Government Ownership Sucks
TheWall Street Journaltoday profiles South Africa ’s electric power company, Eskom. What a mess—something we have seen many times with government-owned businesses. Eskom has a bloated workforce, provides terrible service, fails to maintain its facilities, and is transmitting economic damage in every direction. It has rotten management and appar ently corrupt dealings with politicians.Three decades afterMargaret Thatcher this should not be happening. Governments should not own businesses that can earn revenues in the marketplace. For citizens, there is no advantage to government ownership —there is only hi...
Source: Cato-at-liberty - February 15, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Edwards Source Type: blogs

Young Children With Thinner Brain Regions Have Better Working Memory
Associations between the thickness of different cortical areas and children’s age and working memory (digit span); via Botdorf & Riggins, 2018 By Matthew Warren Anyone who has stood in the supermarket aisle trying to remember their shopping list might have wished for a larger brain. But when it comes to memory, bigger isn’t always better. A study published in Neuropsychologia has found that young children whose cerebral cortex is thinner in certain areas also tend to have better working memory. A number of previous brain imaging studies already found that working memory – which we use for remembering...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Developmental Memory Source Type: blogs

Women ’s Brains Have This Major Advantage (M)
Brain scans examined how men and women's brains were processing oxygen and sugar. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do (Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog)
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - February 11, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Jeremy Dean Tags: Neuroscience subscribers-only Source Type: blogs

How & Why I Encourage My Teens to See a Therapist
Everyone needs a good therapist, that’s my personal opinion anyways. We are comfortable taking our cars for occasional tune-ups, and we regularly scan and update our various devices to ensure that they’re in good working order — so why not do the same for our mental health? That’s why I encourage my teens to see a therapist. I want them to understand that going for counseling is healthy, positive, and beneficial. I don’t want them having a completely outdated mindset that only crazy people need therapy. Therapy doesn’t need to be reserved for a life-altering event or serious mental healt...
Source: World of Psychology - February 10, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tyler Jacobson Tags: Children and Teens Parenting Student Therapist Students Source Type: blogs

Kansas State University Welcomes New MRI for Large Animals
A new magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) machine at Kansas State University, which took three years to install, is finally ready to scan neurological injuries in large animals.According to  KSNT, this is the Midwest ’s first MRI of its kind. Its fast imaging speed reduces the amount of time animals have to spend in the machine. According to David Biller, professor of radiology at Kansas State’s College of Veterinary Medicine, the MRI offers several advantages that conventional scanners lack. “We will be a ble to image smaller structures more rapidly,” he said. “With the greater detail or ab...
Source: radRounds - February 8, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New $2,000 Ultrasound Can Increase Imaging Access Around the Globe
The Butterfly iQ, a small, handheld ultrasound scanner that connects to your smartphone, is now being used by physicians to conduct obstetric, lung, and cardiac imaging procedures.There are several aspects that set the Butterfly iQ apart from traditional scanners. Instead of using piezo crystals, the material commonly used to create ultrasonic waves, the device incorporates a single silicon chip that generates ultrasound waves that flow through the body. This technology significantly reduces the price and can be purchased for  $2,000.The silicon chip was invented by  Jonathan Rothberg, PhD, who has founded multip...
Source: radRounds - February 8, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Heart Implant Measures Left Atrial Pressure to Monitor Heart Failure
Vectorious Medical Technologies, a company based in Israel, has announced that it has developed an unusual intra-cardiac monitoring device that has a built-in microchip but no battery. The V-LAP monitoring device allows patients to take measurements of the left atrial pressure at any time, which is done with the assistance of a small external module. The first implantations of the device are now being conducted as part of a first-in-human study that will enroll 30 patients across Europe and Israel. Left atrial pressure (LAP) is an an important parameter for evaluating heart health, particularly when trying to detect w...
Source: Medgadget - February 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Medicine Source Type: blogs

Ultrasound Case 066
A 47 year old man falls 4m onto a wall, hitting his left chest wall. He is complaining of chest pain and you wonder whether there is a pneumothorax. Describe and interpret these scans The post Ultrasound Case 066 appeared first on Life in the Fast Lane • LITFL • Medical Blog. (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - February 8, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr James Rippey Tags: TOP 100 Ultrasound Lung Ultrasound Pneumothorax Subcutaneous emphysema Surgical emphysema Source Type: blogs

