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Cold and Flu: Prevention, Symptoms and Treatments
In much of the Northern Hemisphere, December through February is prime time for colds, influenza (flu), and other respiratory illnesses. Don’t let a cold or the flu ruin your holidays! Learn how to protect yourself and your family with these tips from the Food & Drug Administration (FDA): Get vaccinated against flu Wash your hands often Limit exposure to infected people Keep stress in check Eat a balanced diet Get enough sleep Exercise Symptoms Most viral respiratory infections, like a cold, come and go within a few days, with no lasting effects. But some cause serious health problems. In addition, people who u...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - December 11, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Consumer Health Health Professionals K-12 Public Health Source Type: news

Tanzania:Kids Deserve Protection From Mental Disorders
[Daily News] THE National Assembly was told on Tuesday that too many children in this country miss balanced diet -- a critical anomaly that endangers their mental state. What many families do not know is the stark reality that unbalanced diets often trigger mental disorders. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 16, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Nutrient drink for Alzheimer's has disappointing result in trial
Conclusion This trial provides valuable evidence about the effects of a nutrient drink, Souvenaid, on memory in individuals with early signs that they may develop Alzheimer's disease. Importantly, the researchers found no significant effect on the main outcome their study looked at (memory). They did find less brain shrinkage and slightly better cognitive scores in the experimental group, but this still didn't lead to any reduction in the number who were diagnosed with dementia by the end of the study. This trial therefore provides no evidence that Souvenaid/Fortasyn Connect can help to prevent or slow Alzheimer's developi...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Peeling into the health benefits of bananas: Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute
What's yellow, weighs more than 25?pounds and is something you'll likely have eaten?by the end of December? The answer: a year's supply of?bananas. In this Mayo Clinic Radio Health Minute, dietitian Angie Murad explains the many benefits of making bananas a part of a well-balanced diet. To listen, click the link below. Peeling into the [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 31, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Marriage may help lower dementia risk
Conclusions The general findings that marriage and having more social relationships seem to be linked to better health and wellbeing is in line with the results of much previous research. But there are several important things to keep in mind: Although the study followed people who didn't have dementia at the start of the study, it can't prove that marital status or the number of close relationships directly increased or decreased dementia risk. Biological, health, lifestyle and environmental factors may all influence a person's risk of dementia (particularly the most common form of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, which...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Eating mushrooms at breakfast may help you feel fuller
Conclusions Though of interest, this study doesn't provide strong evidence that you should eat mushrooms if you want to lose weight. The study has a number of limitations: It's a short-term study that didn't look at effects on weight. It showed that people reported feeling fuller after eating mushrooms, but there were few signs this actually led to them eating less. As the researchers openly acknowledge, there could be other explanations for the findings. To match the protein content in mince required a much larger volume of mushrooms, and therefore a larger sandwich that would have taken more time and effort to chew. ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

New research confirms that omega-3s improve gut health, helping prevent obesity, inflammation, and autoimmune disorders
(Natural News) In the largest cohort study to date, a team of British nutrition experts confirmed just how powerful omega-3 fatty acids are for optimum health. Their research, published in Scientific Reports, observed more than 800 middle-aged to older women to see how a balanced diet consisting of foods rich in omega-3, probiotics, and fibrous... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Maternal diet could affect kids' brain reward circuitry
(Frontiers) Researchers in France found that rats who ate junk food during pregnancy had heavier pups that strongly preferred fat straight after weaning. However, a balanced diet in childhood seemed to reduce the pups' desire for fat. The pups also showed altered brain reward circuitry into adulthood. The findings could have implications for childhood nutrition and obesity in Western countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diet has big impact on healthy aging
Healthy eating is an essential step towards living a long and active life. Dr. Jeffrey Morrison, a physician and nutritionist at the Morrison Center in New York City, spoke to CBSN about the importance of a balanced diet as you age. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Avoid eating just before your bedtime, study recommends
Conclusions Previous research suggests we may be better off consuming more of our calories earlier on in the day, when we have a full, active day ahead of us to use up the energy. It's also been observed that people who consume large calorific meals late in the evening can have a higher body weight. In a sense, the results of this study seem plausible and don't really say anything different from what's already been observed. But as this is a cross-sectional study, it can't really prove very much. The study involved a small, select sample of US university students. Their results can't be applied to everyone, as they have di...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Statins cut heart deaths in men by 28% finds study
Conclusion This new analysis found that men without cardiovascular disease who were prescribed a statin were less likely to go on to develop heart disease or have a major cardiovascular event. These findings from the five-year randomised controlled trial are useful – there's been a lot of debate about whether giving statins to people without any cardiovascular disease is helpful. But it's harder to draw conclusions from the longer term results, as these were from a non-randomised observational period. Potential confounding factors – such as the men's attitude to medicine, risk and health – may have influe...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Going to university may cut your risk of heart disease
Conclusion This study indicates there may be some genetic support for the idea that spending longer in education contributes to lowering the risk of CHD. The researchers also demonstrate that this may be because people who spend longer in education have a lower BMI and are less likely to smoke. However, there are some limitations to this research that need to be considered: The genetic variations identified as being associated with education may not be markers for education at all, but more basic biological pathways. The authors do not account for the fact that differences in education might be due to brain function, w...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Source Type: news

