Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

Researchers test ultrasound to detect breast cancer
If proven to be effective, the new type of scans could eventually be used in addition to annual mammograms (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Siemens debuts cardiology dashboard application
Siemens Healthineers has introduced teamplay Cardio, a new cardiology dashboard...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Siemens to list health division shares on Frankfurt exchange Tablet-controlled CT scanners lead Siemens products at RSNA Materialise, Siemens announce 3D printing partnership at RSNA 2017 Siemens launches new CT scanners at RSNA 2017 Siemens completes 1st U.S. install of new CT scanner (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 13, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

MITA hails bill to suspend medical device tax
The Medical Imaging and Technology Alliance (MITA) said it supports a new bill...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: MITA unveils guidance for live-model ultrasound scanning MITA backs proposed device regulation consistency MITA praises Aetna for covering CT colonography Industry groups laud new medical imaging bill MITA testifies at medical device user fee hearing (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 13, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Dementia SCANDAL: Hundreds of patients will be STRANDED in hospital on Christmas Day
HUNDREDS of people with dementia who are well enough to go home will be stranded in hospital on Christmas Day with some sufferers waiting up to 10 times as long as those without the condition, a new investigation has revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - December 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can technology really help to reduce underage drinking? New evidence on the effects of false ID laws with scanner provisions - Zheng EY.
In Volume 36 of this journal, Yoruk (2014) uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth 1997 and finds that false ID laws with scanner provisions have large impacts on binge drinking participation, frequency of alcohol consumption and binge dri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

MRI scans predict patients' ability to fight the spread of cancer
(University of Liverpool) A simple, non-invasive procedure that can indicate how long patients with cancer that has spread to the brain might survive and whether they are likely to respond to immunotherapy has been developed by researchers in Liverpool. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The Effect of Disinfection with Chlorhexidine on the Shear Bond Strength of Equia Resin-Modified Glass Ionomer Cement to Dentin in Permanent Teeth after Two Thermocycling Protocols
Conclusion:Chlorhexidine can positively affect the short term SBS of Equia RMGIC to dentin. (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - December 11, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

What Does an Anxiety Disorder Feel Like? Here Are 4 Signs You May Have a Problem
If 2.6 billion people were suffering from an illness, you’d think we’d all be more familiar with it. That figure represents 33.7% of the population of the world, after all. It also represents the share of that population that will at some point experience an anxiety disorder, according to the National Institutes of Health. For those billions, the experience of clinical anxiety can range from a persistent fretfulness, distractedness and a sort of whole-body clenching, to the paralytic crisis of a full-blown panic attack. All of it feels lousy; all of it is a state you race to escape — which typically only ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized anxiety disorder behavior health OCD psychology PTSD Source Type: news

Presurgical imaging may predict whether epilepsy surgery will work
(Rice University) A statistical approach to combining presurgical PET scans and functional MRI of the brain may help predict which patients with drug-resistant epilepsy are most likely to benefit from surgery. The method was developed by researchers at Rice University, Baylor College of Medicine, the University of California at Irvine and UCLA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

SABCS: Biannual breast MRI best for young women at high risk
For young women with a high genetic risk of breast cancer, twice-yearly MRI...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: At-risk women not receiving breast MRI scans Breast MRI neural network predicts treatment response Deep learning with breast MRI helps with lesion detection Breast MRI neural networks predict recurrence scores ACR releases breast cancer screening criteria (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 9, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

At-risk women not receiving breast MRI scans
Community practices are not following guidelines for breast cancer screening...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Breast MRI neural network predicts treatment response Deep learning with breast MRI helps with lesion detection Breast MRI neural networks predict recurrence scores ACR releases breast cancer screening criteria Deep learning with breast MRI boosts lesion detection (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 8, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Firms Race to Find New Ways to Scan Brain Health
At a recent conference, companies showed off ways they're leveraging technology to improve diagnosis and treatment of brain disorders. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM) is pleased to announce a partnership with the NIH All of Us Research Program (All of Us), part of the Precision Medicine Initiative. Through this collaboration, NNLM’s Regional Medical Libraries and National Offices will focus on improving consumer access to high quality health information in communities throughout the U.S., specifically, by working with public libraries. Check out the Fall 2017 issue of the MAReport! This quarter, Lydia Collins discusses “Rai...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - December 8, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