How Horizon Scanning Can Give the Military a Technological Edge
Horizon scanning could promote innovative practices and innovation uptake, through the adoption of new ideas, equipment, and methods, with benefits that could positively affect the UK economy as a whole. But a wider mechanism for processing and assessing the selected developments would be needed. (Source: The RAND Blog)
Source: The RAND Blog - February 8, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Sarah Grand-Clement Source Type: blogs

Digital Thermography and Machine Learning Team Up to Improve Burn Wound Care
A team at McGill University in Canada and the Universidad Autonoma de San Luis Potosi in Mexico have developed a system for analyzing thermographic scans of burn wounds to improve how they are analyzed and how patients are treated. The team used digital infrared thermography, a non-invasive imaging technique, to study wounds when they were presented and for the following few days afterward. Infrared thermography shows the heat signature of the tissues being observed, which can indicate a variety of underlying processes taking place, particularly the amount of blood perfusion below the surface. “Digital infr...
Source: Medgadget - February 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Critical Care Informatics Plastic Surgery Source Type: blogs

Where Is Digital Health Heading In Denmark?
After reading the Danish digital health strategy, one of the most forward-looking examples of a government-supported objective to adjust the medical arena to the 21st century, we looked around what real-life projects aim to transform patients’ and doctors’ lives for the better in the Scandinavian country. Our findings are thrilling: the newly established Danish National Genome Center strives to have at least 60,000 whole-genome sequenced in the next 5 years, while the Copenhagen Healthtech Cluster wants to set up a network of data registers updated so fast that it might enable helping doctors real-time – ...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 7, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Healthcare Policy big data Danish Denmark digital health digital health strategy genetics genomics health data healthcare design Innovation technology Source Type: blogs

TestCard, a $4 Urine Test Read by Your Smartphone
Recently announced as one of the Digital Trends’ Top Tech of CES 2019, TestCard is a UK-based company that allows users to turn their smartphones into a clinical-grade urinalysis kit. The process starts with a postcard-like card mailed directly to the consumer. The card costs about $4 and contains three fold-out urine test strips, each with a QR code and several small, multi-colored square pads. A test strip is detached from the card and dipped in a urine sample, after which the accompanying mobile app utilizes the phone’s camera to scan and analyze the test strip. About 20 seconds later, the app displays the t...
Source: Medgadget - February 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Cici Zhou Tags: Diagnostics Medicine Pathology Pediatrics Urology Source Type: blogs

Top Smart Algorithms In Healthcare
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top smart algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you lived under a rock for the last couple of years, could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or machine...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs

Top Smart Algorithms In Healthcare
As artificial intelligence tools have been invading more or less every area of healthcare, we made a list to keep track of the top A.I. algorithms aiming for better diagnostics, more sophisticated patient care or further sighted predictions of diseases. Does A.I. beat doctors? Only if you have lived under a rock for the last couple of years could you not have heard about artificial intelligence. Some might have even come across the spread and potential of A.I. in healthcare. Not only smart algorithms themselves but also the hype around A.I. has grown immensely, thus every time a new study about deep learning or mach...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 5, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI cancer death future Health Healthcare pathology prediction Radiology technology Source Type: blogs

Overcoming the Double Standard Surrounding Psychiatric Medications
Women hold themselves to this standard where we’re supposed to be perfect. We all have our own image of what that should be, and it doesn’t involve taking psychiatric medication. I’m walking up Lexington Avenue towards the subway on a cold Manhattan winter day from my psychiatrist’s office. It’s a route I’ve walked for five years, at varying frequencies, depending on the intensity of my mental health issues. My doctor is warm and nurturing with a great sense of humor, and I always walk out her door with a smile on my face. But once I hit the street, my mood can quickly shift: frustrated ...
Source: World of Psychology - February 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Psych Central Guest Author Tags: Medications Mental Health and Wellness Personal Psychiatry Psychotherapy Publishers Stigma The Fix Anti Depressants Psychiatric Medication Source Type: blogs

Creating an Easier Path for Head/Neck Cancer Patients
Recently, an article was published in the Leader about my work with patients with head or neck cancer. The response has been great, with the most-asked question being about the pathway I created to help patients and caregivers navigate through and receive improved access to care. How did I create this pathway? The first thing I did was listen to patients and caregivers discuss what they wished they knew before treatment started. After years of listening, I realized something had to change for them. From this realization came the idea of designing a pathway so all treating partners—as well as patients and caregivers&m...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - February 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Stacey Brill Tags: Health Care Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Source Type: blogs

