How membrane viscosity affects respiration
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ray, L. B. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Viscous control of cellular respiration by membrane lipid composition
We describe a specific role for the viscosity of energy-transducing membranes in cellular respiration. Engineering of fatty acid biosynthesis in Escherichia coli allowed us to titrate inner membrane viscosity across a 10-fold range by controlling the abundance of unsaturated or branched lipids. These fluidizing lipids tightly controlled respiratory metabolism, an effect that can be explained with a quantitative model of the electron transport chain (ETC) that features diffusion-coupled reactions between enzymes and electron carriers (quinones). Lipid unsaturation also modulated mitochondrial respiration in engineered buddi...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 6, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Budin, I., de Rond, T., Chen, Y., Chan, L. J. G., Petzold, C. J., Keasling, J. D. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

CZI awards over $51 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A molecular look at nascent HDL formation
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers at Boston University pin down a molecular interaction between an apolipoprotein and a lipid transporter that's key to reverse cholesterol transport. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CZI awards over $64 million to fight neurodegenerative disorders
(Chan Zuckerberg Initiative) Today, the Chan Zuckerberg Initiative (CZI) announced $64.25 million in funding and its selection of 17 early career investigators and nine collaborative science teams to launch the CZI Neurodegeneration Challenge Network. This new network brings together experimental scientists from diverse research fields -- neuroscience, cell biology, biochemistry, immunology, and genomics -- along with computational biologists and physicians, to understand the underlying causes of neurodegenerative disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A book for learning NMR Techniques and their applications in civil engineering and biochemistry
(Bentham Science Publishers) 'Magnetic Resonance in Studying Natural and Synthetic Materials' is a useful reference for readers learning different NMR techniques and their applications in civil engineering and biochemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 4, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Peter Jonas receives Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences
(Institute of Science and Technology Austria) Peter Jonas, Professor at the Institute of Science and Technology Austria (IST Austria), receives the Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize of the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The Erwin Schr ö dinger Prize 2018 goes in equal parts to Peter Jonas and Elly Tanaka, biochemist at the IMP. Jonas is honored for his outstanding research achievements in the field of neuroscience, in particular for his significant contribution to the understanding of synaptic signal processing at the molecular and cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 3, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Assistant Professor in Microbiology
The University of Washington Tacoma invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor in Microbiology in the Division of Sciences and Mathematics within the School of Interdisciplinary Arts & Sciences (SIAS). We seek an individual that shares our institutional values of excellence, community, diversity, innovation and access. This is a full-time position with a nine-month service period. The successful candidate will have a proven record of scholarship in microbiology with biomedical applications. We expect the successful candidate to actively seek extramural support to develop and maintain an excellent res...
Source: AIBS Classifieds - November 29, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Classifieds Tags: Other Positions Available Source Type: news

An electron transfer path connects subunits of a mycobacterial respiratory supercomplex
We report a 3.5-angstrom-resolution cryo–electron microscopy structure of a respiratory supercomplex isolated from Mycobacterium smegmatis. It comprises a complex III dimer flanked on either side by individual complex IV subunits. Complex III and IV associate so that electrons can be transferred from quinol in complex III to the oxygen reduction center in complex IV by way of a bridging cytochrome subunit. We observed a superoxide dismutase-like subunit at the periplasmic face, which may be responsible for detoxification of superoxide formed by complex III. The structure reveals features of an established drug target...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Gong, H., Li, J., Xu, A., Tang, Y., Ji, W., Gao, R., Wang, S., Yu, L., Tian, C., Li, J., Yen, H.-Y., Man Lam, S., Shui, G., Yang, X., Sun, Y., Li, X., Jia, M., Yang, C., Jiang, B., Lou, Z., Robinson, C. V., Wong, L.-L., Guddat, L. W., Sun, F., Wang, Q., R Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

