Do uninsured patients receive more unnecessary care?
American physicians dole out lots of unnecessary medical care to their patients. They prescribe things like antibiotics for people with viral infections, order expensive CT scans for patients with transitory back pain, and obtain screening EKGs for people with no signs or symptoms of heart disease. Some critics even accuse physicians of ordering such services to bolster their revenue. So what happens when uninsured patients make it to the doctor’s office with coughs, low back pain, or other problems? Do physicians stop ordering all these unnecessary tests and services, out of recognition that most of these patients w...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 17, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/peter-ubel" rel="tag" > Peter Ubel, MD < /a > Tags: Policy Medicare Public Health & Source Type: blogs

Brainwave study suggests sexual posing, but not bare skin, leads to automatic objectification
This study relies on the discovery first made nearly 50 years ago that when human faces and bodies are presented upside-down, it is particularly hard for us to perceive them in the same holistic way we do when we look at them the right-way up (a phenomenon known as the “inversion effect”). Supporting the concept of objectification, evidence from this decade shows that inverted sexualised bodies (for example, wearing scant clothing in a provocative pose) do not trigger the inversion effect, suggesting that we process them more like we process objects – by scrutinising their individual parts, rather than ho...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - August 17, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Sex Social Source Type: blogs

RightEye Vision Tests with Contextualized Results: Review and Interview
In conclusion, I really enjoyed the opportunity to use the RightEye system. Working with Dr. Kungle and the RightEye system resulted in the most comprehensive, informative session I’ve ever had about my own vision and left me with clear areas to improve, as well as some initial tools to realize that improvement. Interview with Dr. Kungle Mike Batista, Medgadget: How did you initially engage with RightEye? Dr. Jennifer Kungle: My engagement with the team at RightEye began as part of an initiative for better vision screenings in schools. Most vision screeners just look at acuity, but patients can still have ...
Source: Medgadget - August 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Michael Batista Tags: Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Yeast Powered Radiation Detectors to Keep Clinicians Safe
Radiation dosimeters are commonly used by clinicians working around CT scanners, fluoroscopes, radiotherapy systems, and other equipment. Typically, after wearing one for a month or so, the detector is sent to the manufacturer and the results come about a week or two later, though real-time smart counters are coming out. All these counters are also pricey, so there’s real demand for cheap dosimeters that can give rapid results without having to mail anything. Scientists at Purdue University have now developed special yeast-powered badges that can tell a worker exposed to radiation whether the dose has been too great ...
Source: Medgadget - August 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Public Health Radiology Source Type: blogs

ECoG Post-doc opportunities with Nitin Tandon, Stan Dehaene, Nathan Crone, Xaq Pitkow & me
POSTDOCTORAL RESEARCH POSITIONSPONSORED BY BRAIN INITIATIVE GRANTPostdoctoral research positions are available in the lab of Nitin Tandon at Houston. This position is funded by a BRAIN Initiative U01 grant funded project that uses electro-corticographic (ECoG) recordings and fMRI on a large cohort (n=80) to evaluate psycholinguistic models of reading and speech production to create network level representation of language. Collaborators on the project include Greg Hickok, Stanislas Dehaene, Nathan Crone and Xaq Pitkow; the post-doc will benefit from a close interaction with these experts in the fields of reading, semantics...
Source: Talking Brains - August 15, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Why Hillarycare failed …and what we need to learn from that failure
By MATTHEW HOLT In July 2005 George W Bush had relatively recently won a Presidential election in which the Republican won the popular vote (something that will likely never happen again) & the Republicans controlled all three branches of Government. Those of us liberals at the bottom of a dark trench were wondering if and how we’d get to health reform. So in another reprint to celebrate THCB’s 15th birthday, here was my then take on what went wrong in 1994 and what would happen next–Matthew Holt      There are lots of versions about what killed the 1993-4 health car...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Matthew Holt HillaryCare Source Type: blogs

