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The Guardian view on veganism: high in moral fibre | Editorial
Vegans are often unfairly mocked. They should instead be praisedJeremy Corbyn is “going through the process” of eating more vegan food, he has said – he just has to bring himself to give up the brie, verboten under vegan rules, along with eggs, milk and everything animals produce. Later, as if fearful of a backlash, his spokesperson issued a statement denying he was vegan. But the Labour leader was right to be proud of his efforts. Vegans are often unreasonably mocked as do-gooders and sniped at for making dinner parties awkward for those who don’t like lentils quite so much. This is unfair: the die...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Veganism Life and style Food Environment Food science Source Type: news

High fat diet linked to lower risk of death than diet high in carbs
Current global dietary guidelines need to change emphasis, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica High-quality carbs and unsaturated fats lower heart risks Low-carb diets appear to be safe for short-term use Fibre-rich diet linked to lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis Diet, lifestyle and cardiovascular disease Plant-based diet not always best for heart health (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 30, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Stomach bloating? Eat more of THIS food group in your diet to boost gut health
STOMACH bloating can be down to an imbalance in your gut bacteria. While probiotic foods and supplements are well known for helping boost “good” bacteria, adding more fibre to your diet can help too. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Certain occupations linked to increased risk of rheumatoid arthritis
Male manufacturing workers, bricklayers and concrete workers are at particularly high risk Related items fromOnMedica Fibre-rich diet linked to lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis Fibre-rich diet linked to lowered risk of painful knee osteoarthritis Chondroitin sulfate as good as widely used anti-inflammatory for knee osteoarthritis Rheumatoid arthritis Obesity may skew results of rheumatoid arthritis blood tests in women (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 10, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Does 'gastric band in a glass' slimming aid work?
EXCLUSIVE: Nutritionist Fiona Hunter says natural high fibre foods can be more nutritious – and cheaper. But the drink can help snacking addicts - as long as it is used as part of a calorie-controlled diet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Asbestos Type Has No Effect on Mesothelioma Latency Period
New research from scientists in Germany sheds more light on the unusually long latency period associated with mesothelioma and other asbestos-related diseases. The study, published earlier this year in the European Respiratory Journal, is the first to track the presence of asbestos fibers in lung tissue over time. Mesothelioma has one of the longest latency periods of any cancer. It typically takes anywhere from 20 to 50 years after a person’s initial exposure to asbestos before symptoms arise. Using the German Mesothelioma Register, researchers at Ruhr-University Bochum discovered the volume of asbestos fibers in...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 11, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: amosite amphibole asbestos exposure asbestos fiber burden asbestos fibers in lungs biopersistence of asbestos bronchoalveolar lavage Chrysotile asbestos Chrysotile asbestos fibers European Respiratory Journal German Mesothelioma Regist Source Type: news

Researchers try to unknot Alzheimer's protein tangles
Conclusion There's a tendency when scientists announce a breakthrough in our understanding of a disease to immediately start thinking about whether this could lead to a cure. While the ultimate aim of research into Alzheimer's disease is of course to be able to prevent or treat it, early research like this is more about understanding the disease mechanisms. This piece of research demonstrates how a new technique can be used to identify the molecular structure of abnormal protein deposits in the brain. That's a big step forward for use of this technology, which may be useful for other diseases, too. The causes of Alzheimer...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

High fibre diet 'could prevent type 1 diabetes'
Animal trials hint that short-chain fatty acids produced by a fibre-rich diet could protect against early-onset diabetesScientists have raised hope for the prevention of early-onset diabetes in children after a fibre-rich diet was found to protect animals from the disease.More than 20 million people worldwide are affected by juvenile, or type 1, diabetes, which takes hold when the immune system turns on the body and destroys pancreatic cells that make the hormone insulin.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 27, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Diabetes Medical research Science Society Nutrition Asthma Irritable bowel syndrome Digestive disorders Source Type: news

Carbon fibre: the wonder material with a dirty secret
Researchers are scrambling for ways to get the strong, light material out of landfill and make it ready for recycling and reuseCarbon fibre is increasingly celebrated as a wonder material for the clean economy. Its unique combination of high strength and low weight has helped drive the wind power revolution and make planes more fuel efficient.Carbon fibre turbine blades can be longer and more rigid than traditional fibreglass models, making them more resilient at sea and more efficient in less breezy conditions.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Mark Harris Tags: Guardian sustainable business Materials science Automotive industry Recycling Environment Waste Renewable energy Wind power Ethical and green living Technology Chemistry Physics Source Type: news

