At Least 72 People Got Sick After Swimming at a Minnesota Campground, Officials Say
A Minnesota campground seems to be behind an apparent outbreak of water-borne parasitic illness, public health officials said. Minnesota Department of Health (MDH) officials confirmed last week that three people tested positive for cryptosporidiosis after visiting Shades of Sherwood Campground in Zumbrota. (One person also tested positive for E. coli.) In an update posted Friday, MDH officials said they have identified 72 people with symptoms consistent with cryptosporidiosis or E. coli, though most of these illnesses have not been laboratory-confirmed. Cryptosporidiosis is typically contracted after ingesting water that h...
Source: TIME: Health - August 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Minnesota onetime Source Type: news

CDC: Rates of Opioid Use Disorder Seen at Time of Delivery Up
FRIDAY, Aug. 10, 2018 -- Opioid use disorder rates at delivery more than quadrupled nationally from 1999 to 2014, according to research published in the Aug. 10 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 10, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Study Shows Trends in Naloxone Administration by EMS
A new study released today shows the importance of EMS data in estimating the public health burden of opioid overdose and can help emergency responders, public healthcare organizations and community organizations target and evaluate prevention and strategies to address the epidemic. The report, published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), was authored by researchers at the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Office of EMS. Researchers found that the rate of EMS naloxone admini...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - August 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: NREMT Tags: Patient Care News Industry News Source Type: news

New Study Shows Trends in Naloxone Administration by EMS
A new study released today shows the importance of EMS data in estimating the public health burden of opioid overdose and can help emergency responders, public healthcare organizations and community organizations target and evaluate prevention and strategies to address the epidemic. The report, published in the CDC’s Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report (MMWR), was authored by researchers at the National Registry of Emergency Medical Technicians, The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration Office of EMS. Researchers found that the rate of EMS naloxone admini...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 10, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: NREMT Tags: Patient Care News Industry News Source Type: news

CDC: Number of women with opioid use disorder quadruples in 15 years
Pregnant women with opioid overuse quadrupled over 15 years, according to an analysis of hospital deliveries by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rate of women addicted to opioids during pregnancy quadrupled in 15 years, CDC says
Nationwide, the rate of opioid use disorder among women delivering babies more than quadrupled over the 15-year period ending in 2014, according to a Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report published Thursday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Exercise Is Good For Your Mental Health —But Only To A Point
Given the many benefits of exercise — ranging from physical fitness and chronic disease prevention to improved mood — it may seem logical that the more you do, the better. But a large new study suggests that’s not always the case, at least when it comes to mental health. It’s well-established that exercise can improve mental health, and potentially even alleviate or prevent depression. But how much is enough to see a change? The new research, published Wednesday in the Lancet Psychiatry, says that just two hours of any form of exercise each week may make a significant impact. “One of the nice...
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Neuroscientist identifies biomarker for traumatic brain injury
A new UCLA study in rats shows that levels of a molecule called LPA rise quickly in several sites of the brain after traumatic brain injury, or TBI, suggesting a possible route to development of a diagnostic blood test for humans.The findings are consistent with previous research detecting higher concentrations of LPA in the blood after a brain injury, as well as in cerebrospinal fluid following spinal-cord injury. Because traumatic brain injury can produce a variety of symptoms, it can be difficult for doctors to accurately evaluate the severity of the trauma or predict the duration of the injury.The American Journal of P...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 8, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Health Tip: Studying Overseas
-- Spending a semester in another country can be an incredible experience, but it doesn't come without risk of travel-related illness. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers these tips to prepare for a semester abroad: Learn... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 8, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

For Zika-exposed babies, trouble may emerge in their first year
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has found that in their first year of life, 14% of babies exposed to Zika before birth had one or more health problems likely caused by the mosquito-borne virus. And for some of those babies, the toll of that gestational exposure was not evident at... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - August 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Melissa Healy Source Type: news

One in 7 babies prenatally exposed to Zika has health problems, CDC says
Nearly one in seven babies born to women infected with the Zika virus while pregnant had one or more health problems possibly caused by the virus, according to a Vital Signs report published Tuesday by the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. The problems consisted of birth defects including small head size, brain damage, eye damage and nervous system problems, such as vision and hearing impairments, as well as seizures. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Global Health: An Invasive New Tick Is Spreading in the U.S.
The Asian long-horned tick, reported in New York ’ s suburbs and as far west as Arkansas, can carry lethal diseases. But no infected specimens have yet been found here. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Ticks (Insects) Livestock Lyme Disease Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey Hunterdon County (NJ) Far East, South and Southeast Asia and Pacific Areas New York Source Type: news