Creating an Easier Path for Patients With Head/Neck Cancer
Recently, an article was published in the Leader about my work with patients with head or neck cancer. The response has been great, with the most-asked question being about the pathway I created to help patients and caregivers navigate through and receive improved access to care. How did I create this pathway? The first thing I did was listen to patients and caregivers discuss what they wished they knew before treatment started. After years of listening, I realized something had to change for them. From this realization came the idea of designing a pathway so all treating partners—as well as patients and caregivers&m...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - February 4, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Stacey Brill Tags: Health Care Slider Speech-Language Pathology Dysphagia Source Type: blogs

Participants In This Study Successfully Down-regulated Their Amygdala Activity With The Help Of Neurofeedback
This study supports existing research showing promise for the application of rt-fMRI neurofeedback in the treatment of problems like PTSD, addiction and depression that are associated with heightened amygdala activation. The clinical potential of this technique, bridging the worlds of neurobiology and psychotherapy, is clear. That said, fMRI scanning is an expensive business, so it may be a while before a new world of personalised mental health interventions reveals itself. —Training emotion regulation through real-time fMRI neurofeedback of amygdala activity Post written by Eleanor Morgan (@eleanormorgan) for B...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - February 4, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain guest blogger Mental health Source Type: blogs

The Age of A.I. Will Value Compassionate Care More Than Ever
While modern medicine created the professional, efficient, metric-driven medic alienated from the patients, the need for compassionate care is more urgent than ever. However, that’s not only up to the physician but also the organization, because individual attempts might result in burnout symptoms. Adoption of A.I. could change the situation for the better in the future, as it would create space for doctors and nurses to spend more quality time with patients. The question is, are doctors ready for it? Medicating Albert, the plush armadillo Two years ago, my niece had to spend two weeks in hospital as she partia...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 2, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Artificial Intelligence in Medicine AI care compassionate care digital digital health future healthare nursing physician technology Source Type: blogs

RSNA and ACR Introduce RadInfo 4 Kids
In an effort to help kids understand the  daunting mechanismsof imaging machines, RadiologyInfo.org, a patient resource site sponsored and created by the Radiological Society of North America (RSNA) and the American College of Radiology (ACR) has launched RadInfo 4 Kids, an interactive site that helps children learn about medical scans.RadInfo 4 Kids has a  collectionof games, videos, stories, and activities that help kids get emotionally and mentally prepared for their scan procedure. It can be challenging for children to grasp what happens in the scanner, so to get on their level, the site directors have also p...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

New AI Technology Prioritizes Critical Chest Scans
A new artificial intelligence-based system out of the University of Warwick identifies time-sensitive chest scans that need to be prioritized, according to a study recently published inRadiology.Due to theradiologist shortagein the United Kingdom, hospitals are struggling with timely image readings. In emergency departments, scans can take from one hour to two business days to be processed. Chest scans account for a significant portion of a radiologist ’s workload, and according to EureakAlert, they make up 40 percentof all “diagnostic imaging worldwide.”A new AI technology aims to diminish exam back...
Source: radRounds - February 1, 2019 Category: Radiology Authors: Julie Morse Source Type: blogs

Pros and Cons of Aging-in-Place vs Assisted Living
Discussions with Elders about Housing With These 5 TipsMaking Choices: Aging in Place or Assisted Living?10 Ways to Make a Loved-One's Hospital Stay More Comfortable  (Source: Minding Our Elders)
Source: Minding Our Elders - February 1, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Carol Bradley Bursack Source Type: blogs

Computational Model of Heart ’s Mitral Valve to Predict Surgery Outcomes
Mitral valve repairs are complex surgeries that require particular attention to each patient’s unique anatomy, type of regurgitation such as in Carpentier’s classification, and other factors. Recently, transcatheter mitral valve implants have started to become popular, but they’re very difficult to place so as not to obstruct nearby blood flow. Bioengineers at The University of Texas at Austin, Penn Medicine and Georgia Tech have developed a computational modeling method for the movement of mitral valve flaps, which may allow physicians to simulate different surgical techniques and predict which will...
Source: Medgadget - January 31, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Informatics Source Type: blogs