Hospital Introducing HoloLens Augmented Reality into the Operating Room
Alder Hey, an important children’s hospital in Liverpool, England, is working on integrating Microsoft HoloLens augmented reality technology into its operating theaters. The HoloLens is a headset that is able to overlay digital images onto a person’s field of view, essentially mixing virtual reality with the real world. The hospital partnered with Black Marble, a Microsoft partner based in the UK, to implement the HoloLens so that it can be used by surgeons to easily access imaging and other data during surgery. HoloLens technology is being paired with Microsoft’s Surface Hub, a kind of digital ...
Source: Medgadget - August 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: ENT Informatics Neurosurgery Source Type: blogs

As I ’ve always suspected, Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos
By MATTHEW HOLT Happy 15th birthday THCB! Yes, 15 years ago today this little blog opened for business and changed my life (and at least impacted a few others). Later this week we are going to celebrate and tell you a bit more about what the next 15 years (really?) of THCB might look like. But for now, I’m rerunning a few of my favorite pieces from the mid-2000s, the golden age of blogging. Today I present “Health Care = Communism + Frappuccinos”, one of my favorites about the relationship between government and private sector originally published here on Jan7, 2005. And like the Medicare one from last we...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Matthew Holt OP-ED 15th Birthday Celebration Commumism Frappuchinos Source Type: blogs

Improved Brain Health for All! (update on the BRAIN initiative)
adapted from Figure 3 (Koroshetz et al., 2018). Magnetic resonance angiography highlighting the vasculature in the human brain in high resolution, without the use of any contrast agent, on a 7T MRI scanner. Courtesy of Plimeni& Wald (MGH).[ed. note: here's a great summary onIf, how, and when fMRI goes clinical, by Dr. Peter Bandettini.]TheJournal of Neuroscience recently published a paywalled article onThe State of the NIH BRAIN Initiative.This paper reviewed the research and technology development funded by the “moonshot between our ears” [anewly coined phrase]. The program has yielded a raft ofpublication...
Source: The Neurocritic - August 12, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: The Neurocritic Source Type: blogs

How Can We Handle Bullying in the Workplace?
Bullying is often considered something we think about when recalling moments from our childhood. We automatically turn to the experiences of youth in middle school or high school. But as adults we also experience bullying, and despite a change in environment and age, the look and feel of the bully is the same. They are individuals that have been given, and have assumed, the power to decide if you will be rewarded as an insider or mistreated as the outsider. In the workplace, bullying behavior can often appear to be acceptable and supported by an organization’s culture or rules. Andrew Faas, the author of The Bully&rs...
Source: World of Psychology - August 10, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Staff Tags: Bullying Industrial and Workplace Mental Health America Publishers Adults bullying behavior Workplace bullying Source Type: blogs

Study: Brain training games could be used to assess cognitive abilities, replace the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE)
----Study: Brain training games could be used to assess cognitive abilities, replace the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) //SharpBrains___The Use of Mobile Games to Assess Cognitive Function of Elderly with and without Cognitive Impairment (Journal of Alzheimer's Disease):Abstract: In the past few years numerous mobile games have been developed to train the brain. There is a lack of information about the relation between the scores obtained in these games and the cognitive abilities of the patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not mobile games can be used to assess cognitive abilities of elderly. Tw...
Source: Intelligent Insights on Intelligence Theories and Tests (aka IQ's Corner) - August 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Source Type: blogs

The ‘SEAHA CDT collection’ in journal Heritage Science
This blog post has been cross-posted with permission from SEAHA-CDT. The original version can be read here. Following multiple successful publications, we are pleased to announce that SEAHA now has its own collection within journal Heritage Science; ‘The SEAHA-CDT collection’. The SEAHA CDT collection showcases research papers produced by students  studying at our Centre for Doctoral Training, Science and Engineering in Arts, Heritage and Archaeology based at UCL, University of Oxford and University of Brighton. I see the journal Heritage Science as the ideal venue for our research output: i...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - August 10, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Davy Falkner Tags: Open Access Publishing SpringerOpen Source Type: blogs