'Junk food' may increase cancer risk in 'healthy weight' women
"Women who eat junk food such as burgers or pizza are increasing their risk of cancer even if they're not overweight, new research has warned," reports the Daily Mail. The story is based on research from the US looking at the diet of postmenopausal women in the 1990s and then tracking the development of a variety of cancers over about 15 years. "Junk food" is often defined as food that is rich in calories (energy dense food) but low in nutrients. Having a diet high in energy dense foods, such as biscuits, chocolate and pizza was found to increase the risk of cancer in these women, specifically in those ...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

'Healthy Living for Summer': Having a balanced diet
Understanding smart and effective ways to diet and understanding cravings. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

$820 million wasted in failing to attempt Type 2 diabetes prevention efforts
(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Lifestyle intervention is the best approach in preventing Type 2 diabetes. However, most patients don't follow through in having a balanced diet and exercise. Prescribing metformin can save $820 million annually in healthcare costs and reduce the number of Type 2 diabetes patients by 20%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could discovery of 'fat switch' cure obesity?
Conclusion This early-stage research suggests there is potentially a mechanism by which energy expenditure and storage is controlled in normal-weight mice versus obese mice. Removing a protein called hypothalamic TCPTP, which acts as the "switch" for fat storage, promoted weight loss in obese mice. This might give us some insight into how weight loss could be promoted in obese humans by turning this switch off. But at this stage, this is just a hypothesis – we can't assume the same is true for humans. Many therapies and procedures that appear promising at the outset aren't always successful in humans. Giv...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

Some types of vegetarian diet can raise heart disease risk
Conclusion This large pooled cohort study seems to demonstrate an association between a healthy plant-based diet and reduced risk of coronary heart disease, and an increased risk of heart disease with an unhealthy plant-based diet. This adds to the evidence base supporting the possible benefits of healthy plant-based diets in protecting against certain illnesses. However there are some limitations to the research: The cohort included only health professionals from the US so might not be representative of wider populations in the UK or elsewhere. The study can't provide information on the benefits or otherwise of this d...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Long working week 'may increase risk of irregular heartbeat'
Conclusion This study draws together data from a large group of people to investigate whether working hours could be linked to AF. It found people who work 55 or more hours a week had an increased risk of developing an irregular heartbeat. But before we jump to any conclusions, there are several important things to consider: The number of people who developed AF during this study was small: only 1.24%. That's the absolute risk of AF. Even if working more than 55 hours a week does increase your risk of AF by around 40%, it would only be increasing it to something like 1.74% – which is still very small. Only ...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Heart/lungs Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

House dust linked to obesity – but only in mice
Conclusion The main cause of obesity is an imbalance between calories taken into the body and the number of calories used up. But other environmental causes may also play a part, and we're just starting to understand how certain chemicals affect fat storage in the body. One area of interest is semi-volatile organic compounds, such as those tested in this study. These chemicals have been linked to hormonal changes, which may in turn affect the way the body processes glucose and stores it. This potentially could impact on the metabolism and increase weight gain. This study suggests that chemicals already known to affect ho...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Source Type: news