An electron bridge in place of a ferry
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Funk, M. A. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Another N-end rule to add
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Hurtley, S. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Molecular-motor coordination
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Substrate-engaged 26S proteasome structures reveal mechanisms for ATP-hydrolysis-driven translocation
The 26S proteasome is the primary eukaryotic degradation machine and thus is critically involved in numerous cellular processes. The heterohexameric adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) motor of the proteasome unfolds and translocates targeted protein substrates into the open gate of a proteolytic core while a proteasomal deubiquitinase concomitantly removes substrate-attached ubiquitin chains. However, the mechanisms by which ATP hydrolysis drives the conformational changes responsible for these processes have remained elusive. Here we present the cryo–electron microscopy structures of four distinct conformational stat...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: de la Pena, A. H., Goodall, E. A., Gates, S. N., Lander, G. C., Martin, A. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Formyl-methionine as an N-degron of a eukaryotic N-end rule pathway
In bacteria, nascent proteins bear the pretranslationally generated N-terminal (Nt) formyl-methionine (fMet) residue. Nt-fMet of bacterial proteins is a degradation signal, termed fMet/N-degron. By contrast, proteins synthesized by cytosolic ribosomes of eukaryotes were presumed to bear unformylated Nt-Met. Here we found that the yeast formyltransferase Fmt1, although imported into mitochondria, could also produce Nt-formylated proteins in the cytosol. Nt-formylated proteins were strongly up-regulated in stationary phase or upon starvation for specific amino acids. This up-regulation strictly required the Gcn2 kinase, whic...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 29, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kim, J.-M., Seok, O.-H., Ju, S., Heo, J.-E., Yeom, J., Kim, D.-S., Yoo, J.-Y., Varshavsky, A., Lee, C., Hwang, C.-S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Lab-grown placentas 'will transform pregnancy research'
Cambridge team develops organoids or mini placentas to advance knowledge of stillbirth and pre-eclampsiaScientists have grown “mini placentas” in a breakthrough that could transform research into the underlying causes of miscarriage, stillbirth and other pregnancy disorders.The tiny organoids mimic the placenta in the early stages of the first trimester and will be used to understand how the tissue develops in healthy pregnancies, and what goes wrong when it fails.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 28, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Medical research Pregnancy Reproduction Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Zika virus Science University of Cambridge UK news Source Type: news

Six UCLA professors named fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science
Six faculty members from UCLA have been selected as 2018 fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. They are to be honored by the association for their scientifically or socially distinguished efforts to advance science or its applications.New fellows will be presented with an official certificate and a gold and blue rosette pin, representing science and engineering, on Feb. 16, at the association ’s annual meeting in Washington, D.C. Fellows will be formally announced in the “AAAS News and Notes” section of the journal Science on Nov. 29.UCLA ’s newest AAAS fellows are...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 27, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

How changing labs revealed a chemical reaction key to cataract formation
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Researchers working to understand the biochemistry of cataracts have made a surprising finding: A protein that was long believed to be inert actually has an important chemical function that protects the lens of the eye from cataract formation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Shea, Budd named 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science fellows
(University of Iowa) Two scientists from the University of Iowa have been named 2018 American Association for the Advancement of Science fellows. Ann Budd, in the Department of Earth and Environmental Sciences, and Madeline Shea, in the Department of Biochemistry, will be honored at the February 2019 AAAS meeting in Washington, D.C. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modeling the most common form of vision loss in older adults
(University of Pennsylvania) Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in people older than 50. University of Pennsylvania biochemist Kathleen Boesze-Battaglia and colleagues have developed a model system that mimics many features of the human condition, giving scientists a platform to gain a deeper understanding of risk factors and possible treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Clemson researchers reveal secrets of parasite that causes African sleeping sickness
(Clemson University) A team of Clemson University researchers wants to protect humans and other mammals from the debilitating and even deadly effects of African sleeping sickness. James Morris, a Clemson professor in the College of Science's department of genetics and biochemistry, said that studying the cause of the disease is vital because, although the transmission of African sleeping sickness by tsetse flies has been studied for more than 100 years, the secret to the underlying parasite's success remains largely a mystery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 20, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Interaction between immunity and gut bacteria influences aging
A disrupted immune system can upset gut bacteria in ways that can lead to cell damage and tissue changes associated with aging, study finds. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - November 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Biology / Biochemistry Source Type: news