Study: Brain training games could be used to assess cognitive abilities, replace the Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE)
___ The Use of Mobile Games to Assess Cognitive Function of Elderly with and without Cognitive Impairment (Journal of Alzheimer’s Disease): Abstract: In the past few years numerous mobile games have been developed to train the brain. There is a lack of information about the relation between the scores obtained in these games and the cognitive abilities of the patients. The aim of this study was to determine whether or not mobile games can be used to assess cognitive abilities of elderly. Twenty healthy young adults, 29 old patients with cognitive impairments (Mini-Mental State Exam (MMSE) [20- 24]) and 27-aged c...
Source: SharpBrains - August 10, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology assessment cognitive evaluation cognitive-abilities cognitive-function Cognitive-impairment cognitive-impairments dementia Mini-Mental-State-Exam MMSE mobile games Serious-Games Source Type: blogs

How doctors fool patients about the cost of test tube baby treatment.
Because test tube baby treatment is so expensive, patients will often doctor shop and go from clinic to clinic in order to find out who the cheapest clinic is, so that they can afford the treatment .This is where some unethical clinics will take them for a ride.They will take out full page ad in a newspaper and advertise an extremely low price to lure patients.Then, in very small print, they'll say that medications cost extra; or ultrasound scans and lab procedures will need an additional fee.This means that by the time the patient has completed the treatment cycle , they'll end up paying much more than they budgeted for ,...
Source: Dr.Malpani's Blog - August 10, 2018 Category: Reproduction Medicine Source Type: blogs

Surrogate End Points Ain ’t all that Bad
By CHADI NABHAN MD MBA Life is busy, yet we somehow find time to stay engaged on social media, remain engrossed in the 24/7 news cycle, and continue our futile efforts to resist clickbait. While social media can allow us to mindlessly scroll through feeds, it also provides an avenue to provoke vigorous dialogue, however diverse, controversial, or even rooted in unfettered biases. These exchanges have served as the primordial soup for virtual friend or foe-ships. Tense and argumentative Twitter exchanges are especially entertaining given the challenges in justifying a position in fewer than 280 characters. Thus, tweetorial...
Source: The Health Care Blog - August 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: at RogueRad Tags: EBM Source Type: blogs

New $30M venture philanthropy fund aims at revolutionizing the diagnosis of Alzheimer ’s Disease
_____ Why diagnosing Alzheimer’s today is so difficult—and how we can do better (Bill Gates): “Alzheimer’s research is a frontier where we can dramatically improve human life—both the lives of people who have the disease and their loved ones. I’m optimistic that we can substantially alter the course of Alzheimer’s if we make progress in several key areas. One of the biggest things we could do right now is develop a reliable, affordable, and accessible diagnostic. The process of getting diagnosed with Alzheimer’s today is less than ideal…First, it can be expensive and i...
Source: SharpBrains - August 8, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness ADDF Alzheimer’s Drug Discovery Foundation Alzheimers-research Bill Gates Brain-health cognitive-decline diagnosis diagnostics Diagnostics Accelerator venture philanthropy Source Type: blogs

What Does Reading Do to Your Brain?
You're reading What Does Reading Do to Your Brain?, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Have you ever felt inspired after reading a masterful book? Have you ever felt like the book made you see things in a different way? Have you ever discovered knowledge because of a book? Has a book made you feel wiser? Books have power! Reading is an amazing process that can actually rewire your brain. “The more that you read, the more things you will know. The more that you learn, the more places you’ll go.&r...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - August 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: thomaslovecraft Tags: featured reading self improvement brain health habits pickthebrain Source Type: blogs

Working in the ER on holidays
As I prepare to go into work for another string of night shifts, I become aware that this is just another holiday that I will be working. It’s the Fourth of July, not a major holiday as is designated by any scheduler, so no credit will be given to those of us who work today. Some previous employers have given extra pay for said days, as little as $200 to as much a $1,000 for working such shifts. My current employer offers none, no enticement to spend the day away from family while caring for others. Many people work on such holidays, from gas stations to grocery stores, so why should we in health care feel entitled t...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - August 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/maria-perez-johnson" rel="tag" > Maria Perez-Johnson, DO < /a > Tags: Physician Emergency Medicine Practice Management Source Type: blogs