Separating food facts from fiction
UCLA Broadcast Studio As a nutritional epidemiologist devoted to prevention, Karin Michels has spent much of her career studying how health can be optimized through a proper diet.“People think it all comes down to their genes, but there is so much we can control by not smoking or being overweight, eating right and exercising at least moderately,” says Michels, professor and chair of the epidemiology department in the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health.What constitutes healthy eating? Michels, who frequently gives public talks on the topic, has found there are many widely held misconceptions that le...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 13, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Does coffee make you live longer?
Conclusion This study, conducted on a large number of people across Europe, was backed up by similar findings in the US. It appears to show some association between people who drink higher amounts of coffee and a reduced risk of death. But the "potentially beneficial clinical implications" need to be considered carefully for a number of reasons: Although the analyses were adjusted for some confounding variables, there may be a number of other factors that differ between the groups that account for the differences in death, such as socioeconomic status, family history, other medical conditions, and use of medic...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Can I use vitamins for hair growth?
Health experts agree that eating a well-balanced diet that contains the 13 essential vitamins can help maintain the health of your hair. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Nutrition / Diet Source Type: news

Researchers try to unknot Alzheimer's protein tangles
Conclusion There's a tendency when scientists announce a breakthrough in our understanding of a disease to immediately start thinking about whether this could lead to a cure. While the ultimate aim of research into Alzheimer's disease is of course to be able to prevent or treat it, early research like this is more about understanding the disease mechanisms. This piece of research demonstrates how a new technique can be used to identify the molecular structure of abnormal protein deposits in the brain. That's a big step forward for use of this technology, which may be useful for other diseases, too. The causes of Alzheimer...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology Source Type: news

Balanced diets can prevent binge-like eating
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Griffin, C. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Cholesterol-lowering jab 'shows promise' for heart disease
Conclusion This mouse study evaluated the potential of the AT04A vaccine to lower cholesterol levels and potentially reduce or prevent heart disease. The results were promising, showing that mice given the vaccine produced antibodies against the enzyme that stops LDL cholesterol being cleared from the body. This resulted in reduced total and LDL blood cholesterol levels, as well as reduced atherosclerosis. No major safety concerns or side effects were reported. Following this research, AT04A has now moved on to a phase I clinical trial. A small number of people will be given the vaccine to see if it's safe for use in huma...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Eat walnuts as a teenager for lifelong brain health
Scientists at the French National Institute of Health and Medical Research centre  fed mice a balanced diet until early adolescence for the latest study on brain health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nutrition Market in Brazil: Growth Against the Odds
Until the recession of 2014, Brazil saw a sustained period of strong growth in the functional foods and nutritional supplements market, albeit from a low base. The wealth gap was closing and a burgeoning, better-educated middle class with a rising disposable income was increasingly interested in nutrition products, both as lifestyle accessory and aid to healthier, longer lives.While growth was tempered by the deep recession that hit the country two years ago – and restrictive government regulations remained an ongoing challenge – the recession is now (slowly) easing and optimism about the Brazilian market is fa...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

Diabetes diet: Eat up to five of THESE foods a day to manage symptoms
DIABETES symptoms can be controlled with the help of a healthy, balanced diet according to Diabetes UK. However there are certain foods which can particularly help with blood glucose. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nutrition Market in Brazil: Growth Against the Odds
Until the recession of 2014, Brazil saw a sustained period of strong growth in the functional foods and nutritional supplements (VMS) market, albeit from a low base. The wealth gap was closing and a burgeoning, better-educated middle class with a rising disposable income was increasingly interested in nutrition products, both as lifestyle accessory and aid to healthier, longer lives.While growth was tempered by the deep recession that hit the country two years ago – and restrictive government regulations remained an ongoing challenge – the recession is now (slowly) easing and optimism about the Brazilian market...
Source: EyeForPharma - June 15, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Marc Yates Source Type: news

An egg a day may prevent stunted growth in infants
Conclusion This study sounds like good news for undernourished children in parts of the world where stunted growth or being underweight are common, such as the Andean mountains of Ecuador. The study showed that eggs seem to be a safe and practical way of boosting children's nutrition in this population. But this research has some limitations. Adding one food to a diet is likely to affect the rest of the diet, too. And caregivers for the children may have given them different foods in addition to the eggs, or treated them differently in some ways. The children in the control group may also have eaten more eggs than they ...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pregnancy/child Food/diet Source Type: news

