FDDNP-PET shows brain injury effects in military personnel
Researchers have found that changes in PET scans of military personnel with...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Did PET scan confirm CTE in living NFL player? MRI shows promise in diagnosing CTE in living patients FDDNP-PET gives insight into brain trauma of NFL players FDDNP-PET shows toll of concussions on retired NFL players FDDNP-PET helps predict Alzheimer's progression (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Children who undergo CT scans may be at a higher risk of brain cancer
Researchers, led by Dr Michael Hauptmann at the Netherlands Cancer Institute, found rates of cancer were 1.5 times higher in the children who had underwent at least one CT scan in their life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NMC highlights ‘lessons learnt’ on dealing with patients and the public
The nursing and midwifery regulator has outlined a range of measures designed to improve the way it interacts with patients and the public, in response to severe criticism over the way it treated bereaved families involved in two major care scandals. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - July 18, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Study: Military personnel, football players show similar signs of CTE in scans
Researchers found military personnel who suffered head trauma, and reported memory and mood issues, had brain scans similar to retired football players with CTE. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Viewpoint: How Maryland is playing a leading role in the primary care revolution
This is the third time this year the 72-year-old man has landed in the emergency department of his community hospital with chest pain. After a thorough assessment that includes an ECG, blood tests, chest X-ray, and CT scan, the treating physician determines the patient is not having a heart attack — he forgot to refill his angina medication prescription and had missed several doses. This scenario is far more common than it should be, especially for people age 65 and older. According to the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New Zealand start-up scans 1st humans with spectral CT
Researchers from a start-up company in New Zealand have scanned the first humans...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI algorithm generates 'artificial' medical images New 3D CT technique tops x-ray for diagnosing arthritis Augmented reality guides orthopedic surgery Use of skeletal radiography shows modest growth Radiologists can future-proof themselves by embracing 3D visualization (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Dementia could be detected via routinely collected data, new research shows
(University of Plymouth) A new machine-learning model that scans routinely collected NHS data has shown promising signs of being able to predict undiagnosed dementia in primary care, according to research by the University of Plymouth. The results from the feasibility study suggest that the model could significantly reduce the number of those living with undiagnosed dementia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CT scans may increase the risk of brain cancer
(Oxford University Press USA) A new study in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute suggests that CT scans, commonly used in medical imaging, may increase the risk of brain tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When should emergency departments order imaging tests for epileptic seizures?
(Wiley) Patients who go to the emergency department (ED) with seizures often undergo neuroimaging, usually CT scans. Such imaging in adults presenting with new onset ('index') seizures leads to a change in care for 9-17 percent of patients, but it's unclear if such changes are made following imaging in the ED for seizures in adults with known seizure disorders ('non-index' seizures). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trilobites: 3-D Color X-Rays Could Help Spot Deadly Disease Without Surgery
A new medical scanner, derived from technology used by particle physics researchers at CERN, “ is like the upgrade from black-and-white film to color, ” one of its developers said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: X-Rays Anatomy and Physiology Bones CERN Medicine and Health Research Source Type: news

Scant evidence that omega 3 supplements curb cardiovascular disease risk
Cochrane review casts doubt on popular belief about protective effects of over-the-counter remedy Related items fromOnMedica Coalition government derailed measures to cut salt in food Taxing unhealthy products may help tackle chronic diseases Scotland reveals target of halving child obesity by 2030 May be time for Britons to switch to Mediterranean diet, study suggests Obesity associated with worse mortality and higher CVD risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 18, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Trilobites: 3D Color X-rays Could Help Spot Deadly Disease Without Surgery
A new medical scanner, derived from technology used by particle physics researchers at CERN, “ is like the upgrade from black-and-white film to color, ” one of its developers said. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY BAUMGAERTNER Tags: X-Rays Anatomy and Physiology Bones CERN Medicine and Health Research Source Type: news

