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What a Roy Moore Win Could Mean for Washington
On Tuesday, voters in Alabama will choose between two very different political styles: a flame-throwing wild card and an Establishment-backed reliable vote. But as the Alabama Republican Senate primary draws to a close, the differences between incumbent Sen. Luther Strange and conservative firebrand Roy Moore amount to whether voters are happy with the status quo in Washington, and how they felt about their last governor. Strange, the former state attorney general, was appointed in February by embattled former Gov. Robert Bentley, and is backed by President Trump and Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell in a special elec...
Source: TIME: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Maya Rhodan Tags: Uncategorized 2018 election Congress Donald Trump elections Luther Strange Roy Moore Senate Primary Source Type: news

How Russian Voters Fueled the Rise of Germany ’s Far-Right
While fighting for a seat in the German parliament over the last few months, Sergej Tschernow, a candidate for the right-wing Alternative for Germany, or AfD, knew that he could only rely on a few media outlets to give his party the coverage it craves: the Russian ones. “They show our points of view in full,” he told TIME on Election Day, Sunday Sept. 24, when the AfD became the first far-right movement to enter into the German legislature since the end of World War II, winning a remarkable 13% of the vote and going from zero to more than 90 seats in a chamber of 631 lawmakers. The party’s rise has been ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Simon Shuster / Hannover Tags: Uncategorized Alternative for Germany angela merkel Germany election Source Type: news

Docs with scanners order more low-value imaging
Physicians with a history of imaging use are more inclined to order low-value...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Anthem move shows how payors are 'steering' patients Anthem to review hospital outpatient CT, MRI scans Johns Hopkins tackles problem of unnecessary scans New audit pinpoints causes of 'wasteful' unnecessary scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 25, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Increased serotonin 1A receptor availability in the raphe nuclei predicts future suicidal behaviour
Each year, suicide ends an estimated 800G Ç ë 000 lives worldwide.1 Thus, identifying risk factors of future suicidal behaviour is of great importance. Accumulating evidence for- á the last 40 years have linked suicide to alterations in the central serotonergic system,2 but prospective studies predicting future suicidal behaviour from brain serotonin measures are lacking.Brain serotonin 1A (n=100) and serotonin transporter (n=50)- á binding potentials were investigated in vivo in patients with major depressive disorder using positron emission tomography (PET) with the radiotracers [11C]WAY100635 a...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Anthony Weiner Is Going to Prison for Sexting Scandal
(NEW YORK) — Former Rep. Anthony Weiner was sentenced Monday to 21 months in prison for sexting with a 15-year-old girl in a case that rocked Hillary Clinton’s campaign for the White House in the closing days of the race and may have cost her the presidency. Weiner, 53, dropped his head into his hand and wept as the sentence was announced by Judge Denise Cote. He must surrender to prison officials by Nov. 6. The sentencing completed the sordid downfall of the New York Democrat, whose penchant for exchanging lewd messages and photos with young women online destroyed his career in Congress in 2011, doomed his bid...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Larry Neumeister / AP Tags: Uncategorized Courts onetime Source Type: news

Boston Scientific launches MRI-safe Resonate devices with HeartLogic diagnostic in U.S.
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) launched today its Resonate implantable cardioverter defibrillator and cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator systems with the HeartLogic heart failure diagnostic tool. The devices are approved by the FDA for conditional use in an MRI environment, the company reported. Boston Scientific’s HeartLogic diagnostic warns doctors of worsening heart failure, collecting data from sensors monitoring heart sounds, thoracic impedance, heart rate and activity and respiration rate and volume. The company touted its alert system as the first and only of its kind in an implantable device w...
Source: Mass Device - September 25, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Wall Street Beat Boston Scientific Source Type: news

Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe Says He Will Call Snap Elections Next Month
(TOKYO) — Japanese Prime Minister Shinzo Abe announced Monday he will call a snap election for parliament’s more powerful lower house for next month. Abe said at a news conference that he will dissolve the chamber on Thursday when it convenes after a three-month summer recess. The election is to be held Oct. 22. Support ratings for Abe’s government have started to rebound after attacks on him over cronyism scandals faded during parliament’s recess. Also, opposition parties are regrouping and unprepared for an election. Opposition lawmakers have said there is no need to hold an election now. Tokyo&r...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mari Yamaguchi / AP Tags: Uncategorized Japan onetime Source Type: news

