How will you assess the success of repair of mitral valve repair per-operatively?
The ideal method to assess the success of repair of mitral valve repair per-operatively  is to use Intra operative TEE (trans esophageal echocardiography). It gives excellent images and does not interfere with the sterility of the operating field. Newer scanners with live 3-D (4-D) reconstruction of images gives the ‘surgeon’s view’ both from the atrial and ventricular aspects. This makes assessment of residual mitral regurgitation very easy. Surgeon can even revise the repair if needed as the chest is still open. Now most cardiac anaesthesiologists are trained in getting good trans esophageal image...
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 25, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: Cardiac Surgery Source Type: blogs

Vascular Risk and Amyloid Level in the Brain Interact to Speed Cognitive Decline
In a recent paper, researchers provided evidence to suggest that the risk factors associated with cardiovascular decline with age interact with amyloid-β in the brain to accelerate cognitive decline. Having more of both produces a worse prognosis, which is not all that surprising. This is the case in many areas of aging and age-related disease: forms of damage and dysfunction interact with one another, making consequences worse than would be the case if they were independent of one another. This is one of the reasons why aging is an accelerating process, starting off slow and picking up pace ever more rapidly as the d...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 24, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

A physician ’s personal crisis with pain
Six months ago, I had severe right flank pain. In the ER, I had an ultrasound showing a possible kidney stone. I deferred a CT scan and went home with medication. I fit the textbook picture: I had abnormal imaging, and I was given a treatment and discharged. I was advised to return if the pain worsened or failed to resolve. I briefly improved, but then the pain returned much worse. Ten days later, I returned to the ER. I was given ketorolac and had a CT, which showed no stone. The ER attending advised me to go home and take ibuprofen. At that point, my pain was 8/10, and I was having significant trouble moving despite the ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-finlay-morreale" rel="tag" > Heather Finlay-Morreale, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Nephrology Pain Management Source Type: blogs

Double Standards, Trojan Style
By NIRAN AL-AGBA, MD The University of Southern California (USC) appears to look the other way when male physicians harass or assault women. In reality, sexual violence spares no occupation, including medicine, but the way an organization responds to crime against women indicates a certain level of integrity. The World Health Organization estimates sexual violence affects one-third of all women worldwide. In a nation where women make up 50% or more of each incoming medical school class, only sixteen percent of medical school deans are female, making gender imbalance in leadership positions nearly impossible to overcome. Fo...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: OP-ED Physicians #MeToo Sexual Assault USC Source Type: blogs

Cushioning the fall of bad news
Angela Harris has been here in the hospital for six hours, awaiting the results of her CT scan. I won’t take responsibility for all of that wait time: complicated CT scans and labs do take a significant amount of time to perform. But she didn’t need to wait the last hour. She was waiting on me — her emergency physician — because I needed to confirm her cancer diagnosis with radiology, arrange some oncology follow-up … and find the most appropriate phraseology for: “You have stage IV cancer, but you don’t meet admission criteria.” I’ve delivered this diagnosis five time...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/meghan-gaffney-liroff" rel="tag" > Meghan Gaffney Liroff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Oncology/Hematology Source Type: blogs

ECG quiz – Discussion
Discussion appeared first on Cardiophile MD. (Source: Cardiophile MD)
Source: Cardiophile MD - May 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Prof. Dr. Johnson Francis, MD, DM, FACC, FRCP Edin, FRCP London Tags: ECG / Electrophysiology ECG Library Source Type: blogs

Can We Treat Obesity with Regulated Hunger Signaling?
Recent research suggests that obesity can be controlled by regulating the satiety cascade, including influencing the nerves carrying hunger signals. Global obesity levels have almost doubled in the last 30 years. This is a worrying fact, especially when considering that obesity represents one of the major risk factors for many chronic diseases, cardiovascular and metabolic diseases in particular. Thus, it is not surprising that conditions like insulin resistance, pre-diabetes, and diabetes are becoming increasingly common worldwide. Although it is clear that obesity develops when caloric energy intake exceeds energy expen...
Source: World of Psychology - May 23, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Brain Blogger Health-related Publishers Research gut-brain axis hunger signaling Obesity Weight Loss Source Type: blogs