The priority of administering HIV postexposure prophylaxis in cases of sexual assault in an emergency department - Scannell M, MacDonald AE, Berger A, Boyer N.
INTRODUCTION: Contracting the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is a genuine concern for sexually assaulted patients. Emergency departments are a place where sexually assaulted patients seek care, including treatment to prevent HIV. Prompt administration ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Violence and Weapons Issues Source Type: news

Rethinking the relationship between socioeconomic status and health: challenging how socioeconomic status is currently used in health inequality research - Gagn é T, Ghenadenik AE.
AIMS: The Scandinavian Journal of Public Health recently reiterated the importance of addressing social justice and health inequalities in its new editorial policy announcement. One of the related challenges highlighted in that issue was the limited use of... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Social Etiologies and Disparities Source Type: news

Scans reveal solar eclipse damage to woman's eye
The woman told doctors she looked directly at the eclipse for just a few seconds (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A better mammogram? Study puts 3D scans to the test
Health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier scans really improve screening for breast cancer (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Crescent-shaped eye damage in woman who stared at eclipse
Nia Payne, 26, stared into the sun during this summers solar eclipse for just a few seconds in New York. Scans done at from Mount Sinai in New York reveal crescent-shaped damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A better mammogram? Study puts 3-D scans to the test
Health officials are starting a huge study to tell if the newer, sometimes pricier scans really improve screening for breast cancer (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Report: Investors review hedge fund involvement in wake of harassment allegations against Orbimed founder Isaly
Institutional investors with positions in OrbiMed are reportedly reviewing their involvement with the healthcare hedge fund after sexual harassment allegations surfaced against founder and managing partner Sam Isaly. Six former employees of biotech hedge fund accused Isaly, a 72-year-old investor long revered in the biotech community for his ability to pick stocks, of routinely demeaning and harassing women with hardcore pornography and sex toys, STAT reported Dec. 5. Isaly has denied the allegations. The sixth accuser contacted the outlet after that story, requesting anonymity for fear of rep...
Source: Mass Device - December 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Wall Street Beat OrbiMed Venture Capital/Private Equity Source Type: news

Mixed migraine results for PFO closure study
Percutaneous closure of patent foramen ovale did not significantly lessen the frequency of migraines in patients with episodic migraines, according to a study published yesterday in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.  Although the Premium trial missed its primary endpoint, the study met the secondary endpoint of reducing migraine days after PFO closure. A sub-group analysis also found that patients with frequent aura experienced a significant reduction in migraine attacks with PFO closure. One of the trial’s investigators told Medscape that there is validity to right-to-left shunt closu...
Source: Mass Device - December 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Clinical Trials Neurological Wall Street Beat stjudemedical Source Type: news

Bouncing back: Nolan ’s life after stroke
Although he’s only a little over a year old, Nolan Morel is a bona fide charmer. Clad in a red shirt and navy blue suspenders, he flashes a happy grin at his mother, Rosalia; his physician, Dr. Laura Lehman; and the others in the room. “Look at those dimples!” someone coos, and he giggles in response. “I can’t believe how social he’s being,” laughs Rosalia. “He wasn’t always like this.” In fact, Nolan’s first several days of life were anything but lighthearted. Just a few hours after his birth at a hospital north of Boston, he stopped breathing and had to be...
Source: Thrive, Children's Hospital Boston - December 7, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: Jessica Cerretani Tags: Diseases & Conditions Our Patients’ Stories child life Dr. Laura Lehman feeding therapy occupational therapy physical therapy stroke Stroke and Cerebrovascular Center Source Type: news

