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Here ’s Why Aspirin Is Important for Preventing Heart Disease
By now, it’s not a surprise that doctors advise anyone who has had a heart attack or stroke to take a low-dose aspirin every day. But remembering to take a pill daily can be a challenge. In a new study published Monday in the journal Circulation, researchers show just how risky stopping aspirin therapy can be. They followed more than 601,000 people who took low-dose aspirin (80mg) daily to prevent heart disease and stroke. Three years after the study began, people who stopped taking aspirin for whatever reason had a 37% higher rate of heart problems including heart attack and stroke, compared to those who continued r...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 25, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized aspirin aspirin and heart disease onetime Stroke Source Type: news

NYU dentistry study pinpoints role of proteins that produce pearls
(New York University) While it is known that pearls are made of calcium carbonate with an organic matrix core, the role of the proteins modulating the organization of these crystals has, until recently, been unclear. Researchers at NYU Dentistry reported the role of two such proteins that regulate the processes leading up to the formation of pearl. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTA computer scientist earns grant to combine methods to better analyze brain image data
(University of Texas at Arlington) Junzhou Huang, an associate professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, will use a $210,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore how to combine the two methods to more accurately predict the outcome of future data. Chao Chen at the City University of New York is co-principal investigator on the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU College of Dentistry approved for $13 million research funding award by PCORI
(New York University) A research team at New York University College of Dentistry has been approved for a $13.3 million funding award by the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute (PCORI) to study cavity prevention, quality of life, and school performance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Self-Powered Paper Patch could Help Diabetics Measure Glucose During Exercise
A new paper-based sensor patch developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York could allow diabetics to effectively measure glucose levels during exercise. Today's most widespread methods for glucose self-testing involve monitoring glucose levels in blood. Conventional measurements, however, are not suitable for preventing hypoglycemia during exercise, said Binghamton University Electrical and Computer Science Assistant Professor Seokheun Choi. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - September 19, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

New self-powered paper patch could help diabetics measure glucose during exercise
(Binghamton University) A new paper-based sensor patch developed by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York could allow diabetics to effectively measure glucose levels during exercise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unintentional drug use continues among molly users in EDM party scene
(New York University) Use of MDMA or 'Molly' is common in the electronic dance music scene, but research is showing that many Molly users are using other drugs unknowingly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists work out cell ’s ‘internal clock’
New York University scientists have discovered a way to measure where a cell is in its life cycle, and understand how that could be an underlying cause for certain diseases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study finds dangerous drug use trend in high school seniors
A study from New York University has found that the use of synthetic cannabinoids is on the rise among high school seniors. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYU researchers examine disaster preparedness and recovery in a hurricane-induced hospital evacuation
(New York University) Two reports published in the Journal of Nursing Scholarship reveal important insights on emergency preparedness, recovery, and resilience from nurses working at NYU Langone Health's main hospital during Superstorm Sandy in 2012. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dangerous drug use trend among high school seniors, NYU study reveals
In this study, we found that 3 percent of high school seniors reported current use, and current users also tend to be current users of other drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU Bluestone Center discovers that skin color affects skin sensitivity to heat, mechanical stimuli
(New York University) Researchers at the Bluestone Center for Clinical Research at the New York University College of Dentistry (NYU Dentistry) have identified a novel molecular mechanism which explains why dark-skinned and light-skinned people respond differently to heat and mechanical stimulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Foundations: A remedy, with shortcomings, to the journalism crisis
(New York University) Nonprofit journalism organizations have made notable civic contributions, but fall short of offering a strong critical alternative to the market failure and professional shortcomings of commercial journalism, finds a new study from NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is changing languages effortful for bilingual speakers? Depends on the situation
(New York University) Research on the neurobiology of bilingualism has suggested that switching languages is inherently effortful, requiring executive control to manage cognitive functions, but a new study shows this is only the case when speakers are prompted, or forced, to do so. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lively tunes boost sales in crowded stores
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) If a store is crowded, people tend to buy more if the sound system is playing a fast-paced song rather than a ballad. That's what a team of researchers found in a field experiment across a chain of grocery convenience stores in Northern Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vitamin C injections could play a role in treating blood cancers
Conclusion This mouse study explored whether treatment with vitamin C could restore function of TET2 and therefore block the progression of blood cancers like leukaemia. It found that using high doses of vitamin C intravenously did in fact suppress the growth of leukaemia cancer stem cells in the mice implanted with cell lines from human patients with leukaemia. It also reported that using vitamin C alongside existing treatment with PARP inhibitors helped reduce the progressions of the disease. The researchers suggest that in the future, vitamin C could be used alongside chemotherapy and other conventional treatment forms....
Source: NHS News Feed - August 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Challenges and resources for nurses participating in a Hurricane Sandy hospital evacuation - Vandevanter N, Raveis VH, Kovner CT, McCollum M, Keller R.
PURPOSE: Weather-related disasters have increased dramatically in recent years. In 2012, severe flooding as a result of Hurricane Sandy necessitated the mid-storm patient evacuation of New York University Langone Medical Center. The purpose of this study w... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Disaster Preparedness Source Type: news