A Picture is Worth a Thousand Words
By MEGHAN CONROY These days I’m spending a lot of time getting in depth with many tech companies. From time to time I’ll be asking those innovators to tell their story on THCB, and suggest what problems they are solving. First up is Meghan Conroy from Captureproof—Matthew Holt Today’s doctors are communicating with their patients less than ever before, even as their days grow longer and busier. Physicians are pressured to see more patients in shorter encounters, while at the same time shouldering more of the administrative and documentation tasks associated with electronic medical records (EMR). The...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matthew Holt Tags: Health 2.0 Captureproof Meghan Conroy Source Type: blogs

Quantum Computing Technology to Make Next Generation MRIs Possible
Some computational problems are so inherently difficult that conventional computers, including large supercomputers, can take years to solve them. One such problem has been encountered by researchers at Case Western Reserve University, who have developed a way to improve and speed up the detection of tumors on MRI scans and improve MRIs in many other ways. Their technique, known as magnetic resonance fingerprinting, which was featured in Nature a few years ago, can significantly increase the amount of useful information that MRI scans provide. But, to take full advantage of this technology, each scan has to be tuned t...
Source: Medgadget - May 23, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Radiology Source Type: blogs

AI Detects and Measures Small Vessel Disease in Brain CT Scans
Clinicial researchers at Imperial College London and the University of Edinburgh have developed an artificial intelligence software for identifying and quantifying small vessel disease, a frequent cause of dementia and stroke in older people, from CT scans. The investigators have already tested the software at Imperial’s Charing Cross Hospital, demonstrating that the technology rivals that of MRI scans coupled with specialized clinicians in spotting and measuring small vessel disease. Because CT scans are used, which are considerably faster to perform than MRI scans, and that the assessment may not need any human in...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Informatics Neurology Neurosurgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

The State Of Healthcare Cybersecurity (Part 2)
In Part 1 of this series, which drew data from a study by Black Book Market Research, I described how insecure healthcare leaders felt their cybersecurity protections to be. I also noted that a large number of providers are struggling to recruit senior health IT experts, and as a result are basically winging it when it comes to breach protection. Healthcare organizations’ data security problems run deeper than that, however, the study suggests. Not only are C-level execs finding security investments to be troublesome, IT managers responding to the survey admit that they, too, feel that they are not fully prepared to ...
Source: EMR and HIPAA - May 22, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Anne Zieger Tags: EHR EHR Jobs Electronic Health Record Electronic Medical Record EMR EMR Security Health Care Healthcare Healthcare CIO HealthCare IT HIPAA HIPAA Breaches Mobile Apps Mobile Health Security Black Book Market Research Cyberatta Source Type: blogs

A Hippocratic Oath for technology
Modern technology needs to do better. This is the message delivered by every CEO after every Silicon Valley scandal in recent memory. This time, they should really do it. Medicine can show them how. Let’s have the professionals building our future abide by industry-wide standards, just as doctors do. As both a startup founder and a physician, this idea makes intuitive sense to me. Drawing on my experience treating patients and running a digital platform, here’s what a Hippocratic Oath for tech might look like. First, it shouldn’t say “first do no harm.” Not that I’m in favor of doin...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/joshua-landy" rel="tag" > Joshua Landy, MD < /a > Tags: Tech Mobile health Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The unscientific lure of antibiotics
Although my father did not discover penicillin, he helped do the research showing its effectiveness in curing infective endocarditis. As an internist, he then became enamored with the role antibiotics could play in treating infections. Growing up, my siblings and I can attest to his unbridled enthusiasm, as every time we contracted a cold, we would get a shot of the wonder mold in our butts. The fact that colds were caused by viruses and not bacteria did little to dissuade him from the utility of the treatment. When I finally developed a rash after another shot, I celebrated the fact that the painful solution would never e...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 22, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/david-mokotoff" rel="tag" > David Mokotoff, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Infectious Disease Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Post-doc at Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR), University of South Carolina
A post-doctoral position is available in the Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders at the University of South Carolina (Columbia, SC, USA). Prospective hires will join a research team headed by Julius Fridriksson (www.sc.edu/comd/fridriks) as part of the Center for the Study of Aphasia Recovery (C-STAR), which is funded by a P50 grant from the NIH. The primary research focus of the lab is as follows: 1) neural basis of speech/language processing with special emphasis on brain plasticity; 2) neurophysiology of aphasia recovery; 3) computational neurolinguistics, and 4) predicting aphasia recovery from neural, b...
Source: Talking Brains - May 22, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