Stryker pledges $662m cash for Entellus Medical
Entellus Medical (NSDQ:ENTL) said today that it struck a deal to be acquired by Stryker (NYSE:SYK) for $662 million in cash. Plymouth, Minn.-based Entellus, founded in 2006, makes a family of minimally invasive balloon device products, including its flagship Xpress device, that are designed to treat blocked sinuses. Earlier this year it closed the $81 million buyout of Spirox and its Latera absorbable nasal implant. The company’s shareholder must still approve the $24-per-share deal. “The combination of Stryker’s established commitment to making healthcare better and Entellus’ innovative p...
Source: Mass Device - December 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Mergers & Acquisitions Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Wall Street Beat Entellus Medical Inc. Stryker Source Type: news

Examining drivers' eye glance patterns during distracted driving: insights from scanning randomness and glance transition matrix - Wang Y, Bao S, Du W, Ye Z, Sayer JR.
This study examined and quantified drivers' glance patterns and features during distr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Nikki Haley Questions U.S. Participation in the Winter Olympics Amid Tensions With North Korea
Nikki Haley, the U.S. Ambassador to the United Nations, has called American attendance at South Korean winter games into question, citing escalating tension with North Korea. Haley told Fox News on Wednesday night that American athletes’ participation in the games is an “open question,” according to a transcript from CNN. The games — scheduled for Feb. 9-25 in Pyeonchang, South Korea — come amid increasing hostility between Washington and South Korea’s northern neighbor. While acknowledging that she has not “heard anything about” whether the athletes will be participating, Ha...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laignee Barron Tags: Uncategorized North Korea olympics onetime overnight South Korea Source Type: news

Community practices not following guidelines for MRI breast cancer screening
(Springer) Guidelines are not being followed to ensure that breast cancer screening of high risk women, such as those with a strong family history of breast cancer, includes an additional MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) scan. Deirdre A. Hill of the University of New Mexico School of Medicine led a study on this in the Journal of General Internal Medicine which is published by Springer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain scans may reveal most effective anti-drug messages
(Ohio State University) What if you could look into the brains of potential drug abusers and see what messages would be most likely to persuade them to 'just say no?' That's the ultimate goal of researchers whose new study scanned the brains of people while they watched anti-drug public service announcements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart scans on NBA stars show 1 in 5 have abnormal results
Basketball players are 30 times more likely than any other athlete to suffer a sudden cardiac death, and this new research by NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia attempts to look at why. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sponsored Collection | A new age in scanning electron microscopy: Applications in the life sciences
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Botany, Cell Biology, Medicine, Diseases, Neuroscience, Pharmacology, Toxicology opms-sups Source Type: news

Imaging resonant dissipation from individual atomic defects in graphene
Conversion of electric current into heat involves microscopic processes that operate on nanometer length scales and release minute amounts of power. Although central to our understanding of the electrical properties of materials, individual mediators of energy dissipation have so far eluded direct observation. Using scanning nanothermometry with submicrokelvin sensitivity, we visualized and controlled phonon emission from individual atomic-scale defects in graphene. The inferred electron-phonon "cooling power spectrum" exhibits sharp peaks when the Fermi level comes into resonance with electronic quasi-bound stat...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Halbertal, D., Ben Shalom, M., Uri, A., Bagani, K., Meltzer, A. Y., Marcus, I., Myasoedov, Y., Birkbeck, J., Levitov, L. S., Geim, A. K., Zeldov, E. Tags: Materials Science, Physics reports Source Type: news

The metabolic needs of migrating Tregs
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - December 7, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Scanlon, S. T. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Senior Volkswagen Executive Sentenced In Diesel-Emissions Scandal
Oliver Schmidt admitted to conspiring to defraud the United States by misleading federal regulators about the emissions of diesel cars and violating clean air laws.(Image credit: AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Richard Gonzales Source Type: news

