S., Doak, R. B., Foucar, L., Gorel, A., Grü Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structure and dynamics of the CGRP receptor in apo and peptide-bound forms
G protein–coupled receptors (GPCRs) are key regulators of information transmission between cells and organs. Despite this, we have only a limited understanding of the behavior of GPCRs in the apo state and the conformational changes upon agonist binding that lead to G protein recruitment and activation. We expressed and purified unmodified apo and peptide-bound calcitonin gene–related peptide (CGRP) receptors from insect cells to determine their cryo–electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structures, and we complemented these with analysis of protein conformational dynamics using hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass s...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Josephs, T. M., Belousoff, M. J., Liang, Y.-L., Piper, S. J., Cao, J., Garama, D. J., Leach, K., Gregory, K. J., Christopoulos, A., Hay, D. L., Danev, R., Wootten, D., Sexton, P. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Heavy water tastes sweet
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) Ordinary pure water has no distinct taste, but how about heavy water? Does it taste sweet, as anecdotal evidence going back to 1930s may have indicated? And if yes - why, when D2O is chemically practically identical to H2O? Researchers led by Pavel Jungwirth from IOCB Prague and Masha Niv from the Hebrew University show that, unlike ordinary water, heavy water tastes sweet to humans with this effect being mediated by the sweet taste receptor. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

LSU Health New Orleans study discovers source of Zika neurodevelopmental defects
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) A study led by Edward Wojcik, PhD, Associate Professor of Biochemistry& Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, identified how microcephaly (abnormally small heads) and blindness may develop in Zika-infected fetuses, as well as a new way to potentially prevent these neurodevelopmental defects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 6, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Committee with no domain expertise approved indigenously manufactured Covaxin: Health experts
“The committee is Delhi centric and dominated by disciplines not connected to vaccines and clinical research. Like in the US such important committees should be multidisciplinary with virologist, persons having a background in cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, public health and experie nce of conducting clinical research,” former health secretary Sujatha Rao said. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Committee with no domain expertise approved indigenously manufactured Covaxin, say health experts
“The committee is Delhi centric and dominated by disciplines not connected to vaccines and clinical research. Like in the US such important committees should be multidisciplinary with virologist, persons having a background in cellular and molecular biology, biochemistry, public health and experie nce of conducting clinical research,” former health secretary Sujatha Rao said. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - April 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Researchers Are Hatching a Low-Cost Covid-19 Vaccine
A new formulation entering clinical trials in Brazil, Mexico, Thailand and Vietnam could change how the world fights the pandemic. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer Tags: your-feed-science Clinical Trials Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Eggs Immune System Influenza Factories and Manufacturing Antibodies Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Biology and Biochemistry Gates, Bill and Me Source Type: news

Disrupted biochemical pathway in the brain linked to bipolar disorder
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) In new research, scientists at the University of Wisconsin-Madison have found for the first time that disruptions to a particular protein called Akt can lead to the brain changes characteristic of bipolar disorder. The results offer a foundation for research into treating the often-overlooked cognitive impairments of bipolar disorder, such as memory loss, and add to a growing understanding of how the biochemistry of the brain affects health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A plateful of medicine
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Kaiser, J. Tags: Biochemistry, Medicine, Diseases Feature Source Type: news

Mediating transcription
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Integrating form and function for design
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry, Materials Science twis Source Type: news

Structure of the human Mediator-bound transcription preinitiation complex
Eukaryotic transcription requires the assembly of a multisubunit preinitiation complex (PIC) composed of RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and the general transcription factors. The coactivator Mediator is recruited by transcription factors, facilitates the assembly of the PIC, and stimulates phosphorylation of the Pol II C-terminal domain (CTD) by the TFIIH subunit CDK7. Here, we present the cryo–electron microscopy structure of the human Mediator-bound PIC at a resolution below 4 angstroms. Transcription factor binding sites within Mediator are primarily flexibly tethered to the tail module. CDK7 is stabilized by multiple...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Abdella, R., Talyzina, A., Chen, S., Inouye, C. J., Tjian, R., He, Y. Tags: Biochemistry r-articles Source Type: news