The Ethics of Keeping Alfie Alive
By SAURABH JHA Of my time arguing with doctors, 30 % is spent convincing British doctors that their American counterparts aren’t idiots, 30 % convincing American doctors that British doctors aren’t idiots, and 40 % convincing both that I’m not an idiot. A British doctor once earnestly asked whether American physicians carry credit card reading machines inside their white coats. Myths about the NHS can be equally comical. British doctors don’t prostate every morning in deference to the NHS, like the citizens of Oceania sang to Big Brother in Orwell’s dystopia. Nor, in their daily rounds, do the...
Source: The Health Care Blog - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: OP-ED Uncategorized AlfieEvans Source Type: blogs

How mindfulness helped this physician ’s primary care journey
“Paying attention in a particular way: on purpose, in the present moment and nonjudgmentally.” That’s how Jon Kabat-Zinn, PhD, describes mindfulness. In the book Zen Mind, Beginner’s Mind, another thought leader in mindfulness, Shunryu Suzuki, says that, “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, but in the expert’s there are few.” In my experience, I’ve found that cultivating a beginner’s mind opens doors and improves clinical diagnosis. Medical training has phases, and clinicians in different phases think differently. In medical school, students learn...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 20, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/heather-finlay-morreale" rel="tag" > Heather Finlay-Morreale, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Sunday Sermonette: Just when you think it couldn't get more depraved
As we have seen, whatever the Bible may be it is not a manual for morality. Genesis 16 takes it to 11. (But don't worry, it gets worse.)Now Sarai, Abram ’s wife, had borne him no children. But she had an Egyptian slave named Hagar;2 so she said to Abram, “TheLord has kept me from having children. Go, sleep with my slave; perhaps I can build a family through her. ”Abram agreed to what Sarai said.3 So after Abram had been living in Canaan ten years, Sarai his wife took her Egyptian slave Hagar and gave her to her husband to be his wife.4 He slept with Hagar, and she conceived.Credit to the NI...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 20, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

VA Finalizes Telehealth Initiative; What's the Likelihood of Success?
In various previous blog notes, I have strongly advocated for the expansion of telemedicine across most sectors of the healthcare system. My rationale for this recommendation is that it's one of the only ways to expand healthcare delivery in a cost-effective manner. The approach also avoids the rigidity of a bricks-and-morter strategy with physical facilities becoming quickly outmoded as the style of practice changes. The VA is now finalizing plans for its telehealth program. In order to achieve this goal, the VA is circumventing the various state rules governing the licensing of providers. All of this was described in...
Source: Lab Soft News - May 18, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Electronic Health Record (EHR) Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Hospital Executive Management Telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Using MRI and PET to Detect Early Knee Osteoarthritis
Researchers from Stanford University have developed the first protocol using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for detecting early stage knee osteoarthritis (OA) in all joint tissues. Their  findingswere recently published inOsteoarthritis and Cartilage.  Traditionally, joint tissues are examined separately, and MRI can only assist in monitoring changes in the subchondral bone when the disease has progressed substantially. The group of researchers led by Feliks Kogan, PhD, saw the need to create a technique that could non-invasively assess changes in bone remodeling and adjacent tissues.The researchers studied pat...
Source: radRounds - May 18, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Koalas, Chlamydia, Microbiomania, Katie Dahlhausen, John Oliver, Russell Crowe, and me.
This study aimed to use 16S rRNA gene sequences derived from koala feces to characterize the intestinal microbiome of koalas throughout antibiotic treatment and identify specific taxa associated with koala health after treatment. Although differences in the alpha diversity were observed in the intestinal flora between treated and untreated koalas and between koalas treated with different antibiotics, these differences were not statistically significant. The alpha diversity of microbial communities from koalas that lived through antibiotic treatment versus those who did not was significantly greater, however. Beta diversity...
Source: The Tree of Life - May 18, 2018 Category: Microbiology Authors: Jonathan Eisen Source Type: blogs

Baxter ’s Spectrum IQ Drug Infusion System Cleared in U.S.
Baxter won FDA clearance for its Spectrum IQ infusion system, which has some interesting features designed to prevent the wrong drugs and wrong dosages from being administered. The device connects to the hospital’s electronic medical record system, receiving information from it and sending its own data there for permanent storage. Baxter’s Dose IQ software within the Spectrum IQ checks the health record and makes sure that things such as interactions with other drugs taken by the patient don’t cause unwanted effects. There’s a bunch of auto programming options and features to make infusions safe for...
Source: Medgadget - May 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Anesthesiology Cardiology Critical Care Emergency Medicine Pediatrics Source Type: blogs

