C.D.C. Warns the New Virus Variant Could Fuel Huge Spikes in Covid-19 Cases
The more contagious version, first identified in Britain, is expected to spread widely and lead to further strains on an already overburdened health care system. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli and Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Disease Rates Vaccination and Immunization Deaths (Fatalities) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention United States Source Type: news

C.D.C. Warns New Virus Variant Could Fuel Huge Spikes in Covid Cases
The more contagious version, first identified in Britain, is expected to spread widely and lead to further strains on an already overburdened health care system. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli and Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Source Type: news

COVID Vaccine Questions Answered: Can You Still Catch Virus After First Dose?
cbsoptanon.onScriptsReady(function(cmp){cmp.ot.targetingAllowed(function(a){if(a) AnvatoPlayer("p0").init({"mcp":"cbs","width":"100%","height":"100%","video":"5196496","autoplay":false,"titleVisible":false,"accessKey":"EZqvRyKE7qmqDflDPXIw6U7kKZEA0Vx7","accessControl":{"preview":false},"pInstance":"p0","plugins":{"heartbeat":{"account":"cbslocal-global-unified","publisherId":"cbslocal","jobId...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Around the Nation Health News Dr. Mallika Marshall Dr. Max Gomez Norm Elrod Vaccination Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Expanded Vaccine Rollout in U.S. Spawns a New Set of Problems
By JANIE HAR, JENNIFER PELTZ and ALLEN G. BREED Associated Press The rapid expansion of COVID-19 vaccinations to senior citizens across the U.S. has led to bottlenecks, system crashes and hard feelings in many states because of overwhelming demand for the shots. Mississippi’s Health Department stopped taking new appointments the same day it began accepting them because of a “monumental surge” in requests. People had to wait hours to book vaccinations through a state website or a toll-free number Tuesday and Wednesday, and many were booted off the site because of technical problems and had to start o...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 15, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Some Medical Students Wait in Line for Covid Vaccine, While Others Share Selfies of Shots
Across states and schools, medical students ’ access to the coronavirus vaccine has varied widely, creating some confusion and stress. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emma Goldberg Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Medical Schools Vaccination and Immunization Workplace Hazards and Violations Assn of American Medical Colleges Centers for Disease Control and Prevention your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Fewer Children Died in 2020, Despite the Pandemic. Experts Are Trying to Figure Out Why
Since the global pandemic began, one of the grimmer features of daily life has been watching the coronavirus death count tick up and up as the months have gone by. With so much unnecessary death in 2020, it’s surprising that in many countries, at least according to preliminary numbers, there was one significant group that actually saw its death rates fall: children. Data from the Human Mortality Database, a research project run by a global team of demographers, suggest that COVID-19 did not reverse years-long declines in child mortality, despite a mortality surge in the general population. Demographers, pediatricians...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Namibia: Health Ministry Receives Additional Funding for Covid Data Analysts and Public Health Specialists
[Namibia Economist] The U.S. Embassy, through the U.S Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, has extended its support to the Ministry of Health and Social Services to employee 11 data clerks and four public health specialists for an additional month. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 14, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

CDC: Agency Forms Undergoing Paperwork Reduction Act Review
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is extending the comment period on a request for information regarding the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES), which is used to measure the health and nutrition status of the general U.S. population. Comments are due within 30 days of this notice. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - January 14, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Negative COVID-19 Test to Be Required for People Flying to U.S.
WEDNESDAY, Jan. 13, 2021 -- People flying to the United States will soon need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test result, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The order will take effect on Jan. 26 and expands on an... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CDC: Young adults account for most COVID-19 cases among young people
Adults between 18 and 24 years old account for nearly 60% of new COVID-19 cases among young people, according to data released Wednesday by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Health Highlights: Jan. 13, 2021
Negative COVID-19 Test to be Required For People Flying to U.S. People flying to the United States will soon need to show proof of a negative COVID-19 test result, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Tuesday. The order will... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 13, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

U.S. to Require Negative Virus Tests From International Air Passengers
Before they board planes to the U.S., passengers will have to produce proof that they are not infected or have recently recovered. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: your-feed-science Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Tests (Medical) Airlines and Airplanes Vaccination and Immunization Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Redfield, Robert R United States Source Type: news

Doctor's Death After Getting the Covid Vaccine Is Investigated
A Florida physician developed an unusual blood disorder shortly after he received the Pfizer vaccine. It is not yet known if the shot is linked to the illness. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Denise Grady and Patricia Mazzei Tags: your-feed-healthcare Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Deaths (Fatalities) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hemorrhagic Stroke immune thrombocytopenia Pfizer Inc Michael, Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