Anthony Weiner Is Being Sentenced for Sexting. He Faces Up To 27 Months in Prison
(NEW YORK) — Anthony Weiner is scheduled to be sentenced on Monday in a sexting scandal that some blame for Hillary Clinton’s presidential loss. The former New York congressman faces up to 27 months in prison after he pleaded guilty to one charge of transferring obscene material to a minor. Prosecutors say he broke the law by having illicit contact with a 15-year-old girl, including asking her to “sexually perform” for him in conversations on Skype and Snapchat. The Democrat’s obsessive sexting habit not only destroyed his career in the U.S. House, but it also doomed his campaign for mayor and...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Uncategorized anthony weiner Courts Crime onetime Source Type: news

Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan
(University at Buffalo) Forget fingerprint computer identification or retinal scanning. A University at Buffalo-led team has developed a computer security system using the dimensions of your heart as your identifier.The system uses low-level Doppler radar to measure your heart, and then continually monitors your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer. The technology will be presented next month at the 23rd MobiCom conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Goodbye, login. Hello, heart scan.
(University at Buffalo) Forget fingerprint computer identification or retinal scanning. A University at Buffalo-led team has developed a computer security system using the dimensions of your heart as your identifier.The system uses low-level Doppler radar to measure your heart, and then continually monitors your heart to make sure no one else has stepped in to run your computer. The technology will be presented next month at the 23rd MobiCom conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New AI can diagnose Alzheimer's 10 years before human doctors
(Natural News) Researchers from Italy have developed a machine-learning algorithm that can detect signs of Alzheimer’s disease almost 10 years before human doctors can. According to the DailyMail.co.uk, the team from the University of Bari Aldo Moro trained their artificial intelligence (AI) by using 67 MRI scans: 29 came from a healthy control group, while... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘The Gates of Hell Flew Open.’ Man Sentenced for Shooting 8 to Death at Hair Salon
(SANTA ANA, Calif.) — A California man who killed eight people at a hair salon in 2011 was sentenced to life without parole Friday in a courtroom packed with sobbing victims’ relatives, who shared vivid memories of their loved ones and wished the shooter a painful end in prison. Scott Dekraai, a 47-year-old former tugboat operator, received eight consecutive life terms for the murders of his hairstylist ex-wife, her co-workers and others in the tight-knit seaside community of Seal Beach. Paul Wilson, whose wife, Christy, was among those killed, said he would finally feel closure after six years of hearings. He ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Taxin / AP Tags: Uncategorized APW Crime onetime Source Type: news

Abbott Catches Up to Peers With MRI-Compatible ICD
Abbott Laboratories acquired St. Jude Medical earlier this year knowing that the company trailed behind its peers in the cardiac rhythm management (CRM) space by not having a MRI-compatible pacemaker or implantable cardioverter defibrillator (ICD) system. It seems Abbott has officially caught up in that category though, first with FDA approval of the Assurity MRI pacemaker and the Tendril MRI pacing lead during the first quarter, and now with FDA approval of MRI-conditional labeling for the Ellipse ICD system. Abbott said the recent approval covers one of its most widely-used ICD systems and associated high voltage leads. ...
Source: MDDI - September 23, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis Labeling Business Source Type: news

7 medtech stories we missed this week: Sept. 22, 2017
[Image from unsplash.com]From the FDA’s clearance of Covalon’s film-drape to Bioventus launching its study, here are seven medtech stories we missed this week but thought were still worth mentioning. 1. FDA clears Covalon’s MediClear OTC surgical film-drape Covalon announced in a Sept. 21 press release that the FDA has cleared its MediClear PreOp to market in U.S. hospitals, clinic and directly to patients without a prescription. The MediClear PreOp is a breathable, transparent, self-adhesive, silicone barrier film-drape that can conform to a patient’s skin at a planned incision or insertion si...
Source: Mass Device - September 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Laboratory Instruments/Laboratory Supplies mHealth (Mobile Health) Research & Development Vascular Bioventus LLC Contego Medical Covalon Technologies Getinge Guerbe Source Type: news

