Protein controlling magnesium identified as therapeutic target for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease
(New York University) An international team of researchers has identified the CNNM4 protein as a key regulator of magnesium in the liver and potential therapeutic target for non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, according to a study published in the Journal of Hepatology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 4, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Culturally tailored intervention boosts safe sex, reduces drinking among young Black women
(New York University) A series of weekend workshops that integrate strategies for both reducing risky alcohol use and preventing sexually transmitted infections (STIs) led to an increase in safe sex and decrease in drinking among young Black women, according to a new study published in theAmerican Journal of Preventive Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bernanke, Gertler, Kiyotaki and Moore win the Frontiers of Knowledge Award in Economics
(BBVA Foundation) The BBVA Foundation Frontiers of Knowledge Award in the Economics, Finance and Management category has gone in this thirteenth edition to Ben Bernanke (The Brookings Institution, Washington DC), Mark Gertler (University of New York), Nobuhiro Kiyotaki (Princeton University) and John Moore (University of Edinburgh) " for fundamental contributions to our understanding of how financial market imperfections can amplify macroeconomic fluctuations and generate deep macroeconomic recessions, " in the words of the award citation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Custom diets are essential to mental health, new research shows
(Binghamton University) Customized diets and lifestyle changes could be key to optimizing mental health, according to new research including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Report: The Impact of the COIVD-19 pandemic on CUNY students
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) A recent survey of the approximately 274,000 City University of New York (CUNY) students published in the Journal of Urban Health found that the Covid-19 pandemic has taken a toll on their mental health and financial security. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

College student suspended for agreeing with "offensive" biology
(Natural News) A student enrolled at the State University of New York (SUNY) Geneseo was suspended for refusing to convert to the religion of transgenderism. Rather than bow down and worship the idol of LGBTQ, the individual took a brave stand by declaring the scientific fact that “a man is a man, (and) a woman... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drug seizures plummeted early in the COVID-19 pandemic, then climbed once lockdowns lifted
(New York University) Law enforcement seizures of drugs, particularly marijuana and methamphetamine, dropped at the beginning of the COVID-19 pandemic, then increased significantly in the following months--exceeding pre-pandemic seizure rates and providing clues about the impact of the crisis on substance use, according to a new study in the journal Drug and Alcohol Dependence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Oral Cancer Center awarded NIH grant to study interplay between oral cancer and nerves
(New York University) NYU Oral Cancer Center has been awarded a five-year, $3.1 million grant (R01 CA231396) by the National Cancer Institute (NCI), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH). The principal investigators, Donna Albertson, PhD, and Brian Schmidt, DDS, MD, PhD, seek to improve oral cancer treatment and alleviate pain by better understanding how a subset of nerves that possess a receptor called TRPV1 on the cell membrane contribute to cancer progression and pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

