Fearful customers sensitive to size and scope of a data breach while angry customers are not
(Binghamton University) Customers who feel afraid in the wake of a data breach care more about the size and scope of the breach than do angry customers, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Tandon & Global Public Health researcher receives Gates Foundation Grand Challenges Exploration
(New York University) Rumi Chunara, assistant professor of computer science and engineering and global public health at New York University, has won a Grand Challenges Explorations grant -- an initiative funded by the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation. Chunara will pursue an innovative global health and development research project focused on smart immunization targeting in Pakistan using artificial intelligence (AI) and mobile tools. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Check-Cap Announces Second Trial Site Joins Ongoing U.S. Pilot Study of C-Scan(R)
Mayo Clinic joins New York University in pilot study of C-Scan® in the U.S. ISFIYA, Israel, May 13, 2019 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Check-Cap Ltd. (the "Company" or "Check-Cap") (NASDAQ: CHEK) (NASDAQ: CHEKW),... Devices, Gastroenterology Check-Cap, C-Scan, ingestible capsule, colorectal cancer screening (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - May 13, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to those underrepresented in the field
(New York University) Over the course of a school year, elementary school children lose confidence that they can 'be scientists,' but remain more confident that they can 'do science.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find evolutionary backing in analysis of mammalian vertebrae
(New York University) Differences in numbers of vertebrae are most extreme in mammals which do not rely on running and leaping, such as those adapted to suspensory locomotion like apes and sloths, a team of anthropologists has concluded. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 13, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Domestic policy driven by intergovernmental bodies not citizens, research finds
(Binghamton University) Citizens are increasingly being marginalized by intergovernmental organizations for the attention of national politicians and influence over domestic policies, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Index that tracks impact of pharmaceuticals worldwide to relaunch, focus on more diseases
(Binghamton University) The Global Health Impact Index, developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York to rank pharmaceutical companies based on their drugs' impact on global health, is launching a new, more-robust model that addresses even more diseases worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineering researchers receive NSF grant to study power generation using human sweat
(Binghamton University) The National Science Foundation has awarded a grant to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York for research to generate power from human sweat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Scientology Cruise Ship Has Been Quarantined for Measles. Here ’s What to Know
The Church of Scientology’s cruise ship Freewinds with 300 passengers aboard has been quarantined in port by the Caribbean nation of St. Lucia for measles after a female crew member was diagnosed with the highly contagious, preventable disease. MarineTraffic.com lists the vessel in port at St. Lucia as the Freewinds. A ship with that name is owned by a Panamanian company linked to the Church of Scientology. NBC News also reported that a St. Lucia coast guard official confirmed that the quarantined vessel belonged to the church. The Church of Scientology did not respond to TIME’s requests for comment. St. Luci...
Source: TIME: Health - May 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Infectious Disease onetime Travel Source Type: news

Expert: Justin Trudeau's French isn't bad; Quebecers just don't think he belongs
(Binghamton University) Quebec's criticism of Justin Trudeau's French serves to position him as an 'outsider' to Quebecois identity, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two NYU faculty elected to National Academy of Sciences
(New York University) Russel Caflisch, director of NYU's Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, and Gloria Coruzzi, a professor in NYU's Department of Biology, have been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gestures and visual animations reveal cognitive origins of linguistic meaning
(New York University) Gestures and visual animations can help reveal the cognitive origins of meaning, indicating that our minds can assign a linguistic structure to new informational content 'on the fly' -- even if it is not linguistic in nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New dispersion method to effectively kill biofilm bacteria could improve wound care
(Binghamton University) Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a method to treat bacterial infections which could result in better wound care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nursing, dental, and medical students train together to improve kids' oral health
(New York University) Nursing, medical, and dental students can work as a team to improve their knowledge of pediatric oral health -- and how to work with their fellow health professionals, finds new research led by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The study appears in the Journal of Dental Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newly proposed system of measurement could help determine community sustainability
(Binghamton University) A newly proposed system of measurement known as the community sustainability assessment system, or CSAS, could be used to define what it means to be a sustainable community as well as evaluate the impact of individual communities on global sustainability, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sleep Myths Are Commonly Circulated
WEDNESDAY, April 17, 2019 -- Commonly held sleep myths have a questionable evidence base, according to a study published online April 16 in Sleep Health. Rebecca Robbins, Ph.D., from the New York University School of Medicine in New York City, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 17, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Getting fewer than five hours' sleep a night increases risks of heart disease
New York University published the study which looked into sleep and health after searching more than 8,000 websites, news reports and publications. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DON'T take Trump's sleep advice: Myths are making us sick, study warns 
Some celebrities like to brag about how little sleep they need - but a new study from New York University found that myths about short nights, bedtime drinks and more encourage poor sleep. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Getting fewer than five hours a night increases risks of heart disease, strokes and early death
New York University published the study which looked into sleep and health after searching more than 8,000 websites, news reports and publications. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study suggests college students end up in vicious cycle of substance abuse, poor academics, stress
(Binghamton University) One negative behavior such as substance abuse or heavy alcohol drinking can lead college students toward a vicious cycle of poor lifestyle choices, lack of sleep, mental distress and low grades, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New conference to focus on lack of diversity in philosophy departments
(Binghamton University) A new session organized by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York tackles the issue of diversity and representation in philosophy departments across the country. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Doctors Use Electrical Implant to Aid Brain-Damaged Woman
A pilot study offers “ a very promising start ” in the effort to help people recover from traumatic brain injuries. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Brain Therapy and Rehabilitation Traumatic Brain Injury Implants Psychology and Psychologists Surgery and Surgeons Memory your-feed-science Cleveland Clinic Harvard University New York University University of Utah Cornell Universi Source Type: news

ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) National Network Learning Session: We All Want Disability Inclusion in Emergency Management - New Research on What is Actually Happening
Source: ADA [Americans with Disabilities Act] National Network. Published: 4/11/2019. This one-hour, 25-minute webinar reviews findings from new research conducted by New York University and the Pacific ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) Center on what local emergency managers in federal Region 9 say they have done and can do to include people with disabilities in emergency planning, response, recovery, and mitigation. The research discovered crucial information about disability inclusion in emergency management and the structural needs of local offices to achieve this. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Reso...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New York City Is Requiring Some Residents to Get Vaccinated Against Measles. Is That Legal — And Ethical?
New York City officials on Tuesday took the unusual and dramatic step of requiring some Brooklyn residents to get vaccinated against measles, as an outbreak there continues to worsen. The controversial policy was announced just days after a New York judge halted an order in nearby Rockland County, which had previously banned all unvaccinated children from visiting public places. Under New York City’s policy, people in four Brooklyn zip codes who resist vaccination could face fines of up to $1,000, but it’s not clear whether they could actually be compelled to get vaccinated if they continue to refuse. Health Co...
Source: TIME: Health - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime public health Source Type: news

Nurses use FDNY geospatial mapping of opioid overdoses to inform clinical practice in real time
(New York University) Nurse practitioners and nursing students can use local, real-time maps of opioid overdoses to inform their clinical work with adolescents in community health settings, finds new research from NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New algorithm helps to detect and analyze suspicious activity in surveillance footage
(Binghamton University) New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, could make it easier to track and process suspicious activity in surveillance footage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Trial for Mesothelioma Opens Internationally
A long-awaited phase III clinical trial of a novel gene therapy could change malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment in the future. The trial, which will include almost 50 locations around the world, opens this month for mesothelioma patients whose standard treatment has stopped working. The gene therapy drug, called TR002, is also a form of immunotherapy. It will be used in combination with gemcitabine chemotherapy in a second-line setting. “We can’t predict what the outcome will be, but we’re very excited about the potential of this treatment, and the fact there may be another drug in the armamentarium...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks
(New York University) A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Tissue Bank Identifies Survival Factors
This study was on the exploration of risk factors affecting mortality.” The Lancet Respiratory Medicine published the findings early in 2019. Factors Associated with Longer Survival Age under 45 years when diagnosed Female gender Peritoneal mesothelioma subtype Epithelioid histology subtype Treatment including surgery and chemotherapy Stage 1 at time of diagnosis “The identification of these factors could help patients at risk for therapy failure who may benefit from novel interventions, or avoiding treatments that are not effective, or with high mortality risk,” the re...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Cannabis Products Used Differ for Cancer, Noncancer Patients
MONDAY, April 1, 2019 -- The forms of medical cannabis used vary for patients with and without cancer, according to a study published online March 25 in the Journal of Palliative Medicine. Arum Kim, M.D., from the New York University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 1, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Fluorescence discovered in tiny Brazilian frogs
(New York University) An international team of researchers led by NYU Abu Dhabi Postdoctoral Associate Sandra Goutte was studying the acoustic communications of these miniature frogs. When they discovered that Brachycephalus ephippium could not hear its own mating calls, they searched for alternative visual signals the frogs could use to communicate instead. Unexpectedly, when they shone an ultra-violet (UV) lamp on the frogs, their backs and heads glowed intensely. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 29, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Proof proper nutrition is essential to good health: Scientists explore how the immune system uses calcium to fight viral infections
(Natural News) Researchers at New York University School of Medicine, in a study that was published in the online journal Immunity, found that a calcium signal manages the immune cells’ ability to use the nutrients that are needed to boost their reproduction into a cellular army so as to drive away invading viruses. The study findings... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 27, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Controversial study finds that brain differences between the sexes begin in the womb 
Professor Moriah Thomason, from New York University Langone, said one of the main differences was in connectivity across distant areas of the brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Emotionally attuned managers are better at judging workgroup effectiveness: study
(New York University) Experts from NYU, Exeter, Harvard and other institutions show for first time that -- even on the fly -- a manager who can read emotions in others well can better evaluate a working group's performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health insurance associated with lower risk of cardiovascular disease among aging immigrants
(New York University) Aging immigrants' risk for cardiovascular disease may be heightened by their lack of health insurance, particularly among those who recently arrived in the United States, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. The findings are published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a positive work environment leads to feelings of inclusion among employees
(Binghamton University) Fostering an inclusive work environment can lead to higher satisfaction, innovation, trust and retention among employees, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using laughter as their guide, five-month-olds can distinguish friends from strangers
Even before we can speak, humans can glean useful information from the sound of laughter.A study by UCLA and New York University researchers found that infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and laughter between strangers. The results suggest that the ability to identify the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly as part of what the scientists call an “affiliation detection system” that uses vocal cues.“If young infants are able to pick up social information from such brief clips of vocal behavior, it suggests a biologically evolved...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

