VR experiment with rats offers new insights about how neurons enable learning
Scientists have long understood that the region of the brain called the hippocampus is important for memory, learning and navigation.Now, scientists in a UCLA lab led by neurophysicist Mayank Mehta are gaining a deeper understanding of how the hippocampus works on a circuit level — that is, functions involving networks of millions of neurons. That knowledge could be an important step toward the development of treatments for neurological disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease, schizophrenia and epilepsy, all of which are related to dysfunction in the hippocampus.In their latest study, published in the journal Nat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 21, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pig-to-human transplants come a step closer with kidney experiment
Scientists at New York University temporarily attached a pig's kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - October 21, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Science Source Type: news

In a First, Surgeons Attached a Pig Kidney to a Human
A kidney grown in a genetically altered pig functions normally, scientists reported. The procedure may open the door to a renewable source of desperately needed organs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: your-feed-science Kidneys Transplants Pigs Genetic Engineering Surgery and Surgeons Organ Donation New York University Langone Health Research Source Type: news

In a First, Surgeons Attached a Pig Kidney to a Human — and It Worked
A kidney grown in a genetically altered pig seemed to function normally, potentially a new source for desperately needed transplant organs. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Roni Caryn Rabin Tags: your-feed-science Kidneys Transplants Pigs Genetic Engineering Surgery and Surgeons Organ Donation New York University Langone Health Research Source Type: news

Medicine Grand Rounds October 15
Please mark your calendars for Friday, October 15th at 8:00 AM which will be the next in our Biomedical Grand Rounds series. The presenter is Kathryn J. Moore, PhD, the Jean and David Blechman Professor of Cardiology and Director of the Cardiovascular Research Center at New York University School of Medicine. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - October 5, 2021 Category: Hospital Management Authors: NonPerson Geisel Web Service Acct Tags: Announcements Events News grand rounds Source Type: news

New York ’s Vaccine Mandate Is Working, But Hospitals Are Struggling With the Fallout
By almost any measure, New York State’s requirement that health care workers get vaccinated against COVID-19, which was announced on Aug. 16 and went into effect Sept. 27, has been a success. Thousands of reticent health care workers across the Empire State have been vaccinated over the last month. Among hospital staff specifically, 87% were fully vaccinated as of Sept. 28, up from 77% as of Sept. 24. (A similar mandate governing education workers in New York City, which went into effect today, has also resulted in a surge in vaccinations.) However, even health care leaders who support vaccination and vaccine mandate...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

