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Researchers challenge claims that sugar industry shifted blame to fat
(Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health) In recent years, high-profile claims in the academic literature and popular press have alleged that the sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and emphasize instead the dangers of dietary fat. In a new article in the journal Science, historians at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health and the City University of New York challenge those claims through a careful examination of the evidence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New book raises questions about citizen input in government contracting
(Binghamton University) Taxpayer dollars fund a variety of important public programs, including many that are delivered by private contractors, but citizens often are not involved enough in shaping these contracts, according to a new book by Kristina Lambright, associate professor of public administration at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thousands of lives would be saved if counties met ATS clean air standards
(American Thoracic Society) Thousands of lives would be saved each year, and many more serious illnesses avoided, if U.S. counties met standards set by the American Thoracic Society for the two most important air pollutants, according to a new report by the ATS and the Marron Institute of Urban Management at New York University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inequality also Relates to Education, Health & Illiteracy, not Wealth Alone
A health worker marks a boy’s finger with ink to show that he has been vaccinated against measles in India’s Gujarat State. Credit: UNICEF/UNI133530/PietrasikBy Bjorn LomborgCOPENHAGEN, Denmark, Feb 7 2018 (IPS)Antipoverty group Oxfam International got a lot of attention for claiming that there’s a global “inequality crisis,” but a far more important point is entirely neglected: globally, income distribution is less unequal than it has been for 100 years. The best data on this comes from Professor Branko Milanovic, formerly of the World Bank, now at City University of New York. His research sh...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Bjorn Lomborg Tags: Africa Development & Aid Education Featured Gender Headlines Health Inequity Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Toddler formulas and milks -- not recommended by health experts -- mislead with health claims
(New York University) Misleading labeling on formulas and milks marketed as 'toddler drinks' may confuse parents about their healthfulness or necessity, finds a new study by researchers at the NYU College of Global Public Health and the Rudd Center for Food Policy& Obesity at the University of Connecticut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children with disabilities in West Africa experience violence from the day they are born
(New York University) Disabled children in West Africa experience significantly greater violence than their non-disabled peers and all experience violence from they day they are born, finds a study published in BMC Public Health by Janet Njelesani, assistant professor of occupational therapy at New York University Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Even small changes within an ecosystem can have detrimental effects
(Binghamton University) A mutualistic relationship between species in an ecosystem allows for the ecosystem to thrive, but the lack of this relationship could lead to the collapse of the entire system. New research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that interactions between relatively small organisms are crucial to mutualistic relationships in an ecosystem dominated by much larger organisms, including trees and elephants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Vaping causes DNA mutations leading to cancer
Researchers at New York University subjected cultured human bladder and lung cells to e-cigarette vapor which is designed to avoid the carcinogenic byproducts of tobacco. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vaping causes cancer, new study warns
Researchers at New York University subjected cultured human bladder and lung cells to e-cigarette vapor which is designed to avoid the carcinogenic byproducts of tobacco. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Trusting a Stranger May Be a Case of Deja Vu
MONDAY, Jan. 29, 2018 -- Whether you trust a stranger may depend on how much they look like an old friend, a new study suggests. In a series of experiments, New York University researchers found that study participants were more likely to pick... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 29, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Scientists discover oldest known modern human fossil outside of Africa
(Binghamton University) A large international research team, led by Israel Hershkovitz from Tel Aviv University and including Rolf Quam from Binghamton University, State University of New York, has discovered the earliest modern human fossil ever found outside of Africa. The finding suggests that modern humans left the continent at least 50,000 years earlier than previously thought. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Infants recognize foreign languages as a form of communication
(New York University) Infants recognize that speech in a language not their own is used for communication, finds a new psychology study. The results offer new insights into how language is processed at a young age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finding unravels nature of cognitive inflexibility in Fragile X syndrome
(New York University) Mice with the genetic defect that causes Fragile X syndrome (FXS) learn and remember normally, but show an inability to learn new information that contradicts what they initially learned, shows a new study by a team of neuroscientists. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using social and risk networks helps identify people undiagnosed with HIV
(New York University) Conducting HIV testing among the social and risk networks of those recently diagnosed with HIV helps identify undiagnosed cases of HIV at significantly higher rates and at a lower cost than other testing approaches, finds a new study conducted in Ukraine by an international research team. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

J & J ’ s Biosense Webster launches WaveCrest study
Johnson & Johnson‘s (NYSE:JNJ) Biosense Webster said today that the first patient has been enrolled in an investigational device exemption trial for its WaveCrest system. The 1,250-patient study is designed to assess the safety and efficacy of the WaveCrest left atrial appendage occlusion system as a way to reduce the risk of embolic stroke in atrial fibrillation patients. “The WaveCrest System is designed to enable physicians to close the heart’s LAA, where most stroke-causing blood clots occur,” Dr. Larry Chinitz, who treated the first patient in the trial at New York University...
Source: Mass Device - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials BioSense Webster Inc. johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Older adults are increasingly identifying -- but still likely underestimating -- cognitive impairment
(New York University) An increasing number of older adults are reporting cognitive impairment in their families over the past two decades, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU Rory Meyers College of Nursing and East Carolina University's Brody School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Digital Science launches Dimensions: next-generation research and discovery platform
Ground-breaking research information database links publications, grants, policy, data and metrics for the first time Global technology company Digital Science is proud to announce the launch of Dimensions, a new platform that aims to democratise and transform scholarly search. A collaboration between six Digital Science portfolio companies (Altmetric, Digital Science Consultancy, Figshare, Readcube, Symplectic and ÜberResearch) and more than 100 research funders and universities, Dimensions offers a better, faster way to discover, understand and analyse the global research landscape, without wasting time searching fo...
Source: News from STM - January 15, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Digital Featured Source Type: news

Vaping a safer option, could help prevent smoking-related deaths: Study
New research at New York University suggests vaping is a safer option than smoking cigarettes, and smokers switching could prevent 6.6 million early deaths. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Do less harm: E-cigarettes a safer option than smoking
(New York University) A new article publishing in the forthcoming volume of the Annual Review of Public Health focuses on harm minimization and smoking cessation, with alternative nicotine products like e-cigarettes emerging as a promising avenue for people who want to quit smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study suggests many gay and bisexual men are skeptical, but attitudes are on the rise
(The City University of New York) Undetectable = Untransimittable: Study suggests many gay and bisexual men are skeptical, but attitudes are on the rise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young adults report differing sexual effects from alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy
(New York University) Alcohol, marijuana, and ecstasy each have very different sexual effects, from attraction and desire to sensitivity to sexual dysfunction, finds a study by the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research (CDUHR) at NYU Meyers College of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Higher-ranked colleges don't necessarily provide a better educational experience
(Binghamton University) College rankings dominate the conversation regarding quality inpostsecondary education, but new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York reveals that rankings have little to no relationship to student engagement, an important indicator of collegiate quality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why listening to music could make you deaf
William Shapiro from New York University Langone warns people are ignoring advice. Loud music stresses the hairs in the cochlear and shears them, causing permanent damage. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People who sleep less than 8 hours a night more likely to suffer from depression, anxiety
(Binghamton University) Sleeping less than the recommended eight hours a night is associated with intrusive, repetitive thoughts like those seen in anxiety or depression, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

5 Shocking Medical Stories From 2017
CBS Local — The field of medicine has made tremendous strides in 2017. Here’s a list of shocking stories from this year that shows just how far science has come and how unbelievable (and a little gross!) it can be. Laymen beware: the following may contain highly technical terminology for procedures (like swallowing balloons) and medical recommendations (like not to swallow coins). New Procedure Has People Swallowing Balloons To Lose Weight Having trouble hitting your goal weight? With the help of her doctor and a few gas-filled balloons, Bronx-resident Suzy Soto found out how to get rid of those last few pounds...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Medicine Science Shocking Stories Source Type: news

Brain damage in newborns dropped dramatically after non-stick cookware chemicals were banned
(Natural News) Great food is one that’s made naturally from preparation to serving, and it has been a been a key component on the reduction of babies born with low weight and brain damage, based on a study published by the New York University (NYU) School of Medicine. The report, published in the International Journal of Hygiene... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Easter Island had a cooperative community, analysis of giant hats reveals
(Binghamton University) Analysis of giant stone hats found on Rapa Nui, Chile (Easter Island) provides evidence contrary to the widely held belief that the ancient civilization had a warrior culture. According to a new study conducted by a team of researchers, including a professor at Binghamton University, State University of New York, these stone hats suggest that the people of Rapa Nui were part of a supportive and inclusive community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NSF grant funds kent state anthropology professor's study of primate evolution
(Kent State University) Anthony Tosi, Ph.D., assistant professor of anthropology at Kent State University, received a NSF grant to study primate evolution and whether a species' genetic makeup includes genes brought together through occasional episodes of hybridization. Are we an amalgamation of DNA from a variety of interbreeding species? Did such hybridization happen throughout the 7 million years of human evolution? Tosi will collaborate with researchers from New York University and Pennsylvania State University to address such questions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trend of gifting DNA tests could cause family rifts
Popular at-home genetic testing kits have been pushing their products as great gifts this holiday season, but a New York University ethicist warns that your loved one may get unwanted information. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Our memory shifts into high gear when we think about raising our children, new study shows
(Binghamton University) Human memory has evolved so people better recall events encountered while they are thinking about raising their offspring, according to a new study conducted by researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New MRI tech could help doctors detect heart disease with better accuracy
(Binghamton University) Doctors might be able to better detect any disease or disorder that involves inflammation thanks to a new MRI imaging technology co-developed by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professional Develop Award Funds Two Courses on Data Management
The Joint 2017 Midwest Medical Library Association and Michigan Health Sciences Libraries Association Conference received the Professional Development Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region to offer two continuing education courses focused on data management. We selected this topic based on the vision of the new Director of the National Library of Medicine, Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, who said “I believe the future of health and health care rests on data—genomic data, environmental sensor-generated data, electronic health records data, patient-generated data, rese...
Source: The Cornflower - December 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Funding News from the Region Success Stories Training Source Type: news

Your mood depends on the food you eat, and what you should eat changes as you get older
(Binghamton University) Diet and dietary practices differentially affect mental health in young adults versus older adults, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The ‘obesity paradox’ is nonsense, a new study reveals
A new study from New York University finds the fatal flaw in the development of the 'obesity paradox,' showing that being fatter does not improve survival rates for those with heart diseases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists create stretchable battery made entirely out of fabric
(Binghamton University) A research team led by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York has developed an entirely textile-based, bacteria-powered bio-battery that could one day be integrated into wearable electronics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Women who attempt suicide exhibit different protein levels years after the attempt
(Binghamton University) Women with a history of suicide attempts exhibit different levels of a specific protein in their bloodstream than those with no history of suicide attempts, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This everyday habit could reduce your risk of cancer
Researchers from New York University found failing to do this increases a person's risk of the condition by 21 percent. Throat cancer is the eighth most common form of the disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Neanderthal are you … and can you blame your DNA? – personality quiz
If you ’re brutish and promiscuous it could be your ancestors’ fault, says Ben AmbridgeYou ’ve heard of your IQ (Intelligence Quotient) and your EQ (Emotional Intelligence Quotient) but what about your NQ (Neanderthal Quotient)? A newstudy from the State University of New York analysed 200 Homo sapiens to see which personality traits they shared with our distant cousins Homo neanderthalensis. So, what about you? How often (never/occasionally/often) do you …(a) Fantasise about sex with someone other than your partner? (b) Avoid talking to people you don ’t know very well? (c) Feel so nervous t...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 3, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ben Ambridge Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Source Type: news

Study claims men are pressured to have unwanted sex
A study from New York University says men have unwanted sex with women to conform to gender expectations and to avoid uncomfortable situations. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kant, Hume, and the retailer's dilemma
(Journal of Retailing at New York University) To help retailers decide how to handle situations when customers abuse the retailer's rules for their own advantage, the authors explore the consequences for the retailer and for ethically behaving customers and come to unexpected conclusions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mothers' antibiotics give newborns irritable bowel disease
A pregnant mother's antibiotic use may damage the gut microbiome she passes to her baby, putting the child at risk of irritable bowel disease, according to a new New York University study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 27, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Increased oral pathogens, decreased bacterial diversity predict precancerous stomach cancer lesions
(New York University) Elevated pathogen colonization and a lack of bacterial diversity in the mouth were identified in people with precancerous lesions that could precede stomach cancer, finds a new study led by New York University College of Dentistry and New York University School of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Some men confuse sexual interest with consent regardless of the situation, new study shows
(Binghamton University) Some men tend to confuse sexual interest with consent, regardless of the situation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Under Affordable Care Act, Americans have had more preventive care for heart health, UCLA study finds
By reducing out-of-pocket costs for preventive treatment, the Affordable Care Act appears to have encouraged more people to have health screenings related to their cardiovascular health,a UCLA study found. Comparing figures from 2006 through 2013, researchers found that more people were screened for diabetes, high cholesterol, cigarette use and high blood pressure — all risk factors for heart disease — after the ACA was implemented than before.But the research, published in the peer-reviewed American Journal of Managed Care, also revealed a disparity between men and women in one key area. Although more men who ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - November 23, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Biological Threat Agent (BTA) Detection, Response and Remediation
New York University, International Center for Enterprise Preparedness. 10/13/2017 This four-page document summarizes a Web forum that discussed bioterrorism and the ways New York City addresses biological agent threats through detection, response, and remediation planning and preparedness. It discussed the life cycle of a biological threat incident, which can be summarized in three stages of preparedness, crisis management, and consequence management. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - November 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Nanoparticles could allow for faster, better medicine
(Binghamton University) Gold nanoparticles could help make drugs act more quickly and effectively, according to new research conducted at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Opioid Addiction Treatments Face Off in US Trial
CHICAGO (AP) — The first U.S. study to compare two treatments for opioid addiction finds a monthly shot works as well as a daily drug to prevent relapse. The shot requires days of detox first and that proved to be a stumbling block for many. For those who made it past that hurdle, the shot Vivitrol worked about the same as an older treatment, Suboxone. Both drugs had high relapse rates and there were overdoses, including fatal ones, in the experiment in 570 adults. The study , published Tuesday in the journal Lancet, is the first to compare the two drugs in the United States, where an opioid addiction epidemic has do...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Carla K. Johnson, AP Medical Writer Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Punctuation in text messages helps replace cues found in face-to-face conversations
(Binghamton University) Emoticons, irregular spellings and exclamation points in text messages aren't sloppy or a sign that written language is going down the tubes -- these 'textisms' help convey meaning and intent in the absence of spoken conversation, according to newly published research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Endurance training helpful in recovery from muscle inflammation, new study shows
(Binghamton University) Endurance training can actually be helpful in dealing with muscle inflammation, according to a new paper co-written by faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York, and Karolinska Institutet and Karolinska University Hospital in Stockholm, Sweden. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news