A Simple Guide To The Art Of Living (This Works Even If Your Life Is a Mess)
You're reading A Simple Guide To The Art Of Living (This Works Even If Your Life Is a Mess), originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. It’s no secret that everyone wants to “feel” better and improve their lives in some way while reducing the stress that comes along with it. There’s a multi-billion dollar “personal development” industry dedicated to helping people all over the world to live more fulfilled and meaningful life. Thing is, you can invest in all the courses, attend ev...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 31, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DabsOfReality Tags: featured meditation philosophy self improvement benefits of meditation how to meditate personal development self development stoic philosophy the art of living vipassana meditation Source Type: blogs

The DNA Test Results that Uncovered a Family Secret
by Dani Shapiro Two and a half years ago, after whimsically submitting my DNA to Ancestry.com for analysis, I made the discovery that the father who raised me – the long-dead father I adored – had not been my biological father. I could easily have never known this. I could have lived my entire life not knowing the truth of my paternity. As I stared at the results on my computer screen, as I saw a match with a first cousin who was a perfect stranger, as I scanned the list of unfamiliar names to whom I was apparently related, I quickly understood what had happened.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - January 30, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Blog Editor Tags: Editorial-AJOB Featured Posts Genetics memoir Source Type: blogs

Siemens Healthineers Powerful MAGNETOM Lumina 3 Tesla MRI Cleared by FDA
Siemens Healthineers won clearance from the FDA to introduce its MAGNETOM Lumina 3 Tesla MRI scanner in the United States. The device features a large 70 cm bore, which can fit some of the wider patients that today’s clinicians have to work with, and artificial intelligence technologies to speed up exams. An optional audio/video system provides entertainment for patients, which is particularly beneficial when working with children and impatient adults. Thanks to the 3D Petra with Quet Suite technology, the device is considerably quieter than conventional scanners without the latest sound suppression techniques. Sieme...
Source: Medgadget - January 30, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Radiology Source Type: blogs

Handheld Photonic Device Measures Arterial Stiffness
A collaboration between nine different European research organizations, including the medical device giant Medtronic, has developed a prototype device for quick and easy measurement of arterial stiffness. This is an important development, as arterial stiffness is a biomarker for high blood pressure, but there are no reliable ways of measuring it without a cardiologist bearing special equipment. The silicon photonic chips to perform laser doppler vibrometry on a patient’s skin to deduce metrics for arterial stiffness and to diagnose cardiovascular diseases The new device looks like a blow dryer, but it emits low power...
Source: Medgadget - January 29, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Cardiology Diagnostics Medicine Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

Overprescribing Is a Key Component of the Opioid Crisis — Here’s How to Stop It
By DAVE CHASE  Today’s opioid crisis is one of the most dire side effects driven by our dysfunctional U.S. healthcare system. A recent JAMA Surgery report found that many surgeons prescribe four times more opioids than their patients use. This opens the door for misuse and abuse later on. In fact, the total combined cost of misuse, abuse, dependence and overdose is about $78.5 billion. Unfortunately, there’s a direct connection between the low-quality care many patients receive, and the astounding rates of opioid addiction. Often, insurance plans offer access to high-cost, volume-centric physicians and inc...
Source: The Health Care Blog - January 29, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: matthew holt Tags: Patients Value-Based Care Dave Chase Opioid epidemic Source Type: blogs

Retaliation against physicians reporting EHR flaws that cause use errors? Physicians subpoenaed in Rhode Island, allegedly after reporting EHR risks
It appears that way to my eye.  First, on use errors (as opposed to user errors from carelessness):“Use error” is a term used very specifically by NIST to refer to user interface designs that will engender users to make errors of commission or omission. It is true that users do make errors, but many errors are due not to user error per se but due to designs that are flawed, e.g., poorly written messaging, misuse of color-coding conventions, omission of information, etc. From"NISTIR 7804: Technical Evaluation, Testing and Validation of the Usability of Electronic Health Records." It is available a...
Source: Health Care Renewal - January 29, 2019 Category: Health Management Tags: David Levesque healthcare IT difficulties Lifespan retaliation rhode island hospital use error Source Type: blogs

A Surprising New Way To Avoid Choking Under Pressure – Imagine You Have The Prize And Are Performing To Keep It
The mental technique is called “incentive reappraisal” and it’s reflected in changed activity in a key brain structure By Christian Jarrett Choking is a ubiquitous and extremely frustrating human weakness – as the stakes are raised, our performance usually improves, but only up to a point, beyond which the pressure gets too much and our skills suddenly deteriorate. Any new psychological tricks to ameliorate this problem will be welcomed by sports competitors, students and anyone else who needs to be at their best under high pressure situations. A fascinating paper in Social Cognitive and Affective N...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - January 28, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Sport Source Type: blogs