Debunking 8 Telepractice Myths
As a tele-practitioner for the past six years, I’ve come across many misconceptions about telepractice. Here are eight common myths I’ve heard, along with what I believe to be the corresponding truths. Myth #1: Telepractice is easier than working onsite. ASHA states telepractice services must be equivalent to those provided onsite. Our professionalism and commitment should remain as strong as if we see clients in person. Telepractice is not a “shortcut.” In fact, I spend just as much time planning, doing paperwork and attending meetings as when I worked in schools. Myth #2: Telepractice can’t ...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - August 6, 2018 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Tracy Sippl Tags: Audiology Private Practice Schools Slider Speech-Language Pathology Telepractice Source Type: blogs

Irreversible
Follow the Wheat Belly lifestyle and literally hundreds of diseases can be reversed: type 2 diabetes reverts to normal within weeks to months (depending on how much weight needs to be lost to restore insulin sensitivity), fatty liver reverses to normal within a few weeks, skin rashes recede, IBS and acid reflux are gone within days in the majority, high triglycerides plummet, even several forms of kidney disease can reverse. But there are health conditions that, once established, can leave effects that can be irreversible even if the initial causative condition reverses. For example, type 2 diabetes can cause kidney d...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - August 6, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates autoimmune Gliadin gluten gluten-free grain-free grains Inflammation undoctored wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Teaching Young Kids to Tolerate Uncomfortable Emotions
Your child starts wailing because they want to play with your phone, and you took it away. So you promptly give it back. Your child is anxious about an upcoming performance at their preschool, so you immediately tell them there’s nothing to be nervous about, and it’ll be perfectly fine. Your child is sad about a fight with their friend, so you try to cheer them up. You make jokes, tell them not to be upset, and mention that they have sooo many things to be thankful for. Your child starts crying about anything, and you blurt out: “Don’t cry! It’s OK! What can I do to make you happy?” Acco...
Source: World of Psychology - August 6, 2018 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: Children and Teens General Mental Health and Wellness Parenting Self-Help Source Type: blogs

Competition and corruption in education: a lethal combination for academic integrity
“If you take me back to 1995, when [cheating] was completely and totally pervasive, I’d probably do it again.” (Lance Armstrong, BBC Sport 2015) It is too simplistic to place all of the blame for cheating on individuals. While individuals do need to take personal responsibility for their actions, their behaviour is often symptomatic of wider and deeply entrenched patterns in society. As this Call for Papers suggests, when the two toxic pressures of competition and corruption intersect, it cannot be surprising that scholars at all levels of the educational spectrum may choose the ‘easy’ path of...
Source: BioMed Central Blog - August 6, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: Dr Tracey Bretag Tags: Open Access Publishing competition Contract cheating corruption education higher education Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, August 6th 2018
In this study, we analyzed FGF21 levels and alterations in the expression of genes encoding components of the FGF21-responsive molecular machinery in adipose tissue from aged individuals so as to ascertain whether altered FGF21 responsiveness that develops with aging jeopardizes human health and/or accelerates metabolic disturbances associated with aging. We studied a cohort of 28 healthy elderly individuals (≥70 years) with no overt signs of metabolic or other pathologies and compared them with a cohort of 35 young healthy controls (≤40 years). Serum FGF21 levels were significantly increased in elderly indiv...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 5, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Study: Trigger warnings don ’t work, they may even backfire
  It’s Official—Trigger Warnings Might Actually Be Harmful (Mdium): “In the era of college student sensitivities to a seemingly ever-increasing list of possible offending material, the use of so-called “trigger warnings” has become commonplace on university campuses. These warnings are usually given at the beginning of a class (or at the beginning of specific sections of a class) to prepare students…” After controlling for various factors, such as sex, race, age, psychiatric history, and political orientation, the researchers found that those participants who receiv...
Source: SharpBrains - August 3, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain Teasers Cognitive Neuroscience trigger warnings Source Type: blogs