Designed proteins assemble antibodies into modular nanocages
Multivalent display of receptor-engaging antibodies or ligands can enhance their activity. Instead of achieving multivalency by attachment to preexisting scaffolds, here we unite form and function by the computational design of nanocages in which one structural component is an antibody or Fc-ligand fusion and the second is a designed antibody-binding homo-oligomer that drives nanocage assembly. Structures of eight nanocages determined by electron microscopy spanning dihedral, tetrahedral, octahedral, and icosahedral architectures with 2, 6, 12, and 30 antibodies per nanocage, respectively, closely match the corresponding c...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Divine, R., Dang, H. V., Ueda, G., Fallas, J. A., Vulovic, I., Sheffler, W., Saini, S., Zhao, Y. T., Raj, I. X., Morawski, P. A., Jennewein, M. F., Homad, L. J., Wan, Y.-H., Tooley, M. R., Seeger, F., Etemadi, A., Fahning, M. L., Lazarovits, J., Roederer, Tags: Biochemistry, Materials Science, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Cold Tooth Pain's Mysterious Molecular Culprit
Researchers figured out how a jolt of discomfort gets from the damaged outside of your tooth to the nerves inside it. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Veronique Greenwood Tags: Teeth and Dentistry Temperature Biology and Biochemistry Proteins Mice Science Advances (Journal) Research your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news

Reporter Apoorva Mandavilli Makes Science of Covid Clearer
Behind some of The Times ’s vital journalism on the coronavirus is a reporter who speaks seven languages, holds a master’s degree in biochemistry and, OK, has a weakness for “Bridgerton.” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Van Syckle Tags: Mandavilli, Apoorva New York Times News and News Media Science and Technology Content Type: Personal Profile Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Source Type: news

Laser-controlled receptor clustering
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

In non-eutherians, a third type of T cell
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology twis Source Type: news

The molecular assembly of the marsupial {gamma}{mu} T cell receptor defines a third T cell lineage
We describe a population of μTCRs found exclusively in non-eutherian mammals that consist of a two-domain (V-C) -chain paired to a three-domain (Vμ-Vμj-Cμ) μ-chain. μTCRs were characterized by restricted diversity in the V and Vμj domains and a highly diverse unpaired Vμ domain. Crystal structures of two distinct μTCRs revealed the structural basis of the association of the μTCR heterodimer. The Vμ domain shared the characteristics of a single-domain antibody within which the hypervariable CDR3μ loop suggests a major antigen recognition determinant. We define here the molecular basis und...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Morrissey, K. A., Wegrecki, M., Praveena, T., Hansen, V. L., Bu, L., Sivaraman, K. K., Darko, S., Douek, D. C., Rossjohn, J., Miller, R. D., Le Nours, J. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology reports Source Type: news

Photoinduced receptor confinement drives ligand-independent GPCR signaling
Cell-cell communication relies on the assembly of receptor-ligand complexes at the plasma membrane. The spatiotemporal receptor organization has a pivotal role in evoking cellular responses. We studied the clustering of heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide–binding protein (G protein)–coupled receptors (GPCRs) and established a photoinstructive matrix with ultrasmall lock-and-key interaction pairs to control lateral membrane organization of hormone neuropeptide Y2 receptors in living cells by light. Within seconds, receptor clustering was modulated in size, location, and density. After in situ confinement, changes ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Sanchez, M. F., Els-Heindl, S., Beck-Sickinger, A. G., Wieneke, R., Tampe, R. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

University of Bristol continues fight to eradicate deadly disease on World Tuberculosis Day
Researchers at the University of Bristol are working on a number of different developments to finally end the TB epidemic. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - March 24, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Science, School of Physics, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

Structure of the activated human minor spliceosome
The minor spliceosome mediates splicing of the rare but essential U12-type precursor messenger RNA. Here, we report the atomic features of the activated human minor spliceosome determined by cryo–electron microscopy at 2.9-angstrom resolution. The 5' splice site and branch point sequence of the U12-type intron are recognized by the U6atac and U12 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), respectively. Five newly identified proteins stabilize the conformation of the catalytic center: The zinc finger protein SCNM1 functionally mimics the SF3a complex of the major spliceosome, the RBM48-ARMC7 complex binds the -monomethyl phosphate ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Bai, R., Wan, R., Wang, L., Xu, K., Zhang, Q., Lei, J., Shi, Y. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

