Are Smoothies Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say

Smoothies have a health glow about them. They’re often an integral part of cleanses, and they’re ubiquitous at health food stores and health-centric restaurants. And the smoothie trend is still going strong. Workout studios serve them up post-class, dietitians preach their powers and fit celebrities tout their nutritional prowess. But are smoothies healthy? Here’s what you should know about the drink, whether you’re picking one up or making your own. How to make healthy smoothies You can put nearly anything into a smoothie. But most consist of liquid (like water, non-dairy milk or kefir), fruits, vegetables, seeds, nuts (or nut butter), supplements like protein powder, maca or matcha, and toppings (such as granola, coconut and cacao nibs), says Ryan Andrews, a registered dietitian and author of A Guide to Plant-Based Eating. The key to making it healthy is to strike the right balance of vegetables, fruit, protein and fat, says Miranda Hammer, a registered dietitian and natural foods chef based in New York. “The smoothie is a really great way to get in those key foods,” Hammer says. When you make this type of smoothie, “you have the foundation for a healthy breakfast or snack.” Protein can come from unsweetened nut butter, chia, hemp or flax seeds, plain yogurt or nut milk. And fat, which helps fill you up, is the other key factor in a smoothie. “Good sources of fat in smoothies are salt and sugar-free nut butter, chia, fl...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

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Conclusions Two, Not Mutually Exclusive, Hypotheses We have reviewed and organized the literature with the intent of showing the existing parallels between excessive fat accumulation and the aging process. We have categorized these reports following what have been proposed to be the nine hallmarks of aging (21) (Figure 1). Based on the evidence, two distinct hypotheses can be proposed. One is that the cellular responses provoked by an excess of nutrients cause obesity, and that obesity is responsible for accelerating the pace of aging. Supporting this hypothesis are the observations that knocking out the fat-specific ins...
Source: Frontiers in Endocrinology - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusion Most head and neck pathologies show a broad cellular heterogeneity making it difficult to achieve an accurate diagnosis and efficient treatment (Graf and Zavodszky, 2017; Lo Nigro et al., 2017). Single cell analysis of circadian omics (Lande-Diner et al., 2015; Abraham et al., 2018), may be a crucial tool needed in the future to fully understand the circadian control of head and neck diseases. It becomes more obvious that there is only a small genetic component but a largely unknown epigenetics and/or environmental component for most of the head and neck pathologies (Moosavi and Motevalizadeh Ardekani, 2016; He...
Source: Frontiers in Physiology - Category: Physiology Source Type: research
It’s hardly news that the gastrointestinal tract is important to human health: It transports food from the mouth to the stomach, converts it into absorbable nutrients and stored energy, and shuttles waste back out of the body. If you don’t properly nourish yourself, you don’t live. It’s that simple. But in recent years, scientists have discovered that the GI system has an even bigger, more complex job than previously appreciated. It’s been linked to numerous aspects of health that have seemingly nothing to do with digestion, from immunity to emotional stress to chronic illnesses, including can...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news
The Growing Toll of Our Ever-Expanding WaistlinesBy  JANE E. BRODY NOV. 13, 2017Paul Rogers I hope you ’re not chomping on a bagel or, worse, a doughnut while you read about what is probably the most serious public health irony of the last half century in this country: As one major killer — smoking — declined, another rose precipitously to take its place: obesity.Many cancer deaths were averted after millions quit lighting up, but they are now rising because even greater numbers are unable to keep their waistlines in check.Today, obesity and smoking remain the two leading causes of pre...
Source: Dr Portnay - Category: Cardiology Authors: Source Type: blogs
We examined the engraftment and differentiation of alkaline phosphatase-positive NSCs expanded from the postnatal subventricular zone (SVZ), 3 months after grafting into the intact young or aged rat hippocampus. Graft-derived cells engrafted robustly into both young and aged hippocampi. Although most graft-derived cells pervasively migrated into different hippocampal layers, the graft cores endured and contained graft-derived neurons. The results demonstrate that advanced age of the host at the time of grafting has no major adverse effects on engraftment, migration, and differentiation of grafted subventricular zone...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Table of contents A1 Predictive and prognostic biomarker panel for targeted application of radioembolisation improving individual outcomes in hepatocellular carcinoma Jella-Andrea Abraham, Olga Golubnitschaja A2 Integrated market access approach amplifying value of “Rx-CDx” Ildar Akhmetov A3 Disaster response: an opportunity to improve global healthcare Russell J. Andrews, Leonidas Quintana A4 USA PPPM: proscriptive, profligate, profiteering medicine-good for 1 % wealthy, not for 99 % unhealthy Russell J. Andrews ...
Source: EPMA Journal - Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research
Abstract Obesity is a major public health problem worldwide. Obesity-related illnesses, such as coronary heart disease, type 2 diabetes, hypertension, dyslipidemia, stroke, sleep apnea, and several forms of cancer (endometrial, breast, and colon), contribute to a significant number of deaths in the USA. Bariatric surgery, including the Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) procedure, has demonstrated significant improvements in obesity and obesity-related co-morbidities and is becoming more popular as the number of obese individuals rises. Despite the reported benefits of bariatric surgery, there are potential complica...
Source: Current Diabetes Reports - Category: Endocrinology Source Type: research
Conclusions Bariatric surgery as delivered in the UK healthcare system is associated with dramatic weight loss, sustained at least 4 y after surgery. This weight loss is accompanied by substantial improvements in pre-existing T2DM and hypertension, as well as a reduced risk of incident T2DM, hypertension, angina, MI, and obstructive sleep apnoea. Widening the availability of bariatric surgery could lead to substantial health benefits for many people who are morbidly obese.
Source: PLoS Medicine - Category: Internal Medicine Authors: Source Type: research
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs
Do you know someone who should have seen a doctor years ago? Maybe it’s your husband, or your father, or your brother, even your son? They complain about the shortness of breath, the nagging cough, or the stomach pain. But they never take action. For some men, so decisive at work or within the family circle, the lack of motivation to get an illness or symptom checked out is surprising. In fact, men are 24% less likely to have visited a doctor in the past year than women. Seeing a doctor is scary and it makes them feel weak and out of control. Roald Bradstock was one of those men. An Olympic athlete who trained 3 to 4...
Source: Disruptive Women in Health Care - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Men's Health Source Type: blogs
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