It ’s Getting Bot In the Kitchen
Robotic butlers that can cook dinner for the family won’t exist anytime soon. But that doesn’t mean technologists aren’t aiming to help out in the kitchen. A swath of companies, from appliance giants to gadgets startups, are fielding devices that help prepare meals and shop for groceries so families can eat more healthily. Here’s a look at some of the most promising devices so far: Keep you stocked 1 A MAGIC BUTTON FOR REORDERING GROCERIES Amazon wants to make replenishing staples as simple as pressing a button, preferably its Dash Button. You can reorder specific items that are available via the co...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - June 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Eadicicco Tags: Uncategorized Gadgets kitchen gadgets Source Type: news

'Chocolate good for the heart' claims sadly too good to be true
Conclusion Health stories that suggest eating or drinking something we like, whether it's chocolate or wine, are always popular. But they don't really tell us anything we don't know already. Certain foods may have a small impact on certain types of diseases, but it's the overall diet that counts. Previous studies have already suggested that the antioxidant properties of cocoa could reduce the risk of cardiovascular disease, so it's surprising that this study focused on one particular cardiovascular disease, atrial fibrillation. AF is a common condition that affects heart rate, often causing a faster than normal, irregular ...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Pediatricians take aim at juice: It 'has no essential role in healthy, balanced diets of children'
The American Academy of Pediatrics has some new advice about juice: Kids should not drink it. (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - May 22, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Karen Kaplan Source Type: news

Simple way to beat of arthritis: Balanced diet and exercise can help fight misery
THE agony of arthritis can be avoided with plenty of exercise, weight control and a good diet, scientists say. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simple way to beat off arthritis: Balanced diet and exercise can help fight misery
THE agony of arthritis can be avoided with plenty of exercise, weight control and a good diet, scientists say. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Simple way to beat of arthritis: Balanced diet and exercise can help fight misery diseases
THE agony of arthritis can be avoided with plenty of exercise, weight control and a good diet, scientists say. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can fizzy water make you fat?
Conclusion There seemed to be a clear distinction in this study between fizzy and non-fizzy-drink consumption in terms of weight gain, appetite and ghrelin production. These findings were further supported by the study in healthy adult volunteers, which similarly showed that the fizzy drinks increased ghrelin production. But does this mean that carbonation and ghrelin production provide the whole answer to why soft drink consumption is linked with obesity? But this doesn’t account for the link between weight gain and diet drinks which don’t contain sugar’They suggest carbonation could be the common lin...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Obesity Food/diet Source Type: news

Review finds no link between dairy and heart attack or stroke risk
Conclusion This large meta-analysis of cohort studies demonstrated no increased risk to cardiovascular disease, coronary heart disease or all-cause death from eating dairy products. The review has strengths in its large size and the fact it was able to analyse different types of dairy product, such as high and low-fat and everyday products such as cheese and yoghurt. However, there are a number of factors to consider: The results of a systematic review are only as good as the quality of the underlying studies. These are all observational studies and it's possible that unadjusted health and lifestyle factors are having an...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs Neurology Source Type: news

Eating Full-Fat Cheese Won ’ t Raise Chance Of Heart Attack, Study Finds
CBS Local —  Pass the cheese, please. While it may not be the healthiest thing in the world, a new study claims that full-fat dairy products are not as bad as once thought. Eating full-fat cheese, milk or yogurt does not increase the risk of a heart attack or stroke, according to a study published in European Journal of Epidemiology, via Guardian, The study was an in-depth analysis of 29 prior studies that looked at the link between dairy products and risk of cardiovascular disease or heart problems. Their findings were such that these dairy products have a “neutral” effect on those ar...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Cheese study finds Source Type: news

Many U.S. babies and toddlers still don't have a balanced diet
More than half of babies aren't getting any breast milk and many toddlers don't eat enough fruits and veggies, a new U.S. study suggests. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Many U.S. babies and toddlers still don ’t have a balanced diet
(Reuters Health) - Despite some recent improvements in how U.S. parents feed young children, more than half of babies aren ’t getting any breast milk and many toddlers don’t eat enough fruits and veggies, a new study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