A processive RNA replicator
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Atomic structure of the minor spliceosome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Cryo-EM helps engineer enhanced IL-10
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology twis Source Type: news

Processive RNA polymerization and promoter recognition in an RNA World
Early life is thought to have required the self-replication of RNA by RNA replicases. However, how such replicases evolved and subsequently enabled gene expression remains largely unexplored. We engineered and selected a holopolymerase ribozyme that uses a sigma factor–like specificity primer to first recognize an RNA promoter sequence and then, in a second step, rearrange to a processive elongation form. Using its own sequence, the polymerase can also program itself to polymerize from certain RNA promoters and not others. This selective promoter–based polymerization could allow an RNA replicase ribozyme to def...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Cojocaru, R., Unrau, P. J. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Structure-based decoupling of the pro- and anti-inflammatory functions of interleukin-10
Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an immunoregulatory cytokine with both anti-inflammatory and immunostimulatory properties and is frequently dysregulated in disease. We used a structure-based approach to deconvolute IL-10 pleiotropy by determining the structure of the IL-10 receptor (IL-10R) complex by cryo–electron microscopy at a resolution of 3.5 angstroms. The hexameric structure shows how IL-10 and IL-10Rα form a composite surface to engage the shared signaling receptor IL-10Rβ, enabling the design of partial agonists. IL-10 variants with a range of IL-10Rβ binding strengths uncovered substantial differ...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Saxton, R. A., Tsutsumi, N., Su, L. L., Abhiraman, G. C., Mohan, K., Henneberg, L. T., Aduri, N. G., Gati, C., Garcia, K. C. Tags: Biochemistry, Immunology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Masonic Medical Research Institute develops new technology for studying brown fat
(Masonic Medical Research Institute) Brown fat, also known as brown adipose tissue (BAT), is a special type of fat that helps maintain body temperature. Importantly, brown fat is a biological fuel linked to metabolic rate and fat storage. In a recent publication, Dr. Zhiqiang Lin, Assistant Professor at the Masonic Medical Research Institute (MMRI) and senior author of the manuscript, successfully developed a new way to enrich isolation of brown fat cells for use in his biochemistry studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NJIT's Guvendiren develops 3D-printed biomaterials to create rejection-proof organs
(New Jersey Institute of Technology) To date, bioinks cannot fully mimic the dynamic properties of native tissue, like changes in stiffness and biochemistry. Guvendiren's bioinks are " cell-instructive " materials that train stem cells to differentiate into different cell types in the right sequence to create a functional tissue. Their casing functions as support for the cells that are " cured " into the desired structure with blue light, eventually degrading in the body as it is replaced by a naturally produced extracellular matrix. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Basic and applied concepts of biochemical compounds
(Bentham Science Publishers) This book will serve as a learning tool for students belonging to the field of biochemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The epic battle with cancer's 'Death Star'
Forty years after the mutant genes that cause the deadliest cancers were discovered, drugs that target them could be approvedIn the early 1980s, Channing Der was just beginning his career as a scientist at Harvard Medical School when he happened upon a discovery that would change the course of cancer research. At the time, the holy grail of cancer biology was discovering so-called oncogenes – genetic switches that can turn a normal cell into a cancer cell – in the genomes of tumours. But while teams of scientists had thrown everything at it for the best part of a decade, their efforts had proved fruitless. One ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: David Cox Tags: Cancer research Medical research Science Health Society Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

Janssen Announces 96-week Results of Phase 3b Study Demonstrating the Continued Safety and Efficacy of Long-acting HIV Treatment of Rilpivirine and Cabotegravir
CORK, IRELAND, March 6, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today presented positive long-term data from the global Phase 3b trial of the first complete, long-acting (LA), two-drug injectable regimen (consisting of Janssen’s rilpivirine and ViiV Healthcare’s cabotegravir) for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in adults. The 96-week findings of the Antiretroviral Therapy as Long-Acting Suppression Every 2 Months (ATLAS-2M) trial confirmed the primary endpoint, met at Week 48, and met the secondary endpoint, showing efficacy of both month...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - March 6, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Some like it hot, others not
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: Biochemistry, Evolution twis Source Type: news