This Black Hole Just Let Scientists Look Back in Time to the Dawn of Creation
(CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla.) — Astronomers have discovered a super-size black hole harkening back to almost the dawn of creation. It’s the farthest black hole ever found. A team led by the Carnegie Observatories‘ Eduardo Banados reported in the journal Nature on Wednesday that the black hole lies in a quasar dating to 690 million years of the Big Bang. That means the light from this quasar has been traveling our way for more than 13 billion years. Banados said the quasar provides a unique baby picture of the universe, when it was just 5 percent of its current age. It would be like seeing photos of a 50-year-ol...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

OrbiMed Founder Sam Isaly Accused of Sexual Harassment
Sexual harassment scandals are not limited to Hollywood, famous broadcasters, and politicians. This week STAT broke a sexual harassment story that touches medtech, as it involves the founder of one of the industry's largest hedge funds. According to the investigative report, OrbiMed founder and managing partner Sam Isaly harassed and demeaned female employees for years. Former employees reportedly told STAT that Isaly routinely subjected young female assistants to pornography in the workplace, lewd jokes, and sexist comments. Five people who once worked at the firm described how Isaly would often handle a set of breast imp...
Source: MDDI - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Medical Device Business Source Type: news

Women harmed because vaginal mesh regulation 'not fit for purpose'
Oxford University team calls for mandatory clinical trials for invasive devices following scandal that emerged this yearWomen have been exposed to unnecessary harm due to poor regulation for vaginal mesh products, medical experts have warned.The team, from the University of Oxford, have called for clinical trials to be made mandatory for invasive medical devices and for a registry to be created in response to thevaginal mesh scandal.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 6, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Vaginal mesh implants Health Society Women UK news Medical research Science Source Type: news

PET/CT helps identify best prostate cancer regimen
Prostate-specific membrane antigen (PSMA) PET/CT scans can help identify prostate...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: FDG-PET/CT could improve treatment for NSCLC patients FDG-PET/CT contributes to anal cancer follow-up AI algorithm can classify bone lesions on PET/CT images FDG-PET/CT foretells melanoma therapy response New PET tracer could work well for prostate cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 6, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Heart scans on NBA players show 60% have abnormal results
Basketball players are 30 times more likely than any other athlete to suffer a sudden cardiac death, and this new research by NewYork-Presbyterian/Columbia attempts to look at why. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Older Women Less Likely to Recognize Sexual Harassment
by William E. Gibson, AARP, December 5, 2017|Comments: 0. Sexual Harassment Survey. Jordan Strauss/AP. The poll also found that 67 percent of all Americans surveyed believed that sexual harassment, like the Harvey Weinstein scandal, happens in most workplaces. Older Americans are somewhat less inclined than  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - December 6, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Doctors develop new way to use MRI to predict pregnancy complications
FINDINGSUCLA scientists have developed anew way to use magnetic resonance imaging, or MRI, to scan the placenta. The noninvasive approach offers valuable insights into how the mother ’s blood enters the placenta and sustains the fetus with oxygen and nutrients during early pregnancy. The technique breaks new ground because most previous studies on this subject occurred in the laboratory after childbirth.BACKGROUNDThe placenta is a temporary organ that joins a pregnant woman to her baby through the umbilical cord. Few methods exist for safely and accurately studying the placenta in early pregnancy. Ultrasound indirect...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 6, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Why a cooler climate makes you more likely to get cancer
Inuits have the highest rate of cancer, followed closely by Scandinavian people, while chilly Britain has a cancer rate three times higher than that of India and twice the rate of Thailand. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Grow your own: the race to create body parts in the lab
From replacement skin to entire new organs, regenerative medicine is finally leaving its early scandals – and the controversial ‘earmouse’ – behind. Could it one day provide a cure for birth defects, blindness and diabetes?Two years ago, Hassan ’s father was faced with questions that he had no good answers for. “Why do I have this disease?” his seven-year-old son asked him. “Why do I have to live this life?”Hassan was born with a rare genetic skin condition, called epidermolysis bullosa, that causes fragile, blistering skin. His first blister appeared when he was a week...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 5, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Tags: Medical research Health Doctors Society Stem cells Diabetes Biology Science Source Type: news