New drug shows promise in preventing heart attacks
Conclusion This is a high-quality, well-conducted randomised controlled trial conducted in a very large number of people across multiple countries. To date, it's remained uncertain whether evolocumab reduces the risk of cardiovascular events. This study provides good evidence that the drug reduces the risk of major cardiovascular events in people with high LDL cholesterol levels, and with a high risk of having a cardiovascular event, who are already taking statins. The follow-up is limited to around two years, during which roughly 1 in 10 people experienced a cardiovascular event. The reduction in risk was shown to inc...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medication Heart/lungs Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic Minute: Why you need vitamin D and how to get it
Vitamin D is essential for health but isn't as easy as?other nutrients to get?in a?balanced?diet. "Vitamin D is not in a lot of foods," says Dr. Donald Hensrud, medical director of the Mayo Clinic Healthy Living Program.?"So it's challenging to get all that we need." In this Mayo Clinic Minute, Dr. Hensrud explains why vitamin [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - March 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

'Tooth loss link to increased risk of dementia'
Conclusion This study adds to the evidence that good oral health is linked to good overall health, including a reduction in the chances of developing dementia in later life. But the research doesn't prove that regular tooth brushing will prevent dementia. We don't know what causes dementia. From research so far, it looks as if there are a number of interlinked causes. Brain health and ageing are likely to be affected by factors including diet, exercise, smoking, alcohol use, blood pressure and genetics. While living a healthy lifestyle may certainly reduce the chances of dementia, there are no guarantees. This study ha...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Mental health Neurology Older people Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet linked to lower risk of one type of breast cancer
Conclusion This study aimed to assess whether sticking to a Mediterranean diet was associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk for postmenopausal women. The researchers found following a Mediterranean diet was indeed associated with a reduction in breast cancer risk – but only for ER-negative breast cancer. This study has both strengths and weaknesses. Its large, prospective design and long period of follow-up are strengths. The typical weakness of this type of study is that many factors are likely to contribute to risk, and it's very difficult to be sure the factor in question – in this case, eating a...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet Source Type: news

Why Some People In America's Salad Bowl Are Eating Junk Food
The nation’s salad bowl has a surprising and growing problem. California’s Central Valley produces almost one-third of the nation’s domestically grown fresh produce. But many of the region’s residents don’t eat much fruit or vegetables ― a fact reflected in the region’s heightened rates of obesity, diabetes, heart disease and other serious health concerns.  This problem, of course, isn’t unique to the Central Valley — few Americans today eat as much fruit and vegetables as we should. But the stark contrast between the food many of the farm-heavy region’s res...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Wide range of cancers now linked to being overweight
Conclusion The results of this study provide further evidence for the link between increasing levels of fat and the risk of developing certain cancers. There was strong evidence for nine cancers, with another two – ovarian cancer and stomach cancer – included when comparing obesity with healthy weight. This study is important in showing the significance of fat levels and obesity in cancer risk. But there are some important things to consider: The study doesn't tell us how excess body fat might play a role in the development of certain cancers, just that there's a link. Some studies might have been missed,...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Source Type: news

'Avoid fads and stick to diet guidelines,' say US heart experts
Conclusion This review looked into food groups often linked to cardiovascular risk, some of which may be overstated or based on poor evidence. Overall, the researchers reported there being evidence solid fats are harmful. Examples include coconut and palm oil, eggs, fruit and veg juicing with pulp removal, and "[US] Southern diets" that include added fats, fried and processed foods and sugar-sweetened drinks. There's also evidence extra virgin olive oil, blueberries and strawberries, leafy green vegetables and controlled portions of nuts are beneficial for cardiovascular health. Investigating wh...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Heart/lungs QA articles Source Type: news

Does This Ben & Jerry's Ice Cream Flavor Really Boost Breast Milk Supply?
The internet is swirling with rumors about one of Ben & Jerry’s newest ice cream flavors following a report about its potential benefit to breastfeeding mothers. Last week, Romper.com published an article about the ice cream brand’s new “Oat of this Swirled” flavor.  The piece notes that the new flavor contains oats, which many lactation consultants consider to be a galactagogue ― a substance believed to increase breast milk supply. “Oats contain saponins, which along with many other benefits, are thought to increase the milk making hormones lactating moms produce,”...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 9, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news