The margins are CLEAR!!!
Peekaboo, my 11-year-old cat, is such a star. Our amazing little star…And yes, in case you’re wondering, all of these photos are recent, post-surgery photos. Obviously, her right side looks better than her left, as you can see…But once her fur grows back, she’ll be as good as new (not that that’s the most important thing, of course!). Here’s the most important thing: Our vet just called to let us know that the final results of Peekaboo’s mandibulectomy (half of her lower left jaw was removed) show CLEAR MARGINS. In other words, no cancer cells were found in the outer portion of ...
Source: Margaret's Corner - August 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll feline oral cancer feline oral melanoma Source Type: blogs

A Look Back in Time: Free Internet Access in Hospitals
This note marks the beginning of a new continuing series in which I will look back in time and quote an earlier blog note. I will then comment about how the key ideas covered earlier have changed in the ensuing years.In January, 2006, I posted a note about the innovative idea at that time of providing free Wi-FI to patients and visitors in a hospital (see:Free Wi-Fi for Patients in Hospitals). Here is a quote from the article:TheRichardson Regional Medical Center now provides free Wi-Fi Internet access to patients and visitors throughout the hospital.What started as a WLAN to support paperless charting became a broader dep...
Source: Lab Soft News - August 3, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Quality of Care Source Type: blogs

Nano-Optic Endoscope Allows High-Resolution Imaging
Researchers at Harvard University and Massachusetts General Hospital have developed a new type of endoscopic imaging catheter. The catheter uses metalenses, which contain nanostructures to focus light, to achieve higher resolution imaging than conventional catheter imaging systems. So far, the researchers have used the new system to image deep into tissue samples and see tissue features with greater clarity. It can be difficult to accurately identify diseased tissues using current endoscopic imaging technology. The size of endoscopic imaging systems makes it difficult to achieve significant image quality. “Clinical a...
Source: Medgadget - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Diagnostics ENT GI Materials Medicine Nanomedicine Radiology Surgery Thoracic Surgery Source Type: blogs

3D-Printed Ceramic Implants Help Regrow Bone
Researchers at NYU have developed 3D-printed ceramic implants that dissolves slowly, allowing bone to grow in their place. The implants can be tailored to mimic the shape of the missing bone, and are chemically-coated to stimulate bone growth. The research team hopes that the technology will be useful for patients with non-healing bone defects. At present, large non-healing bone defects are difficult to treat. One option is bone grafting, but this involves damaging bone elsewhere, and isn’t always suitable. To address this issue, researchers are developing a variety of implants in the lab that can help to stimulate b...
Source: Medgadget - August 2, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Conn Hastings Tags: Materials Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Undoing Aging: Doug Ethell's Presentation on the Leucadia Therapeutics Approach to Treating Alzheimer's Disease
Doug Ethell has a clear and comparatively easily tested hypothesis on an important cause of Alzheimer's disease: that it results from the progressive failure of drainage of cerebrospinal fluid through one particularly crucial pathway in the skull. This traps ever greater levels of metabolic waste in the brain, such as amyloid-β, tau, and α-synuclein, and leads to the spectrum of well-known neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregates and resultant dysfunction and death of neurons. Dave Gobel of the Methuselah Foundation backed the first work on this hypothesis a few years back, and the r...
Source: Fight Aging! - August 1, 2018 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

See Me Now
​A young woman with known psychiatric illness and a tendency toward self-injury was sent to the emergency department for medical clearance. She had presented in the past after ingesting objects, so an upright chest and KUB radiograph were obtained.​Nothing unusual popped out at first glance, but it was an entirely different story when magnified in a dark room. The sharp square edge extending beyond the vertebral body was impossible to miss. The four holes confirmed she had almost certainly swallowed a razor blade. Inversion made it even easier to see.​Identifying the object is only half the battle. What is the next s...
Source: Lions and Tigers and Bears - August 1, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Blog Posts Source Type: blogs

Drop of Blood Enough for This Device to Diagnose Brain Injury
Brain injuries, particularly the milder ones, are difficult to accurately diagnose. CT scanners can help, but often they just don’t have the resolution for clinicians to identify unusual aberrations in the image. Moreover, they expose patients to radiation, are not always available, and the process of using them and evaluating the images produced can take quite some time before results are available. Researchers at University of Geneva, in collaboration with the Hospitals of Barcelona, Madrid and Seville, have developed a technique, and an accompanying device, that can be used to diagnose mild brain trauma within abo...
Source: Medgadget - July 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Neurology Pathology Sports Medicine Source Type: blogs