When Russian teenagers start drinking
(National Research University Higher School of Economics) High school students intending to pursue vocational education consume alcohol more often than their peers who are planning to go to universities. These findings come from a survey of 1,000 Russian high school students that was carried out as part of a joint research project by scholars from Higher School of Economics and New York University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For post-menopausal women, vaginal estrogens do not raise risk of cancer, other diseases
This study, the first to examine potential adverse health effects in users of vaginal estrogen compared with non-users, suggests that vaginal estrogen therapy is a safe treatment for genitourinary symptoms such as burning, discomfort, and pain during intercourse associated with menopause.AUTHORSThe paper ’s authors are Dr. Carolyn Crandall of UCLA; Kathleen Hovey of the State University of New York at Buffalo; Christopher Andrews of the University of Michigan; Dr. Rowan Chlebowski of City of Hope; Marcia Stefanick of Stanford University; Dr. Dorothy Lane of the State University of New York at Ston y Brook; Dr. Jan Sh...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 16, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

What does music mean? Sign language may offer an answer, new research concludes
(New York University) How do we detect the meaning of music? We may gain some insights by looking at an unlikely source, sign language, a newly released linguistic analysis concludes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Child's home learning environment predicts 5th grade academic skills
(New York University) Children whose parents provide them with learning materials like books and toys and engage them in learning activities and meaningful conversations in infancy and toddlerhood are likely to develop early cognitive skills that can cascade into later academic success, finds a new study by NYU's Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Marijuana use amongst youth stable, but substance abuse admissions up
(Binghamton University) While marijuana use amongst youth remains stable, youth admission to substance abuse treatment facilities has increased, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers describe neural mechanisms for gregariousness and monogamy in zebra finches
(The City University of New York) Researchers describe neural mechanisms for gregariousness and monogamy in zebra finches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pregnant women exposed to pollution 'have preemies'
Scientists at New York University exposed mice at various stages of pregnancy to air pollution. The majority of those exposed in their first trimester (83 percent) had premature babies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Being smarter means you are more likely to use stereotypes
A new study from New York University found that people with higher cognitive abilities are more likely to learn and apply social stereotypes. But, they're also better able to unlearn them. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Higher cognitive abilities linked to greater risk of stereotyping, new study finds
(New York University) People with higher cognitive abilities are more likely to learn and apply social stereotypes, finds a new study. The results, stemming from a series of experiments, show that those with higher cognitive abilities also more easily unlearn stereotypes when presented with new information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study examines effects of stopping psychiatric medication
This study is novel because it asks questions about stopping to take medications from the consumer’s point of view.”Many industry-funded studies have asked patients why they stop taking their medications, but typically with a view to increase compliance, according to Cohen. By contrast, this study asks consumers what they experienced while coming off drugs, who helped them make and carry out their decision, and whether they were satisfied with their attempted or completed discontinuation.“Over 70 percent of our study sample had taken medication for more than a decade; however, these individuals reported h...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Robotics-based study provides insight into predator-prey interactions