What Would a Climate-Conscious Facebook Look Like?
A version of this story first appeared in the Climate is Everything newsletter. If you’d like sign up to receive this free once-a-week email, click here. After a summer of devastating hurricanes, heat waves and wildfires, Facebook’s new measures to address climate misinformation leave something to be desired. In fact, you might be forgiven for thinking they were a joke. In a blog post headlined “Tackling Climate Change Together,” Facebook said it would be adding quizzes to its climate information center and donating $1 million to organizations that fight climate misinformation, among other measures...
Source: TIME: Science - September 22, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Pregnant women who get a Covid vaccine 'pass on antibodies to their babies while in the womb'
Researchers from New York University found protection from jabs can be passed on to unborn babies. The study of 36 babies found all had antibodies after their mothers had a vaccine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Babies have 10 TIMES more microplastics in their stools than adults
Researchers from New York University found much higher levels of one type of microplastic, known as polyethylene terephthalate (PET), when comparing the stools of adults and children. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 22, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Will Doctors Who Are Spreading COVID-19 Misinformation Ever Face Penalty?
Earlier this month, Dr. Rashid Buttar posted on Twitter that COVID-19 “was a planned operation” and shared an article alleging that most people who got vaccinated against the coronavirus would be dead by 2025. His tweets are a recent addition to a steady stream of spurious claims about the COVID-19 vaccines and treatments. Another example is Dr. Sherri Jane Tenpenny’s June testimony, before Ohio state legislators, that the vaccine could cause people to become magnetized. Clips from the hearing went viral on the internet. Earlier in the pandemic, on April 9, 2020, Dr. Joseph Mercola posted a video about wh...
Source: TIME: Health - September 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Victoria Knight / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Nursing Home COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Protect The Most Vulnerable, But Pose a Hidden Threat to Residents
Some two weeks before U.S. President Joe Biden announced on Aug. 18 that nursing homes must require their staff to get vaccinated or risk losing their Medicare and Medicaid funding, Genesis HealthCare, which manages about 250 facilities nationwide that offer long-term care and other services, had said its workers would need to be vaccinated. “The growing spread of the Delta variant makes clear that we need to increase our vaccination rates substantially to better protect our patients, residents and employees,” read an Aug. 2 memo to employees, noting that 65% of staffers were vaccinated at that point; employees...
Source: TIME: Health - September 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Nursing Home COVID-19 Vaccine Mandates Protect The Most Vulnerable, But Pose a Hidden Threat to Residents
Some two weeks before U.S. President Joe Biden announced on Aug. 18 that nursing homes must require their staff to get vaccinated or risk losing their Medicare and Medicaid funding, Genesis HealthCare, which manages about 250 facilities nationwide that offer long-term care and other services, had said its workers would need to be vaccinated. “The growing spread of the Delta variant makes clear that we need to increase our vaccination rates substantially to better protect our patients, residents and employees,” read an Aug. 2 memo to employees, noting that 65% of staffers were vaccinated at that point; employees...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Delta Air Lines Is Charging Unvaccinated Employees $200 Insurance Fee. Will It Work?
As the fourth wave of the COVID-19 pandemic continues, more companies are starting to require coronavirus vaccines for their employees. But this week, Delta Air Lines chose a different tactic when it became the first major U.S. company to say it will charge more for health insurance if employees do not get vaccinated. Some may see this as a compromise between vaccine mandates and more positive incentives, but experts say it could be complicated to execute and that there’s no way to tell how effective it will be. The move represents the tricky calculus employers are being forced to make as they try to keep employees s...
Source: TIME: Health - August 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Having someone to talk to could help stave off Alzheimer's in middle-aged people, study claims 
Researchers at New York University's Grossman School of Medicine analysed the cognitive function of 2,171 volunteers with an average age of 63. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Accelerates Full Approval of Pfizer-BioNTech Vaccine as Delta Variant Surges
The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has begun accelerating the process to fully approve the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine, facing pressure to add resources from those who believe the lack of full approval is hampering efforts to get more Americans vaccinated. “We recognize that for some, the FDA approval of COVID-19 vaccines may bring additional confidence and encourage them to get vaccinated,” Abigail Capobianco, a spokeswoman at the FDA, said in a statement on Aug. 4. “Acknowledging the urgency related to the current state of the pandemic, we have taken an all-hands-on-deck approach, including ide...
Source: TIME: Health - August 4, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams and Brian Bennett Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Second click Source Type: news

