For Coronavirus Testing, the Nose May Not Always Be Best
As Omicron spreads, some experts are calling for a switch to saliva-based tests, which may detect infections days earlier than nasal swabs do. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 14, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Anthes Tags: your-feed-science your-feed-health Tests (Medical) Coronavirus Omicron Variant Coronavirus Delta Variant Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Nose Throat Biology and Biochemistry Great Britain United States Source Type: news

Jennifer Doudna: What does CRISPR mean for the future of human evolution?
In 2011, biochemist Jennifer Doudna helped discover the genetic editing tool CRISPR. Today CRISPR is actively deployed in clinical trials with the potential to cure disease—and alter human evolution.(Image credit: James Duncan Davidson/James Duncan Davidson / TED) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 7, 2022 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Manoush Zomorodi Source Type: news

Inside the Project to Genetically Modify Rice to Emit Fewer Greenhouse Gases
A cup of tea in 2006 changed genetic engineering forever. Jill Banfield, a University of California at Berkeley ecosystem scientist and 1999 MacArthur Foundation fellow, had become curious in 2006 about mysterious repeating DNA sequences that were common in microbes that live in some of the planet’s most extreme environments, such as deep-sea heat vents, acid mines and geysers. She just needed a biochemist to help explain what the sequences known as Crispr/Cas9 were, and ideally somebody local. The best scientist-location tool available to the highly decorated PhD researcher—a web search—recommended a Ber...
Source: TIME: Science - January 3, 2022 Category: Science Authors: Eric Roston / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized bloomberg wire climate change Food & Agriculture healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

2021 reflections: In an amazing year of achievements, nothing topped the return to campus
As we approach the end of December, it ’s a natural time to look back at the year that was. In 2021, UCLA welcomed students, faculty, staff, alumni and visitors back to our home in Westwood, though of course it wasn’t exactly the way things had been.Different from pre-pandemic times: Masks remain present. Better (much better): UCLA officially opened the Black Bruin Resource Center.Even with all the changes, UCLA persisted as a force for public good, guided by our mission of teaching, research and service. In the past year,  professors continued helping us better understand our world with their research, st...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 17, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New institute will fund Stanford, Berkeley, UCSF scientists targeting complex human diseases
Promising $650 million in funding for scientists, the Palo Alto institute is led by Silvana Konermann, an assistant professor of biochemistry at Stanford whose work has focused on the genetic risk of neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Nobel Prize-winning biochemist Edmond Fischer was 'truly committed to excellence'
Fischer ’s son, retired Seattle attorney Francois “Franc” Fischer, said his father was “extremely hard-working — to the point of being obsessive about it when he was doing his research, and he was always in his lab. He always devoted time to his children and was generous with it." (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - December 11, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Patti Payne Source Type: news

Bristol ’ s pioneering COVID-19 research prompts French Embassy visit
Representatives from the French Embassy visited University labs today [10 Dec] to see some of the innovative COVID-19 research being undertaken at Bristol, including work on ADDomer ™ , a thermostable vaccine platform being developed by Bristol scientists to combat emerging infectious diseases. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - December 10, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research, Business and Enterprise, International; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Institutes, Bristol BioDesign Institute, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

Are scientists homing in on a cure for Parkinson ’s disease?
A molecule that shows promise in preventing Parkinson’s disease has been refined by scientists at the University of Bath in the UK, and has the potential to be developed into a drug to treat the deadly neurodegenerative disease. Professor Jody Mason, who led the research from the Department of Biology and Biochemistry at Bath, said: (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 10, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

‘Amazing science’: researchers find xenobots can give rise to offspring
Xenobots are synthetic lifeforms made by cells from frog embryos and assembling them into clustersSome species do it in pairs, some without knowing the other parties involved, and some even do it on their own: when it comes to replication, nature is nothing if not versatile.Now researchers say they have found that clusters of frog cells can undergo a form of replication never before seen in plants or animals. The spherical clumps, known as xenobots, can give rise to “offspring” by sweeping up loose cells and swashing them into yet more clusters.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 29, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