CDC: Half of U.S. Adults Tried to Lose Weight From 2013 to 2016
MONDAY, Aug. 6, 2018 -- Nearly half of U.S. adults have tried to lose weight from 2013 to 2016, according to a July data brief published by the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's National Center for Health Statistics. Crescent B.... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 6, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

What do CDC's surveys say about the frequency of defensive gun uses? - Kleck GD.
In 1996, 1997, and 1998, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) conducted large-scale surveys asking about defensive gun use (DGU) in four to seven states. Analysis of the raw data allows the estimation of the prevalence of DGU for those area... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Research Methods, Surveillance and Codes, Models Source Type: news

IDSA announces recipients of Antimicrobial Stewardship CoE designation
(Infectious Diseases Society of America) The Infectious Diseases Society of America (IDSA) announced today the recipients of its Antimicrobial Stewardship Centers of Excellence (CoE) designation. The program, launched in 2017, recognizes institutions that have created stewardship programs led by infectious diseases physicians and ID-trained pharmacists that are of the highest quality and have achieved standards established by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The unapproved antidepressant that's poisoning people
From 2014 through 2017, there was an increase in US poison control calls related to the intentional abuse and misuse of tianeptine, an unapproved antidepressant drug, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in a report on Thursday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Sleep Affects Your Relationships, According to Science
In a properly functioning body, sleep helps the brain process your emotions and memories from the day. You wake up well-rested with enough mental space to both create and log new memories and work through the experiences of your day. Sleep deprivation, on the other hand, is like falling into an icy river: “The body shuts down circulation to the appendages and tries to keep the core warm. It goes into survival mode,” says W. Christopher Winter, a neurologist based in Charlottesville, VA and the author of The Sleep Solution. When you’re not sleeping well, “your brain’s ability to do things gets ...
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized Living relationships sleep Source Type: news

PHF Partners with Tribes to Support Tribal Drinking Water Program Improvement
The Public Health Foundation (PHF), with support from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Environmental Health, is collaborating to provide technical assistance and training for Tribal drinking water programs around the country. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - August 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chicken Is the Number-One Cause of Foodborne Illness Outbreaks. Here ’s How to Stay Safe
This article originally appeared on Health.com. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda Macmillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Health Tip: Eat Safely at Outdoor Fairs
-- The summer calendar is filled with fairs and festivals, but with the warmer temperatures comes an increased risk of food contamination, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention warns. The CDC suggests considering these questions when... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 3, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Opioid Addicts Turning to Unapproved Antidepressant
Tianeptine is used in some European, Asian and Latin American countries for treatment of depression and anxiety. But the U.S. Food and Drug Administration has not approved use of the drug in the United States, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC: Salmonella Outbreaks in 44 States Linked to Backyard Poultry
THURSDAY, Aug. 2, 2018 -- At least 212 people in 44 states have been sickened in Salmonella outbreaks linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Twenty-six percent of the... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Increasing evidence proves the undeniable therapeutic benefits of vitamin D
(Natural News) In 2014, breast cancer, the most common cause of cancer in women, claimed at least 41,000 lives, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). However, health experts advised that patients can fight cancer with proper supplementation, particularly an increased intake of vitamin D. Vitamin D, disease prevention, and recommended intake If the public... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Update on Salmonella Outbreak Tied to Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 1, 2018 -- A Salmonella outbreak linked to Hy-Vee Spring Pasta Salad has now sickened 79 people in nine states. Eighteen people have been hospitalized. No deaths have been reported, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 1, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

79 sick from salmonella linked to Hy-Vee pasta salad in the Midwest, CDC warns
A multistate salmonella outbreak linked to pasta salad sold by Midwestern grocery store chain Hy-Vee has sickened 79 individuals, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reported Wednesday. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Salads and Wraps Sold at Kroger and Trader Joe ’s May Have Been Contaminated By a Parasite
Salads and wraps sold at major grocery chains may have been contaminated by an infectious parasite, according to a public health alert. The U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Food Safety and Inspection Service (FSIS) warned consumers on Monday to stay away from certain beef, pork and poultry salads and wraps sold at stores including Kroger, Trader Joe’s, Gordon Food Service and Walgreen’s. Romaine lettuce used in these products may have been tainted by Cyclospora, a parasite that can cause gastrointestinal illness, according to FSIS. The salads and wraps in question were produced by Indianapolis-based Caito...
Source: TIME: Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Recalls Source Type: news