School-based dental program reduces cavities by more than 50%
(New York University) A school-based cavity prevention program involving nearly 7,000 elementary school students reduced cavities by more than 50 percent, according to a study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media use driven by search for reward, akin to animals seeking food
(New York University) Our use of social media, specifically our efforts to maximize " likes, " follows a pattern of " reward learning, " concludes a new study by an international team of scientists. Its findings reveal parallels with the behavior of animals, such as rats, in seeking food rewards. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancestry estimation perpetuates racism, white supremacy
(Binghamton University) Ancestry estimation -- a method used by forensic anthropologists to determine ancestral origin by analyzing bone structures -- is rooted in " race science " and perpetuates white supremacy, according to a new paper by a forensic anthropologist at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drones used to locate dangerous, unplugged oil wells
(Binghamton University) There are millions of unplugged oil wells in the United States, which pose a serious threat to the environment. Using drones, researchers from Binghamton University, State University of New York have developed a new method to locate these hard-to-locate and dangerous wells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NYUAD researchers develop high throughput paper-based arrays of 3D tumor models
(New York University) By engineering common filter papers, similar to coffee filters, a team of NYU Abu Dhabi researchers have created high throughput arrays of miniaturized 3D tumor models to replicate key aspects of tumor physiology, which are absent in traditional drug testing platforms. With the new paper-based technology, the formed tumor models can be safely cryopreserved and stored for prolonged periods for on-demand drug testing use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 22, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What is COVID-19's impact on Black and Latino persons living with HIV?
(New York University) Study looks at COVID-19 effects on engagement in HIV care, HIV medication use, and overall well-being among low-income Black and Latino individuals who have lived with HIV for many years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 22, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NYU Abu Dhabi researcher sheds new light on the psychology of radicalization
(New York University) Learning more about what motivates people to join violent ideological groups and engage in acts of cruelty against others is of great social and societal importance. New research from Assistant Professor of Psychology at NYUAD Jocelyn B é langer explores the idea of ideological obsession as a form of addictive behavior that is central to understanding why people ultimately engage in ideological violence, and how best to help them break this addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to calculate the social cost of carbon? Researchers offer roadmap in new analysis
(New York University) The Biden administration is revising the social cost of carbon (SCC), a decade-old cost-benefit metric used to inform climate policy by placing a monetary value on the impact of climate change. In a newly published analysis, a team of researchers lists a series of measures the administration should consider in recalculating the SCC. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mutation in SARS-CoV-2 spike protein renders virus up to eight times more infectious
(New York University) A mutation in the spike protein of SARS-CoV-2--one of several genetic mutations in the concerning variants that have emerged in the United Kingdom, South Africa, and Brazil -- makes the virus up to eight times more infectious in human cells than the initial virus that originated in China, according to research published in the journal eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to Work from Home Without Burning Out
Working remotely is a luxury—but it’s also an acquired skill. For employees lucky enough to be able to work from home at least some of the time, the trick to staying motivated and preventing burnout is to keep the office and the home from truly becoming one. That’s been challenging during the coronavirus pandemic, which has forced millions of people all over the world to suddenly turn their home into their office. Despite the abrupt change of scenery, many of the same productivity rules still apply, says Wendy Wood, a professor of psychology and business at the University of Southern California and author...
Source: TIME: Health - February 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laura Entis Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

It's morally wrong for rich nations to hoard COVID-19 vaccine
(Binghamton University) Rich nations should not engage in " vaccine nationalism " and keep the COVID-19 vaccine to themselves when poorer nations need them, according to Nicole Hassoun, professor of philosophy at Binghamton University, State University of New York. Hassoun's paper, " Against Vaccine Nationalism, " was published in the Journal of Medical Ethics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSF/Amazon grant supports research at NYU to help cities detect biases in algorithmically
(New York University) Researchers aim for ways to minimize systemic biases and produce more equitable effects in city housing inspections, policing, courts decisions, and other domains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pfizer's Covid vaccine WILL work against South African variant, study says
Researchers at New York University tested how well the blood of people who had received the vaccine could destroy the coronavirus, and found it still worked but was slightly weaker. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Online searches can help foreshadow future COVID-19 surges and declines, new study shows
(New York University) Online searches for mobile and isolated activities can help to predict later surges and declines in COVID-19 cases, a team of researchers has found. Its findings, based on a four-month analysis of online searches, offer a potential means to anticipate the pathways of the pandemic--before new infections are reported. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Zoombombing' research shows legitimate meeting attendees cause most attacks
(Binghamton University) Most zoombombing incidents are " inside jobs " according to a new study featuring researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYUAD researchers propose programming to support adolescent mothers in areas of conflict
(New York University) In a new paper titledA Bioecocultural Approach to Supporting Adolescent Mothers and their Young Children in Conflict Affected Contexts, published in the journalDevelopment and Psychopathology, Global TIES for Children researchers propose a developmental, two-generational framework to guide the design of research and policies that better address the needs of adolescent mothers and their children in contexts of conflict and displacement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How governments address COVID-19 misinformation--for better or for worse
(New York University) In a new article in theJournal of Public Health Policy, legal scholars at NYU School of Global Public Health and the global health organization Vital Strategies identify five approaches countries have taken to address misinformation about COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 1, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry awarded $1.9M NIH grant to study mitochondrial changes behind stroke, heart attack
(New York University) The National Institute of General Medical Sciences, part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded NYU College of Dentistry's Evgeny Pavlov a grant to study a phenomenon called mitochondrial permeability transition, one of the central causes of tissue damage during stroke and heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Amivantamab Data from CHRYSALIS Study Show Robust Clinical Activity and Durable Responses in Patients with Metastatic or Unresectable Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer and EGFR Exon 20 Insertion Mutations
January 28, 2021 (RARITAN, N.J.) – The Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson today announced new data from the Phase 1 CHRYSALIS study, which evaluated amivantamab in patients with metastatic or unresectable non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) exon 20 insertion mutations whose disease progressed on or after platinum-based chemotherapy.1 These data were presented for the first time in an oral presentation at the International Association for the Study of Lung Cancer’s (IASLC) 2020 World Conference on Lung Cancer (WCLC) Singapore. The key findings sho...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 29, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