A cellular cholesterol sensor
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - March 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

A structure of human Scap bound to Insig-2 suggests how their interaction is regulated by sterols
The sterol regulatory element–binding protein (SREBP) pathway controls cellular homeostasis of sterols. The key players in this pathway, Scap and Insig-1 and -2, are membrane-embedded sterol sensors. The 25-hydroxycholesterol (25HC)–dependent association of Scap and Insig acts as the master switch for the SREBP pathway. Here, we present cryo–electron microscopy analysis of the human Scap and Insig-2 complex in the presence of 25HC, with the transmembrane (TM) domains determined at an average resolution of 3.7 angstrom. The sterol-sensing domain in Scap and all six TMs in Insig-2 were resolved. A 25HC mole...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Yan, R., Cao, P., Song, W., Qian, H., Du, X., Coates, H. W., Zhao, X., Li, Y., Gao, S., Gong, X., Liu, X., Sui, J., Lei, J., Yang, H., Brown, A. J., Zhou, Q., Yan, C., Yan, N. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Parallel molecular mechanisms for enzyme temperature adaptation
The mechanisms that underly the adaptation of enzyme activities and stabilities to temperature are fundamental to our understanding of molecular evolution and how enzymes work. Here, we investigate the molecular and evolutionary mechanisms of enzyme temperature adaption, combining deep mechanistic studies with comprehensive sequence analyses of thousands of enzymes. We show that temperature adaptation in ketosteroid isomerase (KSI) arises primarily from one residue change with limited, local epistasis, and we establish the underlying physical mechanisms. This residue change occurs in diverse KSI backgrounds, suggesting par...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 4, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Pinney, M. M., Mokhtari, D. A., Akiva, E., Yabukarski, F., Sanchez, D. M., Liang, R., Doukov, T., Martinez, T. J., Babbitt, P. C., Herschlag, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Evolution, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

$1m grant funds research on potential new RX for prostate cancer
(Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center) The Biomedical Laboratory Research and Development Branch of the Veterans Administration (VA) has awarded Hari Koul, PhD, Professor and Interim Chairman of the Department Biochemistry& Molecular Biology at LSU Health New Orleans School of Medicine, $1,056,317 in research funding over four years to help find new treatments for prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA forms research collaboration with Yuyu Pharma to advance MS treatment
Through a new collaboration with a South Korean pharmaceutical company, UCLA scientists will participate in the process to develop a new drug to treat multiple sclerosis.UCLA and Yuyu Pharma will evaluate the efficacy and safety of drugs that have the potential to treat the debilitating disease.The collaboration was facilitated by theUCLA Technology Development Group, which manages UCLA ’s intellectual property and spearheads partnerships with private industry to commercialize UCLA research.“We are excited that Yuyu Pharma chose UCLA as its first academic institution partner in the U.S.,” said Amir Naiber...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Signal transduction without signal -- receptor clusters can direct cell movement
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Whether we smell, taste or see, or when adrenaline rushes through our veins, all of these signals are received by our cells via a specific group of receptor proteins called G protein-coupled receptors, which transmit signals to the inside of the cell. Biochemists at Goethe University Frankfurt and the University of Leipzig have now discovered that such receptors can also produce signals even in the absence of an external stimulus: For certain receptors clustering is apparently sufficient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Janssen Announces Submission of Supplemental New Drug Application to U.S. FDA by ViiV Healthcare for Expanded Use of CABENUVA (rilpivirine and cabotegravir) as an HIV Treatment for Use Every Two Months
TITUSVILLE, N.J., February 24, 2021 – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced that a supplemental New Drug Application (sNDA) has been submitted to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) by ViiV Healthcare for the expanded use of CABENUVA (consisting of Janssen’s long-acting rilpivirine and ViiV Healthcare’s cabotegravir). The sNDA seeks to expand the CABENUVA label to include administration every two months for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in virologically suppressed adults (HIV-1 RNA less than 50 copies per mL) on a sta...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 24, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Co-Diagnostics, Inc. Announces New Chief Financial Officer
Company also elevates in-house Senior VP of Biochemistry to Chief Scientific Officer SALT LAKE CITY, Feb. 23, 2021 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Co-Diagnostics, Inc. (Nasdaq: CODX), a molecular diagnostics company with a unique, patented... Diagnostics, Personnel Co-Diagnostics, molecular diagnostics (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - February 23, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Bristol Science Film Festival 2021 - calling all creatives to submit short films!
Bristol ’ s Science Film Festival is set to take place this summer and the organisers of the annual event are calling for submissions from amateur and professional movie makers ahead of the festival ’ s September showcase. Film-makers behind shortlisted films will have their films screened and a chance to win cash prizes. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 18, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Health, Current students, Alumni; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Elizabeth Blackwell; Press Release Source Type: news