CurveBeam ’s Tiny InReach CT Scanner Cleared by FDA
InReach Cone Beam CT System for Extremity Imaging (PRNewsfoto/CurveBeam) CurveBeam‘s InReach point-of-care extremity CT system garnered FDA clearance for use in scanning the arms, hands, wrists, and elbows, as well as the feet and legs. This is one of the smallest CT scanners out there, giving a detailed 3D view of the extremities that digital X-rays can’t provide. The device doesn’t need any additional shielding and is small enough to be kept in a corner with other equipment and used as necessary. InReach’s bore can be moved up and down to level with the patient’s arms or legs and once a scan...
Source: Medgadget - May 17, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Source Type: blogs

This Made Me Wonder Just What Was Happening With The “Bonfire Of The Faxes”?
This appeared last week:He died alone after his medical test results were faxed to wrong numberBy Melissa Cunningham10 May 2018 — 6:08pmMettaloka Halwala was alone in a hotel room near Shepparton when he was found dead from complications that arose from his chemotherapy treatment of Hodgkin’s lymphoma.Hotel staff opened the door of his room on the morning of November 17, 2015 to find the 58-year-old father of two decease d in his bed, fully clothed in jeans and a shirt, a lit torch beside him.Now, a Victorian coroner has found Mr Halwala's lonely death could have been prevented had he not been let down by a ser...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 17, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

Wow, how did this get by me?
The new director of the CDC is named Robert Redfield. The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (still abbreviated CDC because " prevention " was added later) is the country's public health agency.Here are some fun facts about Redfield.He was in charge of the armed forces'response to the HIV epidemic in  the 1980s. Among his policies:Mandatory HIV testing of all troops, without confidentiality. Positive tests were revealed to the entire chain of command.HIV+ troops were kept in isolation and dishonorably discharged when they developed AIDS. . .Which meant they were dumped on the street without heal...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 16, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Three years of research into #thedress, digested – a lesson in humility for perceptual science
By Christian Jarrett Three years ago, in a time before Trump or Brexit or This Is America, someone posted an overexposed photograph of a black and blue striped dress on Tumblr. Soon millions of people had seen it and started arguing about it. The reason? It quickly became apparent that about half of us – more often women and older people – perceive the dress, not as black and blue, but white and gold. In a neat example of real life echoing a classic psychology experiment (I’m referring to Asch), #thedress was enough to make you think your friends were gas lighting you – how could it be tha...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 16, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Cognition Feature Perception Source Type: blogs

Royal Wedding Dress Scandal
This week’s most important #FakeNews is about a wedding. The truth is that Meghan Markle’s wedding dress didn’t cost 300 grand, it was a third of that and apparently she’s paying for it “herself”, anyway. The disingenuous reference to the Grenfell tragedy in the fake news stories is scurrilous. Fact was the people who built that tower didn’t spend the requisite amount of money to use fire-retardant cladding! It’s also worth pointing out that Princess Diana’s dress cost more nominally, but that was almost 40 years ago, inflation since then means that Ms Merkle’s dr...
Source: David Bradley Sciencebase - Songs, Snaps, Science - May 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Bradley Tags: Science Source Type: blogs

How to be The Shop Floor Clinician
LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog LITFL • Life in the Fast Lane Medical Blog - Emergency medicine and critical care medical education blog Once in a while we don’t have to be Epic. We can be a plain worker bee, low ranking, mission brown, a serf. We are permitted to hitch up our strides like peasants, and get on with the business of hoeing through the garden of the unwell. Such freedom, you say. None of the high-level responsibility of being in charge of the department. No duty phone. No behaving like an epileptic desperado when asked to go to a flow meeting. Just good, honest toil. I’ve been...
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 16, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle Johnston Tags: Literary Medicine How to be Shop Floor Shop Floor Clinician Source Type: blogs

I Think The European GDPR Is Going To Have An Impact Sooner Than We Thought.
This appeared last week:Senate backs Greens motion for privacy laws based on GDPR 11 May 2018 Written by  Sam Varghese The Australian Senate has reversed its position and backed a motion by the Greens calling for the adoption of more stringent privacy protections in line with the EU's General Data Protection Regulation, acknowledging that it is world's best practice.The EU legalisation is scheduled to take effect on 25 May and companies and institutions around the world are scrambling to be compliant with its stipulations.Greens privacy spokesman Senator Jordon Steele-John said in a statement that the fact that priva...
Source: Australian Health Information Technology - May 16, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: Dr David G More MB PhD Source Type: blogs