Tong generating data for criteria air pollutants for the 750 largest US cities
(George Mason University) Daniel Tong, Associate Professor, Atmospheric, Oceanic and Earth Sciences, received $33,600 from New York University for a project in which Mason researchers will work with NYU researchers to generate census tract-level data for criteria air pollutants for the 750 largest cities in the United States. The data will be generated through fusing datasets from observations and computer model prediction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NYU Dentistry awarded NIH grant to investigate oral cancer pain treatment utilizing co-delivery of DNA and RNA
(New York University) NYU College of Dentistry clinician-scientists Seiichi Yamano and Brian Schmidt have set out to develop a new class of medicines using gene therapy to effectively and safely treat oral cancer pain. The National Institute of Dental and Craniofacial Research (NIDCR), part of the National Institutes of Health (NIH), has awarded the researchers a five-year, $3,276,000 grant to test whether nonviral co-delivery of DNA and RNA will safely alleviate oral cancer pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 28, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

NYU professor creates COVID-19 dashboard to compare country and state data
(New York University) Publicly Available Tool Allows Users to View Data on Vaccinations, Cases, Deaths, Testing, and COVID-Related Policies (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Drinking during COVID-19 up among people with anxiety and depression
(New York University) People with anxiety and depression are more likely to report an increase in drinking during the COVID-19 pandemic than those without mental health issues, according to a new study by researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Elite medical centers associated with Harvard, Columbia, Vanderbilt and New York University
Hundreds of medical centers across the U.S. have been giving administrators, young graduates, postdoctoral researchers and other non-frontline workers their first COVID vaccine doses. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Marijuana use typically drops at the beginning of the year, then climbs in summer and fall
(New York University) Marijuana use increases throughout the calendar year, with use up 13 percent on average at the end of each year compared to the beginning. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYUAD scientists uncover the genomic differences of marine and freshwater microalgae
(New York University) NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Associate Professor of Biology Kourosh Salehi-Ashtiani and NYUAD Senior Research Scientist David Nelson report in a new study that they have successfully cultured and sequenced 107 microalgae species from 11 different phyla indigenous to varied locations and climates to gain insights on genomic differences in saltwater and freshwater microalgae. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

At Elite Medical Centers, Even Workers Who Don ’t Qualify Are Vaccinated
Administrators and young graduate students have been inoculated at leading research hospitals, contrary to state and federal guidelines. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Hospitals Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Brigham and Women ' s Hospital Columbia University Harvard University Health Department (NYS) Massachusetts General Hospital New York University New York University Lango Source Type: news

NYUAD study informs research of child development and learning in conflict-affected areas
(New York University) To provide effective aid to children who live in areas of conflict it is necessary to understand precisely how they have been impacted by the crises around them. One area of importance is the effect of conflict and trauma on a child's development and education. Global TIES for Children researchers present a review of opportunities and challenges they have encountered in designing and conducting rigorous research that advances our understanding of this effect (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Binghamton University awarded SUNY Prepare Innovation Grants to pursue COVID-19 research
(Binghamton University) The State University of New York has awarded grants of up to $10,000 to three teams at Binghamton University to pursue research projects related to COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Early Vaccine Doubters Now Show a Willingness to Roll Up Their Sleeves
Polls show that pervasive skepticism is melting, partly because of the high efficacy rates in trials and the images of real people getting the shot. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jan Hoffman Tags: your-feed-science Vaccination and Immunization Polls and Public Opinion Disease Rates Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Race and Ethnicity Black People Deaths (Fatalities) Kaiser Family Foundation City University of New York ProPublica Pew Res Source Type: news