Walter Gratzer, Biophysical Chemist and Science Writer, Dies at 89
His career bridged impactful research in molecular biology and biochemistry with prolific science writing for academic and nonacademic audiences alike. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 23, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Late-Breaking Phase 2 Data for Investigational Oral Factor XIa Inhibitor Milvexian Suggest Favorable Antithrombotic Profile Across a Wide Range of Doses
This study establishes proof-of-principle for milvexian as a differentiated antithrombotic agent,” said Jeffrey Weitz, M.D., Professor of Medicine & Biochemistry and Biomedical Sciences at McMaster University and Executive Director of the Thrombosis and Atherosclerosis Research Institute.[i] “Furthermore, the consistently low rates of bleeding across a 16-fold range of milvexian doses suggest that it has a wide therapeutic window, which opens the opportunity to explore milvexian across a broad range of patients including those for whom factor Xa inhibitors are underutilized or not indicated.” The tria...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - November 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Cranberry juice won ’t cut it: UTIs and the potential for repurposing drugs
The winning essay in the Max Perutz science writing award 2021, published below, was written by Vicky Bennett from the department of biology and biochemistry at Bath UniversityIn May, PhD students who are funded by the Medical Research Council (MRC) were invited to enter theMax Perutz science writing award 2021 and write a compelling piece about their research for the non-scientific reader.From the many entries received, the 10 that made the shortlist covered diverse topics, including dementia, childhood adversity, the role of genes in schizophrenia and the use of hypnosis to treat psychosis.Continue reading... (Source: Gu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 6, 2021 Category: Science Authors: The Observer Tags: Science Medical research Antibiotics Health Awards and prizes Source Type: news

With CEO hire, this biotech boasts an all-women C-suite
Three months after publicly launching, Kojin Therapeutics has named a managing partner at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute as its first CEO. With the addition of Luba Greenwood's, Kojin now boasts an executive team made up entirely of women — a rarity in the male-dominated field of life sciences. Johnson& Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) veteran Kay Ahn is the startup's chief scientific officer, Lynn Abel is vice president of biochemistry and founder Vasanthi Viswanathan has stayed on as head of discovery … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 16, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

With CEO hire, this biotech boasts an all-women C-suite
Three months after publicly launching, Kojin Therapeutics has named a managing partner at the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute as its first CEO. With the addition of Luba Greenwood's, Kojin now boasts an executive team made up entirely of women — a rarity in the male-dominated field of life sciences. Johnson& Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) veteran Kay Ahn is the startup's chief scientific officer, Lynn Abel is vice president of biochemistry and founder Vasanthi Viswanathan has stayed on as head of discovery … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 16, 2021 Category: American Health Authors: Rowan Walrath Source Type: news

Collaborative COVID-19 lockdown effort delivers major boost for vaccine innovation in Bristol
Faster vaccine development could be a step closer thanks to £ 4 million investment to Imophoron Ltd, a Bristol University biotech start-up developing a novel, next generation rapid-response vaccine platform called ADDomer ™ . Imophoron will use the investment to bring ADDomer vaccines to clinical stage, initially targeting three viruses, RSV (respiratory syncytial virus), COVID-19, and mosquito-borne Chikungunya. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements, Business and Enterprise, Grants and Awards, Health, International, Research; Faculty of Health Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Medical School, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty Source Type: news

Oxford Covid biotech firm makes stellar debut on London stock market
Shares of Oxford Nanopore close up 44%, giving co-founder paper fortune of £63mSee all our coronavirus coverageOxford Nanopore, whose DNA sequencing technology has been essential in tracking Covid-19 variants globally, has made a stellar stock market debut in London. A rise in its share price of as much as 47% has left the firm valued at almost £5bn.The flotation of the Oxford University spin-out has given its chief executive and co-founder, Gordon Sanghera, a fortune on paper of £63m.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 30, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Julia Kollewe Tags: IPOs FTSE Stock markets Nanotechnology Biochemistry and molecular biology Science University of Oxford Business UK news Source Type: news

