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Under Affordable Care Act, Americans have had more preventive care for heart health, UCLA study finds
By reducing out-of-pocket costs for preventive treatment, the Affordable Care Act appears to have encouraged more people to have health screenings related to their cardiovascular health,a UCLA study found. Comparing figures from 2006 through 2013, researchers found that more people were screened for diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette use and high blood pressure — all risk factors for heart disease — after the ACA was implemented than before.But the research, published in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Managed Care, also revealed a disparity between men and women in one key area. Although more men who ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
(Binghamton University) Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Punctuation in text messages helps replace cues found in face-to-face conversations
(Binghamton University) Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes -- these 'textisms' help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Endurance training helpful in recovery from muscle inflammation, new study shows
(Binghamton University) Endurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regular Marijuana Users Have More Sex, Study Says
By Jen Christensen, CNN (CNN) — Dr. Michael Eisenberg, an assistant professor of urology, sees a lot of patients at the Stanford University Medical Center who have problems performing in the bedroom. To determine what the problem is, they’ll go through a laundry list of regular activities. Often, patients will ask whether they need to smoke less marijuana. There isn’t a lot of research on the topic. However, with marijuana becoming legal in a growing number of states, Eisenberg thought it’d be worth exploring. What he found surprised him. “Usually, people assume the more frequently you smoke,...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Marijuana Source Type: news

New study identifies mechanism bacteria use to attach to surfaces
(The City University of New York) A new study appearing in the journal   Science   shows that bacteria need the resistance to pilus retraction that occurs upon contact with a surface in order to sense surfaces and excrete the glue that makes them firmly adhere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Special issue of Journal of Nursing Scholarship confronts climate change and health
(New York University) A special issue of the Journal of Nursing Scholarship explores climate change, global health, and the role of nursing in addressing environmental changes and protecting vulnerable people and populations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

There is no safe amount of alcohol during pregnancy, new study shows
(Binghamton University) Any amount of alcohol exposure during pregnancy can cause extreme lasting effects on a child, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Separate but unequal: NYU Metro Center Report examines segregation in NYC schools
(New York University) A new report by the NYU Metro Center explores patterns of segregation in New York City public schools and finds a link between increased school diversity and modest academic benefits. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry receives $2.8 million as part of multi-center study to stop progression of cavities
NIH-funded study to test cavity-fighting liquid at three clinical sitesNew York UniversityThe National Institute of Dental& Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a grant that will provide funding to New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) and its collaborators to test the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride in stopping the progression of cavities in young children.The grant provides $9.8 million over four years, $2.8 million of which will come to NYU Dentistry, to fund a Phase III randomized controlled trial at three clinical sites: University of Michigan, U...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - October 23, 2017 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Adolescents underreport amphetamine use, likely unaware that adderall is amphetamine
(New York University) High school seniors appear to be underreporting their nonmedical use of amphetamine, despite reporting using Adderall without a doctor's orders, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Expert warns that AI brains are not infallible and have even been found to "make bad decisions" that can harm humans
(Natural News) We’re learning more every day about the price to be paid for all the conveniences modern technology brings us, and while some of the potential pitfalls of artificial intelligence (AI) are rather obvious, others are a bit more insidious. New York University Research Professor Kate Crawford and a group of colleagues are so... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Graduate Center and Princeton University explore the interface between physics and biology
(The City University of New York) The Graduate Center (GC) of the City University of New York (CUNY) has entered into a joint endeavor with Princeton University to explore the interface between biology and physics through the establishment of the Center for the Physics of Biological Function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

When you die you know you're dead as the mind still works
A person's consciousness continues to work after the body has died, a study from New York University Langone School of Medicine finds. The findings echo the new Hollywood film Flatliners. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When you die you KNOW you're dead: The mind still works
A person's consciousness continues to work after the body has died, a study from New York University Langone School of Medicine finds. The findings echo the new Hollywood film Flatliners. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists create most powerful micro-scale bio-solar cell yet
(Binghamton University) Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have created a micro-scale biological solar cell that generates a higher power density for longer than any existing cell of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The nursing workforce is growing more diverse and educated, finds NYU Meyers study
(New York University) More males and people of color are entering nursing, and more nurses are earning bachelor's degrees compared with a decade ago, according to a new study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HealthWatch: C-Section Obesity Risk, Baby Talk Same Around World
BOSTON (CBS) – Having a C-section puts a woman’s offspring at higher risk of obesity and now researchers at the New York University School of Medicine may have a better understanding why. They studied mice and found that the microbiomes of those born by C-section were different from those of mice born vaginally.  In fact the “naturally” born mice had bacteria in their gut associated with a leaner body type. In addition, mice born by C-section gained more weight than the mice who passed through the birth canal. Mothers’ Baby Talk, Identical Regardless Of Language Coochy coo.  Turns o...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Babies Health Dr. Mallika Marshall New York University School of Medicine Princeton Source Type: news