SFXN1 is a mitochondrial serine transporter required for one-carbon metabolism
One-carbon metabolism generates the one-carbon units required to synthesize many critical metabolites, including nucleotides. The pathway has cytosolic and mitochondrial branches, and a key step is the entry, through an unknown mechanism, of serine into mitochondria, where it is converted into glycine and formate. In a CRISPR-based genetic screen in human cells for genes of the mitochondrial pathway, we found sideroflexin 1 (SFXN1), a multipass inner mitochondrial membrane protein of unclear function. Like cells missing mitochondrial components of one-carbon metabolism, those null for SFXN1 are defective in glycine and pur...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kory, N., Wyant, G. A., Prakash, G., uit de Bos, J., Bottanelli, F., Pacold, M. E., Chan, S. H., Lewis, C. A., Wang, T., Keys, H. R., Guo, Y. E., Sabatini, D. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Programmed DNA destruction by miniature CRISPR-Cas14 enzymes
CRISPR-Cas systems provide microbes with adaptive immunity to infectious nucleic acids and are widely employed as genome editing tools. These tools use RNA-guided Cas proteins whose large size (950 to 1400 amino acids) has been considered essential to their specific DNA- or RNA-targeting activities. Here we present a set of CRISPR-Cas systems from uncultivated archaea that contain Cas14, a family of exceptionally compact RNA-guided nucleases (400 to 700 amino acids). Despite their small size, Cas14 proteins are capable of targeted single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) cleavage without restrictive sequence requirements. Moreover, tar...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Harrington, L. B., Burstein, D., Chen, J. S., Paez-Espino, D., Ma, E., Witte, I. P., Cofsky, J. C., Kyrpides, N. C., Banfield, J. F., Doudna, J. A. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Protein assemblies ejected directly from native membranes yield complexes for mass spectrometry
Membrane proteins reside in lipid bilayers and are typically extracted from this environment for study, which often compromises their integrity. In this work, we ejected intact assemblies from membranes, without chemical disruption, and used mass spectrometry to define their composition. From Escherichia coli outer membranes, we identified a chaperone-porin association and lipid interactions in the β-barrel assembly machinery. We observed efflux pumps bridging inner and outer membranes, and from inner membranes we identified a pentameric pore of TonB, as well as the protein-conducting channel SecYEG in association wit...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Chorev, D. S., Baker, L. A., Wu, D., Beilsten-Edmands, V., Rouse, S. L., Zeev-Ben-Mordehai, T., Jiko, C., Samsudin, F., Gerle, C., Khalid, S., Stewart, A. G., Matthews, S. J., Grünewald, K., Robinson, C. V. Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

Mitochondrial serine transporter identified
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

A programmable type of CRISPR system
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Innovating to be nondisruptive
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Obesity gives unexpected boost to anticancer drugs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Kaiser, J. Tags: Biochemistry, Medicine, Diseases In Depth Source Type: news

How to produce fluorescent nanoparticles for medical applications in a nuclear reactor
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) Scientists from IOCB Prague and IMC have developed a revolutionary method for the easy and inexpensive production of irradiated nanodiamonds and other nanomaterials suitable for use in highly sensitive diagnostics of diseases, including various types of cancer. Their article was recently published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do peptides penetrate cells? Two sides of the same coin
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) The research team of Pavel Jungwirth from IOCB Prague has discovered a previously unknown mechanism by which short peptides are able to penetrate cells and, in principle, could serve as carriers of drug molecules. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Recruiting more proteins to the RNA world
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Scott, W. G., Nagai, K. Tags: Biochemistry perspective Source Type: news

Built to be reversible
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Vinson, V. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Structures of eukaryotic ribonuclease P
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry twis Source Type: news