Robert Mueller ’s Russia Investigation Is Moving Really Fast. Here’s Why
It’s hard to know what special counsel Robert Mueller‘s investigation is doing, but it’s clear that it’s going quickly. Experts on independent investigations, including some who have worked with them in the past, say that the former FBI director is moving on an aggressive timeline as he looks into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 election. They say that could help keep it from getting bogged down or off track, like some past investigations. “We don’t want it to be spread out,” says Solomon Wisenberg, who was second-in-command in the Whitewater/Lewinsky investigation into Pres...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tessa Berenson Tags: Uncategorized justice Justice Department onetime Robert Mueller White House Source Type: news

Why Robert Mueller Is Moving So Quickly
It’s hard to know what special counsel Robert Mueller‘s investigation is doing, but it’s clear that it’s going quickly. Experts on independent investigations, including some who have worked with them in the past, say that the former FBI director is moving on an aggressive timeline as he looks into Russian attempts to influence the 2016 election. They say that could help keep it from getting bogged down or off track, like some past investigations. “We don’t want it to be spread out,” says Solomon Wisenberg, who was second-in-command in the Whitewater/Lewinsky investigation into Pres...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tessa Berenson Tags: Uncategorized justice Justice Department onetime Robert Mueller White House Source Type: news

Avoid Dopamine, Prefer Bolus Diuretic in Preserved-EF Acute HF Avoid Dopamine, Prefer Bolus Diuretic in Preserved-EF Acute HF
That's the message from a small trial that hones the scant evidence base on managing acute preserved-EF heart failure. Dopamine had little effect; continuous-IV furosemide may have hurt the kidneys.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cardiology News Source Type: news

Interactive effects of music tempi and intensities on grip strength and subjective affect - Karageorghis CI, Cheek P, Simpson SD, Bigliassi M.
Pretask music is widely used by athletes albeit there is scant empirical evidence to support its use. The present study extended a line of work into pretask music by examining the interactive effects of music tempo and intensity (volume) on the performance... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

fMRI locates brain region tied to sleep-related depression
Functional MRI (fMRI) has pinpointed increased activity in a region of the...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI scans may help choose depression treatment strategy fMRI shows emotional areas of brain fMRI links high-risk kids and depression fMRI connects fitness and brain health in older adults fMRI predicts response to antipsychotic medications (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 22, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Who Is Frida Sofia? Mexico Shocked at the Truth Behind Girl ‘Trapped’ in Rubble
(MEXICO CITY) — Hour after excruciating hour, Mexicans were transfixed by dramatic efforts to reach a young girl thought buried in the rubble of a school destroyed by a magnitude 7.1 earthquake. She reportedly wiggled her fingers, told rescuers her name and said there were others trapped near her. Rescue workers called for tubes, pipes and other tools to reach her. News media, officials and volunteer rescuers all repeated the story of “Frida Sofia” with a sense of urgency that made it a national drama, drawing attention away from other rescue efforts across the quake-stricken city and leaving people in Me...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gisela Salomon and Maria Verza / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

Changes in [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose activities in a shockwave-induced traumatic brain injury model using lithotripsy - Divani AA, Phan JA, Salazar P, SantaCruz KS, Bachour O, Mahmoudi J, Zhu XH, Pomper M.
We present a longitudinal study of cerebral metabolism using [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) in a rat model of shockwave-induced traumatic brain injury (SW-TBI). Anesthetized rats received 5 or 10 shockwave pulses to the ri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Ergonomics, Human Factors, Anthropometrics, Physiology Source Type: news

How "Star Trek" predicted modern medicine
"Star Trek'"s tricorder? Now, there are CT scans, MRIs and ultrasounds (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mexico Struggles to Find the Missing as Death Toll From Earthquake Rises to 273
(MEXICO CITY) — As painstaking attempts to reach survivors in quake-ravaged buildings across Mexico City stretched into a third day Thursday, desperation mounted among loved ones who earlier had high hopes for quick rescues and some complained they were being kept in the dark about search efforts. And what many had clung to as the unlikely triumph of life over death was revealed to be a case of some very high-profile misinformation: A top navy official announced there were no missing children at a collapsed Mexico City school where the purported plight of a girl trapped alive in the rubble had captivated people acros...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Maria Verza & Peter Orsi / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