Dietary fibre intake 'can help prevent development of knee pain'
People's dietary intake of fibre could have an effect on their chances of developing chronic knee pain, according to a new study. Research carried out by Boston University School of Medicine has offered evidence that an increase in dietary fibre may be an effective means of reducing knee pain, in part by lowering body weight and inflammation. The study Published in the medical journalArthritis Care& Research, the study examined a group of 4,796 men and women aged 45 to 79 years with or at risk of kneeosteoarthritis, whose dietary fibre levels were estimated using a validated food frequency questionnaire at the star...
Source: Arthritis Research UK - December 7, 2016 Category: Rheumatology Source Type: news

Small fibre neuropathy defies ‘dying-back’ nerve process
Neuronal degradation in patients with small fibre neuropathy is not dependent on nerve fibre length, study findings suggest. (Source: MedWire News)
Source: MedWire News - April 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Finnish SME's are boosting the development of new fibre products
(VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland) VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland Ltd and Lahti University of Applied Sciences will develop optimised product properties for fibre products and biocomposites that have been manufactured using a foam-forming technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 16, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Young women with high-fibre diet may have lower breast cancer risk
ConclusionThis large and long-term cohort study showed that women with the top fifth highest average fibre intake during adolescence and early adulthood were around 25% less likely to develop premenopausal breast cancer decades later than those in the bottom fifth.This raises the suggestion that young women might be able to significantly lower their risk of breast cancer – the most common cancer in the UK – simply through eating more high-fibre foods such as fruits and vegetables.However, it’s worth noting a few points before accepting these promising results at face value. Total dieta...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 2, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news

10 years of 1:1 taping in Belgium - a selection of murder cases involving fibre examination - De Wael K, Lepot L, Lunstroot K, Gason F.
Since 2002, the 1:1 tape lifting technique on murder victims has been introduced in Belgium. Thirty-six murder cases for which a fibre examination was carried out in our laboratory between 2002 and 2012 are reviewed. These cases all involved the collection... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 23, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Porridge and high fibre for breakfast cuts the risk of diabetes by nearly a fifth 
Experts believe dietary fibre, especially cereals, may help people maintain a healthy weight, which in turn reduces the chances of developing type 2 diabetes. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a high-fibre, vegetable-rich diet slashes your risk of diabetes
EATING a high-fibre diet packed with cereals and vegetables is the simplest way to beat diabetes, scientists have said. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 26, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New technique doubles the distance of optical fibre communications
A new way to process fibre optic signals could double the distance at which data travels error-free through transatlantic sub-marine cables. The new method has the potential to reduce the costs of long-distance optical fibre communications as signals wouldn't need to be electronically boosted on their journey, which is important when the cables are buried underground or at the bottom of the ocean. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - February 3, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Get more fibre by eating crisps and frozen yoghurt!
Most of us know we should include fibre in our diet, but as a nation we simply don't eat enough of it. Here are smart ways to sneak in more fibre. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fibre boost
Heart attack survivors who eat more fibre have a higher chance of living longer, research has shown (Source: BHF National News)
Source: BHF National News - April 30, 2014 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Heart attack survivors 'gain from high-fibre diet'
Conclusion This was a well-designed study. Although it was a cohort study and so cannot prove causation, attempts were made to analyse the results while taking multiple factors into account. Its strengths include that it used data from a large number of people and measured dietary habits over the previous year, which may be a more accurate assessment than snap-shot 24-hour food questionnaires. However, there will still be room for bias in people's recall and estimates of portion size. There were a few limitations to the study: it was not able to take into account people who suffered from a heart attack and died before ...
Source: NHS News Feed - April 30, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Food/diet Source Type: news