How to prevent errors in IVF - what every patient needs to know !
The biggest nightmare for any IVF patient is that the lab may mix up their eggs and sperms with another patients. This has happened in many clinics, and IVF is as prone to errors as any other treatment because it is provided by a host of people working together – doctors, nurses, receptionist, ultrasonographers, lab technicians and embryologists. It requires lots of coordination, and there are few treatment processes for which a team approach is more important than for assisted reproduction. Close, continuous communication is required at many levels to e nsure everything goes as planned.Communication mattersAll of th...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - May 15, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: IVF error IVF mistakes Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 14th 2018
This study found that professional chess players had shorter lifespans than those players who had careers outside of chess and argued that this might be due to the mental strain of international chess competition. In the present study, we focused on survival of International Chess Grandmasters (GMs) which represent players, of whom most are professional, at the highest level. In 2010, the overall life expectancy of GMs at the age of 30 years was 53.6 years, which is significantly greater than the overall weighted mean life expectancy of 45.9 years for the general population. In all three regions examined, mean life...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 13, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

vintage scutmonkey: surgery
So starting in 2000, and for more than a decade thereafter, I used to have part of my blog hosted on a platform called Homestead. (The f., you say? Shut up, it was the early 2000s, we didn't have nice things back then.) Homestead was clunky and hard to navigate and ugly as sin, and they also charged me upwards of $400 a year in annual hosting fees. As aresident I paid this. I mean, my God. Every July they wouldextort me remind me to cough up this renewal fee, and every July I would put off the payment as late as possible until they threatened to wipe all my data, at which point I'd pay and they'd keep my files online for a...
Source: the underwear drawer - May 12, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: Michelle Au Source Type: blogs

Wearable MRI Detector Allows Imaging of Moving Joints
Researchers at NYU Langone Health have developed a wearable detector glove that allows them to image a moving hand in an MRI scanner. The glove allows for high-quality images of moving joints, whereby tendons and ligaments can be seen moving in relation to bones and muscle, and could be useful in helping to guide surgery. The capability should aid in the design of prostheses and for diagnosing conditions such as carpal tunnel syndrome. MRI is a hugely powerful imaging technique. However, it can typically only image motionless objects, meaning that the soft tissue dynamics of moving joints are out of grasp. Part of the...
Source: Medgadget - May 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Orthopedic Surgery Radiology Rehab Source Type: blogs

Novartis' Latest Ethical Misadventure: Did it Pay to Play ... with the US President?
DiscussionMost corrupt actions require two parties.  While it is understandable that there has been tremendous recent interest in evidence that the Trump regime is corrupt (lookhere), any such corruption had to have been enabled by unethical actions on the parts of others.  Those others likely included large numbers of leaders of large corporations, including health care corporations.  We have shown repeatedly that top leaders of US health care organizations have enjoyedimpunity that has allowed them to foster a host of unethical actions, includingcrimes such asbribery,fraud, andkickbacks, and truehealth car...
Source: Health Care Renewal - May 11, 2018 Category: Health Management Tags: bribery corporate integrity agreement crime Donald Trump fraud legal settlements Novartis Source Type: blogs

The Digital Future of Pathology
Pathology is the motor that drives healthcare to understand diseases. While it does the job via the same methods as it did for the last 150 years, it’s time to change. Digital technologies could push the field into becoming more efficient and more scalable. They could transform the job of pathologists into a more creative and data-driven profession while allowing patients to receive diagnoses faster and more accurately. Let’s see how the digital future of pathology looks! The foundation of medicine, pathology, has not changed for over 150 years Although the whole edifice of medicine rests on the pathologis...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 10, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine AI artificial intelligence biotechnology deep learning digital digital health medical imaging pathology precision medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

Pushing Back Against FCPA's Punitive Moralism
Compliance Week invited me to write on what ’s wrong with the Foreign Corrupt Practices Act.Excerpt:  Scenario: an American city hires an Asian-based bank to float a bond deal. Scandal! Turns out the bank wined and dined the mayor and council and treated them to sports events. After an investigation, the Asian bank agrees to put things right by paying millions of dollars to the government of France.That ’s crazy, right? What does any of this have to do with the government of France? But it’s certainly no crazier than the workings of our own Foreign Corrupt Practices Act, under which European companie...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - May 10, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Walter Olson Source Type: blogs