Biometric features on new iPhone spark safety and privacy concerns: Owners could be forced to open phones against their will
(Natural News) The iPhone X’s brand new Face ID recognition software has come under scrutiny as experts cautioned that the system might be used to compromise the user’s safety and privacy. The new feature enables users to open their phone by scanning their face. According to technology experts, the new software can be exploited by thieves by... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET tracks Zika virus, disease progression in mice
Researchers from the U.S. Army are using PET scans of mice to study brain inflammation...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: NIH prepares for potential re-emergence of Zika virus Studies at RSNA offer new insights into Zika's spread Zika's rapid spread on MRI scans shocks researchers Imaging detects telltale signs of Zika infection (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Siemens to launch RT version of Vida MRI scanner
Siemens Healthineers will debut a new version of its Magnetom Vida 3-tesla...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Siemens launches new application for Acuson SC2000 Siemens inks research deal with Houston Methodist Report: Siemens preps security fix for molecular units Siemens health unit posts revenues, profit gain in Q3, plans IPO Siemens completes 1st U.S. Artis C-arm angio install (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 21, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

She chose to die so she could give birth. Now her newborn is dead, too.
The headaches began in March. The couple didn’t think much of them — until Carrie DeKlyen began vomiting. An initial scan showed a mass in her brain. More tests showed that it was a form of cancer, possibly lymphoma, but treatable. But a pathology exam revealed a more grim diagnosis. The 37-year-old mother of five from Wyoming, […]Related:Primal screams, blood and burns: What it’s like to survive a lightning strikeIvanka Trump reveals struggles with postpartum depression on ‘Dr. Oz’Could some ADHD be a type of sleep disorder? That would fundamentally change how we treat it. (S...
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

More than 85 medicines in development for Alzheimer ’s disease
WhenBrian Kursonis started “blanking out” for moments at a time, a scan revealed plaques of a protein called amyloid in the brain, one sign of Alzheimer’s disease. A test of his spinal fluid found high levels of amyloid and tau, another protein linked to the condition. (Source: The Catalyst)
Source: The Catalyst - September 21, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Medicines in Development Alzheimer's New Era of Medicine Source Type: news

Can You Help Prevent These Insulin-Delivery Errors?
New consensus-based guidelines may inspire ideas to curb errors.   Insulin is considered a high-alert medication because it is often associated with significant patient harm when used in error.  “According to a 2014 survey of pharmacists and nurses conducted by the Institute for Safe Medication Practices (ISMP), IV insulin ranked first and subcutaneous insulin ranked ninth among nearly 40 drugs and drug classes identified as high-alert medications that concerned practitioners,” Susan F. Paparella, RN, MSN, vice president, ISMP, told MD+DI. “Yet of all the high-alert medications, subcut...
Source: MDDI - September 21, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Surprising discovery -- how the African tsetse fly really drinks your blood
(University of Bristol) Researchers at the University of Bristol have been taking a close-up look at the biting mouthparts of the African tsetse fly as part of ongoing work on the animal diseases it carries. Using the new high-powered scanning electron microscope in the University's Life Sciences Building, researchers from the Trypanosome Research Group were able to see the rows of sharp teeth and rasps that the fly uses to chew through the skin when it bites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Neuroinflammation abetted by ILCs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - September 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Rescuers Race to Free Survivors Trapped After Mexico Earthquake
(MEXICO CITY) — The wiggling fingers of a young girl trapped in the rubble of her collapsed school in Mexico City raised hopes among hundreds of rescuers working furiously Wednesday to try to free her — a drama that played out at dozens of buildings toppled by the powerful earthquake that killed at least 223 people. But it was the ongoing rescue at the Enrique Rebsamen school, where 25 people including 21 children perished, that was seen as emblematic of Mexicans’ rush to save survivors before time runs out. Helmeted workers spotted the girl buried in the debris early Wednesday and shouted to her to move ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Christopher Sherman, Peter Orsi & Mark Stevenson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Mexico onetime Source Type: news