(American Institute of Physics) A research team led by New York University professor Maurizio Porfiri put forth a robotics-based study to control information flow in predator-prey interactions, as well as test the validity of transfer entropy when attempting to understand causal influences of the system. They report their findings this week in the journal Chaos, from AIP Publishing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 19, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health awarded $2.4 M NIH grant
(The City University of New York) CUNY Institute for Implementation Science in Population Health awarded $2.4 M NIH grant. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Grant awarded to Hunter College to study factors that influence HIV seroconversion
(The City University of New York) Hunter College's Center for HIV/AIDS Educational Studies and Training (CHEST; @CHESTNYC) has been awarded a two-year milestone-based award (UG3-AI133674) for more than $2.9 million from the National Institute on Allergies and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) and the Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institute of Child Health and Human Development (NICHD) to address the sustained HIV epidemic among gay and bisexual men and other men who have sex with men (MSM). If agreed upon milestones for the first two years are achieved, an additional three years and more than $3.9 million have been committed. ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Privacy, please: Why surveiling shoppers can inhibit sales, and how to fix it
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) The authors designed a series of studies and field experiments that tested shoppers' reaction to being watched while shopping and found that when they feel their privacy or freedom of behavior is threatened, they will back off. Simple solutions are available to retailers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How off-line retailers can fight back
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) For concrete thinkers, product touch is important; for abstract thinkers, not so much. The offline retailer who can mine the wealth of consumer research data available through the internet to pinpoint these concrete thinkers, the authors suggest, can target them with appropriate marketing strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Partnering cells turn off immune attack on pancreatic tumors
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Two cell types work together to protect pancreatic tumors from destruction by the immune system. But, blocking this partnership may restore the system's ability to attack these same tumor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 18, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CDC chief propped up controversial anti-aging medicine in private practice
Before the newly-appointed CDC head Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald ran the public health department for the state of Georgia, she was a board-certified OB/GYN with a private practice. But according to a report from Forbes, she not only provided women’s healthcare in the 30 years she practiced medicine – she was also a fellow in “anti-aging medicine.” The controversial kinds of treatment endorsed by Fitzgerald were reportedly described as “snake-oil” by Dr. David Goldstein, a professor of obstetrics and gynecology at the New York University School of Medicine. Get the full story at ...
Source: Mass Device - July 17, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Hospital Care Wall Street Beat Women's Health Centers for Disease Control & Prevention (CDC) Source Type: news