Study: Practice effect due to repeated testing can delay detection of cognitive impairment and dementia
___ Practice Imperfect: Repeated Cognitive Testing Can Obscure Early Signs of Dementia (UC San Diego Health press release): “Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is a progressive, neurodegenerative condition that often begins with mild cognitive impairment or MCI, making early and repeated assessments of cognitive change crucial to diagnosis and treatment. But in a paper published online in the journal Alzheimer’s & Dementia: Diagnosis, Assessment & Disease Monitoring, a team of researchers led by scientists at the University of California San Diego School of Medicine found that repeated testing of middl...
Source: SharpBrains - July 30, 2018 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology aging Alzheimer’s Alzheimer’s Disease cognitive change cognitive-decline cognitive-testing dementia MCI middle-age mild-cognitive-impairment neurodegenerative practice eff Source Type: blogs

Diffuse brainstem gliomas: MRI
Case Report: This is a pediatric case of diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas with enlargement of the pons, with the basilar artery displaced anteriorly against the clivus . The floor of the fourth ventricle is flattened, this is called as flat floor of fourth ventricle sign and obstructive hydrocephalus may be present. There is only minimal post gadolinium enhancement in post contrast scans. Diffuse intrinsic pontine gliomas harbour K27M mutations in the histone H3 gene H3F3A, or less commonly in the related HIST1H3B genes.Famous Radiology Blog http://www.sumerdoc.blogspot.com TeleRad Providers at www.teleradprovi...
Source: Sumer's Radiology Site - July 30, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Sumer Sethi Source Type: blogs

The dynasty of the disc! More history in pain management
Low back pain, despite the multitude of explanations and increasing disability associated with it, has been with humans since forever. Who knows why and I’m not about to conjecture. What’s interesting is that despite ergonomic solutions (fail), increased fitness amongst many people (also a fail), surgical solutions (fail), hands on solutions (fail, fail), and a whole bunch of “special” exercises (fail, fail, fail) we still don’t have a handle on how to reduce disability from it. I don’t think there will be many people who haven’t seen this: I’ve never quite worked out why, w...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - July 29, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Back pain Low back pain Pain conditions Research biopsychosocial Chronic pain Clinical reasoning disability pain management Therapeutic approaches Source Type: blogs

CMS Adds Home Monitoring Reimbursement to Home Health Payments
I have blogged previously about the growing decentralization in healthcare with an increasing number of services provided away from hospitals and with movement toward consumer homes (see:TEN MAJOR TRENDS FACING THE HEALTHCARE INDUSTRY IN THE AMBULATORY SPACE ON A FIVE-YEAR HORIZON;Mobile Health Teams as a Variant on the Theme of Decentralized Acute Care in the Home). New technology is providing cost-effective and useful solutions in terms of home monitoring devices (see:Top 10 Remote Patient Monitoring Companies for Hospitals).A key element in the success of new ways to deliver healthcare has always been whether reimbursem...
Source: Lab Soft News - July 28, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Healthcare Business Healthcare Delivery Healthcare Information Technology Healthcare Innovations Healthcare Insurance Public Health Source Type: blogs

Tracing The Future of Forensic Medicine
Realistic genetic photo fits, portable diagnostic labs and microbiomes are all new elements in the tool-kit of medical professionals in forensic medicine to catch criminals and solve complex cases. Reality is not at all CSI, but not because of the lack of high-tech, but due to the distortions of television. Let’s see how the future of forensic medicine might look in actuality. CSI and its effect Ultraviolet cameras showing bruises healed a while ago. Luminol displaying traces of blood on leather jackets. UV lights like lightsabers scouring over empty rooms to find saliva, semen or any fluid to do a DNA exam in a high...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 26, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Bioethics Biotechnology Future of Medicine Genomics AI artificial intelligence crime CSI DNA forensic forensic medicine forensic science genetics microbiome police Source Type: blogs

