Kaiser Permanente ’s New Medical School Will Be Free for Its First 5 Graduating Classes
Kaiser Permanente’s new medical school will be free to attend for its first five graduating classes, the school announced Tuesday. The newly formed Kaiser Permanente School of Medicine will begin accepting applications from prospective students in June 2019, following the receipt of primary accreditation from the Liaison Committee on Medical Education, Kaiser announced in a release. The school, which will be located in Pasadena, Calif., will welcome its first class of students in the summer of 2020. Those students, as well as the four following classes, will attend the school for free for all four years of their medi...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime medicine onetime Source Type: news

Kaiser Permanente ’ s New Medical School Will Waive Tuition for Its First 5 Classes
By eliminating the financial burden of a medical education, the school hopes that more students will chose family medicine and other vital but lower-paid specialties. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ABBY GOODNOUGH Tags: Kaiser Permanente Medical Schools Tuition Pasadena (Calif) New York University School of Medicine Source Type: news

Young children may see nationality as biological, new study suggests
(New York University) Young children see national identity, in part, as biological in nature, a perception that diminishes as they get older. But despite changes in views of nationality as we age, the work suggests the intriguing possibility that the roots of nationalist sentiments are established early in life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do we conserve and restore computer-based art in a changing technological environment?
(New York University) Just as conservators have developed methods to protect traditional artworks, computer scientists, in collaboration with time-based media conservators, have created means to safeguard computer- or time-based art by following the same preservation principles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Check-Cap ’ s cancer screening capsule will have U.S. study
Check-Cap (NSDQ:CHEK) said its X-ray-enabled, colorectal cancer-screening capsule will have a pilot study in the United States. The Isfiya, Israel-based startup makes the C-Scan System, an ingestible capsule used to detect precancerous polyps without the need for laxatives or an invasive procedure. The C-Scan system uses an ultra-low dose X-ray capsule, an integrated positioning, control, and recording system, and proprietary software to generate a 3D map of the inner lining of the colon. It received approval from Israel’s Ministry of Health Medical Device division (AMAR) and the CE Mark...
Source: Mass Device - February 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Clinical Trials Implants News Well Oncology Research & Development Check-Cap FDA New York University Source Type: news

Your genes could impact the quality of your marriage
(Binghamton University) The quality of your marriage could be affected by your genes, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Defending Darwin: Scientists respond to attack on evolution
(The City University of New York) Science magazine, the country's top scientific journal, has taken the rare step of publishing criticism of a new book. The book is called Darwin Devolves, and Science says its author, Michael Behe, is on a 'crusade to overturn evolution.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Doing science,' rather than 'being scientists,' more encouraging to girls
(New York University) Asking young girls to 'do science' leads them to show greater persistence in science activities than does asking them to 'be scientists,' finds a new psychology study by researchers at New York University and Princeton University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients with facial pain report most benefit from self-care techniques
(New York University) While oral appliances such as splints and bite guards are the most common treatment for facial pain from temporomandibular disorders (TMD), patients rate them as less helpful than self-care treatments, such as jaw exercises or warm compresses, finds a new study by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers link overexpression of MDMX protein to metastasis of 3X negative breast cancer
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) In a newly published paper in the journal Breast Cancer Research, scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Hunter College are the first to report that MDMX promotes metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer -- one of the most aggressive forms of the disease, and one that is more prevalent in young women and women of color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Smart, self-powered knee implants could reduce number of knee replacement surgeries
(Binghamton University) Smart knee implants may soon be a reality thanks to research conducted by a team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Life Science Graduates Face Daunting Labor Market
In my position as CEO of a firm employing over 80,000 engineers, I can testify that most were excellent engineers. But the factor that most distinguished those who advanced in the organization was the ability to think broadly and read and write clearly.(Norman Augustine, former chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin) Biology graduate students have a dizzying array of options after completing their degree, including settling on an initial career path. Although many young biologists hope to make these decisions on the basis of personal preference, changing labor market conditions are likely to influence the decision. The empl...
Source: Washington Watch - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: Julie Palakovich Carr Source Type: news