SCRO Welcomes a New Board Chairman
With newly established operations in Norway, Finland, and Denmark, Scandinavian CRO (SCRO) wants to grow further to build a strong Nordic contract research organisation (CRO) company. To realise this vision, the owners have strengthened its board wit … (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - September 20, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Hurricane Maria Aims for Puerto Rico After Slamming Dominica
(SAN JUAN, Puerto Rico) — Hurricane Maria barreled toward Puerto Rico on Tuesday night after wreaking widespread devastation on Dominica and leaving the small Caribbean island virtually incommunicado. As rains began to lash Puerto Rico, Gov. Ricardo Rossello warned that Maria could hit “with a force and violence that we haven’t seen for several generations.” “We’re going to lose a lot of infrastructure in Puerto Rico,” Rossello said, adding that a likely island wide power outage and communication blackout could last for days. “We’re going to have to rebuild.” Auth...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Danica Coto and Carlisle Jno Baptiste / AP Tags: Uncategorized Dominica Hurricane Maria Puerto Rico weather Source Type: news

3-D analysis of dog fossils sheds light on domestication debate
(Cornell University) In an effort to settle the debate about the origin of dog domestication, a technique that uses 3-D scans of fossils is helping researchers determine the difference between dogs and wolves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D printed brain allows surgeons to practice
(University of Connecticut) The first time a young surgeon threads a wire into a stroke victim's chest and neck and fishes a blood clot out of the brain may be one of the most harrowing moments in her career. Using brain scans and a 3-D printer, a UConn Health radiologist and a medical physicist made a life-size model of the arteries and will make the pattern freely available to any doctor who requests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In This Issue
Having a disability does not preclude the possibility of a woman ’s ­having a healthy pregnancy with a good outcome, but adverse outcomes are more common among women with disabilities than among others. Ensuring that women with disabilities can plan their pregnancies is thus critical, yet research on contraceptive use within this population is scant. (Source: The Guttmacher Institute)
Source: The Guttmacher Institute - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Guttmacher Source Type: news

Mevion files for FDA clearance for S250i proton therapy system
Mevion Medical Systems said yesterday it submitted a 510(k) premarket notification to the FDA for its Mevion S250i proton therapy system with Hyperscan pencil beam scanning tech. The Mevion S250i features improved pencil beam scanning fields and Hyperscan pencil beam scanning tech to allow for faster energy layer switching, the Littleton, Mass.-based company said. “We focused on addressing the challenges clinicians faced with 1st generation systems and engineered a novel and transformative solution,” CEO Joseph Jachinowski said in a press release. The system also features the company’s Adaptive Apert...
Source: Mass Device - September 19, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Oncology Regulatory/Compliance Mevion Medical Systems Source Type: news

Digital versus conventional implant impressions for partially edentulous arches: An evaluation of accuracy
Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry Published online:September 16, 2017AbstractStatement of problemTo the authors ’ knowledge, while accuracy outcomes of the TRIOS scanner have been compared with conventional impressions, no available data are available regarding the accuracy of digital impressions with the Omnicam and True Definition scanners versus conventional impressions for partially edentulous arche s.PurposeThe purpose of this in vitro study was to compare the accuracy of digital implant impressions using 2 different intraoral scanners (IOSs) with that of conventional impressions for partially edentulous arch...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 19, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

fMRI cheese study wins Ig Nobel Prize
It isn't every day that cheese is the focal point of a functional MRI (fMRI)...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: fMRI shows how walnuts influence hunger fMRI, EEG may detect consciousness in TBI patients fMRI scans may help choose depression treatment strategy fMRI contributes to confidence-boosting technique fMRI finds where God might dwell in the brain (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Study questions whether x-rays really need to be repeated
Current radiology practice gives radiologic technologists significant leeway...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Study: Reject pelvic x-rays if axial rotation exceeds 10° Study: Skip the x-rays after shoulder arthroplasty surgery Virtual coaching takes on x-ray training Are chest x-rays still useful for syncope patients? Take 2: Techs opt to repeat more head scans than radiologists (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