U.S. to Speed COVID-19 Shots as Cases and Deaths Rise
By ZEKE MILLER and RICARDO ALONSO-ZALDIVAR Associated Press WASHINGTON (AP) — Barely a month into a mass vaccination campaign to stop the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trump administration unexpectedly shifted gears Tuesday to speed the delivery of shots. The move came after widespread concern over a slow start even as coronavirus cases and deaths reach new highs. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar announced a series of major changes to increase supply of vaccines and expand the age groups eligible as well as locations where people can get shots. One change will have some teeth to it. Azar said going for...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 12, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Source Type: news

Texas Legislature to consider Covid liability protections for businesses
An effort is picking up steam at the Texas Legislature to increase legal protections for businesses when it comes to liability for where someone contracted Covid-19. The Texas Civil Justice League is preparing a bill that would heighten protections for all businesses — including small businesses, nonprofits, health care systems and religious organizations — as long as they were following Covid-19 guidelines from government authorities, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - January 12, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Kathryn Hardison Source Type: news

Doctor's Death After Getting the Covid-19 Vaccine Is Investigated
A Florida physician developed an unusual blood disorder shortly after he received the Pfizer vaccine. It is not yet known if the shot is linked to the illness. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Denise Grady and Patricia Mazzei Tags: your-feed-healthcare Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Coronavirus Risks and Safety Concerns Deaths (Fatalities) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Hemorrhagic Stroke immune thrombocytopenia Pfizer Inc Michael, Source Type: news

Does Double-Masking Help Slow the Spread of Covid?
Health experts double down on their advice for slowing the spread of the coronavirus. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine J. Wu Tags: your-feed-science Protective Clothing and Gear Masks Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Centers for Disease Control and Prevention your-feed-health Source Type: news

Trump Administration Announces New COVID-19 Vaccine Plans Designed to Speed Up Distribution
(WASHINGTON) — The Trump administration is asking states to speed delivery of COVID-19 vaccines to people 65 and older and to others at high risk by no longer holding back the second dose of the two-dose shots, officials said Tuesday. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar said that “the administration in the states has been too narrowly focused.” As a result, he said, the Trump administration is now asking states to vaccinate people age 65 and over and those under 65 with underlying health conditions that put them at high risk. He said the vaccine production is such that the second dose of the two...
Source: TIME: Health - January 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zeke Miller / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 wire Source Type: news

How The Vaccine Rollout Went Wrong And What To Do Next
Only about 7 million doses have been administered, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). At current rates, it will take years to vaccinate everyone in the country. Why has the vaccine rollout fallen below expectations, and what can we do next to course-correct? (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 12, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: William A. Haseltine, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Coronavirus business pharma & Source Type: news

CDC Expands Negative COVID-19 Test Requirement to All Air Passengers Entering the United States
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) expanded the requirement for a negative COVID-19 test to all air passengers entering the United States, effective January 26, 2021. Air passengers are required to get a viral test within the 3 days before their flight to the U.S. departs, and provide written documentation of their test result or provide documentation of having recovered from COVID-19. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - January 12, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

CDC report: removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) is committed to removing unnecessary medical barriers to contraception use by people with certain characteristics or medical conditions. The CDC is celebrating the 10th anniversary of the release of its U.S. Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use (MEC), (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus live news: Ireland surges to worst infection rate in world; Spain sees record rise in weekend cases
Ireland ’s10,100 cases per million puts hospitals under severe strain; more than 61,000 new casesreported in Spain since FridayEngland told to prepare for worst weeks of Covid pandemicChina agrees to let in WHO team investigating Covid originsFrench vaccine scepticism reflects ‘dissatisfaction with politicians’UK coronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverage10.39pmGMTNearly nine million Americans had been given their first Covid-19 vaccination dose as of Monday morning, as states scrambled to step up inoculations that have yet to slow rising cases.The 8,987,322 people who have been gi...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 11, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Murray (now); Archie Bland, Kevin Rawlinson and Helen Sullivan (earlier) Tags: Coronavirus World news UK news Science Infectious diseases US news Ireland Source Type: news

