Is Peanut Butter Good For You?

Is peanut butter healthy? Nutrition experts have long debated the question, given peanut butter’s high fat content. But when its full nutritional profile is considered, to many, the answer is yes. “It really is a healthy food,” says registered dietitian Lisa Sasson, a clinical professor in the department of nutrition and food studies at New York University. “There are so many reasons to keep it in your pantry or bring it to work, if you like the taste.” One major reason is that peanut butter has “a great nutritional package” with protein, fiber and many minerals and vitamins, says Dr. Walter Willett, professor of epidemiology and nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health and of medicine at Harvard Medical School. Two tablespoons have about 7 grams of protein, 16 grams of fat and 2 grams of fiber. Thanks to these three components, “it’s very satisfying,” says Sasson. Here’s what else you should know about peanut butter. Is peanut butter a ‘good’ fat? Peanut butter’s high fat content is what gave the spread a reputation for being unhealthy, says Willett. But researchers and experts now distinguish between different types of fats, and peanut butter is a prime example of a “mostly healthy unsaturated fat,” Willett explains. Eating more of this kind of fat “will reduce blood cholesterol and risk of heart disease,” he says, “especially if this replace...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

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If you have a CT heart scan score (also called coronary calcium score), what effect do statin cholesterol drugs have on stopping or slowing the increase in score? (Increasing scores pose increasing risk for heart attack and other cardiac events.) NONE. If you do nothing at all, the score increases by 25% per year, on average. If you take a statin drug, aspirin, and follow a low-fat diet, what my colleagues call “optimal medical therapy,” the score increases . . . 25% per year—no difference. Yet this is the “solution” that conventional doctors push on their patients, a “treatment” t...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - Category: Cardiology Authors: Tags: Open cholesterol coronary calcium ct scan do statin drugs reduce heart scan scores reduce coronary calcium reverse coronary calcium reverse heart disease undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs
High levels of plaque calcification on coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: CCTA, functional tests stratify heart disease risk by age Onsite FFR-CT tops CCTA in detecting coronary stenosis CCTA reveals statins may lower mortality in low-risk CAD CCTA biomarker may predict mortality from heart disease CCTA biomarker spots high-risk plaques in heart disease
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
Did you ever wonder why medical research seems to flip-flop so often? Eggs used to be terrible for your health; now they’re not so bad. Stomach ulcers were thought to be due to stress and a “type A personality” but that’s been disproven. I was taught that every postmenopausal woman should take hormone replacement therapy to prevent heart disease and bone loss; now it’s considered way too risky. It can make you question every bit of medical news you hear. But maybe that’s not such a bad thing. Questioning what you read or hear is reasonable. And maybe medical reversals — when new re...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Medical Research Prevention Tests and procedures Source Type: blogs
Researchers are using artificial intelligence to measure a common marker of heart disease via lung cancer screenings. The research was presented at the annual meeting of the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA). Low-dose chest CT is approved for lung cancer screening in high-risk people, such as long-time smokers. While these CT scans are intended to diagnose lung cancer, coronary artery calcium, a measure of plaque in the arteries, is also visible on CT. The coronary artery calcium score derived from CT is a well-established measure that helps doctors decide who should get cholesterol-lowering preventive medicatio...
Source: MDDI - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Digital Health IVD Source Type: news
The combination of coronary CT angiography (CCTA) scans and functional tests...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FFR-CT beats CCTA for assessing heart disease outcomes CCTA reveals statins may lower mortality in low-risk CAD CCTA biomarker may predict mortality from heart disease SCOT-HEART: CCTA cuts risk of heart attack, death by 41% CCTA biomarker spots high-risk plaques in heart disease
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - Category: Radiology Source Type: news
This study clearly goes against what has been the common wisdom for the last 30, 40 years” and may lead to less testing and invasive treatment for such patients in the future, said Dr. Glenn Levine, a Baylor College of Medicine cardiologist with no role in the research. Some doctors still may quibble with the study, but it was very well done “and I think the results are extremely believable,” he said. About 17 million Americans have clogged arteries that crimp the heart’s blood supply, which can cause periodic chest pain. Cheap and generic aspirin, cholesterol-lowering drugs and blood pressure medic...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news
In this study, researchers studied 438,952 participants in the UK Biobank, who had a total of 24,980 major coronary events - defined as the first occurrence of non-fatal heart attack, ischaemic stroke, or death due to coronary heart disease. They used an approach called Mendelian randomisation, which uses naturally occurring genetic differences to randomly divide the participants into groups, mimicking the effects of running a clinical trial. People with genes associated with lower blood pressure, lower LDL cholesterol, and a combination of both were put into different groups, and compared against those without thes...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
In conclusion, with study of the frailty syndrome still in its infancy, frailty analysis remains a major challenge. It is a challenge that needs to be overcome in order to shed light on the multiple mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of this syndrome. Although several mechanisms contribute to frailty, immune system alteration seems to play a central role: this syndrome is characterized by increased levels of pro-inflammatory markers and the resulting pro-inflammatory status can have negative effects on various organs. Future studies should aim to better clarify the immune system alteration in frailty, and seek to esta...
Source: Fight Aging! - Category: Research Authors: Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs
Authors: Alves-Ferreira J, Rocha-Neves J, Dias-Neto M, F Braga S Abstract Objetives: Carotid endarterectomy (CEA) is an established treatment for carotid stenosis (CS). However, this procedure is not risk-free and it is insufficient to control disseminated atherosclerosis. Our aim was to determine long-term cardiovascular (CV) morbidity and mortality after CEA and identify associated risk predictors. DESIGN: Consecutive cohorts of CEAs performed between 2010-2018 in two Portuguese hospitals were retrospectively analysed. The major end-points were acute myocardial infarction (AMI), stroke, all-cause death and ma...
Source: Scandinavian Cardiovascular Journal - Category: Cardiology Tags: Scand Cardiovasc J Source Type: research
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