CBD Oil Is Everywhere, But Is It Really Safe and Healthy?
You might have seen it in your neighborhood health store, your local spa or your corner coffee shop. CBD, aka cannabidiol, is getting mixed into cocktails, lotions and drinks. But what is CBD, exactly? Does it have real health benefits? Is it even safe? To get a better understanding of the compound, TIME spoke to two scientists on the cutting edge of CBD research: Dr. Esther Blessing, an associate professor of psychiatry at New York University, and Margaret Haney, professor of neurobiology at Columbia University Medical Center and director of the university’s Marijuana Research Laboratory. Blessing and Haney agree th...
Source: TIME: Health - March 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

Babies who calm down easily are more likely to be obese children
A new Buffalo-State University of New York study found that babies who can be easily calmed down are more likely to become obese later - and it may be linked to giving them sugary juices. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

For infants, distinguishing between friends and strangers is a laughing matter
(New York University) Infants as young as five months can differentiate laughter between friends and that between strangers, finds a new study. The results suggest that the ability to detect the nature of social relationships is instilled early in human infancy, possibly the result of a detection system that uses vocal cues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

High testosterone levels could be killing men by causing blood clots and heart failure, study claims
A joint study by the City University of New York and the University of Hong Kong examined relations between the killer heart conditions and the male sex hormone. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A new way to map cell regulatory networks
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) A new mathematical method developed by researchers at Cincinnati Children's and New York University may soon make it much easier to conduct more of the complex data analysis needed to drive advances in the exploding field of personalized medicine. Proof-of-principle results for the method are reported this month in Genome Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

President Recruits Climate Skeptics for Climate Panel
The White House is planning to create an ad hoc panel to reassess the government’s analysis of climate science and examine whether climate change impacts national security, according to a leaked White House memo. The memo dated February 14, 2019 reveals that the White House has drafted an Executive Order to create a 12-member committee called the “Presidential Committee on Climate Security.” The memo states that recent scientific and defense reports that conclude that climate change poses a threat to national security “have not undergone a rigorous independent and adversarial peer review to examine...
Source: Public Policy Reports - March 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace
(Binghamton University) Positivity can transform the healthcare workplace, according to a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weeks After Trump ’s Pledge to End HIV in the U.S., Report Shows Progress Has Stalled
(NEW YORK) — Three weeks after President Donald Trump announced a campaign to end the U.S. HIV epidemic by 2030, new government data show that progress against the disease stalled recently. After declining for several years, the estimated number of new HIV infections held about steady from 2013 to 2016, the latest available data, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said Wednesday. Health officials already knew HIV diagnoses had stopped declining. But that is a flawed measure, because in some cases people are not diagnosed until years after infection. This latest CDC report estimates how many new infections...
Source: TIME: Science - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: MIKE STOBBE / AP Tags: Uncategorized HIV onetime Source Type: news

High-tech laser scans uncover hidden military traverse at Alcatraz Island
(Binghamton University) High-tech radar and laser scans have uncovered a hidden military traverse underneath the infamous Alcatraz penitentiary, according to research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Complex medication regimens create challenges for home health care
(New York University) Medically high-risk patients and communication breakdowns between providers contribute to the difficulty of medication management for older adults receiving home health care, finds a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Binghamton University to establish Institute for Social Justice for Women and Girls
(Binghamton University) A seven-figure gift from alumna and world-renowned psychologist Ellyn Uram Kaschak will help establish the Institute for Social Justice for Women and Girls at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How a certain bacterium communicates and makes us sick
(Binghamton University) Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have uncovered the unique way in which a type of Gram-negative bacterium delivers the toxins that make us sick. Understanding this mechanism may help design better ways to block and eventually control those toxins. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Life's transitions easier with a sense of a well-rounded ending, new study shows
(New York University) We are more likely to have positive feelings about transitioning from one stage of life to the next if we have a 'well-rounded ending' -- or one marked by a sense of closure--finds a team of psychology researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news