For this physician, financial independence is bittersweet
I say that financial independence is bittersweet and you look at me with your jaw slack, your eyes questioning.  You scan to the top of my blog, and you see the words “personal finance,” and you’re wondering if I’ve gone slightly daffy. But then I point to my byline, personal finance with a twist, and continue on my belligerent rant.  I have said before that money is a foil.  A false mirage.  A tangible object on which we pin our hopes and dreams.  No one ever lived for money, or even died for it.  We live for principles, ideals, people, objects, the unobtaina...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/docg" rel="tag" > DocG, MD < /a > Tags: Finance Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Aging of the Locus Coeruleus and Loss of Focus in Older Individuals
Cognitive ability has many different dimensions. While all decline with age, it is quite possible for any given individual to find them declining at different rates and at different times, according to the individual distribution of damage and atrophy in the brain. The research noted here illustrates one of many links between a particular cognitive function and a particular location in the brain. In most cases we can look at this sort of evidence and consider that it would be very helpful to have a way to (a) spur greater generation of new cells in the brain, that can integrate into tissues, repair areas of damage, and res...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 10, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The corporate media is taking a long time to wake up from its slumber
Here is Jonathan Chait saying fairly succinctly what we know to be true. It is now a confirmed fact that a Russian oligarch -- which ipso facto means a crony of Vladimir Putin -- paid $500,000 to a shell company set up by Donald Trump's bag man, a firm with no employees that had no apparent function other than making secret payments on Trump's behalf. We have learned this thanks to the lawyer for a porn star who received one such payment. (Really. We are talking about the president of the United States here.) Chait notes:For all the speculation about theexistence of the pee tape, the latest revelations prove what is tantam...
Source: Stayin' Alive - May 9, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

Never undermine the work of a nurse
A few months ago a nurse I know vented her frustration at a misperception she had received several times, unfortunately. She recalled a conversation in which someone had asked her in a condescending manner if she does anything else at work besides “handing out pills.” I became visibly irritated at this, not only was this person purposely making disrespectful comments to bring her down but was also perpetuating her own biased notions to a larger audience. As anyone who has ever been admitted to a hospital or visited a loved can tell you, it is usually the nurse who is readily available for a patient. When it com...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 9, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/nabeela-patail" rel="tag" > Nabeela  Patail, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Hospital-Based Medicine Source Type: blogs

Overdiagnosis in IVF - how some IVF clinics increase work for themselves.
Lots of IVF doctors are very trigger happy, and make a diagnosis which is completely inaccurate. For example, they will do an ultrasound scan for a patient on the fifth or sixth day of the cycle and notice at that time that the follicles are small or the endometrium is thin , and then tell her, "Oh, your thin endometrium means that you most probably have endometrial tuberculosis, and you need investigation and treatment for this." This is plainly ridiculous ! On Day 6, most fertile women will have small follicles , because they haven't started growing yet , as a result of which their estrogen levels are goin...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - May 9, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Tags: IVF diagnosis IVF misdiagnosis IVF overdiagnosis IVF tests Source Type: blogs

NEUROSCIENCE & SOCIETY: Ethics, Law, and Technology Confrence - Neuroethics & Law Blog
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Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - May 8, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

More Dander Rising: Ditto to Dr. Poses
Let me second the emotion now recently and repeatedly voiced by Dr. Poses in these pages. It's getting real hard to separate the health policy and malfeasance fecaliths from the general Washington Schei ßsturm raining down on us. We all feel pretty much buffeted non-stop, like(whomp!)badminton shuttlecocks in the corruption game the prevaricator-in-chief seems happily destined to carry on forever. Or at least until some better angels out there in America rise up to put an end to it. Because it's pretty obvious the party hacks clearly aren't going to. They're way too busy (padre you're fired! padre you'...
Source: Health Care Renewal - May 8, 2018 Category: Health Management Source Type: blogs

HOW TO Improve Your Mental Health With Technology
Technology and mental well-being might seem as profoundly antagonistic expressions. However, there are excellent digital tools to reach mindfulness and to practice meditation. You can even use these smartphone apps, virtual reality solutions, digital devices as de-stressing and de-toxifying means for getting out of technology – as, after a while, you will be able to practice all types of anti-anxiety skills on your own. So, let The Medical Futurist show you how you can enhance your mental and emotional health with technology. The need for taking care of our emotional health “Just as we observe physical hygiene ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 8, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: From Chance to Choice Health Sensors & Trackers anxiety depression digital health emotional emotional health Innovation mental health mental wellbeing stress management technology Source Type: blogs

