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Testing Tears Could Aid Parkinson's Diagnosis Testing Tears Could Aid Parkinson's Diagnosis
Testing samples of an individual's tears for the presence of certain biomarkers could allow easier diagnosis of Parkinson's disease, a new study suggests.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could your tears help to diagnose Parkinson's?
A new study suggests that checking alpha-synuclein levels in tear samples may serve as a noninvasive test for Parkinson's disease before symptoms appear. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Could your tears help to diagnose Parkinson's?
A new study suggests that checking alpha-synuclein levels in tear samples may serve as a noninvasive test for Parkinson's disease before symptoms appear. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - February 23, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Clues to Parkinson's May Be Shed in Tears
When people shed tears, certain proteins are released. Levels of those proteins are different in people with Parkinson's compared to those without the disease, according to a preliminary study. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tears could diagnose Parkinson's
Researchers at the Keck School of Medicine in California found differences in the levels of a particular protein, alpha-synuclein, in the tears of people with Parkinson's compared to controls. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clues to Parkinson's May Be Shed in Tears
THURSDAY, Feb. 22, 2018 -- Your tears may reveal if you are at risk of Parkinson's disease, preliminary research suggests. When people shed tears, certain proteins are released. Levels of those proteins are different in people with Parkinson's... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Adaptive Deep Brain Stim Shows Promise in Parkinson's
(MedPage Today) -- Approach can induce stable control of PD-related motor disturbances (Source: MedPage Today Neurology)
Source: MedPage Today Neurology - February 21, 2018 Category: Neurology Source Type: news

QR Pharma CEO weighs in on FDA's proposal for Alzheimer's disease drugs
The Berwyn company's lead new drug candidate targets Alzhemier's and Parkinson's. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 21, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

FDA OKs Extended-Release Amantadine (Osmolex ER) for Parkinson's FDA OKs Extended-Release Amantadine (Osmolex ER) for Parkinson's
Osmolex ER tablets, taken once daily in the morning, are a proprietary formulation containing immediate- and extended-release amantadine.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Alert Source Type: news

Acorda Therapeutics wins FDA NDA nod for Inbrija
Acorda Therapeutics (NSDQ:ACOR) said today that the FDA accepted the New Drug Application for its Inbrija investigational inhaled levodopa product designed for treating symptoms of OFF periods in patients with Parkinson’s disease who are taking carbidopa/levodopa regimens. The approval comes with a target date of October 5, 2018, the Ardsley, N.Y.-based company said. Read the whole story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business The post Acorda Therapeutics wins FDA NDA nod for Inbrija appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - February 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Neurological Regulatory/Compliance Respiratory Acorda Therapeutics Source Type: news

Parkinson's disease: Too much cheese and milk 'could trigger the neurological disorder'
PARKINSON'S disease could be caused by too much calcium in the brain, according to new research. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Protein levels in spinal fluid correlate to posture and gait difficulty in Parkinson's
(Rush University Medical Center) Levels of a protein found in the brain called alpha-synuclein (α-syn) are significantly lower than normal in cerebrospinal fluid collected in Parkinson's disease patients suffering from postural instability and gait difficulty, a study led by movement disorders experts at Rush University Medical Center has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parkinson's disease risk may increase with excess calcium in brain cells
Excess levels of calcium in the brain might lead to Parkinson's disease, according to new research in Britain. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Excessive calcium in the brain may be behind Parkinson's
Researchers from Cambridge University found excessive levels of calcium triggers nerve cell death, despite the mineral being critical for communication in the brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The risk of traumatic brain injury occurring among patients with Parkinson'sdisease: a 14-year population-based study - Eric Nyam TT, Ho CH, Wang YL, Lim SW, Wang JJ, Chio CC, Kuo JR, Wang CC.
This study investigated the contribution o... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Falls Source Type: news