Bristol Science Film Festival 2021 - calling all creatives to submit short films!
Bristol ’ s Science Film Festival is set to take place this summer and the organisers of the annual event are calling for submissions from amateur and professional movie makers ahead of the festival ’ s July showcase. Film-makers behind shortlisted films will have their films screened and a chance to win cash prizes. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 18, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Health, Current students, Alumni; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Institutes, Elizabeth Blackwell; Press Release Source Type: news

Making the energy makers
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Building a barrel
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Moving targets of neurotoxins
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jiang, D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Phage-assisted evolution of botulinum neurotoxin proteases with reprogrammed specificity
Although bespoke, sequence-specific proteases have the potential to advance biotechnology and medicine, generation of proteases with tailor-made cleavage specificities remains a major challenge. We developed a phage-assisted protease evolution system with simultaneous positive and negative selection and applied it to three botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) light-chain proteases. We evolved BoNT/X protease into separate variants that preferentially cleave vesicle-associated membrane protein 4 (VAMP4) and Ykt6, evolved BoNT/F protease to selectively cleave the non-native substrate VAMP7, and evolved BoNT/E protease to cleave phosp...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Blum, T. R., Liu, H., Packer, M. S., Xiong, X., Lee, P.-G., Zhang, S., Richter, M., Minasov, G., Satchell, K. J. F., Dong, M., Liu, D. R. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Mechanism of membrane-tethered mitochondrial protein synthesis
We report cryo–electron microscopy structures of human mitoribosomes with nascent polypeptide, bound to the insertase oxidase assembly 1–like (OXA1L) through three distinct contact sites. OXA1L binding is correlated with a series of conformational changes in the mitoribosomal large subunit that catalyze the delivery of newly synthesized polypeptides. The mechanism relies on the folding of mL45 inside the exit tunnel, forming two specific constriction sites that would limit helix formation of the nascent chain. A gap is formed between the exit and the membrane, making the newly synthesized proteins accessible. O...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Itoh, Y., Andrell, J., Choi, A., Richter, U., Maiti, P., Best, R. B., Barrientos, A., Battersby, B. J., Amunts, A. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

De novo design of transmembrane {beta} barrels
Transmembrane β-barrel proteins (TMBs) are of great interest for single-molecule analytical technologies because they can spontaneously fold and insert into membranes and form stable pores, but the range of pore properties that can be achieved by repurposing natural TMBs is limited. We leverage the power of de novo computational design coupled with a "hypothesis, design, and test" approach to determine TMB design principles, notably, the importance of negative design to slow β-sheet assembly. We design new eight-stranded TMBs, with no homology to known TMBs, that insert and fold reversibly into syntheti...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Vorobieva, A. A., White, P., Liang, B., Horne, J. E., Bera, A. K., Chow, C. M., Gerben, S., Marx, S., Kang, A., Stiving, A. Q., Harvey, S. R., Marx, D. C., Khan, G. N., Fleming, K. G., Wysocki, V. H., Brockwell, D. J., Tamm, L. K., Radford, S. E., Baker, Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news