PET imaging tracks Zika virus infection, disease progression in mouse model
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) For the first time, scientists have used Positron Emission Tomography (PET) imaging to study brain inflammation following Zika virus infection in mice, according to a study recently published online in Molecular Imaging and Biology. Traditional methods of infectious disease research using animal models provide limited information about disease progression until the study's endpoint, when investigators can analyze tissues from those animals. Imaging studies allow longitudinal studies of the same animal during the course of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectio...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 19, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Behavioral therapy increases connectivity in brains of people with OCD
UCLA researchers report that people with obsessive-compulsive disorder, when treated with a special form of talk therapy, demonstrate distinct changes in their brains as well as improvement in their symptoms.In the study, published in  Translational Psychiatry, people with OCD underwent daily cognitive behavioral therapy, or CBT, to learn how to better resist compulsive behaviors and to decrease distress. Within one month, they had developed extensive increases in the strength of the connections between regions of their brains — which may reflect the participants gained new non-compulsive behaviors and thought p...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UCSF installs 'KittenScanner' at pediatric center
The University of California, San Francisco (UCSF) Benioff Children's Hospital...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Superheroes help kids triumph over fears of MRI scans (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

3M, Patterson Dental Open Doors to Digital Dentistry
ST. PAUL ‚ Minn. – (Sept. 14, 2017) – 3M Oral Care and Patterson Dental have signed a distribution agreement for 3M’s True Definition Scanner. The agreement brings Patterson’s customers the opportunity to explore digital dentistry via an open platform and a trusted partner. With the 3MTM True Defin ition Scanner, oral care professionals are choosing a digital hub that gives them an unrestricted entry point into traditional crown& bridge work with any lab, advanced implant solutions, clear aligners, in-office milling and more.“Distributors have enjoyed putting the True Definition Scan...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 18, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Mevion submits 510(k) to FDA for proton therapy system
Mevion Medical Systems has submitted a 510(k) premarket notification to the...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Mevion touts scanning milestone Mevion joins forces with MedPhoton Mevion completes milestone installation Mevion completes Fla. installation Mevion, RaySearch partner on info system (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Apple Needs the iPhone X More Than You Do
On September 12, Apple CEO Tim Cook took the stage at the company’s just-unveiled Steve Jobs Theater inside its lavish new 175-acre headquarters in Cupertino, California. It was a big day for Apple, and not just because the company would go on to introduce five new products over the course of two hours. The event was also the first public glimpse inside Apple’s much-hyped “spaceship” campus, which Jobs himself helped plan before his death in October 2011. It was thus fitting that Cook invoked his predecessor’s famous catchphrase to headline the event’s biggest announcement. “But we...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lisa Eadicicco Tags: Uncategorized Apple iPhone 2017 iPhone 8 iphone x Smartphones Source Type: news

Officials Break Ground on Monument Celebrating 9/11 EMS Responders
KEANSBURG, NJ -- Approximately 125 people attended the Sept. 10 groundbreaking ceremony here for the EMS Council of New Jersey’s (EMSCNJ) 9/11 memorial, which will feature a piece of steel beam from the World Trade Center. The monument -- the only one in the USA dedicated exclusively to all the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day -- will sit next to the borough’s existing 9/11 memorial on Beachway Avenue. EMSCNJ and Keansburg officials collaborated on the project. Ceremony participants and guests included: EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. of Neptune; Keansburg Borough Mayor George H...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - September 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Officials Break Ground on Monument Celebrating 9/11 EMS Responders
KEANSBURG, NJ -- Approximately 125 people attended the Sept. 10 groundbreaking ceremony here for the EMS Council of New Jersey’s (EMSCNJ) 9/11 memorial, which will feature a piece of steel beam from the World Trade Center. The monument -- the only one in the USA dedicated exclusively to all the emergency medical services personnel who responded that day -- will sit next to the borough’s existing 9/11 memorial on Beachway Avenue. EMSCNJ and Keansburg officials collaborated on the project. Ceremony participants and guests included: EMSCNJ President Joseph G. Walsh, Jr. of Neptune; Keansburg Borough Mayor George H...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - September 18, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: EMS Council of New Jersey Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Afib? There ’s an App for That
While many of us reach for our tablets to scan Facebook, watch the newest series on Netflix, or make a quick purchase on Amazon, researchers want to test their potential for a more serious task: detecting atrial fibrillation (afib). (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - September 18, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news