Gait adaptations in response to obstacle type in fallers with Parkinson's disease - Alcock L, Galna B, Hausdorff JM, Lord S, Rochester L.
BACKGROUND: Gait impairment places older adults and people with Parkinson's disease (PD) at an increased risk of falls when walking over obstacles. Increasing the height of obstacles results in greater challenge to balance however little is known about the... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Falls Source Type: news

Saccade frequency response to visual cues during gait in Parkinson's disease: the selective role of attention - Stuart S, Lord S, Galna B, Rochester L.
Gait impairment is a core feature of Parkinson's disease (PD) with implications for falls risk. Visual cues improve gait in PD but the underlying mechanisms are unclear. Evidence suggests that attention and vision play an important role however the relativ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

Medical News Today: 'Too much' brain calcium may cause Parkinson's
Calcium may affect how alpha-synuclein — a protein linked to Parkinson's — interacts with structures important for chemical signaling between brain cells. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

'Too much' brain calcium may cause Parkinson's
Calcium may affect how alpha-synuclein — a protein linked to Parkinson's — interacts with structures important for chemical signaling between brain cells. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - February 19, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease
Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. The international team, led by the University of Cambridge, found that calcium can mediate the interaction between small membranous structures inside nerve endings, which are important for neuronal signalling in the brain, and alpha-synuclein, the protein associated with Parkinson's disease. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

FDA Approves Osmolex ER (amantadine) for the treatment of Parkinson ’s Disease and Drug-Induced Extrapyramidal Reactions
BRIDGEWATER, N.J., Feb. 19, 2018 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) -- Osmotica Pharmaceutical US LLC ( “Osmotica” or the “Company”), a privately-held specialty pharmaceutical company developing novel central nervous system (CNS) treatments utilizing its... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - February 19, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease
(University of Cambridge) Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Multimodal characterization of the late effects of TBI (LETBI): a methodological overview of the LETBI project - Edlow BL, Keene CD, Perl D, Iacono D, Folkerth R, Stewart W, Macdonald CL, Augustinack J, Diaz-Arrastia R, Estrada C, Flannery E, Gordon W, Grabowski T, Hansen K, Hoffman J, Kroenke C, Larson E, Lee P, Mareyam A, McNab JA, McPhee J, Moreau AL, Renz A, Richmire K, Stevens A, Tang CY, Tirrell LS, Trittschuh E, van der Kouwe A, Varjabedian A, Wald LL, Wu O, Yendiki A, Young L, Zollei L, Fischl B, Crane PK, Dams-O'connor K.
Epidemiological studies suggest that a single moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI) is associated with an increased risk of neurodegenerative disease, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease (AD and PD). Histopathological studies describe c... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

DTI-MRI ties lack of fitness to cognitive decline
With the aid of diffusion-tensor MR imaging (DTI-MRI), researchers from the...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Court rules that DTI-MRI scans are not 'junk science' DTI-MRI poses new cause for schizophrenia MRI shows concussion effects can linger in athletes MRI may predict cognitive impairment in fighters DTI-MRI sheds light on Parkinson's disease (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 16, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

DIY faecal transplants carry risks including HIV and hepatitis, warn experts
Faecal transplants have been used in medical settings to tackle superbugs, but following YouTube videos at home is too risky, say researchersConcerns have been raised about the growing trend for DIY faecal transplants, with experts fearing such attempts could put individuals at an increased risk of HIV and hepatitis as well as conditions ranging from Parkinson ’s and multiple sclerosis to obesity and sleep disorders.Thetransfer of faeces from one human to another has gained attention as a growing number of studies have suggested links between microbes in the gut anda host of health problems, from autoimmune diseases ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Microbiology Human biology Infectious diseases Medical research Science Health Source Type: news