Imaging Agent to Spot Signs of Rheumatoid Arthritis
A research team based in South Korea has developed a positron-emission tomography (PET) tracer that may help to diagnose rheumatoid arthritis (RA). The tracer spots the translocator protein (TSPO), which is produced when white blood cells are active as in the joints of RA patients. Study in Journal of Nuclear Medicine: 18F-FEDAC as a Targeting Agent for Activated Macrophages in DBA/1 Mice with Collagen-Induced Arthritis: Comparison with 18F-FDG… Via: Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging… (Source: Medgadget)
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

A surgeon channels his mentor
“A teacher affects eternity; he can never tell where his influence stops.” – Henry Adams Mrs. Jones (identifying information changed) is a vibrant woman in her eighties who has been admitted to the hospital with swallowing problems and a fever. The CT scans show some swelling next to one of the major blood vessels and our team has been asked to see her and decide if she would benefit from surgery. She winces as I touch her swollen, tender neck. “The scan shows that there is an infection deep in the tissues,” I tell her. “It will clear up more quickly if we take you to the operating room,...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/bruce-campbell" rel="tag" > Bruce Campbell, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Surgery Source Type: blogs

The Stress Reaction Cycle
It may seem like stress is an external force — something that happens to you, such as a rude driver, a work deadline, or the illness of a loved one. As a result, it may seem like there’s really nothing you can do about your stress, but this simply isn’t the case. You may not be able to shape the world so that nothing stressful ever happens to you again, but you can change the way you respond to stress, and that can make all the difference in how you feel.   The most fundamental thing to understand about stress is that it isn’t a one-time event with one cause and one reaction. It’s actuall...
Source: World of Psychology - May 7, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Melissa Samartano, PhD.,LMHC, RYT Tags: Habits Happiness LifeHelper Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Stress Coping Skills Cortisol fight or flight homeostatis neuroception Reactivity Self Medication Stress Hormone stress reduction Stress Response Sympathetic Source Type: blogs

Insurance denials: the law of the land
It all started out with Malaysian methimazole, and didn’t end until two highly trained medical professionals sat on opposite ends of a telephone call, scratching their heads and wondering how two digits being transposed could lead to so many problems. Those two transposed digits caused a thyroid uptake scan to become a bone marrow scan (whatever that is). But look at all it took to get there. Mystery illness, mystery medicine It started when a new patient came to see one of my colleagues with a mystery illness, and a medication in a pill bottle with a label in another language. After figuring out what this medicine w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - May 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/fred-n-pelzman" rel="tag" > Fred N. Pelzman, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

How over-reporting on ultrasound scans harms infertile patients
Vaginal ultrasound is an extremely useful tool when evaluating an infertile woman, but it often bothers me because there are some sonographers who over interpret the scan images. Now, I like the fact that they are careful and systematic, and document everything they see by taking lots of images. However, I hate the fact that draw clinical conclusions based on the black and white images they see on the screen - and they shouldn't be doing this.Their reports will say things like, " There are adhesions between the ovary and the uterus"; " There is a 3 cm endometriotic cyst"; the fallopian tubes a...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - May 7, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 7th 2018
The objective here is a set of tests that (a) match up to the expected outcome based on human trials of mitochondrially targeted antioxidants, and (b) that anyone can run without the need to involve a physician, as that always adds significant time and expense. These tests are focused on the cardiovascular system, particularly measures influenced by vascular stiffness, and some consideration given to parameters relevant to oxidative stress and the development of atherosclerosis. A standard blood test, with inflammatory markers. An oxidized LDL cholesterol assessment. Resting heart rate and blood pressure. Heart r...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 6, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

What is AR Doing for Ultrasound and Surgery?
Medical imaging as we know it might be in the midst of a massive transformation with the emergence of augmented reality (AR). Physician researchers are developing and utilizing the technology to conduct ultrasound, surgeries, and other procedures to make faster and more effective diagnoses.Imperial College and St. Mary ’s Hospital in London have been using Microsoft HoloLens AR Glasses to perform reconstructive surgery on patients with leg injuries. Normally, a surgeon would use a handheld scanner to identify the major blood vessels located near the wound. However, augmented reality headset produces three-dimens iona...
Source: radRounds - May 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs