Eating a Mediterranean diet may offset the damage of air pollution
Researchers from New York University studied 548,699 adults across America over 17 years. Those who ate more fruit, veg and whole grains were five times less likely to die pollution-related deaths. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opioids becoming drug of choice at raves and electronic dance clubs
(Natural News) Besides their children’s obsession with computers, some modern-day parents must deal with another, deadlier form of addiction that may be manipulating their offspring: the overuse of opioids. A new study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at New York University Rory Meyers College of Nursing concluded that one in 10... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The English language is collapsing into "Idiocracy" gobbledygook on liberal college campuses as "gender pronoun" lunacy kicks into overdrive
(Natural News) The first known college to do so, the City University of New York (CUNY) – Guttmana, located in New York City, recently distributed and has been actively propagating a “Gender Identity and Pronouns” manifesto that instructs students and faculty on how to further bastardize the English language by replacing its traditional gender pronouns... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cannabis oil could reduce epileptic fits by 40 per cent
Cannabis oil (CBD) has been used in a clinical trial by the School of Medicine at New York University to lower severe seizures in patients suffering from Lennox-Gastaut by more than 40 per cent (stock). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Proposed Guidelines Could Leave Some PTSD Patients in the Dark
Researchers from the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine said less patients would be diagnosed with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) under proposed changes to diagnostic criteria for the disease. The researchers conducted a study of how the guidelines could impact PTSD diagnosis and those findings were published Monday in the journal Psychological Medicine. The guidelines in question are the International Classification of Diseases (ICD)11, a system of medical coding, created by the World Health Organization (WHO) for documenting diagnoses, diseases, signs and symptoms, and social circumstances. “There ...
Source: MDDI - May 15, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Biologists find mechanisms that control where transcription factors bind
(New York University) A team of biologists has determined how transcription factors, which guide gene regulation, function differently in embryonic development. The results help illuminate how cells acquire distinct functions as the embryo matures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rise in kids inhaling second-hand marijuana smoke at home
The report by the City University of New York suggests cannabis may be complicating efforts to limit kids' exposure to second-hand smoke, after years of efforts to curb cigarette smoking around kids. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU Resident, Medical Student Commit Suicide 5 Days Apart NYU Resident, Medical Student Commit Suicide 5 Days Apart
A New York University (NYU) resident describes feelings of vulnerability and helplessness after the deaths, as colleagues seek answers. NYU is offering counseling and support to the community.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

NYU Resident, Medical Student Die by Suicide 5 Days Apart NYU Resident, Medical Student Die by Suicide 5 Days Apart
A New York University (NYU) resident describes feelings of vulnerability and helplessness after the deaths, as colleagues seek answers. NYU is offering counseling and support to the community.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

New research puts distinct memories of similar events in their place
(New York University) Neuroscientists have found new evidence on how distinct memories of similar events are represented in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is All Our Photo Taking Worthwhile?
New research sheds light on what’s working and what’s not. Smart phone cameras have turned many of us into de facto members of the paparazzi. Every event from the mundane to the glorious is shared in the moment or preserved for the future. But do our efforts pay off as intended? Whatever your motivation is for taking photos, it’s worthwhile to have a clear view of what’s working and what’s not. For example, recent studies offer conflicting and sometimes surprising results on how photo taking impacts our memory and quality of experience. One of the common complaints waged by those who dislike t...
Source: Psych Central - May 4, 2018 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Amy Fries Tags: Anxiety Memory and Perception Motivation and Inspiration Self-Help Technology Active Listening Attention comparison Distraction Experience Mindfulness nonvisual memory Present Moment worry Source Type: news

Non-white scholars are underrepresented in scholarly articles in communications
(New York University) Non-white scholars continue to be underrepresented in publication rates, citation rates, and editorial positions in communications and media studies, finds a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development and published in the Journal of Communication. This has negative professional implications both for non-white scholars, in terms of contract renewals, tenure and promotion, and for the field in general, in terms of the visibility of and attention to the knowledge produced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could cannabis treat autism? Scientists will investigate the effects of marijuana in the disorder
The University of California, San Diego, has announced plans to launch such a study next year, with others due to begin at New York University and  the Montefiore Medical Center. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Transgender people who are denied mental health care at higher risk of self-harm
(New York University) When those who identify as transgender are denied mental health care, they stand at higher risk of substance abuse as a coping method. In turn, this can increase their vulnerability to attempted suicide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Smart' dresser prototype guides people with dementia in getting dressed
(New York University) A new study published in JMIR Medical Informatics describes how a 'smart home' prototype may help people with dementia dress themselves through automated assistance, enabling them to maintain independence and dignity and providing their caregivers with a much-needed respite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lonely and non-empathetic people more likely to make unethical shopping decisions
(Binghamton University) Lonely consumers are capable of behaving morally, but aren't motivated to, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You Asked: Is Listening to Music Good For Your Health?
If you’re looking for an easy way to transform your mood, cue the music. Studies have shown that music can buoy your mood and fend off depression. It can also improve blood flow in ways similar to statins, lower your levels of stress-related hormones like cortisol and ease pain. Listening to music before an operation can even improve post-surgery outcomes. How can music do so much good? Music seems to “selectively activate” neurochemical systems and brain structures associated with positive mood, emotion regulation, attention and memory in ways that promote beneficial changes, says Kim Innes, a professor ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology Source Type: news

Heavy Drinking May Change the Bacteria In Your Mouth and Raise Gum Disease Risk
There’s still quite a bit scientists don’t know about the microbiome: the vast collection of microorganisms living within your body. What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that your lifestyle habits, from the foods you eat to the medications you take, may influence these bacterial colonies. Even drinking seems to have an effect. A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Microbiome, finds that drinking alcohol may alter some of the approximately 700 types of bacteria in your mouth — and probably not for the better. The study finds that alcohol may give rise to strains of oral bacteria that ar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Reflections on Big Data in Healthcare: Exploring Emerging Roles
In conclusion, librarians can become experts in the field of data science. There are several mechanisms that are already in place to assist us with learning these skill sets. Both NLM and MLA have a vast number of opportunities to learn more about data science and to participate in data science initiatives. As we create partnerships and collaborations, we will become more knowledgeable about the needs of our researchers. In addition, librarians must remember that we are life-long learning and we welcome a challenge. References Epstein, B. A. (2017). Health sciences libraries in the United States: new directions. Healt...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - April 24, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Data Science Source Type: news

Just one alcoholic beverage per day raise risks of mouth cancer
A New York University study revealed that people who drank one or more alcoholic beverage per day had an excess of harmful oral bacteria and a drought of healthy bacteria to fight off harmful strains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Just one alcoholic beverage per day raise risks of mouth cancer, gum disease and heart disease  
A New York University study revealed that people who drank one or more alcoholic beverage per day had an excess of harmful oral bacteria and a drought of healthy bacteria to fight off harmful strains. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Black parents can help bridge cultural divide between students and white teachers
(Binghamton University) Bringing black parents into school settings can work toward shifting and closing the cultural disconnects between black families and predominantly white school personnel, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

IBS patients obtain robust, enduring relief from home-based treatment program
(University at Buffalo) In the largest federally funded non-drug clinical trial for irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), patients with the most severe and persistent symptoms achieved robust and sustained relief by learning to control symptoms with minimal clinician contact. Led by University at Buffalo researchers in collaboration with colleagues at New York University and Northwestern University, the study was published online before print in Gastroenterology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Obsessing over Harry and Meghan's wedding can be dangerous
Dr Sue Varma, a psychiatrist based at New York University Langone Medical Center, stressed that fandom over Prince Harry and Markle can cause people to live in a 'fantasy world'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Higher rates of type one diabetes found in 'food swamps'
Findings from a New York University study challenge the traditional belief that type one is caused by genetics and indicate that an unhealthy diet may contribute to all kinds of health conditions. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How a 27-Year-Old Math Whiz (and His Uber Driver) Found a Big Flaw in an IRS Tax Formula
Most people chat with their Uber driver about traffic or the weather. Sam Ferguson, on the other hand, spent one January Uber ride diving into tax math—and unearthed a big problem for many Obamacare customers. Ferguson, 27, a math Ph.D student at New York University, was on a trip to Iowa when he got to talking with his Uber driver about their jobs. The driver told Ferguson that he had trouble calculating the premium assistance he was eligible for under the Affordable Care Act, also known as Obamacare. People without job-based coverage making up to $48,560 are eligible for government help paying their monthly health ...
Source: TIME: Health - April 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Elizabeth O'Brien Tags: Healthcare Obamacare Taxes Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry study identifies effective school-based cavity prevention program
(New York University) School-based prevention programs can substantially reduce children's cavities -- but what type of treatment should be delivered in schools to best prevent tooth decay? A new study by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry, published in the journal BMC Oral Health, suggests that cavity prevention programs with a combination of prevention strategies may be more effective than one alone for reducing tooth decay. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are the media all 'doom and gloom'? Not when it comes to coverage of our oceans
(New York University) The news media are often accused by adopting a 'doom and gloom' tone, especially when it comes to coverage of the environment. However, a new study on how journalists report on the state of our oceans shows that view may be misguided. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Ruth Nussenzweig, Who Pursued Malaria Vaccine, Dies at 89
Dr. Nussenzweig ’ s research into one of the world ’ s most deadly diseases laid the groundwork for an approach once thought beyond reach. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NEIL GENZLINGER Tags: Malaria New York University Langone Medical Center Deaths (Obituaries) Research Nussenzweig, Ruth Source Type: news

When we sign, we build phrases with similar neural mechanisms as when we speak
(New York University) Differences between signed and spoken languages are significant, yet the underlying neural processes we use to create complex expressions are quite similar for both, a team of researchers has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DataFlash: Data Indexers
The Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) is “an independent population health research center at UW Medicine, part of the University of Washington, that provides rigorous and comparable measurement of the world’s most important health problems and evaluates the strategies used to address them.” Their mission is to improve the health of the world’s populations by providing the best information on population health, and to do so, IHME enlists the expertise of countless individuals, including researchers, data analysts, data scientists, and thirteen data indexers. What is a data indexer? ...
Source: Dragonfly - April 2, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Source Type: news

People with diabetes visit the dentist less frequently despite link between diabetes, oral health
(New York University) Adults with diabetes are less likely to visit the dentist than people with prediabetes or without diabetes, finds a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

We'll pay more for unhealthy foods we crave, neuroscience research finds
(New York University) We'll pay more for unhealthy foods when we crave them, new neuroscience research finds. The study also shows that we're willing to pay disproportionately more for higher portion sizes of craved food items. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is This Tissue a New Organ? Maybe. A Conduit for Cancer? It Seems Likely.
A new study reveals a network of tissue that acts as a “ highway of moving fluid ” but loses its shape when viewed. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JACEY FORTIN Tags: Research Tissue (Human) Anatomy and Physiology Cancer Scientific Reports (Journal) New York University School of Medicine Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System interstitium Theise, Dr. Neil Benias, Petros Source Type: news

Opioid use prevalent among electronic dance music partygoers
(New York University) One in 10 electronic dance music (EDM) party attendees have misused opioids in the past year, exceeding the national average, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want people to fund your Kickstarter project? Sell them on your reputation first
(Binghamton University) When trying to entice people to invest in your product on a crowdfunding website, potential funders are more concerned about your ethical characteristics than your actual ability to make and deliver the product, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Teens Are ‘Juuling’ At School. Here’s What That Means
The most popular product in the booming e-cigarette market doesn’t look like a cigarette at all. The Juul, a trendy vape that resembles a flash drive and can be charged in a laptop’s USB port, accounted for 33% of the e-cigarette market as of late 2017, according to Wells Fargo data. And while the product is made for and legally available only to adults older than 21, its “growth appears to be due to growth with the 18 to 24 year old age group,” according to a Wells Fargo report. In many cases, media reports suggest, these devices are being used by kids and teenagers even younger than that — w...
Source: TIME: Health - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Scientists Have Discovered a New Organ in the Human Body
It’s not a second stomach or a mini-brain. But scientists have discovered an important new organ that may play a critical role in how many tissues and other organs do their jobs, as well as in some diseases like cancer. In a study published in Scientific Reports, a New York University-led team of researchers describe the interstitium, which is a series of connected, fluid-filled spaces found under skin as well as throughout the gut, lungs, blood vessels and muscles. The bubble wrap-like network only became visible when the pathologists used a new laser endoscope, called a confocal laser endomicroscope, that allowed ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime medicine Source Type: news

Scientists Have Discovered a New Organ in the Human Body. What is the Interstitium?
It’s not a second stomach or a mini-brain. But scientists have discovered an important new organ that may play a critical role in how many tissues and other organs do their jobs, as well as in some diseases like cancer. In a study published in Scientific Reports, a New York University-led team of researchers describe the interstitium, which is a series of connected, fluid-filled spaces found under skin as well as throughout the gut, lungs, blood vessels and muscles. The bubble wrap-like network only became visible when the pathologists used a new laser endoscope, called a confocal laser endomicroscope, that allowed ...
Source: TIME: Health - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized health healthytime medicine Source Type: news

Sports leagues blamed for fueling childhood obesity
A study by the New York University School of Medicine found that more than three-quarters of the foods sponsored by American children's favorite sports leagues are unhealthy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sports leagues blamed for fueling childhood obesity as 76% of teams promote junk food and soda  
A study by the New York University School of Medicine found that more than three-quarters of the foods sponsored by American children's favorite sports leagues are unhealthy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Dr. Neville Sanjana receives 2018 AAAS Martin and Rose Wachtel Cancer Research Award
(New York Genome Center) The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) and Science Translational Medicine have selected Neville Sanjana, PhD, Core Faculty Member at the New York Genome Center, Assistant Professor of Biology, New York University, and Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Physiology at NYU School of Medicine, for its prestigious 2018 AAAS Martin and Rose Wachtel Cancer Research Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

From signal propagation to consciousness: New findings point to a potential connection
(New York University) Researchers have discovered a novel mechanism through which information can be effectively transmitted across many areas in the brain -- a finding that offers a potentially new way of understanding how consciousness arises. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research into letter-spacing could help improve children's reading
(Binghamton University) Increased letter spacing helps individuals read faster, but not due to visual processing, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Microplastic Contamination Is Found in Most Bottled Water, a New Study Says
Drinking from a plastic water bottle likely means ingesting microplastic particles, a new study claims, prompting fresh concerns — and calls for scientific research — on the possible health implications of widespread plastics pollution. A study carried out on more than 250 water bottles sourced from 11 brands in nine different countries revealed that Microplastic contamination was nearly universal, found in more than 90% of the samples. The study, by journalism organization Orb Media and researchers at the State University of New York at Fredonia, found an average of 10.4 microplastic particles about the width ...
Source: TIME: Science - March 15, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Laignee Barron Tags: Uncategorized Environment onetime overnight Source Type: news

A combination of personality traits might make you more addicted to social networks
(Binghamton University) As social networking companies feel the heat to create a more socially responsible and positive experience for their millions of users, new research out of Binghamton University, State University of New York explores how the interaction of personality traits can impact the likelihood of developing an addiction to social networking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insurers Are Getting Into Health Care, But Is It Good for You?
In the not-too-distant future, your health insurance, your prescription drugs and some of your treatment may come from the same company. Insurers are dropping billions of dollars on acquisitions and expansions in order to get more involved in customer health. They say this push can help cut costs and improve care, in part by keeping the sickest patients healthy and out of expensive hospitals. That’s a huge potential benefit for employers and other customers stressed by rising costs. But is this good for your health? That question worries some health care insiders who wonder if the patient’s best interest &mdash...
Source: TIME: Health - March 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tom Murphy / AP Tags: Uncategorized APH Healthcare healthytime Source Type: news

This 3D-printed device analyzes tissue cells from rheumatoid arthritis
[Image from New York Genome Center]Researchers in New York have created a 3D-printed, portable and low-cost microfluidic controller that analyzes tissue cells and can recognize fibroblast subtypes in rheumatoid arthritis patients. Single-cell analysis is a way for researchers to study how cells influence disease and their response to treatment, but there is a lack of cost-effective and user-friendly devices to help. Researchers at the New York Genome Center and New York University have attempted to alleviate those barriers and enable broader access to single-cell analysis by creating a 3D-printed, portable, low-cost microf...
Source: Mass Device - March 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Diagnostics Research & Development MedTech New York Genome Center New York University rheumatoid arthritis Source Type: news

What do iPhones, Halloween candy, and sushi have in common?
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) How people seek to express their uniqueness is played out in many ways -- one of the more subtle ways is how they choose products when presented with product-related information in various colors, versus in black and white or a uniform color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

You Asked: Should I Use a Toilet Seat Cover?
Some people hover. Some build a nest of toilet paper. And some reach for those hard-to-keep-centered, always-getting-splashed-by-the-prematurely-auto-flushing-toilet seat covers. If you’re in the latter camp, you’ve probably wondered whether the extra effort is really protecting you from something. The answer is yes—though probably not the thing you’re worried about. “In terms of preventing illness and transmission of infectious disease, there’s no real evidence that toilet-seat covers do that,” says Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of preventive medicine at Vanderbilt University...
Source: TIME: Health - March 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news