'I have Parkinson's at 39 but it's no reason to panic'
Marathon runner Aaron found he had Parkinson's aged 39 but through his love of exercise he's found a way to combat the symptoms. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds that a surprise stimulus helps people stop an action
(University of Iowa) A new study from the University of Iowa finds that an unexpected sound causes people to stop an action more often than when they heard no sound at all. The finding could lead to new treatments for patients with motor-control disorders, such as Parkinson's disease and ADHD, as well as address the decline in motor control that accompanies aging. Results published in the Journal of Neuroscience. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dave Clark: Sky sports presenter lifts lid on battle with Parkinson's disease
SKY SPORTS presenter Dave Clark will never forget how old he was when he got the devastating news that he had incurable Parkinson ’s disease. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Medical cannabis significantly safer for elderly with chronic pain than Opioids
(American Associates, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev) The new study, published in The European Journal of Internal Medicine, found cannabis therapy is safe and efficacious for elderly patients who are seeking to address cancer symptoms, Parkinson's disease, post-traumatic stress disorder, ulcerative colitis, Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and other medical issues. After six months, more than 18 percent of patients surveyed had stopped using opioid analgesics or had reduced their dosage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Parkinson's sufferer ejected from Halfords 'for funny walk'
Chris Cartlidge says he was told to leave Halfords after his symptoms caused his leg to stiffen. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pennsylvania needs more doctors for medical marijuana program
About 355 doctors in Pennsylvania have been approved to certify patients for the state's medical marijuana program, according to Trib Total Media. But more than 16,000 residents have registered for the program to treat 17 state-approved illnesses and ailments, like Crohn's disease, cancer and Parkinson's disease. About 3,300 have been certified to receive medical marijuana, according to the Trib. About 300 more doctors have registered to ta ke the four-hour training course for certification into… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - February 12, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Stacey Federoff Source Type: news

Experiences of fear of falling in persons with Parkinson's disease - a qualitative study - Jonasson SB, Nilsson MH, Lexell J, Carlsson G.
BACKGROUND: Fear of falling is common among persons with Parkinson's disease and is negatively associated with quality of life. However a lack of in-depth understanding of fear of falling as a phenomenon persists. This qualitative study aimed to explore th... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Elder Adults Source Type: news

New test speeds up diagnosis of Parkinson's, Lewy body dementia
Researchers at the National Institutes of Health said they've developed a new test to detect Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NIH scientists adapt new brain disease test for Parkinson ’s, dementia with Lewy bodies
Early and accurate diagnoses of these brain disorders is essential for developing treatments and identifying patients eligible for clinical trials. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - February 9, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Nurses who started Parkinson ’s dementia clinic win award
A pair of specialist nurses have been recognised with an award for their involvement in setting up a specialist clinic for patients with both Parkinson ’s disease and dementia. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - February 9, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

NIH scientists adapt new brain disease test for Parkinson's, dementia with Lewy bodies
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) NIH scientists have modified a test for early diagnosis of prion diseases with the goal of improving early diagnosis of Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. The NIAID-led group tested cerebral spinal fluid samples from people with Parkinson's disease; people with dementia with Lewy bodies; and controls, some of whom had Alzheimer's disease. The test correctly excluded all the controls and diagnosed both Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies with 93 percent accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Could an existing drug halt Parkinson's disease?
A new Parkinson's study suggests that drugs for treating a rare genetic disorder may be effective in targeting toxic alpha-synuclein clusters in neurons. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Could an existing drug halt Parkinson's disease?
A new Parkinson's study suggests that drugs for treating a rare genetic disorder may be effective in targeting toxic alpha-synuclein clusters in neurons. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - February 7, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patients
(American Chemical Society) After being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report in ACS' journal Biochemistry the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and might even help researchers develop better Parkinson's disease treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Parkinson's disease: Boosting dopamine promotes movement
A study with insights for Parkinson's finds that the brain uses a burst of dopamine, not a steady level, to initiate movement and maintain its vigor. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Parkinson's disease: Boosting dopamine promotes movement
A study with insights for Parkinson's finds that the brain uses a burst of dopamine, not a steady level, to initiate movement and maintain its vigor. (Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today)
Source: Parkinson's Disease News From Medical News Today - February 5, 2018 Category: Neurology Tags: Parkinson's Disease Source Type: news