Children born via c-section gain more weight, study says
A New York University study has found that mice born via c-section gain about 30 percent more weight than those born vaginally. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry receives $2.8 million as part of multi-center study to stop progression of cavities
(New York University) The National Institute of Dental& Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, has awarded a grant that will provide funding to New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) and its collaborators to test the effectiveness of silver diamine fluoride in stopping the progression of cavities in young children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemical in baby bottles increase the risk of obesity
EXCLUSIVE Researchers from Brunel University London, New York University and Vrije University in Amsterdam also found BPA exposure raises fat levels in the blood. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New technology uses mouth gestures to interact in virtual reality
(Binghamton University) Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new technology that allows users to interact in a virtual reality environment using only mouth gestures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stress diminishes our capacity to sense new dangers
Stress makes us slower to learn that there is a new danger in our environment, according to a New York University study. Reducing stress can help you to identify and react more quickly to threats. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New Princeton-CUNY program to bring together physicists and biologists
(Princeton University) The NSF has awarded $13 million to create the Center for the Physics of Biological Function, a joint endeavor between Princeton University and the City University of New York that will tackle a deceptively simple question: What does modern physics reveal about life itself? The funding is targeted to people, not equipment, from undergraduates to postdoctoral fellows who will be free to work with any or all of the six theorists and eight experimentalists involved. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘As If Puerto Rico Did Not Exist.’ Hurricane Maria Is a Reminder of ‘Second-Class’ Status for Some
(PHILADELPHIA) — Xavier Totti moved to the mainland United States from his native Puerto Rico 43 years ago. He is still asked routinely if he is “legal,” and when he mails packages to relatives back home, he has to fill out an international form. So, the 65-year-old anthropologist was not surprised by a Morning Consult-New York Times poll that showed more than half of Americans don’t realize that Puerto Rico is a U.S. territory — and that its residents are U.S. citizens. “By now, it’s sort of comical, but it makes me feel second-class, like you don’t belong,” said Totti...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Errin Haines Whack / AP Tags: Uncategorized Hurricane Maria onetime Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

NYU College of Dentistry's Yu Zhang awarded nearly $3.7 million by NIH's NIDCR
(New York University) New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) researchers have received two R01 grants from the National Institute of Dental& Craniofacial Research, part of the National Institutes of Health, totaling nearly $3.7 million. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sustainable Pacemaker Research Accelerates
One of the great "meta" areas of investigation for the scientific community is how to attain greater efficiency in sustainable energy creation and storage, from solar power arrays to car batteries to batteries for mobile phones and laptops. To the quest for greater sustainability in these industries one can add cardiac pacemakers, and one pioneer of the technology says it could be ready for trials sooner rather than later. "It's not far," M. Amin Karami, PhD, director of the Intelligent Dynamic Energy and Sensing Systems Lab at the State University of New York at Buffalo, said. "We can have the tec...
Source: MDDI - September 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Greg Goth Tags: Implants Source Type: news

People think harder and produce better political arguments when their views are challenged
(Binghamton University) People who are presented with political statements contradictory to their own beliefs tend to think harder and produce better arguments, according to research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers uncover our brain's filing system for storing experiences
(New York University) A team of neuroscientists has uncovered how our brains organize, over time, our experiences: that is, according to their similarities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

16 Ways to Get People to Like You Immediately, According to Psychology
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shana Lebowitz / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

How your music taste could reveal if you're a psychopath
Researchers from New York University found those who had psychopathic tendencies were the biggest fans of rap songs, including No Diggity by Blackstreet, and Lose Yourself by Eminem. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teachers report weaker relationships with students of color, children of immigrants
(New York University) The relationship between teachers and students is a critical factor for academic success. However, a new study by NYU Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development finds that teachers report weaker relationships with children of immigrants and adolescents of color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s Why Aspirin Is Important for Preventing Heart Disease
By now, it’s not a surprise that doctors advise anyone who has had a heart attack or stroke to take a low-dose aspirin every day. But remembering to take a pill daily can be a challenge. In a new study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers show just how risky stopping aspirin therapy can be. They followed more than 601,000 people who took low-dose aspirin (80mg) daily to prevent heart disease and stroke. Three years after the study began, people who stopped taking aspirin for whatever reason had a 37% higher rate of heart problems including heart attack and stroke, compared to those who continued r...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized aspirin aspirin and heart disease onetime Stroke Source Type: news

Why It ’s So Risky for Heart Patients to Stop Taking a Daily Aspirin
By now, it’s not a surprise that doctors advise anyone who has had a heart attack or stroke to take a low-dose aspirin every day. But remembering to take a pill daily can be a challenge. In a new study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers show just how risky stopping aspirin therapy can be. They followed more than 601,000 people who took low-dose aspirin (80mg) daily to prevent heart disease and stroke. Three years after the study began, people who stopped taking aspirin for whatever reason had a 37% higher rate of heart problems including heart attack and stroke, compared to those who continued r...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized aspirin aspirin and heart disease onetime Stroke Source Type: news

NYU dentistry study pinpoints role of proteins that produce pearls
(New York University) While it is known that pearls are made of calcium carbonate with an organic matrix core, the role of the proteins modulating the organization of these crystals has, until recently, been unclear. Researchers at NYU Dentistry reported the role of two such proteins that regulate the processes leading up to the formation of pearl. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTA computer scientist earns grant to combine methods to better analyze brain image data
(University of Texas at Arlington) Junzhou Huang, an associate professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, will use a $210,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore how to combine the two methods to more accurately predict the outcome of future data. Chao Chen at the City University of New York is co-principal investigator on the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU College of Dentistry approved for $13 million research funding award by PCORI
(New York University) A research team at New York University College of Dentistry has been approved for a $13.3 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to study cavity prevention, quality of life, and school performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Self-Powered Paper Patch could Help Diabetics Measure Glucose During Exercise
A new paper-based sensor patch developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York could allow diabetics to effectively measure glucose levels during exercise. Today's most widespread methods for glucose self-testing involve monitoring glucose levels in blood. Conventional measurements, however, are not suitable for preventing hypoglycemia during exercise, said Binghamton University Electrical and Computer Science Assistant Professor Seokheun Choi. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - September 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New self-powered paper patch could help diabetics measure glucose during exercise
(Binghamton University) A new paper-based sensor patch developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York could allow diabetics to effectively measure glucose levels during exercise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unintentional drug use continues among molly users in EDM party scene
(New York University) Use of MDMA or 'Molly' is common in the electronic dance music scene, but research is showing that many Molly users are using other drugs unknowingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists work out cell ’s ‘internal clock’
New York University scientists have discovered a way to measure where a cell is in its life cycle, and understand how that could be an underlying cause for certain diseases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds dangerous drug use trend in high school seniors
A study from New York University has found that the use of synthetic cannabinoids is on the rise among high school seniors. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU researchers examine disaster preparedness and recovery in a hurricane-induced hospital evacuation
(New York University) Two reports published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship reveal important insights on emergency preparedness, recovery, and resilience from nurses working at NYU Langone Health's main hospital during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dangerous drug use trend among high school seniors, NYU study reveals
In this study, we found that 3 percent of high school seniors reported current use, and current users also tend to be current users of other drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Bluestone Center discovers that skin color affects skin sensitivity to heat, mechanical stimuli
(New York University) Researchers at the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research at the New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) have identified a novel molecular mechanism which explains why dark-skinned and light-skinned people respond differently to heat and mechanical stimulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Foundations: A remedy, with shortcomings, to the journalism crisis
(New York University) Nonprofit journalism organizations have made notable civic contributions, but fall short of offering a strong critical alternative to the market failure and professional shortcomings of commercial journalism, finds a new study from NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is changing languages effortful for bilingual speakers? Depends on the situation
(New York University) Research on the neurobiology of bilingualism has suggested that switching languages is inherently effortful, requiring executive control to manage cognitive functions, but a new study shows this is only the case when speakers are prompted, or forced, to do so. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news