Resilience, not collapse: What the Easter Island myth gets wrong
(Binghamton University) New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York suggests that the demographic collapse at the core of the Easter Island myth didn't really happen. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who start losing their teeth are more likely to develop DEMENTIA
Tooth loss is a risk factor for both dementia and cognitive impairment - and with each tooth lost, the risk grows, according to scientists from New York University. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Factors ID'd for Radiologist Performance in Screening Mammography
THURSDAY, July 8, 2021 -- Radiologist characteristics predict performance in screening mammography, according to a study published online June 22 in Radiology. Cindy S. Lee, M.D., from New York University in New York City, and colleagues assessed... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Tooth loss associated with increased cognitive impairment, dementia
(New York University) Tooth loss is a risk factor for cognitive impairment and dementia--and with each tooth lost, the risk of cognitive decline grows, according to a new analysis led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and published in JAMDA: The Journal of Post-Acute and Long-Term Care Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pfizer and Moderna Covid vaccines work against 'more lethal and infectious' Lambda variant
New York University Grossman School of Medicine research suggested Pfizer's and Moderna's vaccines are effective at reducing serious illness caused by the Lambda Covid strain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers unlock secrets behind liver regrowth and regenerative medicine
(New York University) NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) researchers uncovered a code that sets the genome of the liver to account for the remarkable ability for this organ to regenerate. This finding offers new insight into how the specific genes that promote regeneration can be activated when part of the liver is removed. These findings have the potential to inform the development of a new form of regenerative medicine that could help non-regenerative organs regrow in mice and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NYUAD study maps nanobody structure, leading to new ways to potentially fight diseases
(New York University) For the first time in the UAE, researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi have used nuclear magnetic resonance techniques to determine the structure of a specific nanobody, Nb23, potentially leading to a better understanding of how this small protein derived from an antibody type, found only in camelids (i.e camels, llamas, and alpacas) and sharks, can fight diseases ranging from rheumatoid arthritis, lupus and psoriasis to lymphoma and breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 2, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NYUAD study finds protein aggregation inhibitor can be used to develop cancer therapies
(New York University) A new study provides important insights into the p53 protein, a critical tumor suppressor often mutated and deactivated in cancer, and a key target in the development of cancer therapeutics. Using protein mimetics (small molecules that mimic proteins) originally designed to prevent aggregation of proteins associated with Alzheimer's disease and type II diabetes, the researchers were able to breakdown p53 aggregates and reactivate the protein, leading to the death of cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 27, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Having the same nurse for home health visits may prevent rehospitalization for people with dementia
(New York University) People with dementia receiving home health care visits are less likely to be readmitted to the hospital when there is consistency in nursing staff, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines 'red flag' gun laws and state efforts to block local legislation
(New York University) " Red flag " gun laws--which allow law enforcement to temporarily remove firearms from a person at risk of harming themselves or others--are gaining attention at the state and federal levels, but are under scrutiny by legislators who deem them unconstitutional. A new analysis by legal scholars at NYU School of Global Public Health describes the state-by-state landscape for red flag legislation and how it may be an effective tool to reduce gun violence, while simultaneously protecting individuals' constitutional rights. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers outline specific patterns in reading in Russian
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) Psycholinguists from the HSE Center for Language and Brain, in collaboration with researchers from the City University of New York and the University of Stuttgart, investigated how reading in Russian varies among different groups of readers. The authors used a novel method in bilingualism research -- comparison of the eye-movement sequences (scanpaths) in adult native speakers of Russian, Russian-speaking children, and adult bilinguals with different levels of Russian proficiency. The results of the study were published in Reading Research Quarterly. (Source: EurekA...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Declining treatment during maternity care can foster tension between patients and providers
(New York University) When a pregnant person declines a recommended treatment such as prenatal testing or an epidural, tension and strife may ensue between the patient and provider, according to a new analysis by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and the University of British Columbia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Melatonin in mice: there's more to this hormone than sleep
(RIKEN) Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Brain Science and the RIKEN BioResource Research Center in Japan, along with collaborators at the State University of New York at Buffalo, have created a mouse model that allows the study of naturally occurring melatonin. Experiments using the new mice showed that natural melatonin was linked to a pre-hibernation state that allows mice to slow down their metabolism and survive when food is scarce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 23, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mental well-being higher in the summer vs. fall
(Binghamton University) Mental distress tends to be lower in the summer when compared to the fall, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Political variables carried more weight than healthcare in government response to COVID-19
(Binghamton University) Political institutions such as the timing of elections and presidentialism had a larger influence on COVID-19 strategies than the institutions organizing national healthcare, according to a research team led by a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robin Wall Kimmerer: ‘Mosses are a model of how we might live’
The moss scientist and bestselling author reveals the secrets of these primitive plants – and what they might teach us about surviving the climate crisisRobin Wall Kimmerer can recall almost to the day when she first fell under the unlikely spell of moss. “It’s kind of embarrassing,” she says. “I’ve always been engaged with plants, because I grew up in the countryside. That was my world. But mosses I’d set aside in my mind as not worthy of attention. I was studying to be a forest ecologist. That little green scum on the rocks: how interes ting could it really be? Only then there ca...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Rachel Cooke Tags: Science Plants Environment Climate change Source Type: news