Structural insight into precursor tRNA processing by yeast ribonuclease P
Ribonuclease P (RNase P) is a universal ribozyme responsible for processing the 5'-leader of pre–transfer RNA (pre-tRNA). Here, we report the 3.5-angstrom cryo–electron microscopy structures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase P alone and in complex with pre-tRNAPhe. The protein components form a hook-shaped architecture that wraps around the RNA and stabilizes RNase P into a "measuring device" with two fixed anchors that recognize the L-shaped pre-tRNA. A universally conserved uridine nucleobase and phosphate backbone in the catalytic center together with the scissile phosphate and the O3' leaving grou...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Lan, P., Tan, M., Zhang, Y., Niu, S., Chen, J., Shi, S., Qiu, S., Wang, X., Peng, X., Cai, G., Cheng, H., Wu, J., Li, G., Lei, M. Tags: Biochemistry, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

De novo design of self-assembling helical protein filaments
We describe a general computational approach to designing self-assembling helical filaments from monomeric proteins and use this approach to design proteins that assemble into micrometer-scale filaments with a wide range of geometries in vivo and in vitro. Cryo–electron microscopy structures of six designs are close to the computational design models. The filament building blocks are idealized repeat proteins, and thus the diameter of the filaments can be systematically tuned by varying the number of repeat units. The assembly and disassembly of the filaments can be controlled by engineered anchor and capping units b...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 8, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Shen, H., Fallas, J. A., Lynch, E., Sheffler, W., Parry, B., Jannetty, N., Decarreau, J., Wagenbach, M., Vicente, J. J., Chen, J., Wang, L., Dowling, Q., Oberdorfer, G., Stewart, L., Wordeman, L., De Yoreo, J., Jacobs-Wagner, C., Kollman, J., Baker, D. Tags: Biochemistry reports Source Type: news

Voters just elected six more scientists to Congress
The next Congress will include at least six newly elected scientists, including a nuclear engineer and a biochemist. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - November 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A cure for cancer: how to kill a killer
Revolutionary work on the body ’s immune system and a host of new drug trials mean that beating cancer may be achievableLast month, the Nobel prize in medicine was awarded fortwo breakthrough scientific discoveries heralded as having “revolutionised cancer treatment”, and “fundamentally changed the way we view how cancer can be managed”. One of them went to a charismatic, harmonica-playing Texan namedJim Allison for his breakthrough advances in cancer immunotherapy. His discovery had resulted in transformative outcomes for cancer patients and a radical new direction for cancer research.And yet...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Charles Graeber Tags: Cancer research Medical research Immunology Biochemistry and molecular biology Health Science Source Type: news

Bristol to join forces with one of the world ’ s most prestigious research societies
The University of Bristol partners with the Max Planck Society in Germany to establish an innovative new Max Planck Centre for Minimal Biology in Bristol. The Centre will pursue game-changing research in the emerging field of minimal biology to address some of the most complex challenges in fundamental science. This could lead to transformative applications in biotechnology and medicine. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - November 2, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research, Announcements, Business and Enterprise; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Institutes, Bristol BioDe Source Type: news

Molecular virologist fights influenza at the molecular level
(University of Alabama at Birmingham) In research to improve influenza therapies against H7N9 and other influenza strains, Chad Petit and his University of Alabama at Birmingham colleagues have detailed the binding site and mechanism of inhibition for two small-molecule experimental inhibitors of influenza viruses. Their report is published in the Journal of Biochemistry, (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Deconstructing the superfood that determines honeybee hierarchy
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) All bee larvae eat royal jelly when they're new, but only future queens continue to eat it. To figure out why, researchers in Austria are taking a close look at the molecular ingredients of the fancy fare. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Business Minister visits Bristol BioDesign Institute and Unit DX
The Rt Hon Lord Henley, Parliamentary Under Secretary of State at the Department for Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy (BEIS), visited the University ’ s Bristol BioDesign Institute today, along with a visit to science incubator, Unit DX [25 Oct]. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 26, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research, Business and Enterprise; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute, Faculty of Source Type: news

Evolutionary shift toward protein-based architecture in trypanosomal mitochondrial ribosomes
Ribosomal RNA (rRNA) plays key functional and architectural roles in ribosomes. Using electron microscopy, we determined the atomic structure of a highly divergent ribosome found in mitochondria of Trypanosoma brucei, a unicellular parasite that causes sleeping sickness in humans. The trypanosomal mitoribosome features the smallest rRNAs and contains more proteins than all known ribosomes. The structure shows how the proteins have taken over the role of architectural scaffold from the rRNA: They form an autonomous outer shell that surrounds the entire particle and stabilizes and positions the functionally important regions...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Ramrath, D. J. F., Niemann, M., Leibundgut, M., Bieri, P., Prange, C., Horn, E. K., Leitner, A., Boehringer, D., Schneider, A., Ban, N. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Super-resolution chromatin tracing reveals domains and cooperative interactions in single cells
We report an imaging method for tracing chromatin organization with kilobase- and nanometer-scale resolution, unveiling chromatin conformation across topologically associating domains (TADs) in thousands of individual cells. Our imaging data revealed TAD-like structures with globular conformation and sharp domain boundaries in single cells. The boundaries varied from cell to cell, occurring with nonzero probabilities at all genomic positions but preferentially at CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)- and cohesin-binding sites. Notably, cohesin depletion, which abolished TADs at the population-average level, did not diminish TAD-lik...
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Bintu, B., Mateo, L. J., Su, J.-H., Sinnott-Armstrong, N. A., Parker, M., Kinrot, S., Yamaya, K., Boettiger, A. N., Zhuang, X. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Structure of the largest, most complex ribosome
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mao, S. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology twis Source Type: news

Imaging chromatin spatial organization
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - October 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zahn, L. M. Tags: Biochemistry, Cell Biology twis Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Early Detection Getting Closer with Blood Test
German scientists are advancing a new, more reliable blood test that could lead to earlier detection and better prognosis for malignant mesothelioma. Instead of the typically lengthy and invasive process, the simple blood test could identify early stage disease almost a year before symptoms appear, making it much more treatable. The advancement stems from a study analyzing a combination of calretinin and mesothelin, two blood-based proteins that are overexpressed when mesothelioma tumors start growing. “This is a real breakthrough,” biochemist Dr. Georg Johnen, lead study researcher and head of Molecular Medici...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - October 23, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Motley crews of bacteria cleanse water at huge oceanic Georgia Aquarium exhibit
(Georgia Institute of Technology) Good bacteria cleaning water in Georgia Aquarium's huge oceanic exhibit delivered a nice surprise to researchers. The aquarium wanted to know which bacteria were at work, so Georgia Tech oceanic biochemists analyzed them: The bacterial colonies raised eyebrows because they were virtually indistinguishable from those found in natural settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers discover drug that could combat brain cell death in those with Alzheimer ’s disease
This study was funded by the Turken Research Award and departmental recruitment funds to Jiang; as well as grants from the National Institutes of Health, Department of Energy and Howard Hughes Medical Institute to Eisenberg. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Frances Arnold: ‘To expect a Nobel prize is rather silly’
The joint winner of this year ’s Nobel prize in chemistry talks about her pioneering work on enzymes and the realities of sexism in the sciencesThismonth,Frances Arnold, professor of chemical engineering atCaltech in California, was awarded the 2018Nobel prize in chemistry, shared with two others. She ’s the fifthfemale chemistry laureatesince the prizes first began in 1901, and the only ever American woman to win in the subject.Where were you when you got the news you had won the Nobel prize?I was in deep sleep in a Dallas hotel room having arrived at midnight to give a lecture the next day. The phone rang at ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 21, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Zo ë Corbyn Tags: Biochemistry and molecular biology Nobel prizes Science prizes People in science Source Type: news

Here's an easy way to improve gut health: Eat more cherries
(Natural News) Adding more tart cherries to your diet is an effective way to improve gut health, according to a study published in The Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry. In the study, researchers examined the effect of tart cherry concentrate on gut bacteria using both laboratory testing and clinical trials. Earlier research has shown that polyphenols... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news