Asleep Deep Brain Stimulation as Effective as Awake Asleep Deep Brain Stimulation as Effective as Awake
Medscape speaks with the authors of a recent study in Parkinson disease, whose results may lead more patients to seek out this effective but underused therapy.Medscape Neurology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery Expert Interview Source Type: news

Concussions, Head Trauma and CTE
From the desk of Jerome Gronli, MDJerome Gronli,  MDSports participation offers many tremendous benefits for children and adolescents. Regular participation in sports can help maintain and improve physical health, has important cognitive and emotional benefits, and provides wonderful opportunities for building friendships and camaraderie. At the same time, families sometimes have questions about issues related to sports participation. In recent years, there has been increasing awareness of the significance of concussions and repeated head trauma, including the risk of developing chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE),...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - February 2, 2018 Category: Pediatrics Tags: Healthy Habits Source Type: news

Cause of severe genetic disease identified
(Goethe University Frankfurt) Mutations in the p63 protein lead to a number of disorders, but none is as severe as the AEC syndrome. Scientists at Goethe University Frankfurt in collaboration with a research group from the University of Naples Federico II have now discovered that this syndrome resembles diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's or ALS more closely than it does other p63-based syndromes. Their results were recently published in the scientific journal " Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences " (PNAS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zeroing in on dopamine
(Harvard Medical School) Harvard Medical School scientists have identified the molecular machinery responsible for secretion of the neurotransmitter dopamine, opening the door for strategies to precision target dopamine release to treat disorders such as Parkinson's and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insightec closes $150m Series E
Insightec said today it closed a $150 million Series E private equity round of financing with plans to use funds to support marketing, commercialization and further development of its Exablate Neuro platform. The round was led by Koch Disruptive Technologies subsidiary Koch Industries, who invested a total of $100 million during the round, the Israel-based company said. The company’s flagship Exablate Neuro device, which won FDA approval last July for treating essential tremor, uses high-intensity, focused ultrasound to thermally ablate targeted tissue, guided by continuous magnetic resonance imaging; the proced...
Source: Mass Device - January 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Wall Street Beat INSIGHTEC Source Type: news

Verily, Sanofi and other industry players team up with NIH to advance Parkinson ’ s therapies
The National Institutes of Health is joining forces with the tech and pharmaceutical industries to speed the development of new drugs for Parkinson’s disease and identify biomarkers for the debilitating condition. Companies participating in the public-private partnership include Celgene (NSDQ:CELG), GlaxoSmithKline (NYSE:GSK), The Michael J. Fox Foundation for Parkinson’s Research, Pfizer (NYSE:PFE), Sanofi (NYSE:SNY) and Verily. Combined the groups plan to commit $12 million to effort, which the NIH is slated to match. Get the full story at our sister site, Dru...
Source: Mass Device - January 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Diagnostics Neurological Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat Celgene GlaxoSmithKline plc National Institutes of Health (NIH) Pfizer Sanofi-Aventis Verily Source Type: news

Sunovion touts pivotal Ph3 trial for Parkinson ’s drug
Gearing up for a springtime FDA submission, Sunovion Pharmaceuticals reported today that its apomorphine sublingual film succeeded in a pivotal Phase III trial in patients with Parkinson’s disease who experience motor fluctuations. Without revealing the study’s full results, the Marlborough, Mass.-based company said that the trial met its primary and key secondary endpoints and that the drug was generally well-tolerated by patients. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Sunovion touts pivotal Ph3 trial for Parkinson’s drug appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - January 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Drug-Device Combinations Neurological Pharmaceuticals Wall Street Beat Acorda Therapeutics Sunovion Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NIH launches partnership to improve success of clinical trials for patients with Parkinson ’s disease
Effort is part of the Accelerating Medicines Partnership to speed development of disease-altering treatments. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - January 30, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Michael J Fox pledges £100k for Parkinson's app
The Hollywood actor, who lives with the long-term degenerative disorder of the central nervous system, has given the money to a University of London researcher. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news