Trial of High-Dose Blood Thinners in I.C.U. Coronavirus Patients Is Halted
Giving anticoagulants to hospitalized Covid-19 patients is routine. But high doses may sometimes do more harm than good, a safety board finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald G. McNeil Jr. Tags: Clinical Trials Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Blood Clots National Institutes of Health Journal of the American College of Cardiology University of Pittsburgh Medical Center New York University your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Trial of High-Dose Blood Thinners in I.C.U. Patients Is Halted
Giving anticoagulants to hospitalized Covid-19 patients is routine. But high doses may sometimes do more harm than good, a safety board finds. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - December 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald G. McNeil Jr. Tags: Clinical Trials Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Blood Clots National Institutes of Health Journal of the American College of Cardiology University of Pittsburgh Medical Center New York University your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

New research could lead to better eyewitness recall in criminal investigations
(Binghamton University) A team of researchers, including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, explore ways to potentially improve the recall of eyewitnesses in a new paper in the Journal of Cognitive Psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research points to effective ways to increase support for addressing ec
(New York University) Researchers have found that information about economic inequality focusing on the disadvantages facing people from the lower-socioeconomic class leads Americans to engage more with the issue and to express greater support for action to mitigate inequality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The First Global Event in the History of Humankind
This article is a joint publication by Social Europe and International Politics and Society (IPS)-Journal published by the International Political Analysis Unit of the Friedrich-Ebert-Stiftung, Hiroshimastrasse 28, D-10785 Berlin   Follow @IPSNewsUNBureau !function(d,s,id){var js,fjs=d.getElementsByTagName(s)[0],p=/^http:/.test(d.location)?'http':'https';if(!d.getElementById(id)){js=d.createElement(s);js.id=id;js.src=p+'://platform.twitter.com/widgets.js';fjs.parentNode.insertBefore(js,fjs);}}(document, 'script', 'twitter-wjs');   The post The First Global Event in the History of Humankind appeared first on...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Branko Milanovic Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Peace TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

NYUAD researchers shed new light on mysteries behind the light emission of fireflies
(New York University) A team of researchers from the NYU Abu Dhabi's (NYUAD) Smart Materials Lab (SML) led by Professor of Chemistry Panče Naumov has conducted a thorough review of the scientific literature surrounding the natural production of light, called bioluminescence, and developed conclusions that will help others in the field direct their research to uncover the mysteries behind this fascinating natural phenomenon. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Jin Kim Montclare named a fellow of the National Academy of Inventors
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) Jin Kim Montclare, professor of chemical and biomolecular engineering at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering, and director of the Montclare Lab, has been named a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors (NAI). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIDCR's Winter 2020 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Winter 2020 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities NIH/HHS News Funding Notices Science Advances Subscribe to NICDR News Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR Welcomes New Director Rena D’Souza Rena N. D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, was sworn in as the director of NIDCR by NIH Director Francis S. Collins, MD, PhD, on October 13. Prior to joining NIH, Dr. D’Souza was the assistant vice president for academic affairs and education for health s...
Source: NIDCR Science News - December 4, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

CUNY SPH launches CONVINCE USA to understand and address public concerns about COVID vaccine
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) The City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) today launched CONVINCE USA, part of a global project to increase understanding of factors that influence people's willingness to accept new COVID-19 vaccines, and to promote inclusive public dialogue to reduce vaccine hesitancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Flashy lizards are more attractive to mates and to predators
(Binghamton University) In the lizard world, flashy colors attract the interest of females looking for mates. But they can make colorful males desirable to other eyes, too -- as lunch, according to new research led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New device offers faster way to detect antibiotic-resistant bacteria
(Binghamton University) A new device for faster testing of antibiotic-resistant bacteria has been developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How U.S. Medical Schools Are Training a Post-Pandemic Generation of Doctors
In February 2019, the Kaiser Permanente health system announced a new kind of medical school. The school would be built “from the ground up” to prepare students for the complexities of the U.S. medical system. The curriculum would emphasize cultural competency, patient and provider well-being, and the elimination of socioeconomic disparities in the medical system. Students would see patients right away, and hands-on learning would replace many lectures. What’s more, the first five graduating classes would pay nothing to attend; Kaiser hoped this would attract a student body more diverse than the typical U...
Source: TIME: Health - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news