Eating more fibre extends life for heart attack survivors
Heart attack survivors live longer if they have a high-fibre diet, according to a US study of thousands of health professionals. (Source: Nursing Times Breaking News)
Source: Nursing Times Breaking News - April 30, 2014 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Increasing fibre in heart attack survivors' diets helps reduce chance of death by a quarter
A study found that every 10 grams of fibre eaten per day was associated with a 15 per cent reduced risk of dying after a heart attack over a nine year period. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 30, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fibre boost
Heart attack survivors who eat more fibre have a higher chance of living longer, research has shown (Source: BHF National News)
Source: BHF National News - April 29, 2014 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Study reveals fibre releases an 'appetite-suppressing compound'
Researchers at Imperial College London say acetate is released when fibre is broken down and this compound travels to the brain where it tells people to stop eating. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discovery of anti-appetite molecule released by fibre could help tackle obesity
New research has helped unpick a long-standing mystery about how dietary fibre supresses appetite. (Source: Medical Research Council Press Releases)
Source: Medical Research Council Press Releases - April 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Discovery of anti-appetite molecule released by fibre could help tackle obesity
In a study led by Imperial College London and the Medical Research Council (MRC), an international team of researchers identified an anti-appetite molecule called acetate that is naturally released when we digest fibre in the gut. Once released, the acetate is transported to the brain where it produces a signal to tell us to stop eating. (Source: Medical Research Council General News)
Source: Medical Research Council General News - April 28, 2014 Category: Research Source Type: news

Evaluation of crashworthiness of a carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) ladder frame in a body-on-frame vehicle - Park CK, Kan CDS, Hollowell WT.
This paper investigates the opportunities of lightweighting a steel ladder frame, which is a primary structural component in a body-on-frame vehicle, using a carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) composite. The finite element (FE) model of a 2007 Chevrole... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - April 17, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Comparative study of effective stresses of concrete beams strengthened using carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer and external prestressing tendons - Choi J.
In this study, the load-carrying capacities of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened with carbon-fibre-reinforced polymer (CFRP) and external tendons were compared. The effective stress of the RC beams was estimated by analysing the experimental rein... (Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated))
Source: SafetyLit: All (Unduplicated) - March 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

What to eat now: fibre, to lower cholesterol
The statin debate may be heating up, but, says expert nutritionist and author Ian Marber, if you want to lower cholesterol start by topping up your fibre levels     (Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice)
Source: The Telegraph : Health Advice - February 17, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: fibre side-effects of statins cholesterol porridge Source Type: news

How fibre prevents diabetes and obesity (Alpha Galileo, 14 January 2014)
A French-Swedish study in Cell has investigated the mechanisms by which fibre-rich diets can protect animals from obesity and diabetes. Full link (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - January 15, 2014 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Does a high-fibre diet help relieve asthma?
Conclusion The current study has discovered more about the role of dietary fibre in the gut and its effect on lung inflammation. The findings come from experiments with mice in the laboratory. Importantly, the researchers only tested the effect of dietary fibre on airway inflammation in mice. The results of animal research often do not translate into the same results for people. However, the basic biology of humans and mice is surprisingly similar in some aspects, so these findings give a good starting point for further study in humans. Although these results can help scientists learn more about the role dietary fibre pl...
Source: NHS News Feed - January 7, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Kenya: Increase Fibre Intake in Diet to Avoid Hemorrhoids
[The Star]You are being advised to eat foods rich in fibre, drink plenty of water and exercise to avoid getting hemorrhoids- a condition in the rectum caused by constipation. Nutritionist Lina Njoroge also says you should avoid drinking excess amounts of alcohol as it dehydrates your body. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 24, 2013 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Fibre benefits
Don't pass on the sprouts this Christmas, because researchers have claimed fibre could protect your heart (Source: BHF National News)
Source: BHF National News - December 19, 2013 Category: Cardiology Source Type: news

Solving the Internet capacity crunch: first demonstration of a multicore fibre network
The University of Bristol's High Performance Networks Group in collaboration with the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) have demonstrated successfully for the first time a multicore fibre-based network, which will form the foundation for the future Internet infrastructure. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - October 8, 2013 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: news_text Tags: Press releases Source Type: news

Twisted light carries data over 1 km in optical fibre
New "vortex" fibre could lead to a faster Internet (Source: PhysicsWeb News)
Source: PhysicsWeb News - July 2, 2013 Category: Physics Source Type: news

High-fibre diet can cut stroke risk, scientists claim
Research finds every 7g increase in daily fibre cuts risk of first-time stroke by 7% Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 28, 2013 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Tags: Medical research Health & wellbeing Food drink Life and style Science Source Type: news

IPG Photonics revise Fibre Laser and Amplifier ranges
IPG Photonics has published new datasheets for certain models in their broad range of 1.0, 1.5 and 2.0 µm fibre lasers and amplifiers. (Source: PhysicsWeb Products and Press)
Source: PhysicsWeb Products and Press - January 31, 2013 Category: Physics Source Type: news

A high fibre diet could slow the progression of prostate cancer
A chemical in fibre prevents tumors from making the new blood vessels they need to grow, say scientists at the University of Colorado. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 10, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news