Following the Vaccine Schedule Protects Children From Deadly Diseases
Texas children have a better likelihood of fighting off diseases circulating at school if their parents make sure they get their shots before the first bell rings. Doctors urge parents to follow the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recommended school vaccine schedule to build their child ’s immune system against dangerous diseases, reports the August issue of Texas Medicine magazine. (Source: TMA News Room)
Source: TMA News Room - July 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol In Breast Milk May Lead To Lower Cognition In Kids, Study Finds
(CBS Local/CNN)– Children’s exposure to alcohol through breast milk may cause a comparable drop in their cognitive abilities, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. “This is the first study in which associations between alcohol exposure through breast milk and cognition in children are examined,” the researchers from Macquarie University in Australia wrote in the report. Previously Undisclosed TSA Program Tracks Unsuspecting Passengers The authors obtained data from a longitudinal study, a continuous study of data over a period of time, of 5,107 Australian infants who were...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News breastfeeding CNN Local TV Source Type: news

How Should the Media Cover Suicides? A New Study Has Some Answers
It’s no secret to mental health experts that exposure to suicide, either directly or through media and entertainment, may make people more likely to resort to suicidal behaviors themselves. The phenomenon even has a name: suicide contagion. And a new paper, published Monday in the Canadian Medical Association Journal, says some specific journalistic practices — such as including lots of details about a death by suicide, or glamorizing these incidents — may make suicide contagion worse. “We’re not saying reporting on suicide is bad,” says Dr. Ayal Schaffer, a psychiatry professor at the U...
Source: TIME: Health - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Tool Improves Identification of Undiagnosed Hypertension
MONDAY, July 30, 2018 -- Use of billing and clinical data can help to identify undiagnosed hypertension, according to research published in the July 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Scientists discover that common purslane and henna show great potential in preventing yeast infections
(Natural News) The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that about 46,000 people in the U.S. contract invasive candidiasis every year, about 20 percent of whom die from the disease. A study published in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine examined several herbs for antimicrobial properties that could make them effective against... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A New Study Shows Just How Much Doctors Prescribe Opioids
After years of rising use, federal data suggests that opioid prescriptions are beginning to drop off in the U.S., perhaps in an effort to curtail a substance abuse epidemic that continues to get worse. But new research suggests that many doctors are still prescribing these powerful drugs — even for relatively minor injuries. In fact, a quarter of patients treated for ankle sprains between 2011 and 2015 left the hospital with an opioid prescription, according to a paper published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. To reach that finding, University of Pennsylvania researchers analyzed private insurance claims filed ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime opioids Source Type: news

CDC: Homicides by Firearm on the Rise in the United States
FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 -- Gun murders are on the rise in the United States and are the most common type of murder, according to a QuickStats report published in the July 27 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 27, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CDC urges Americans to stop re-using condoms by turning them inside out or washing them
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention tweeted a reminder that condoms cannot be washed or reused. The prophylactics are deceptively simple and commonly misused. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

July 28 Is World Hepatitis Day
FRIDAY, July 27, 2018 -- July 28 is World Hepatitis Day, according to an announcement published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report. The goal of the annual commemoration... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 27, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CDC: Advisory Committee to the Director (ACD), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)-Health Disparities Subcommittee (HDS)
Announcement from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention of a public meeting for the Advisory Committee to the Director, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention — Health Disparities Subcommittee (ACD, CDC-HDS) on October 9, 2018. Agenda items are focused on providing new members of the Subcommittee with information related to their roles and responsibilities. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - July 27, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Gun homicides on the rise, CDC says
Shooting homicides are on the rise, though other common methods of murder remain flat, according to the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CDC: Salmonella-Tainted Melon Outbreak Appears to Be Over
THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 -- A Salmonella outbreak linked to melons and fruit salad mixes appears to be over, say officials at the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. As of July 24, 2018, 77 people have been sickened across nine states... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Why backyard chickens are a health risk
"Always wash your hands after handling live poultry." That's the reminder from the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention this week due to another outbreak of salmonella from backyard chickens. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Guidance Provided for Reporting Foodborne Illness
THURSDAY, July 26, 2018 -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention offers guidance for health care professionals on reporting foodborne illnesses. Through a collaborative effort between several health agencies, including the CDC,... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Even More Snacks Are Being Recalled Over the Salmonella Fears Affecting Goldfish and Ritz Crackers
Swiss Rolls and bread are the latest products disappearing from store shelves amidst a string of food recalls also affecting Goldfish and Ritz crackers. Due to possible salmonella contamination, Flowers Foods, Inc. is recalling Swiss Rolls sold under a variety of brand names nationwide, as well as Captain John Derst’s Old Fashioned Bread sold in Alabama, Florida, Georgia, North Carolina and South Carolina, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) announced. It appears that Flower Foods uses the same potentially tainted whey powder, sourced from Associated Milk Producers Inc., that prompted Pepperidge Farm and Mondelez...
Source: TIME: Health - July 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime Recalls Source Type: news