Military personnel show brain changes similar to those in retired football players suspected to have CTE
This study was supported by the Fran and Ray Stark Foundation Fund for Alzheimer ’s Disease Research; the Parlow-Solomon and Plot Professorships; Bob and Marion Wilson; the Ahmanson Foundation; the National Institutes of Health; and the Department of Energy.The FDDNP tracer is intellectual property owned by UCLA and licensed to TauMark LLC. Barrio, Huang, Omalu, Satyamurthy and Small are co-inventors of the marker. Barrio, Fitzsimmons, Huang, Satyamurthy and Small have a financial interest in TauMark. Other disclosures are listed in the study. (Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences)
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

MRI connects autism with deficit in brain reward pathway
MRI scans revealed that the social impairment common to children with autism...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI brain scans show benefits of prenatal folic acid DTI-MRI finds abnormal brain connections in autistic kids MRI reveals key brain differences in people with genetic autism MRI links early brain abnormality in infants to autism DTI shows how music could help kids with autism, ADHD (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

PET could make synaptic density an Alzheimer's biomarker
Researchers from Yale University are reporting promising results with a PET...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Are amyloid PET scans ready for the clinical setting? PET links amyloid, vascular factors to cognitive decline PET with novel tracers foretells early Alzheimer's risk PiB-PET study strengthens link between amyloid, dementia High amyloid levels on PET may indicate early Alzheimer's (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

It ’s Nearly Impossible to Diagnose Alzheimer’s Disease in Living People. Bill Gates Wants to Change That
Name practically any disease or condition that afflicts the human body and there’s probably a good test for detecting it — preferably early, when there’s a chance that promising treatments can slow it down or even cure it. Cancer, inherited forms of heart disease, diabetes, hypertension, and even certain mental illnesses can be picked up by tracking hormones, genes or other things circulating in the body. But that hasn’t been the case with Alzheimer’s disease, the neurodegenerative condition that was first described in 1906, and more than a century later, still doesn’t have a blood test ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Disease healthytime onetime Source Type: news

MRI links iron in the brain to multiple sclerosis
Lower levels of iron in the thalamus as seen on MRI scans of people with multiple...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI shows potentially better indicator for MS progression Do ED MRI scans reduce hospital stays for MS patients? SIR: MRI debunks venoplasty for treating MS Timely MRI finds more brain bleeds in military TBI patients MRI protocol links gray-matter changes to MS severity (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Board Meeting Minutes, May 22, 2018
  Participants:  Geri Baumblatt, Judy Danielson, Dave DeBronkart, Peter Elias, Nancy Finn, Sarah Krüg, Janice McCallum, Jan Oldenburg, Burt Rosen, Danny Sands, Joe Ternullo, Sue Woods, Michael Millenson, Vera Rulon Welcome                                                               Danny Sands Danny announced th...
Source: Society for Participatory Medicine - July 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Janice McCallum Tags: Board Minutes Board Meeting Meeting Minutes Source Type: news

3D-printed corneas could save millions ’ vision
Photo by Victor Freitas on Unsplash British scientists have 3D printed the first human corneas, yielding a potential fix to the worldwide shortage of corneas for implantation.  The Newcastle University researchers created a bio-ink using stem cells from a healthy donor cornea mixed with alginate and collagen. They used a simple, low-cost 3D bio-printer to extrude the bio-ink in concentric circles to form the shape of a human cornea. It took less than 10 minutes to print. The proof-of-concept research was published in May in Experimental Eye Research. “Many teams across the world have been ...
Source: Mass Device - July 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Biotech Blog Optical/Ophthalmic Research & Development Transplants Fight for Sight Newcastle University Source Type: news

Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism
Kids with autism show differences in the structure and function of a brain circuit that helps you take pleasure in social interaction -- something that people with autism struggle with, researchers have found. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The influence of culture on healthy relationship formation and teen dating violence: a qualitative analysis of South Asian female youth residing in the United States - Ragavan M, Syed-Swift Y, Elwy AR, Fikre T, Bair-Merritt M.
Teen dating violence (TDV) has well-documented detrimental health effects. Scant research has examined the perspectives of ethnically diverse youth about the impact of culture on TDV. We sought to explore the intersection between culture and TDV specifical... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Brain Scans Yield More Clues to Autism
TUESDAY, July 17, 2018 -- Children with autism show abnormalities in a deep brain circuit that typically makes socializing enjoyable, a new study finds. Using MRI brain scans, researchers found that kids with autism showed differences in the... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Preclinical PET sheds light on Parkinson's abnormalities
Data collected from preclinical PET scans of rhesus macaque monkeys eventually...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET imaging could help personalize cancer treatment Michael J. Fox Foundation launches $2M PET tracer prize FDG-PET predicts survival in Parkinsonian syndrome IDEAS study to explore amyloid PET and Alzheimer's PET imaging shows promise with Parkinson's (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