How urgent care rejuvenates this primary care doctor
I volunteered to work Saturdays. And to do walk-ins. And to take all comers, not just our patients. It has been an interesting journey. Some clinics put their newest, least experienced clinicians on the very front line of doing urgent care. Here, it’s the opposite. I’ve got 39 years under my belt, and I see everything from sore throats to people who left the emergency room in the middle of a workup because their anxiety kept them from waiting for their CT scan to rule out a blood clot in their lungs. The waiting room fills up, and it’s just me and a medical assistant. Continue reading ... Your patients a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/a-country-doctor" rel="tag" > A Country Doctor, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Primary Care Source Type: blogs

The pathologic manifestations of professionalism
Four years ago after moving back to Iowa City, I needed to find a new primary care doctor. I went to the University’s website and scanned the list of general internists. There I noted a physician that I had known when she was a medical student during my prior stint at the University of Iowa 20 years prior. She had been an amazing medical student, very bright, hardworking, conscientious, and intellectually curious. My guess was that she now was an amazing internist. I asked a few colleagues about her and the responses were consistent: a superb clinician, an internist’s internist. Exactly what I was looking for. ...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 25, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/michael-edmond" rel="tag" > Michael Edmond, MD, MPH < /a > Tags: Physician Practice Management Primary Care Source Type: blogs

Why medical errors can never be completely eliminated
This article originally appeared in Physician’s Weekly. Image credit: Shutterstock.com Your patients are rating you online: How to respond. Manage your online reputation: A social media guide. Find out how. (Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog)
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 24, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/skeptical-scalpel" rel="tag" > Skeptical Scalpel, MD < /a > Tags: Physician Gastroenterology Surgery Source Type: blogs

Could you have prevented this young man's cardiac arrest?
Written by Pendell MeyersWe received a call from an outside hospital asking to transfer a " traumatic post arrest " patient. We were told that a young patient was brought in with altered mental status but complaining of right hip and/or leg pain after being found by his mother at the bottom of the stairs into the basement. His history was significant only for IV heroin abuse, but he denied any recent use. Apparently he had been confused about why he was at the bottom of the stairs, unsure if he had fallen, unsure whether there was any specific traumatic mechanism.The practitioner on the phone stated that he sudde...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - July 24, 2018 Category: Cardiology Authors: Pendell Source Type: blogs

You ungrateful wretches
Brad DeLong is postingentire chapter drafts of his in-progress magnum opus. It is a sweeping economic history of what he calls the " long 20th Century " which began around 1870 and ended in November, 2016 when the liberal project ran into a ditch. I say, maybe, there's still hope, but that's a digression.We take our current condition for granted, but it is not the human condition of the 300,000 year career of Homo sapiens. As DeLong reminds us:When the Long 20th Century started in 1870, the overwhelming bulk of humanity was still so malnourished as to be constantly hungry, so ill-clothed as to be (in climates not...
Source: Stayin' Alive - July 23, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: blogs

MKSAP: 55-year-old woman with an eating disorder
Test your medicine knowledge with the MKSAP challenge, in partnership with the American College of Physicians. A 55-year-old woman is evaluated for a new-patient visit. Medical history is significant for an eating disorder. Although she has maintained a normal weight for the past 20 years, she notes that prior to that time her weight would fluctuate in a range correlating with BMIs of 17 to 19. She has otherwise been healthy and currently feels well. She is postmenopausal and a never-smoker. Family history is significant for postmenopausal osteoporosis in her mother. Her medications are over-the-counter calcium a...
Source: Kevin, M.D. - Medical Weblog - July 23, 2018 Category: General Medicine Authors: < a href="https://www.kevinmd.com/blog/post-author/mksap" rel="tag" > mksap < /a > Tags: Conditions Endocrinology Source Type: blogs

Learning from old research (digging into history)
I recently submitted a manuscript to a journal. After the usual delay as the reviewers commented on my draft, I received the feedback – one comment stood out to me: “the references are quite old”. I scurried around to find some more recent references and resubmitted, but as I did, I started pondering this drive to continually draw on recent research even if the findings of the older references had not been superseded. There is a sense that maybe journal editors and perhaps people reading the journals think that old research has no merit. As someone who relishes reading about the history of pain and pain m...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - July 22, 2018 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Back pain Low back pain Professional topics history Source Type: blogs