Bristol retains Strategic Partnership with the BBSRC and ranks fourth for bioscience research funding  
The   BBSRC, one of the UK ’ s largest UK bioscience funders, has announced Bristol will retain its Strategic Partnership (SP) status. The decision was announced this month following   BBSRC ’ s SP member triannual review. Bristol is one of only ten top-funded university   partners with this status – which it has retained since 2012 recognising the University ’ s long-term record for excellence in biosciences research.   (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - September 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, Business and Enterprise, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Source Type: news

Antibodies in breast milk remain for 10 months after Covid infection – study
Exclusive: Researchers believe such antibodies could be used to treat people with severe coronavirusCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageBreastfeeding women who have been infected with Covid-19 continue to secrete virus-neutralising antibodies into their milk for up to 10 months, data suggests.Besides emphasising the important role breastfeeding could play in helping to protect infants from the disease, researchers believe that such antibodies could be used to treat people with severe Covid-19, preventing their condition from getting worse.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 27, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Breastfeeding Coronavirus Science Infectious diseases Microbiology Immunology World news Medical research Biochemistry and molecular biology Source Type: news

Major advance in race for SARS-CoV-2 inhibitor drugs
A new advance towards the development of drugs specifically designed to inhibit a key SARS-CoV-2 enzyme is reported in the Royal Society of Chemistry's leading journal, Chemical Science. The international team, led by scientists from the Universities of Oxford and Bristol, has designed new peptide molecules and shown that they block (inhibit) the virus ’ s main protease [Mpro] - a prominent SARS-CoV-2 drug target. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - September 20, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry; Press Release Source Type: news

Oxford Covid biotech firm plans £2.4bn flotation on LSE
Business founded in 2005 has won contracts worth £144m from the UK government during pandemicOxford Nanopore, whose Covid-19 technology wassnapped up by the UK government and used to track variants of the virus globally, has unveiled its plans to float in one of the biggest London debuts this year.The company, a startup spun out from Oxford University, hopes to exceed a £2.4bn valuation achieved at a fundraising round in May. It has laid out plans to tap into the growing genomic sequencing market, estimated to be worth $5.7bn globally. Its revenues more than doubled to £114m last year, from £52m in ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Julia Kollewe Tags: IPOs Biochemistry and molecular biology Coronavirus Nanotechnology University of Oxford Business Stock markets Science Infectious diseases Source Type: news

Neuroscience and the misperception of reality | Letter
As living creatures, we are exquisitely evolved to interact with the world through perception, saysDavid HughesGaia Vince, reviewing Anil Seth ’s Being You: A New Science of Consciousness (The exhilarating new science of consciousness, 25 August), extols the thesis that because our perception of the world is a complex physical process, perception is itself a “hallucination” and “a big lie created by our deceptive brains”. But when we consider that dogs hear sounds we don’t, flies look through compound eyes, birds navigate using inbuilt GPS, it does seem perverse to claim that the very ph...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 3, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Letters Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Science and nature books Consciousness Source Type: news

Edmond Fischer, Biochemist and Nobel Laureate, Dies at 101
Fischer was recognized for his work with reversible protein phosphorylation. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 31, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Henry Higgs Named the John La Porte Given Professor in Cytology
Henry N. Higgs, PhD, a nationally known researcher and professor of biochemistry and cell biology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has been named the John La Porte Given Professor in Cytology. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - August 11, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Henry Higgs professorship Source Type: news

Community-acquired bacterial meningitis
Progress has been made in the prevention and treatment of community-acquired bacterial meningitis during the past three decades but the burden of the disease remains high globally. Conjugate vaccines against the three most common causative pathogens (Streptococcus pneumoniae, Neisseria meningitidis, and Haemophilus influenzae) have reduced the incidence of disease, but with the replacement by non-vaccine pneumococcal serotypes and the emergence of bacterial strains with reduced susceptibility to antimicrobial treatment, meningitis continues to pose a major health challenge worldwide. In patients presenting with bacterial m...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A.I. Predicts the Shapes of Molecules to Come
DeepMind has given 3-D structure to 350,000 proteins, including every one made by humans, promising a boon for medicine and drug design. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cade Metz Tags: Proteins Artificial Intelligence Computers and the Internet Genetics and Heredity Biology and Biochemistry Human Genome Project your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news

Revolutionary mosquito researchers receive $2.7 million grant
(Virginia Tech) " Mosquitoes are sometimes described as the deadliest animal on Earth, " said Cl é ment Vinauger, principal investigator on the project and assistant professor from the Department of Biochemistry in the College of Agriculture and Life Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thomas Rando named director of UCLA Broad Stem Cell Research Center
Dr. Thomas Rando, a renowned neurologist and stem cell biologist, has been named director of the  Eli and Edythe Broad Center of  Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.Rando, who was chosen after an international search, is currently a professor of neurology and neurological sciences at the medical school at Stanford University, where he also serves as director of the Glenn Center for the Biology of Aging and deputy director of the Stanford Center on Longevity. In addition, he is chief of neurology at the  Veterans Affairs Palo Alto Health Care System.His appointment is effective Oct. 1.&ldquo...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 7, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Gambia: Upstate Faculty Member Named As a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences
[The Point] Alaji Bah, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Upstate Medical University has been named as a 2021 Pew Scholar in the Biomedical Sciences, the Pew Charitable Trusts announced. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 7, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Summer 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR to Release Report on Oral Health in America As a 20-year follow-up to the seminal Oral Health in America: A Report of the Surgeon General, NIDCR will release Oral Health in America: Advances and Challenges in the fall of 2021. The report will illuminate new directions...
Source: NIDCR Science News - July 1, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

UofL researchers lead call to increase genetic diversity in immunogenomics
(University of Louisville) Historically, most large-scale immunogenomic studies - those exploring the association between genes and disease - were conducted with a bias toward individuals of European ancestry. Corey T. Watson, Ph.D., assistant professor in the University of Louisville Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Genetics, is leading a call to actively diversify the genetic resources he and fellow immunogenomics researchers use in their work to advance genomic medicine more equitably. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

No lab required: New technology can diagnose infections in minutes
(McMaster University) Engineering, biochemistry and medical researchers at McMaster University have combined their skills to create a hand-held rapid test for bacterial infections that can produce accurate, reliable results in less than an hour, eliminating the need to send samples to a lab. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UConn researchers find health benefits of connecticut-grown sugar kelp
(University of Connecticut) In a paper published in the Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, the researchers reported significant findings supporting the nutritional benefits of Connecticut-grown sugar kelp. They found brown sugar kelp (Saccharina latissima) inhibits hepatic inflammation and fibrosis in a mouse model of diet-induced non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, a fatty liver disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Upstate faculty member named as a Pew Scholar in Biomedical Sciences
Alaji Bah, PhD, assistant professor in the Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology at Upstate Medical University was one of only 22 individuals out of 198 nominations to be named a Pew Scholar. (Source: SUNY Upstate Medical)
Source: SUNY Upstate Medical - June 15, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: News Source Type: news

Bacteria hijack latent phage of competitor
(University of Vienna) Bacteriophages are still a relatively unknown component of the human microbiome. However, they can play a powerful role in the life cycles of bacteria. Biochemist Thomas B ö ttcher from the University of Vienna and Ph.D. student Magdalena Jancheva were able to show for the first time how Pseudomonas bacteria use a self-produced signal molecule to selectively manipulate phages in a competing bacterial strain to defeat their enemy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers find toxin from maple tree in cow's milk
(Martin-Luther-Universit ä t Halle-Wittenberg) Cows can pass on the hypoglycin A toxin through their milk, a study by the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg (MLU) and the Leibniz Institute of Plant Biochemistry (IPB) in Toxins shows. The substance can cause severe symptoms in humans and animals. Small amounts of the toxin were detected in the raw milk of cows that grazed in a pasture exposed to sycamore maple. The team calls for further investigations to realistically assess the potential dangers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Baylor study uses candy-like models to make STEM accessible to visually impaired students
(Baylor University) A breakthrough study by Bryan Shaw, Ph.D., professor of chemistry and biochemistry at Baylor University, aims to make science more accessible to people who are blind or visually impaired through small, candy-like models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Jerome Kagan, Who Tied Temperament to Biology, Dies at 92
A Harvard psychologist, he originally attributed personality traits to nurturing only. Then he concluded, We ’re largely born this way. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam Roberts Tags: Psychology and Psychologists Deaths (Obituaries) Harvard University Kagan, Jerome Children and Childhood Parenting Biology and Biochemistry Source Type: news

Novel method of labeling DNA bases for sequencing
(Institute of Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry of the Czech Academy of Sciences (IOCB Prague)) A research team headed by Michal Hocek of IOCB Prague (Czech Republic) and Ciara K. O'Sullivan of Universitat Rovira i Virgili (Spain) have developed a novel method for labeling DNA, which in the future can be used for sequencing DNA by means of electrochemical detection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How the United States Beat the Coronavirus Variants, for Now
The country has managed to avoid a variant-fueled spike in coronavirus cases. Scientists say we were lucky. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carl Zimmer and Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Research Disease Rates Biology and Biochemistry Vaccination and Immunization your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Research team investigates causes of tuberous sclerosis
(University of M ü nster) A team of biochemists from the Faculties of Chemistry/Pharmacy and Medicine at the University of M ü nster has discovered a mechanism which regulates cell division and cell growth. The results can help to understand how Tuberous Sclerosis, a genetic disease, arises. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Archaeal enzyme that produces membrane lipids is spectacularly promiscuous
(University of Groningen) Cells of all life forms are surrounded by a membrane that is made of phospholipids. One of these are the cardiolipins. When studying the enzyme that is responsible for producing cardiolipins in archaea (single-cell organisms that constitute a separate domain of life), biochemists at the University of Groningen made a surprising discovery. A single archaeal enzyme can produce a spectacular range of natural and non-natural cardiolipins, as well as other phospholipids. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

What Are Some Etiologies for Intellectual Disability?
Discussion “Intellectual disability (ID) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that is characterized by deficits in both intellectual functioning and adaptive function whose onset is in the development period.” Global developmental delay (GDD) is used to describe children from 0-5 years old with significant delays in 2 or more developmental areas. These delays may be transient but up to 2/3 of children with GDD will have ID. Overall 1-3% of the general population has ID which makes it very common. Most children with GDD/ID are identified because of delays in meeting milestones or general academic achievement. ID pat...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - May 3, 2021 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Pediatric Education Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Geisel Professor Elected to the National Academy of Sciences
Ta-Yuan (T.Y.) Chang, PhD, a professor of biochemistry and cell biology at Dartmouth’s Geisel School of Medicine, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences (NAS), considered to be one of the country’s premier scientific societies. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - April 29, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Authors: Timothy Dean Tags: News Press Release Chang Laboratory National Academy of Sciences Source Type: news

Proposal of new universal nomenclature for oxytocin and vasotocin genes
(University of Barcelona) Oxytocin and arginine vasopressin are two hormones in the endocrine system that can act as neurotransmitters and regulate -in vertebrates and invertebrates- a wide range of biological functions, such as bonding formation, breastfeeding, birth or arterial pressure. Biochemists in the pregenomic era, named these genes differently in different species, due to small protein coding differences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bristol documentary photographer captures some of the faces behind COVID-19 research
The human stories behind Bristol scientists who are playing an important role in global efforts to overcome COVID-19 have been captured in a billboard campaign by a Bristol-based photographer. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biochemistry, Faculty of Science, Faculty of Science, School of Chemistry, Faculty of Healt Source Type: news

Real Life TS Book Club Discussion
Join The Scientist on May 21 to discuss Brandon Taylor ’s novel about a biochemistry graduate student navigating relationships inside and outside the lab. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 23, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Webinars Source Type: news

A new study identifies interleukin 11 as a marker of cancer-associated fibroblasts
(Toho University) A research group led by Prof. Hiroyasu Nakano of Department of Biochemistry, Toho University Faculty of Medicine, found that interleukin 11 (IL-11)-positive cells rapidly appear in the colons of mice with colitis and colitis-associated colorectal cancers. In RNA-seq analysis of the gene expression profiles, they found that high expression of enriched genes in IL-11-positive fibroblasts correlated with short duration of disease-free survival in human colorectal cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Fifty years of collaborative science
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Scientists from around the world will come together virtually to celebrate the 50th anniversary of a key piece of the infrastructure for sharing scientific knowledge: the Protein Data Bank. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news