NICE: Hospitals should refer patients with suspected COPD to GP-led spirometry
GPs should consider spirometry testing for patients who are incidentally found to have signs of COPD on a chest X-ray or CT scan. (Source: NHS Networks)
Source: NHS Networks - July 17, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

3D color X-rays could help diagnose cancer, heart disease and more
Image courtesy of MARS Bioimaging New Zealand scientists have performed the first-ever 3-D, color X-ray on a human, using technology that could improve medical diagnostics in oncology, cardiology, neurology and orthopedics. Based on traditional black-and-white X-ray technology, the scanner incorporates the Medipix3RX detector chip, a particle-tracking technology developed for the CERN Large Hadron Collider. It was developed by the Medipix3 Collaboration, which comprises CERN in Geneva and 18 research institutions worldwide. The scanner records the energy of each photon as it collides with pixels while the shutter...
Source: Mass Device - July 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Cardiovascular Diagnostics Imaging Neurological Orthopedics Research & Development CERN MARS Bioimaging Source Type: news

Novel Imaging Tracer May Have Promise in Alzheimer's (CME/CE)
(MedPage Today) -- PET scans targeting SV2A assess synaptic density, small study suggests (Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry)
Source: MedPage Today Psychiatry - July 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Source Type: news

CS 3600 Intraoral Scanner Certified for Use with Dental Wings ’ Software Solutions
ATLANTA —Carestream Dental is pleased to announce that the CS 3600 intraoral scanner has been certified by Dental Wings for use with its Dental Wings Open System (DWOS), DWOS Chairside CAD Software and coDiagnostiX Implant Planning Software." This official certification of the CS 3600 for use with Dental Wings DWOS, DWOS Chairside Design Software and coDiagnostiX Implant Planning Software makes Carestream Dental one of the premiere partners of choice for premium digital impressions ” said Marianne Belcari, global product line manager for CS Solutions, Carestream Dental, said. “The fully open sys...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - July 16, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Researchers Find Link Between Vitamin D and Asbestosis
This study was not designed to explain whether supplementing with vitamin D will protect against asbestosis. This new research also does not examine if taking vitamin D will slow down the progression of existing ILD. Still, there are a lot of good reasons to pay attention to the sunshine vitamin. Regardless of whether a person has been exposed to asbestos, no one should ignore very low vitamin D levels. People already diagnosed with an asbestos-related cancer, may benefit from a quick check of vitamin D levels. According to the medical literature, up to 80 percent of people with cancer may be vitamin D deficient. People ca...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 16, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Football training may preserve bone health in prostate cancer patients
(Wiley) Androgen deprivation therapy for the treatment of prostate cancer can lead to loss of muscle and bone mass. In a recent Scandinavian Journal of Medicine& Science in Sport study of elderly patients undergoing the treatment, playing football -- or what's known as soccer in the United States -- over a 5-year period was linked with preserved bone mineral density (BMD) in the neck of the leg's femur. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yale-developed test for Alzheimer's disease directly measures synaptic loss
(Yale University) Yale researchers have tested a new method for directly measuring synaptic loss in individuals with Alzheimer's disease. The method, which uses PET imaging technology to scan for a specific protein in the brain linked to synapses, has the potential to accelerate research for new Alzheimer's treatments, the researchers said. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NEMA Adds New Tests in NU 2-2018 Performance Measurement Standards of PET
The National Electrical Manufacturers Association publishes NEMA NU 2-2018 Performance Measurements of Positron Emission Tomographs (PET). The revised standards include two new tests: Measurement of TOF resolution for TOF equipped PET scanners and Co-registration accuracy between computed tomography and PET components of PET/CT scanner. NEMA NU 2-2018 offers uniform and consistent method for measuring and reporting performance parameters.This story is related to the following:Health, Medical,& Dental Supplies and EquipmentSearch for suppliers of:Trade Associations (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - July 14, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

Calif. mayor proposes necktie ban after MRI study
A new research study that used MRI to show that wearing neckties could restrict...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MRI scans show neckties cut blood flow to brain (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Scans Increasingly Catch Incidentalomas That Are Rarely Problematic Scans Increasingly Catch Incidentalomas That Are Rarely Problematic
Advanced imaging tests for many common health problems may catch something else entirely: incidentalomas that can create anxiety about tumors but more often than not, don't turn out to be cancer, a research review suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

FDA clears Zebra Medical's CAC scoring software
Big-data visualization software developer Zebra Medical Vision has received...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Zebra Medical secures $30M in financing Zebra, Change Healthcare partner on AI Zebra to exhibit AI image analysis with Google at RSNA 2017 Zebra offers AI reads of medical images for $1 per scan Teleradiology Solutions partners with Zebra Medical (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 13, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Zebra Medical Vision wins FDA nod for Coronary Calcium Scoring algorithm
Israeli machine-learning radiology firm Zebra Medical Vision said this week it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Coronary Calcium Scoring algorithm. The company said the algorithm is designed to automatically calculate a patient’s Agatston equivalent coronary calcium score from ECG gated CT scans to improve assessments of patients at risk for coronary artery disease. “Identification of high-risk individuals is key to prevention Zebra’s algorithm could run on CT studies of the chest and potentially help identify people with cardiovascular risk sooner, allowing more effective treatment and overall reduc...
Source: Mass Device - July 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Cardiovascular Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Imaging Regulatory/Compliance Zebra Medical Vision Source Type: news

Immediate placement too close to buccal?
There was no perforation of the buccal cortical plate visually, but a CT scan showed that the implant was close to the buccal wall.The postImmediate placement too close to buccal? appeared first onOsseoNews Dental Implants. (Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts)
Source: Dental Implants Discussed by Experts - July 13, 2018 Category: Dentistry Authors: osseonews Tags: Clinical Cases Surgical Source Type: news

Injectable platelet rich fibrin: cell content, morphological, and protein characterization
Clinical Oral Investigations pp 1 –10 | Original ArticleFirst Online:12 July 2018AbstractObjectivesThe aim of the present study was to evaluate the blood cell content, morphological aspects, gene expression of type I collagen, and release of growth factors on an injectable platelet rich fibrin (i-PRF).Materials and methodsBlood samples were collected from 15 volunteers to prepare i-PRF samples. Peripheral blood was used as a control group. Blood clot and i-PRF samples were cultured for 10 days. The supernatant of the samples was collected for ELISA immunoassay quantification of PDGF and VEGF growth factors ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - July 13, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What to know about liver hemangiomas
Hemangiomas of the liver are the most common type of benign liver tumor. Liver hemangiomas rarely cause symptoms, although large or multiple hemangiomas can cause abdominal pain or discomfort. Liver hemangiomas often do not require treatment. Doctors can diagnose them using an ultrasound or CT scan. Learn more here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Liver Disease / Hepatitis Source Type: news

Breast cancer follow-up imaging varies widely, study finds
(University of California - San Francisco) Follow-up imaging for women with non-metastatic breast cancer varies widely across the country, according to a new study led by researchers at UC San Francisco. Some patients go without the annual mammograms that experts recommend, while others with the same cancer diagnosis receive full-body scans that expose them to significant amounts of radiation and are not recommended by experts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

College launches safe staffing levels guidance
RCP guidance sets out safe levels for patient care Related items fromOnMedica CQC tells Trust to improve safety of 111 service Winter A&E waiting time cases quadruple over seven years Primary Care Home has positive impact on care and services Hunt condemns ‘silent scandal of NHS’ Patients report better overall satisfaction with A&E (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - July 13, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast - JAMA Internal Medicine's Rita Redberg
This week influential Editor-in-Chief ofJAMA Internal Medicine Dr Rita Redberg joins host Ray Moynihan on Cochrane Australia's podcastThe Recommended Dose to share a wide ranging conversation on all things health. A Professor at the University of California San Francisco and high profile contributor to The Washington Post and New York Times, Rita is also a practising cardiologist who loves to see patients. She says that ‘being a doctor is really a privilege’.Together, Ray and Rita canvas many topics including shared decision making between doctors and patients, the tricky territory of medical device a...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

The Recommended Dose podcast - JAMA Internal Medicine's Rita Redberg
This week influential Editor-in-Chief ofJAMA Internal Medicine Dr Rita Redberg joins host Ray Moynihan on Cochrane Australia's podcastThe Recommended Dose to share a wide ranging conversation on all things health. A Professor at the University of California San Francisco and high profile contributor to The Washington Post and New York Times, Rita is also a practising cardiologist who loves to see patients. She says that ‘being a doctor is really a privilege’.Together, Ray and Rita canvas many topics including shared decision making between doctors and patients, the tricky territory of medical device a...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - July 12, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Muriah Umoquit Source Type: news

Start-up offers 'name your price' tool for imaging
A start-up company called Medmo is offering a platform that connects patients...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Price transparency leads to more revenue, happy patients Fla. hospital charges nearly $9K for CT exam Family gets bill for $25K MRI scan Patients want imaging price information HealthCost offers consumers access to imaging costs (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 12, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Stryker ortho group prez Floyd to retire, Scannell to take prez, COO role
Stryker (NYSE:SYK) said earlier this week that its orthopedics group prez David Floyd will retire, effective at the end of next June, and that it has appointed Timothy Scannell as its new prez and COO, effective August 1. Floyd has been with Stryker since 2012, and will stay on as group prez and advisor to the CEO through to his retirement date, the Kalamazoo, Mich.-based company said. Scannelle joined Stryker in 1990 serving in leadership roles in sales and marketing, and has risen through the company to the role of group president, most recently for the company’s medsurg & neurotechnology divisions. &ldquo...
Source: Mass Device - July 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News personnel-moves Stryker Source Type: news

Scans increasingly catch 'incidentalomas' that are rarely problematic
(Reuters Health) - Advanced imaging tests for many common health problems may catch something else entirely: abnormalities, known as "incidentalomas," that can create anxiety about tumors but more often than not, don't turn out to be cancer, a research review suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Researchers Probe Part of Brain Where Autism Might Begin
THURSDAY, July 12, 2018 -- The underpinnings of autism may lie in an unexpected part of the brain, a small study suggests. Scientists conducted brain scans on 20 boys with autism and 18 boys without the neurodevelopmental disorder. The scans showed... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 12, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kenya:Patients Suffer as Lack of Scanning Machines Bites
[Nation] Heart and cancer patients in four counties in Mt Kenya cannot access basic scans after the equipment in the hospitals either broke down, or have not been delivered. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 12, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

More CT screening may be needed for high-risk smokers
A few annual rounds of negative CT screening exams might not be enough to rule...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: 4 reasons why people seek CT lung cancer screening 3 steps to personalized CT lung cancer screening Lung cancer risk model optimizes follow-up CT screening High-risk patients not getting timely follow-up CT scans Study: High-risk smokers can skip second CT screen (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 12, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Science fiction enthusiasts have a positive attitude to the digitizing of the brain
(University of Helsinki) The goal of a technology known as mind upload is to make it possible to create functional copies of the human brain on computers. The development of this technology, which involves scanning of the brain and detailed cell-specific emulation, is currently receiving billions in funding. Science fiction enthusiasts express a more positive attitude towards the technology compared to others. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zebra Medical Vision receives its first 510(k) clearance for coronary artery calcification algorithm
Kibbutz Shefayim, Israel-based deep learning startup Zebra Medical Vision announced that it has received FDA 510(k) clearance for an algorithm that helps physicians quantify a patient ’s coronary artery calcification. From a ECG-gated computed tomography (CT) scan, the Coronary Calcium Scoring algorithm automatically calculates a calcification rating equivalent to those derived using the Agatston Coronary Artery Calcium Scoring method. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - July 11, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news