Africa: Africa Surpasses Three Million Covid-19 Cases, Most in South Africa
[RFI] The Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention says more than three million cases have been logged on the continent since the start of the pandemic, with South Africa accounting for more than 30 percent. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 11, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Texas Legislature to consider Covid liability protections for businesses
An effort is picking up steam at the Texas Legislature to increase legal protections for businesses when it comes to liability for where someone contracted Covid-19. The Texas Civil Justice League is preparing a bill that would heighten protections for all businesses — including small businesses, nonprofits, health care systems and religious organizations — as long as they were following Covid-19 guidelines from government authorities, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 11, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Kathryn Hardison Source Type: news

Toxins In Marijuana Smoke May Be Harmful To Health, Dana-Farber Study Finds
(CNN) — Smoking weed may expose you to the same type of toxic chemicals found in tobacco smoke, a new study finds. People who only smoked marijuana had higher blood and urine levels of several smoke-related toxins such as naphthalene, acrylamide and acrylonitrile than nonsmokers, according to the study published Monday in the journal EClinicalMedicine. Naphthalene is associated with anemia, liver and neurological damage, while acrylamide and acrylonitrile have been associated with cancer and other health issues. “Marijuana use is on the rise in the United States with a growing number of states legalizing it for...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Dana Farber Cancer Institute Marijuana Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pressure Grows for States to Open Vaccines to More Groups of People
Some states are already expanding eligibility to people 65 and over, even though millions of people the C.D.C. recommends go first — health care workers and nursing home residents — have yet to get shots. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abby Goodnough Tags: States (US) Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Elderly Governors (US) United States Politics and Government Medicine and Health Centers for Disease Control and Prevention your-feed-healthcare Hospitals Retirement Comm Source Type: news

Texas Legislature to consider COVID liability protections for businesses
An effort is picking up steam at the Texas Legislature to increase legal protections for businesses when it comes to liability for where someone contracted COVID-19. The Texas Civil Justice League is preparing a bill that would heighten protections for all businesses — including small businesses, nonprofits, health care systems and religious organizations — as long as they were following COVID-19 guidelines from government authorities, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 9, 2021 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Kathryn Hardison Source Type: news

Texas Legislature to consider COVID liability protections for businesses
An effort is picking up steam at the Texas Legislature to increase legal protections for businesses when it comes to liability for where someone contracted COVID-19. The Texas Civil Justice League is preparing a bill that would heighten protections for all businesses — including small businesses, nonprofits, health care systems and religious organizations — as long as they were following COVID-19 guidelines from government authorities, such as the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention or… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 9, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Kathryn Hardison Source Type: news

CDC: Meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF)
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention will hold a virtual public meeting of the Community Preventive Services Task Force (CPSTF) on February 10-11, 2021. The CPSTF is charged with identifying community preventive programs, services, and policies that increase healthy longevity and improve quality of life while saving money. Agenda items include deliberation on systematic reviews of the literature on nutrition, physical activity, and obesity and health equity/social determinants of health. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - January 8, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

CDC: Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, (BSC, NCIPC)
Notice from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) of a public meeting of the Board of Scientific Counselors, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control (BSC, NCIPC) on February 16, 2021 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:15 p.m. Agenda items include updates on the BSC Opioid workgroup, NCIPC health equity activities, suicide prevention, firearm research awards and surveillance activities, and NCIPC COVID-19 activities. Participants are required toregister for the meeting. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - January 8, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Study reveals new details about how bacterial toxins cause life-threatening colitis
FINDINGSResearch led by scientists from UCLA and Harvard University has uncovered details about how the bacterium Clostridioides difficile causes excessive inflammation in the gut that can lead to potentially deadly colitis. Studying C. difficile toxin A, one of two toxins released by the bacterium, the researchers produced two key findings.They pinpointed which part of the toxic protein can permeate cell membranes to gain entry to cellular structures called endosomes, demonstrating that even fragments of the protein that contain that key segment are capable of accessing endosomes.In addition, they revealed how the toxin m...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 8, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Predicted Heart Age Higher Among Cancer Survivors
THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2021 -- The excess heart age is more than five years higher among cancer survivors, according to research published in the Jan. 8 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Morbidity and Mortality Weekly... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CDC urges Americans to get coronavirus vaccine despite 10 times higher allergic reaction rate than flu shots
(Natural News) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) remains headstrong in its faith in the COVID-19 vaccines even though these jabs are causing more allergic reaction cases than flu shots. In a report published on Wednesday, the CDC revealed that nearly two dozen Americans have experienced life-threatening allergic reactions after receiving the Pfizer-BioNTech vaccine between Dec. 14... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 7, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news