Psychologists identify 18 best measures to assess intimate partner violence
(Binghamton University) Millions of people experience intimate partner violence (IPV) in their lifetime and assessment is important in conducting therapy and assisting victims. A team of psychologists at Binghamton University, State University of New York have evaluated dozens of available measures used to assess intimate partner violence and have pinpointed the most effective ones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What We Learned About Genetic Sequencing During COVID-19 Could Revolutionize Public Health
You don’t want to be a virus in Dr. David Ho’s lab. Pretty much every day since the COVID-19 pandemic began, Ho and his team have done nothing but find ways to stress SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes the disease. His goal: pressure the virus relentlessly enough that it mutates to survive, so drug developers can understand how the virus might respond to new treatments. As a virologist with decades of experience learning about another obstinate virus, HIV, Ho knows just how to apply that mutation-generating stress, whether by starving the virus, bathing it in antibodies that disrupt its ability to infect cells, ...
Source: TIME: Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Genetics Magazine Source Type: news

‘I Truly Did Find My Calling.’ Meet the Young People Shaping Health Care’s Post-Pandemic Future
The COVID-19 pandemic has been exhausting for the world’s health care workers, who have spent the last year-plus putting their lives on the line to keep the rest of us safe and healthy. Now, their tireless efforts are inspiring a new generation to join their ranks: applications to U.S. medical schools shot up nearly 20% in fall 2021, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. Individual schools are reporting similar spikes—New York University’s Rory Meyers College of Nursing saw a 33% increase in applications this year over the previous year, for instance. To learn more about the people wh...
Source: TIME: Health - June 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Women's mental health has higher association with dietary factors
(Binghamton University) Women's mental health likely has a higher association with dietary factors than men's, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are COVID-19 Vaccination Incentives Ethical? Are COVID-19 Vaccination Incentives Ethical?
WebMD's Chief Medical Officer, John Whyte, MD, speaks with Arthur L. Caplan, PhD, Professor of Bioethics, New York University Langone Medical Center, about the ethics around offering COVID-19 vaccination incentives.WebMD (Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines)
Source: Medscape Infectious Diseases Headlines - June 8, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: Infectious Diseases Expert Interview Source Type: news

Orphans and exiles: Research shows the impact of family separation
(Binghamton University) New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York shows the human trauma and family separation that resulted from the Trump Administration's zero tolerance policy on undocumented immigration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bloom studying New York state communities exposed to PFAS contaminated drinking water
(George Mason University) Michael Bloom, Associate Professor, Global and Community Health, is serving as co-investigator and environmental epidemiologist along with Drs. Erin Bell, Professor, Environmental Health Sciences, at the University at Albany, State University of New York, and Elizabeth Lewis-Michl, Research Scientist and Director, Division of Environmental Health Assessment at the New York State Department of Health, for the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

