Harvard Study: Plant-Based Diet Might Help Prevent Type 2 Diabetes

(CNN) — Sticking to a plant-based diet could help lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, a new paper suggests. That link between plant-based eating habits and type 2 diabetes is even more beneficial when only healthy plant-based foods — such as fruits, vegetables, whole grains, legumes and nuts — are included in your daily diet, as opposed to refined grains, starches and sugars, according to the study, published in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine on Monday. “We found that eating plant-based diets was associated with, on average, 23% reduction in diabetes risk,” said Dr. Qi Sun, an associate professor in the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health in Boston and senior author of the paper. “We further showed that individuals who consumed a healthy version of the plant-based diet by emphasizing the intake of fresh fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts and legumes, and minimizing intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and refined carbohydrates, had a further 30% reduction in their risk of developing type 2 diabetes,” he said. “I would describe these risk reductions as being quite significant.” Doctors have long known that a healthy diet — along with regular exercise, maintaining a healthy body weight and not smoking — are among the ways to prevent or delay the onset of type 2 diabetes. “Indeed, a vegetarian or other plant-based diets that are high in free sugars and refined carb...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Boston News Health CNN Harvard University Type 2 Diabetes Source Type: news

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This study aimed to investigate the irisin levels in elderly patients with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity, to investigate the possible association between irisin levels and anthropometric and biochemical parameters, and also to assess the irisin levels associated with a risk of hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity.MethodsA nested case-control study was conducted, with hypertension, diabetes mellitus type 2, and overweight and obesity being set as the case group; 71 elderly patients from the cohort were enrolled in each case group, and 71 healthy elderly from...
Source: International Journal of Diabetes in Developing Countries - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
This study aims to understand the progression of two chronic diseases in the Australian health context. It specifically focuses on the comorbidity progression of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), as the prevalence of these chronic diseases in Australians is high. A research framework is proposed to understand and represent the progression of CVD in patients with T2DM using graph theory and social network analysis techniques. Two study cohorts (i.e., patients with both T2DM and CVD and patients with only T2DM) were selected from an administrative dataset obtained from an Australi...
Source: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health - Category: Environmental Health Authors: Tags: Article Source Type: research
ConclusionsResults revealed expert consensus and literature review agreement on a number of common modifiable risk factors for T2DM and dementia, as well as agreement on brain-related complications of diabetes. A number of other proposed shared risk factors did not reach consensus agreement suggesting a need for more high-quality studies to add to the evidence base.
Source: Canadian Journal of Diabetes - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
ConclusionsSADI-S appears to be a safe bariatric surgical procedure with favorable outcomes at 2  years in the Australian population.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeTo investigate the prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) at the 5-year follow-up after polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) diagnosis compared between lean and overweight/obese groups.MethodsThis retrospective cohort study included 400 prediabetes PCOS women who attended our clinic. Participants were divided into either the lean group (body mass index [BMI]:  
Source: Archives of Gynecology and Obstetrics - Category: OBGYN Source Type: research
CONCLUSIONS: Our study has expanded the methodological utility of PRS in patient stratification and risk prediction, especially in a multifactorial condition like PCOS, across different genetic origins. By utilizing the individual genome-phenome data available from the EHR, our approach also demonstrates that polygenic prediction by PRS can provide valuable opportunities to discover the pleiotropic phenomic network associated with PCOS pathogenesis. PMID: 31917831 [PubMed - as supplied by publisher]
Source: The Journal of Clinical Endocrinology and Metabolism - Category: Endocrinology Authors: Tags: J Clin Endocrinol Metab Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
ConclusionBoth operations produced excellent weight loss and maintenance in the short to intermediate term. There was better resolution of T2D and HTN after OAGB/MGB at the expense of a higher incidence of nutrient deficiency and some protein caloric malnutrition. There is need for prospective and larger series studies to confirm these findings.
Source: Obesity Surgery - Category: Surgery Source Type: research
Conclusion A great deal of progress is being made in the matter of treating aging: in advocacy, in funding, in the research and development. It can never be enough, and it can never be fast enough, given the enormous cost in suffering and lost lives. The longevity industry is really only just getting started in the grand scheme of things: it looks vast to those of us who followed the slow, halting progress in aging research that was the state of things a decade or two ago. But it is still tiny compared to the rest of the medical industry, and it remains the case that there is a great deal of work yet to be done at all...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Of Interest Source Type: blogs
Publication date: January 2020Source: JACC: Heart Failure, Volume 8, Issue 1Author(s): Milton PackerAbstractBoth obesity and type 2 diabetes are important risk factors for the development of heart failure with a preserved ejection fraction (HFpEF), and both disorders increase the risk of systemic thromboembolic events. Traditionally, the risk of stroke has been explained by the strong association of these disorders with atrial fibrillation (AF). However, adiposity and diabetes are risk factors for systemic thromboembolism, even in the absence of AF, because both can lead to the development of an inflammatory and fibrotic a...
Source: JACC: Heart Failure - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
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