Ways to avoid “ othering ”
This study provides an insight into the norms expected as part of “being a proper patient – ready for change”. Norms are a part of culture, assumptions about what “is done” in a particular context. Just as health professionals learn to “be professionals”, people seeking help for their health are also expected to behave in certain ways. Othering is, as I’ve indicated above, a normal or common part of interactions – some authors suggest we need an “other” in order to for our self to “know itself and define its boundaries” (Krumer-Nevo, 2012). At...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - January 27, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Assessment Clinical reasoning Coping strategies Pain conditions Professional topics Resilience/Health charity Chronic pain othering persistent pain reasonableness understanding Source Type: blogs

Bagel Brain: What Wheat and Grains Do to the Brain
You know that raisin bagel or bowl of bran cereal you have every morning, or the plate of pasta or spaghetti you have for dinner? Each and every serving erodes the health of your brain. Some of the effects are reversible, while others are cumulative and irreversible. But understand the concepts behind living the Wheat Belly wheat/grain-free lifestyle and you are enormously empowered in regaining control over health, weight, and youthfulness. Transcript: Hi everybody, Doctor William Davis here. Why do I call this Bagel Brain? Well, a number of reasons — consumption of modern wheat and closely-related grains have a w...
Source: Wheat Belly Blog - January 27, 2019 Category: Cardiology Authors: Dr. Davis Tags: News & Updates adhd appetite autism autoimmune cognitive dementia Depression Gliadin gluten-free grain-free grains wheat belly Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, January 28th 2019
In this study, we show that calorie restriction is protective against age-related increases in senescence and microglia activation and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in an animal model of aging. Further, these protective effects mitigated age-related decline in neuroblast and neuronal production, and enhanced olfactory memory performance, a behavioral index of neurogenesis in the SVZ. Our results support the concept that calorie restriction might be an effective anti-aging intervention in the context of healthy brain aging. Greater Modest Activity in Late Life Correlates with Lower Incidence of Dementia ...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 27, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The Future of Surfaces in Healthcare and Beyond
Augmented reality displays, transparent touchscreens, shape-shifting buildings, digital tattoos with screens, living organisms as vibrating information panels, projectors turning any exterior into a control panel: the future of surfaces is as exciting as never before. How could medicine and healthcare benefit from the change in the usage of surfaces in the future? Beauty and aesthetics of the surfaces around humans In the cacophony of noise, colors and constant stimuli, humans of the 21st century are yearning after simplicity, cleanliness, and nature. Clear-cut shapes, single colors and natural materials. An escape from th...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 26, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Healthcare Design augmented reality display future futuristic Hospital hospital design Innovation LED screen smartphone surface technology touchscreen VR Source Type: blogs

Towards Reliable, Low-Cost Tests for the Earliest Stages of Alzheimer's Disease
The research community has moved quite determinedly these past few years towards practical, low-cost tests for early Alzheimer's disease. Even with the limited means available to patients today, an early warning might be used to delay the aggregation of amyloid-β that takes place in the initial stages of the condition, before the appearance of cognitive impairment. Lifestyle changes such as weight loss and improved fitness, antiviral therapies, and control of chronic inflammation should all make some difference, given what is known of the mechanisms of Alzheimer's disease. Looking ahead, better options may soon be ava...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 25, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Boston Sci ’s Vercise Gevia Deep Brain Stimulators for Parkinson’s Now Available in U.S.
Boston Scientific is releasing its Vercise Primary Cell (PC) and Vercise Gevia deep brain stimulation (DBS) systems in the U.S. Both have received recent FDA approval to be used in managing symptoms of Parkinson’s, as well as European regulatory clearance for Parkinson’s, dystonia, and essential tremor. The devices feature the company’s innovative Vercise Cartesia directional lead which allows for precise control of the location, direction, shape, and range of the electrical stimulation that is delivered. The lead has eight independent electrodes and the system can adjust the electrodes&rsq...
Source: Medgadget - January 25, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Neurology Neurosurgery Rehab Source Type: blogs

uEXPLORER Whole Body PET-CT Cleared by FDA for Clinical and Research Use
United Imaging Healthcare, a company out of Shanghai, China, won FDA clearance for its uEXPLORER combined Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and Computed Tomography (CT) scanner. The device can perform whole-body scans using both imaging modalities at the same time. The system is expected to be used in both clinical practice, to spot cancers and to track disease progression, and in research when studying inflammation, blood flow, and other processes affecting large parts of the body. United Imaging believes its system can deliver superior imaging performance to existing PET/CT scanners thanks to new hardware...
Source: Medgadget - January 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Nuclear Medicine Radiology Source Type: blogs