The USDA Invests in Biology Education
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) might not come to mind when biology educators are searching for funding to support innovative projects, but the agency turns out to be a welcome partner in the field. In early 2013, the USDA joined other federal agencies and private funders in supporting the second Vision and Change in Biology Education conference. As Muquarrab Qureshi, assistant director of the USDA's Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, explained in an opening presentation, the USDA is concerned about the disparity between the high level of interest in science among younger students and the low number of coll...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Health literacy linked to blood pressure medication adherence among Hispanics
(New York University) Good health literacy is associated with better adherence to blood pressure medications among Hispanic individuals with high blood pressure, finds a study by NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and Columbia University School of Nursing. However, the majority of this population lacks health literary and has poor adherence to their medications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cop voice: Jay-Z, Public Enemy songs highlight police tactic to frighten people of color
(Binghamton University) What do songs by artists like Jay-Z and Public Enemy have in common? They feature representations of 'cop voice,' a racialized way of speaking that police use to weaponize their voices around people of color, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pain and substance abuse interact in a vicious cycle
(Binghamton University) Pain and substance use interact in a vicious cycle that can ultimately worsen and maintain both chronic pain and addiction, according to a research team including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Solving the ancient mysteries of Easter Island
(Binghamton University) The ancient people of Rapa Nui (Easter Island, Chile) built their famous ahu monuments near coastal freshwater sources, according to a team of researchers including faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The next car bomb: Cars already on the road can be hacked and taken over, used to kill millions, according to expert
(Natural News) Your laptops, computers, smartphones, or smart appliances are not the only things that are susceptible to hacking. Modern cars could be remotely hacked by terrorists and turned into lethal weapons, a computer scientist has warned. The warning was made by Justin Cappos from New York University. Cappos has stated that cyber criminals working for... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NYUAD study suggests that 'Actin' is critical in genome regulation during nerve cell formation
(New York University) One of the most fascinating questions in biology is how genes are regulated during development and differentiation when cells acquire a specific identity. This research suggests for the first time that Actin is critical in regulating the genome during 'neurogenesis' -- which involves the formation of 'neurons' or nerve cells. The methodology employed in this study will enable researchers to model neurogenesis, and eventually, provide a new perspective to understand disease at the molecular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 31, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Graphene's magic is in the defects
(NYU Tandon School of Engineering) A team of researchers at the New York University Tandon School of Engineering and NYU Center for Neural Science has solved a longstanding puzzle of how to build ultra-sensitive, ultra-small electrochemical sensors with homogenous and predictable properties by discovering how to engineer graphene structure on an atomic level. The researchers detail their study in a paper published today in the journal Advanced Materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can social interactions affect spread of disease?
(Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics) In a paper publishing next week in the SIAM Journal on Applied Dynamical Systems, a team of researchers from New York University and Politecnico di Torino, Italy, draws connections between people's social activity and the spread of epidemics through a mathematical model. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Navigation system in rodents akin to ancient, open ocean direction-finding
(New York University) The navigation system used by rodents is similar to that used by Pacific Islanders in finding their way through the open ocean without a compass, a team of neuroscientists has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Surgeons successfully perform full face transplant
With the help of innovative techniques, surgeons at New York University Langone Health have successfully conducted a full face transplant. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - December 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cosmetic Medicine / Plastic Surgery Source Type: news

Facebook, NYU release MRI dataset for AI
The New York University (NYU) School of Medicine has released a large-scale...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Is Facebook useful for mammography screening education? Facebook, NYU feel need for MRI speed with AI NYU gets NIH grants to study dose, image analytics (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 29, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Mischievous responders taint LGBQ health estimates in national survey
(New York University) Many research studies have reported on the elevated health risk and deviance of youth who identify as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or questioning (LGBQ) but a new study using national data suggests that many of those estimates may be overstated and that LGBQ youth risk and deviance is not as different from heterosexual youth as many studies claim. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computer hackers could be thwarted by new 'deception consistency' method
(Binghamton University) Can you deceive a deceiver? That's the question that computer scientists at Binghamton University, State University of New York have recently been exploring.Assistant Professor of Computer Science   Guanhua Yan   and PhD student Zhan Shu are looking at how to make cyber deception a more effective tool against malicious hackers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

YouTube fueling prostate myths: 77% of 150 most watched videos 'have factual errors'
The internet in general and YouTube in particular are popular resources for health information, but a new New York University study warns that 'educational' prostate cancer videos have errors. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New York University urged to use UAE links to help jailed UK academic
Academics ask New York University to use its Abu Dhabi campus to press the UAE government for the release of Matthew HedgesAround 200 academics from New York University have called on their institution to publicly condemn the life imprisonment of the Durham PhD studentaccused of spying by the United Arab Emirates.Ina letter addressed to NYU president, Andrew Hamilton, the academics said the university, which has a campus in Abu Dhabi, should use its ties with the UAE government to press for the release of Matthew Hedges, whose detention they describe as unjustified and “tantamount to torture”.Continue reading.....
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 23, 2018 Category: Science Authors: David Batty and Rachel Hall Tags: UK news Universities Academics Education Higher education United Arab Emirates Middle East and North Africa World news Research Science Source Type: news

Alaska Airlines: the healthiest airline in the sky
(The City University of New York) The Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center at the City University of New York and DietDetective.com has released the 2018-19 Airline Food Study rating foods for eleven airlines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Airline food study 2018
(The City University of New York) The Hunter College NYC Food Policy Center at the City University of New York and DietDetective.com has released the 2018-19 Airline Food Study rating foods for eleven airlines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Growing number of state laws limit local government control over food and nutrition
(New York University) In recent years, more than a dozen states have passed laws limiting local governments' ability to create food and nutrition policies and more than two dozen states previously enacted laws preventing obesity-related lawsuits against food businesses, finds a new analysis led by NYU College of Global Public Health. These laws are examples of preemption, a legal mechanism in which a higher level of government withdraws or limits the ability of a lower level of government to act on an issue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Get More Acne in the Winter — And How to Fix It
Nothing much blooms in winter, but pimples may be an exception. A 2015 study of New England acne patients found the percentage of them who enjoyed a clear complexion was greatest during summer and fall. Winter, on the other hand, tended to be a rough season; rates of moderate-to-severe acne leaped 11% among the study participants in winter compared to summer. One reason your skin tends to act up in cold weather may have to do with sebum, a type of oil that the small glands of the skin secrete. Sebum helps keep your skin properly moist and supple, but too much can cause the cells in your skin to stick together. This can lea...
Source: TIME: Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Studying the microbiome could be the next frontier in colon cancer research
Colon cancer is the second-leading cause of cancer-related deaths in the U.S. but colonoscopies have been found to reduce the risk of death from the disease by 70 percent or more. CBS News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jon LaPook talks to New York University medical student, Rachel Sarnoff, about how the field of microbiomes could be the next frontier of colon cancer research. (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - November 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sign language reveals the hidden logical structure, and limitations, of spoken language
(New York University) Sign languages can help reveal hidden aspects of the logical structure of spoken language, but they also highlight its limitations because speech lacks the rich iconic resources that sign language uses on top of its sophisticated grammar. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New NYU Abu Dhabi research suggests corals produce molecules that can help resist disease
(New York University) In a new study published in Communications Biology, NYU Abu Dhabi Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin, along with Philippe Schmitt-Kopplin from the Helmholtz Center Munich, report that corals, though they are stationary organisms, can alter their surroundings by producing unique molecules that can help recruit healthy microbiomes and fight parasitic microbes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

William Mu ñ oz receives Nemko Prize in Cellular or Molecular Neuroscience
(Society for Neuroscience) The Society for Neuroscience (SfN) will award the Nemko Prize in Cellular or Molecular Neuroscience to William Mu ñ oz, PhD, a student in the MD-PhD program at the New York University School of Medicine, for his development and application of a method to record from interneurons deep in the cerebral cortex and identify both their morphology and their function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

End-of-life care preferences of chinese adults vary based on whether they have children
(New York University) Chinese adults who have children prefer to receive end-of-life care from family members at home, while those who lost their only child prefer to be cared for in hospice or palliative care institutions, finds a new study led by an international team of researchers and published in the November issue of The Journal of Palliative Medicine. Income, property ownership, and support from friends also influenced individuals' end-of-life care preferences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Quit rates are low and not increasing among cigarette smokers with mental health problems
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) Even as more and more American quit smoking cigarettes, individuals with serious psychological distress (SPD) are much less likely to extinguish their habit. A new study by scientists at the Columbia Mailman School of Public Health and The City University of New York found that individuals with mental health problems quit cigarettes at half the rate of those without psychological distress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Three neuroscientists earn prestigious NIH grant for brain research
Three UCLA neuroscientists — Michele Basso, Dr. Peyman Golshani and Daniel Aharoni — received a nearly $3.7 million, three-year grant from the National Institutes of Health for a study that will develop imaging technology that allows the recording of tens of thousands of neurons to better understand how the brain goes aw ry in disease.The grant, part of the National Institutes of Health ’s Brain Research Through Advancing Innovative Neurotechnologies, or BRAIN, Initiative, will support the team ’s work to design, manufacture and test a miniature microscope for measuring brain activity in n...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 31, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

NCI awards Temple, Hunter College $13.5M grant to study cancer health disparities
The Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University and Hunter College of the City University of New York jointly received a $13.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to create an entity to study cancer health disparities. The five-year grant from the NCI, which is part of the National Institutes of Health, will be used to create the Temple University Fox Chase Cancer Center and Hunter College Regional Comprehensive Cancer Health Disparities Partnership. The regional partnership… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University, Hunter College awarded $13.5 million NCI/NIH Grant
(Temple University Health System) The Lewis Katz School of Medicine at Temple University (LKSOM) and Hunter College of the City University of New York (Hunter) have jointly received a five-year, $13.5 million grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI). The award will underwrite creation of the Temple University Fox Chase Cancer Center (TUFCCC) and Hunter College (HC) Regional Comprehensive Cancer Health Disparities Partnership. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Robotic arm may help to rehabilitate chronic stroke victims, finds new study
(New York University) New research published in Frontiers in Neurology by NYU researcher Adam Buchwald finds that robotic arm rehabilitation in chronic stroke patients with aphasia, the loss of ability to understand or express speech, may promote speech and language function recovery. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New nurses with bachelor's degrees feel better prepared than nurses with associate degrees
(New York University) Nurses with bachelor's degrees report being very prepared in more quality and safety measures than do their peers with associate degrees, finds a new study by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The 5 Most Germ-Filled Places In Your Office —And How to Protect Yourself
Just getting to work can be a bacteria-ridden experience. The subway is full of it, as are stair railings and revolving doors. But once you finally sit down at your desk for the day, you’re still exposed. The germiest places tend to be high-traffic areas where a lot of different people touch the same surface, and your office is no exception. But by taking one main precaution—washing your hands regularly—you’ll reduce your risk for getting sick. Here are five of the most bacteria-filled spots in your workplace. Elevator buttons and escalator railings Pretty much everyone who goes above the second fl...
Source: TIME: Health - October 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Cassie Shortsleeve  Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Patient-Reported Oral Cancer Pain Level Predicts Risk Of Metastasis Patient-Reported Oral Cancer Pain Level Predicts Risk Of Metastasis
Oral cancer pain level at the primary site may help doctors identify which patients with occult metastases will benefit from neck dissection, according to results of a study by researchers at New York University in New York City.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - October 17, 2018 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

The easy way may not be the best
(New York University) The steps cells take in response to challenges are more complex than previously thought, finds new research. The study investigates a system relevant to cancer, viral infection, and diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 15, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Now you can vape VITAMINS - but should you? 'Absolutely not,' expert warns
A number of brands are now selling vitamin vape pens to help users get their daily nutrients. But a New York University nutrition professor explains why our body keeps us from inhaling nutrients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Statement on the Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel 2018
The Nobel Assembly has awarded the 2018 Sveriges Riksbank Prize in Economic Sciences in Memory of Alfred Nobel to William Nordhaus of Yale University and Paul Romer of New York University for expanding the understanding of global scale macroeconomics. The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Directorate for Social, Behavioral and Economic Sciences (SBE) has supported the research of both laureates with multiple awards, including more than three decades of support for ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=296861&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - October 10, 2018 Category: Science Source Type: news

Scientists go 'back to the future,' create flies with ancient genes to study evolution
(New York University) Scientists at New York University and the University of Chicago have created fruit flies carrying reconstructed ancient genes to reveal how ancient mutations drove major evolutionary changes in embryonic development--the impact of which we see today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news