People who use methamphetamine likely to report multiple chronic conditions
(New York University) People who use methamphetamine are more likely to have health conditions, mental illness, and substance use disorders than people who do not use the drug, according to a new study by researchers at the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU School of Global Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How is the genome like an open book? New research shows cells' 'library system'
(New York University) The organization of the human genome relies on physics of different states of matter - such as liquid and solid. The findings reveal how the physical nature of the genome changes as cells transform to serve specific functions and point to new ways to potentially better understand disease and to create improved therapies for cancer and genetic disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How news coverage affects public trust in science
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) News media reports about scientific failures that do not recognize the self-correcting nature of science can damage public perceptions of trust and confidence in scientific work, according to findings of a study by researchers at the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania and the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Non-parents expand 'facial dexterity' in caring for infants among primates
(New York University) Non-parents expand the range of their facial expressions in caring for infants among primates. The study shows the ability, among non-relatives, to both decipher facial expressions and to be attuned to others' emotional states, revealing the evolutionary nature of communication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RYBREVANTTM (amivantamab-vmjw) Receives FDA Approval as the First Targeted Treatment for Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with EGFR Exon 20 Insertion Mutations
May 21, 2021 (HORSHAM, P.A.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has granted the accelerated approval of RYBREVANTTM (amivantamab-vmjw) for the treatment of adult patients with locally advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) with epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations, as detected by an FDA-approved test, whose disease has progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.[1] RYBREVANTTM is the first fully-human, bispecific antibody approved for the treatment of patients with NSCLC t...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - May 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Modeling can predict mutation " hotspots " and antibody escapers in SARS-CoV-2 spike protein
(New York University) A new study from the Centers for Genomics and Systems Biology at New York University and NYU Abu Dhabi uses computational modeling to assess the biological significance of spike protein mutations, uncovering versions of the virus that bind more tightly or resist antibodies and offering a promising public health surveillance tool. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NYU Abu Dhabi researchers develop non-contact probe to analyze single cells within tumors
(New York University) NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) researchers have developed a special noncontact multi-physics probe (NMP) that enables them to collect cytoplasmic samples from single tumor cells without disrupting their spatial configurations in the original tissue. As a result, the NMP will facilitate advanced studies that could improve the current understanding of the basic building blocks of diseases, including cancer and Alzheimer's, and lead to the development of new therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 19, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MEDICAL ETHICS FAIL: Covid vaccines worsen disease upon exposure, and trial participants are not being warned by doctors or researchers
(Natural News) Patients who participated in Wuhan coronavirus (Covid-19) “vaccine” clinical trials were not told that the injections could worsen disease upon exposure to challenge or circulating viruses, a new study has found. Researchers from New York University (NYU) and Tulane University looked at available published literature to see whether or not the risks associated... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Juul Got Vaporized
On June 7, North Carolina attorney general Josh Stein will enter a Durham courtroom with a mission: proving that the e-cigarette company Juul Labs purposely targeted teenagers with its nicotine-rich products. If Stein—who in 2019 became the first state attorney general in the U.S. to sue Juul—is successful, the vaping company may be in for a world of hurt. Hundreds of lawsuits against Juul, many of which were consolidated into multi-district litigation in California, are pushing allegations mirroring Stein’s. They claim Juul purposely designed its stylish, flash-drive-like devices and flavored nicotine e-...
Source: TIME: Health - May 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Excerpt feature Magazine Vaping Source Type: news

Losing an only child is more devastating than losing a spouse, according to study of Chinese parents
(New York University) Which wound cuts deeper: the loss of an only child or loss of a spouse? A new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and Fudan University suggests that Chinese parents find the loss of an only child to be approximately 1.3 times as psychologically distressing than the loss of a spouse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even fractures in arm, wrist increase risk for future breaks in postmenopausal women
Current guidelines for managing osteoporosis specifically call out hip or spine fractures for increasing the risk for subsequent bone breaks. But anew UCLA-led study suggests that fractures in the arm, wrist, leg and other parts of the body should also set off alarm bells.A fracture, no matter the location, indicates a general tendency to break a bone in the future at a different location, said Dr. Carolyn Crandall, the study ’s lead author and a professor of medicine at theDavid Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA.“Current clinical guidelines have only been emphasizing hip and spine fractures, but our findings c...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - May 5, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Study: New York City nurses experienced anxiety, depression during first wave of COVID-19
(New York University) New York nurses caring for COVID-19 patients during the first wave of the pandemic experienced anxiety, depression, and illness--but steps their hospitals took to protect them and support from their coworkers helped buffer against the stressful conditions, according to a study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 29, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news