Quick update on Peekaboo
I took our cat, Peekaboo, to the vet two days ago, around lunchtime. When her new CAT scan results came in, my vet told me that, even though the melanoma had spread a bit in the past two weeks, the cancer hadn’t gone into the jawbone yet. She recommended that we do the surgery. After asking a few obvious but almost-impossible-to-answer questions (will the surgery PROLONG HER LIFE without impacting her QUALITY OF LIFE, blablabla), I called Stefano, and we both agreed it was our only choice at this point, even though there really aren’t any guarantees: this sort of cancer is very aggressive, so it may come back a...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll cat surgery feline oral cancer feline oral melanoma Source Type: blogs

Name Your Price MRI Startup Coming to an Imaging Center Near You
Medmo, a unique name-your-price imaging service, is helping patients access affordable MRIs and other imaging services by matching them to imaging centers within their budget.  The New York-based startup’s platform is designed to help patients with high deductibles or no insurance find low-cost scans and imaging centers fill up empty slots in their schedule.Medmo could be paving the way for a whole new pricing concept in the healthcare industry. Since the platform works by connecting patients with imaging centers that might have last minute openings, users can pay discounted rates as low as $225 for an MRI and $...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

How MRI Can Help Detect MS in Children Before They Start to Develop Symptoms
Yale University scientists have developed a way to use MRI to determine if a child is at high risk for developing multiple sclerosis (MS) before they start exhibiting symptoms.In a  studypublished inNeurology: Neuroimmunology& Neuroinflammation, researchers evaluated MRI scans of 38 children across 16 different facilities in six countries who had demonstrated signs of MS. The children underwent the neuroimaging procedure for various reasons, but many received scans for headaches. The researchers found that around 42 percent of the children later developed symptoms of MS about two years after their MRI. Children wh...
Source: radRounds - July 19, 2018 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

On Holiday With Health Technologies
Scorching sun, ice-cold beverages, light naps in a poolside beach bed. The time for summer vacation has finally arrived, and you cannot even think of anything else just some margaritas in the pool bar. We collected the best digital technologies for you, so you don’t have to worry about emergency situations or your health on holiday. Have a great vacation! 1) Protect your skin with wearable patches! Although we have to wait a bit until nanoparticles make their way into UV-light absorbing sunscreens and anti-aging products, health apps and wearables already line up to save your skin from looking red potatoes the next d...
Source: The Medical Futurist - July 19, 2018 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Health Sensors & Trackers Patients chatbot dermatology digital health food allergy food sensor health chatbot holiday summer technology telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Orthopedic Surgeons are Training in Virtual Reality : Interview with J & J ’s David Badri
The Johnson & Johnson Institute has recently launched a virtual reality training program designed to prepare orthopedic surgeons and nurses for a couple common procedures. The program will expand to other surgeries, but for now it’s focusing on total knee replacement with direct anterior approach and hip fracture treatment with a proximal femoral nail. The hope is that using virtual reality to learn and practice surgical techniques will help improve clinical outcomes for patients. We spoke with David Badri, Virtual Reality and WW Professional Education at Johnson & Johnson, about the new program and what...
Source: Medgadget - July 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Exclusive Orthopedic Surgery Source Type: blogs

It ’ s not just malignant. It ’ s very aggressive.
All of Peekaboo’s test results are in (see my July 4 post; Peekaboo is one of our cats…11 years old…I took the above photo of her in 2015). The biopsy confirmed the diagnosis of an aggressive malignant oral melanoma. I won’t go on and on about all the discussions Stefano and I (and friends and family) have had in the past couple of weeks, especially this past weekend…all the going back and forth (surgery…or no surgery???), all the online research we’ve done, reading horrible stories on various cat forums, the heartbreak, the anxiety…”what should we DO???”&hel...
Source: Margaret's Corner - July 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Margaret Tags: Blogroll feline oral melanoma mandibulectomy in a cat Source Type: blogs