Eating small meals can resist the brain's urge to overeat
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania analyzed brain scans to understand why we get so excited when we see food come out at a restaurant and so disappointed when it goes to someone else. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HeartFlow stakes $90m step toward $150m Series E
HeartFlow took a $90 million step toward the $150 million it hopes to raise in a Series E round for the cardiac imaging technology it’s marketing. Redwood City, Calif.-based HeartFlow’s FFRct technology works by taking the data from a standard CT scan and applying algorithms that result in a color-coded 3D “map” detailing the changes in flow across coronary lesions. Last week reports surfaced that the company was eyeing a $150 million raise, which would vault it into “unicorn” territory with a $1.4 billion valuation. HeartFlow’s $99.9 million Series D valued the comp...
Source: Mass Device - December 5, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Funding Roundup Imaging Wall Street Beat HeartFlow Source Type: news

Is the vaccine industry more like Harvey Weinstein or Jared Fogle?
(Natural News) Long-time Natural News readers know that the vaccine industry is more than just a scandal, it represents a direct health threat to all of us, thanks in large part to behind-the-scenes shenanigans between Big Pharma and the federal government’s healthcare approval agencies. But perhaps the most sinister thing about the industry is the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Introducing 3d printed models as demonstrative evidence at criminal trials - Baier W, Warnett JM, Payne M, Williams MA.
This case report presents one of the first reported uses of a 3D printed exhibit in an English homicide trial, in which two defendants were accused of beating their victim to death. The investigation of this crime included a micro-CT scan of the victim's s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Experts Warn of Severe Influenza, Low Vaccine Efficacy Experts Warn of Severe Influenza, Low Vaccine Efficacy
The recent influenza season experienced in Australia suggests the United States might be in for a severe flu season, with scant protection from the latest vaccine.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

PET identifies which prostate cancer patients can benefit from salvage radiation treatment
(Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging) For prostate cancer patients who have rising levels of PSA (a cancer indicator) even after radical prostatectomy, early treatment makes a difference. In a study featured in the December issue of The Journal of Nuclear Medicine, Australian researchers demonstrate that PET scans can identify which of these prostate cancer patients would benefit from salvage radiation treatment (SRT). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report: HeartFlow ’ s estimated $150m Series E would make it medtech ’ s latest unicorn
A reported Series E round for HeartFlow, estimated at $150 million, would value the company at more than $1 billion, vaulting it into unicorn territory. Redwood City, Calif.-based HeartFlow’s FFRct technology works by taking the data from a standard CT scan and applying algorithms that result in a color-coded 3D “map” detailing the changes in flow across coronary lesions. According to a Delaware regulatory filing uncovered by PitchBook and reported by Recode.net, the $25.33 per share valuation would make HeartFlow worth $1.4 billion. HeartFlow’s $99.9 million Series D valued the company at...
Source: Mass Device - December 1, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Funding Roundup Imaging Wall Street Beat HeartFlow Source Type: news

Siemens to list health division shares on Frankfurt exchange
German industrial conglomerate Siemens AG announced this week that it will...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Tablet-controlled CT scanners lead Siemens products at RSNA Materialise, Siemens announce 3D printing partnership at RSNA 2017 Siemens launches new CT scanners at RSNA 2017 Siemens completes 1st U.S. install of new CT scanner Siemens maintains course despite Q4 currency headwinds (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - December 1, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Africa:Among Children, Aids Epidemic Is Far From Over, Unicef Finds
[Thomson Reuters Foundation] New York -Eighteen children every hour were infected with HIV last year, a sign of scant progress in protecting the world's young from the deadly AIDS-causing virus, the United Nations' children's agency said on Friday. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 1, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news