Majority of Those in Residential Care Have Advance Directives
WEDNESDAY, July 25, 2018 -- More than three-quarters of those living in residential care facilities have an advance directive, according to a QuickStats report published in the July 20 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 25, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Salmonella concern with snack crackers
Salmonella?infection is one of the most common forms of foodborne illness in the U.S. An estimated 1 million people become sick and 380 people die each year from the bacterial disease, according to the?Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Currently, the?U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA)?has issued voluntary recalls of Ritz, Goldfish and other products [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 25, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Backyard Chickens Sicken People In 44 States
(CBS News) — Live poultry in backyard flocks are linked to several multistate outbreaks of salmonella infections that have now sickened 212 people in 44 states, federal health officials warned Monday. One case has been reported in Massachusetts. The most recent illnesses began on June 21, with 88 of the cases reported in the last month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, or CDC, said in an advisory. The federal agency is working with multiple states in investigating several outbreaks of salmonella infections linked to contact with live poultry in backyard flocks, it said. A half-dozen strains of sal...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News chickens Local TV SALMONELLA Source Type: news

1 in 9 US Adults Above Age 45 Report Cognitive Decline 1 in 9 US Adults Above Age 45 Report Cognitive Decline
Around 11% of people in the U.S. age 45 or above self-report experiencing cognitive decline, according to survey data analyzed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

A New Study Links Rising Temperatures to an Increased Risk of Suicide
This study’s authors focused on suicide since it is one of the top causes of death worldwide, particularly in wealthier nations. Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the suicide rate increased by more than 25% between 1999 and 2016. If you or someone you know may be contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Siobhan Morrin Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

A New Study Links Rising Temperatures to an Increased Risk of Suicide
This study’s authors focused on suicide since it is one of the top causes of death worldwide, particularly in wealthier nations. Suicide is the tenth leading cause of death in the U.S., according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the suicide rate increased by more than 25% between 1999 and 2016. If you or someone you know may be contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255. (Source: TIME: Science)
Source: TIME: Science - July 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Siobhan Morrin Tags: Uncategorized climate change healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: How to avoid foodborne illness
The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimates that 48 million people in the U.S. get sick every year from food poisoning, also called foodborne illness. And more than 128,000 Americans are hospitalized and 3,000 die from foodborne diseases. Dr. Pritish Tosh, a Mayo Clinic infectious diseases specialist, says prevention is especially important in your [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - July 24, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Global Health: For the First Time, a Female Ebola Survivor Infects Others
A Liberian woman recovered after tending her dying brother, but infected her family a year later. Being pregnant may have reignited the virus in her. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Ebola Virus Pregnancy and Childbirth Discrimination Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Lancet Infectious Diseases, The (Journal) World Health Organization Africa Liberia Emily Kainne Dukobo Vaccination and Immunization Source Type: news

This Tanzanian Couple Plans Together, Dreams Together, and Fights HIV Transmission Together
July 23, 2018A simple procedure is lowering the risk for thousands of couples in  Tanzania.Twenty-one-year-old Khadija Butemi was doing her morning chores when she heard an announcement through a loudspeaker passing by on the nearby country road.There was a campaign going on, it said, for men who wanted to undergo voluntary medical male circumcision (VMMC). She immediately thought of her husband, a 22-year-old fisherman, who was down by the lake fishing.The couple lives with their two-year-old daughter in Nansio, a remote village on the island of Ukerewe, Tanzania. VMMC isn ’t routinely offered in the area, and ...
Source: IntraHealth International - July 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: mnathe Source Type: news