Amphibians can become tolerant to pesticides, but at a cost
(Binghamton University) Amphibians can develop tolerance to pesticides, but this tolerance can lead to increased susceptibility to parasites, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 17, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Drug combined with care program better at reducing Alzheimer's symptoms than drug alone
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Combining a specific care management program with a commonly-prescribed drug for Alzheimer's, memantine, multiplies the medication's ability to improve daily function by about 7.5 times, stalling some of the disease's most damaging effects, according to new research from NYU Langone Medical Center. With no significant new drug for Alzheimer's having been approved since 2003, the study authors say the time has come for the field to pay more attention to methods that can improve the impact of existing drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU researchers identify promising target to protect bone in patients with diabetes
(New York University) Utilizing metabolomics research techniques, NYU Dentistry researchers investigated the underlying biochemical activity and signaling within the bone marrow of hyperglycemic mice with hopes of reducing fracture risks of diabetics (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NYU to investigate the biology of sex differences in oral cancer pain
(New York University) Dr. Nicole N. Scheff Receives $120,000-Plus NIDCR F32 Grant to investigate whether immune cells in the oral cancer environment contribute to sex differences in oral cancer pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Taking photos improves our memory of experiences
Taking photos of surroundings helps enhance visual memory of experiences, New York University and Yale researchers found. Just having a camera with you boosts memory. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Preschoolers learn from math games -- to a point
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) What is the best way to help poor schoolchildren succeed at math? A study co-authored by researchers at MIT, Harvard University, and New York University now sheds light on the ways preschool activities may -- or may not -- help children develop cognitive skills. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital Games Improve Mental Health & Educational Outcomes of Syrian Refugee Children
Digital games can effectively teach refugee children much-needed skills - including a new language, cognitive skills, and coding - while also improving their mental health, finds research by New York University, the City University of New York, and Turkey's Bahcesehir University. The study of Syrian refugee children suggests that digital games can be a cost-efficient and scalable approach to meeting the educational and psychological needs of refugee children. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - June 29, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Oral Health Workforce Research Center (OHWRC)
OHWRC is based at the Center for Health Workforce Studies (CHWS) at the School of Public Health, University at Albany, State University of New York. OHWRC provides timely, accurate data and conducts policy relevant research to assist in future health workforce planning. (Source: PHPartners.org)
Source: PHPartners.org - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Seattle Cancer Center Opens Latest Mesothelioma Clinical Trial
The Seattle Cancer Care Alliance has opened a phase II clinical trial involving durvalumab, the promising immunotherapy drug, in combination with chemotherapy for the first-line treatment of unresectable pleural mesothelioma. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already granted accelerated approval to durvalumab in May for the treatment of bladder cancer. Researchers have also lauded the drug for its effectiveness in earlier lung cancer clinical trials. “We have every reason to believe it will be effective with mesothelioma, too,” Dr. Bernardo Goulart, chief trial investigator and medical oncologist at t...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 27, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Tags: cancer in seattle doctor Bernardo Goulart mesothelioma clinical trials mesothelioma in seattle mesothelioma treatment seattle cancer care alliance Source Type: news

Population health resource to give US cities access to key data
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Hundreds of United States cities will be able to identify their most pressing health needs more accurately -- thanks to a nationwide expansion of the City Health Dashboard, an innovative health data visualization tool. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Symbolic traces of communist legacy in post-socialist Hungary by Dr. Lisa Pope Fischer
(The City University of New York) In what ways does societal change carry aspects of the past?   How is the past reworked and molded to fit the present? A new book published in September 2016 by Brill examines how Hungarians have adjusted their perceptions and daily activities in the transition from communism to a post-socialist society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New insight into a central biological dogma on ion transport
(Aarhus University) New research results from Aarhus University and New York University show how active transport of potassium can be achieved by a membrane protein complex that has roots in both ion pump and ion channel super-families. The results, which have just been published in Nature, shed new light on what define channels and pumps. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Identified brain circuitry bridges neural and behavioral roles in PTSD
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Specific cerebral circuitry bridges chemical changes deep in the brain and the more outward behavioral expressions associated with post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD), which could lead to more objective biomarkers for the disorder, according to a comprehensive review of rapidly changing data published June 22 in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

8 Ways To Sleep Better When It's Blistering Hot Outside
Jenni June raised four kids as a single mom, in homes in Oregon and Southern California where she wasn’t able to have air conditioning. She says it was hard to see her kids struggle to sleep in the summer heat. As a result, she developed some creative tricks to cool down her kids before bedtime, like dampening and freezing a teddy bear that they could take to bed. “It definitely broke my heart for my kids. It was hard to keep them cool and comfortable, and to protect their sleep,” said June, who now works as a child and family sleep consultant. “When a room is overheated because it’s warm outs...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People who go to bed late have less control over OCD symptoms
(Binghamton University) A late bedtime is associated with lower perceived control of obsessive thoughts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Transgender actors effective in teaching new doctors to provide respectful care
(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) By acting out scenarios commonly seen in the clinic, real-life transgender actors can help residents learn to provide more sensitive care to people with a different gender identity than the one they were assigned at birth. This is the main finding of a study published online June 15 in the Journal of Graduate Medical Education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news