A Digitally Caring Environment: The Internet of Things in Hospitals
What do hospital beds tell about patients? How does an „indoor GPS”-system work? How could sensors and connected devices enhance both patient experience and medical resource efficiency? Here, we tell you everything about IoT within the walls of health facilities. Emergency drones, Fitbits, and chatty hospital-beds In April 2045, Paul was walking down the street with her 4-year-old daughter, Lily, in downtown Boston. They were heading to the ice cream & deli at the corner of the square two minutes from their home. Suddenly, the man experienced chest pain, started to breathe heavily and collapsed. Lily looked...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design AI connected digital digital health digital health sensors doctor future of hospital IoT patient smart smart algorithm Source Type: blogs

A Digitally Caring Environment: The Internet of Things in Hospitals
What do hospital beds tell about patients? How does an „indoor GPS”-system work? How could sensors and connected devices enhance both patient experience and medical resource efficiency? Here, we tell you everything about IoT within the walls of health facilities. Emergency drones, Fitbits, and chatty hospital-beds In April 2045, Paul was walking down the street with her 4-year-old daughter, Lily, in downtown Boston. They were heading to the ice cream & deli at the corner of the square two minutes from their home. Suddenly, the man experienced chest pain, started to breathe heavily and collapsed. Lily looked...
Source: The Medical Futurist - January 24, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: nora Tags: Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers Healthcare Design AI connected digital digital health digital health sensors doctor future of hospital IoT patient smart smart algorithm Source Type: blogs

10 Ways to Stop Self-Sabotaging Your Success
You're reading 10 Ways to Stop Self-Sabotaging Your Success, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. Usually, self-sabotaging behavior takes hold of people’s lives, and they do not even realize it. They attribute it to stress, common sense considerations, and ‘objective’ assessment of the possible struggles. Self-sabotaging behavior is deeply interconnected with self-esteem and the way a particular person perceives the world. Thus, self-sabotaging behavior should be treated as an outcome of inade...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - January 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Patrick Reeves Tags: career self education success confidence pickthebrain self improvement self-sabotaging Source Type: blogs

Interview with Dr. David Rhew, Samsung ’s Chief Medical Officer: CES 2019
Most people think of Samsung as a manufacturer of televisions and smartphones, but the company is much more diversified and in the last few years it has seriously entered the medical space. Samsung now offers its own portable CT scanners, ultrasound machines, radiography systems, and in-vitro diagnostics products. It has done so by buying existing companies, such as Medison, an ultrasound maker, by partnering with other firms, and through accelerating their independent R&D efforts. At CES 2019 we got a chance to interview Dr. David Rhew, Chief Medical Officer at Samsung, about the various efforts that the company is un...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Medicine Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

Improving Healthcare Efficiency with Incentives: Interview with Ben Kraus, CEO of Stellar Health
We present simple reminders to the provider at the point-of-care. For example: “There are two things that you really need to do for this patient today, based on their history.”  It simplifies everything and prioritizes the actions that contribute to a healthier patient in the long-run. Trying to use an EHR to do this doesn’t work because EHRs were designed to serve as a complete clinical record of a patient, which is cavernous and lacks actionability. EHRs were not designed to align payor and providers incentives and create a prioritization framework to maximize health outcomes. There are innovative ...
Source: Medgadget - January 23, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Informatics Medicine Public Health Society Source Type: blogs

A Recent Update on the Use of Immune Ablation and HSCT to Treat Autoimmunity
For more than twenty years now, Richard Burt's research teams have been working on the treatment of autoimmunity through the destruction and recreation of the immune system. Autoimmunity is a malfunction in the self-tolerance of immune cells, leading them to attack patient tissues. The malfunction is entirely contained in the immune system, so if the immune system is destroyed and replaced, the autoimmunity stops. If the genesis of autoimmunity is happenstance, an unfortunate one-time accident, then this is a cure. But if autoimmunity has a trigger outside the immune system in a given patient, it will return after some per...
Source: Fight Aging! - January 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs