U.S. COVID-19 Cases Are Skyrocketing, But Deaths Are Flat —So Far. These 5 Charts Explain Why
In just the last two weeks, the global daily tally for new COVID-19 cases has jumped more than 30%, according to TIME’s coronavirus tracker, which compiles data from Johns Hopkins University. The steep upward trend is driven by viral waves in Europe and the United States that started in August and mid-September, respectively. On Oct. 23, the daily case count in the U.S. reached a new record high, suggesting that this wave will be worse than the one that swept the country over the summer. But despite this rapid uptick in cases, the daily death count in the U.S. is not yet rising at the same rate, and remains at lower ...
Source: TIME: Health - October 26, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Barone Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Kid influencers are promoting junk food brands on YouTube -- garnering more than a billion views
(New York University) Kids with wildly popular YouTube channels are frequently promoting unhealthy food and drinks in their videos, warn researchers at NYU School of Global Public Health and NYU Grossman School of Medicine in a new study published in the journal Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most dentists have experienced aggression from patients
(New York University) Roughly half of US dentists experienced verbal or reputational aggression by patients in the past year, and nearly one in four endured physical aggression, according to a new study led by researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Birthrates, marriage, gender roles will change dramatically in post-pandemic world, scientists predict
COVID-19 and America ’s response to it are likely to profoundly affect our families, work lives, relationships and gender roles for years, say12 prominent scientists and authors who analyzed 90 research studies and used their expertiseto evaluate our reaction to the pandemic andpredict its aftermath.The group, which included several UCLA researchers, foresees enduring psychologicalfallout from thecrisis, even amongthose who haven ’t been infected. Their predictions and insights,published Oct. 22 in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, include:Planned pregnancies will decrease in a d...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 22, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Time to Diagnosis Longer for Subtle Seizures in Focal Epilepsy
TUESDAY, Oct. 20, 2020 -- Patients with new-onset focal epilepsy with subtle seizures experience prolonged time to diagnosis, according to a study published online Oct. 20 in Epilepsia. Jacob Pellinen, M.D., from the New York University School of... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 20, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Neurologic Complications Seen in Hospitalized COVID-19 Patients
MONDAY, Oct. 19, 2020 -- Neurologic disorders are not uncommon in hospitalized COVID-19 patients, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in Neurology. Jennifer A. Frontera, M.D., from the New York University Grossman School of Medicine in New... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - October 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

NYU Abu Dhabi study discovers how some single-cell organisms control microbiomes
(New York University) Large swaths of single-celled eukaryotes, non-bacterial single-cell organisms like microalgae, fungi or mold, can control microbiomes (a collection of tiny microbes, mostly bacteria) by secreting unusual small molecules around their cells, maintaining host survival and ecological success, according to a new study by NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) Assistant Professor of Biology Shady Amin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

After COVID-19 outbreak, SUNY Oneonta president departs
The State University of New York at Oneonta announced its president had resigned to “pursue other opportunities,” following a coronavirus outbreak that forced the school to switch to all-remote classes for the rest of the semester (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - October 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Scientists use holographic imaging to detect viruses and antibodies
(New York University) A team of scientists has developed a method using holographic imaging to detect both viruses and antibodies. The breakthrough has the potential to aid in medical diagnoses and, specifically, those related to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Chemists create new crystal form of insecticide, boosting its ability to fight mosquitoes and malaria
(New York University) Through a simple process of heating and cooling, New York University researchers have created a new crystal form of deltamethrin -- a common insecticide used to control malaria -- resulting in an insecticide that is up to 12 times more effective against mosquitoes than the existing form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NYUAD researchers discover immune evasion strategy used by Malaria-causing parasite
(New York University) A team of researchers at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) has found that the Plasmodium parasite, which transmits malaria to humans through infected mosquitos, triggers changes in human genes that alter the body's adaptive immune response to malarial infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People use, trust different COVID-19 information sources depending on gender, age, and other factors
(New York University) Gender, age, education level, and political affiliation predict where people turn for information about COVID-19 -- and what sources they use and trust is linked to differing beliefs about the pandemic, according to a new study by NYU School of Global Public Health researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Oral cancer pain predicts likelihood of cancer spreading
(New York University) Oral cancer is more likely to spread in patients experiencing high levels of pain, according to a team of researchers at NYU College of Dentistry that found genetic and cellular clues as to why metastatic oral cancers are so painful. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What makes us averse to loss in making economic decisions? NYU neuroscientist aims to understand why under new NIH grant
(New York University) NYU neuroscientist Christine Constantinople will examine the neurological intricacies of the decision-making process under a five-year, $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Some employees more likely to adhere to information security policies than others
(Binghamton University) Information security policies (ISP) that are not grounded in the realities of an employee's work responsibilities and priorities exposes organizations to higher risk for data breaches, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-score: A tool to evaluate public perception of countries' response to the pandemic
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) The Barcelona Institute for Global Health, in coordination with the City University of New York Graduate School of Public Health& Health Policy and other international institutions, has developed an easy and reliable tool to evaluate the public perception of governmental response to the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Women more likely to embrace behaviors aimed at preventing the spread of COVID-19
(New York University) Women are more likely than are men to follow guidelines outlined by medical experts to prevent the spread of COVID-19, new research finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Landmark discovery could improve Army lasers, precision sensors
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) An Army-funded landmark discovery at New York University could change the way researchers develop and use optical technologies, such as lasers, sensors and photonic circuits over the next decade. After years of research, the team of scientists achieved what many thought was perhaps impossible-they developed a method to create colloids that crystallize into the diamond lattice. This photonic technique, published in Nature, could lead to cheap, reliable and scalable fabrication of 3D photonic crystals for optical circuits and light filters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mason and NYU researchers to study drug and counterfeit illicit supply chains
(George Mason University) Louise Shelley, Professor/Director, Terrorism, Transnational Crime and Corruption Center (TraCCC), Edward Huang, Associate Professor, Systems Engineering and Operations Research, Volgenau School of Engineering, and Damon McCoy, Associate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering in New York University's Tandon School of Engineering, are beginning a multidisciplinary project to understand, model, and disrupt drug and counterfeit illicit supply chains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Clinical Trial for Mesothelioma Moving Forward
This study will compare the effectiveness of the drug against a control group receiving only the gemcitabine and celecoxib. Patients have a one-in-two chance of being randomly assigned to either the adenovirus treatment or the control group. Adenovirus-delivered interferon Alpha-2b is designed as a second- or third-line treatment for patients who have failed in earlier regimens. Patients who previously had aggressive mesothelioma surgery but whose tumors have since progressed would be eligible to enroll. Success at the phase III level would mark the culmination of 20 years of researching and fine tuning gene therapy for us...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 23, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Fran Mannino Source Type: news

Neurotic college students could benefit from health education
(Binghamton University) College students are under a lot of stress, even more so lately due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Based on certain personality types, especially neurotic personalities, college health courses could help students develop a more positive stress mindset, according to research from faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking in refugees does not strongly influence xenophobia in East German communities
(WZB Berlin Social Science Center) The reception of refugees in East German communities did not lead to changes in voting behaviour or attitudes to migration. This is the main finding of a study conducted by Max Schaub (WZB), Johanna Gereke (MZES), and Delia Baldassarri (New York University). In the over 200 East German communities they examined, negative attitudes to migration were widespread. However, the arrival of refugees in the immediate neighbourhood had hardly any influence on these attitudes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
Low-dose botox injections for jaw and facial pain not linked to bone changes, but NYU Dentistry researchers observe reduced bone density at higher dosesNew York UniversityBotox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used.The researchers, whose findings are published in theJournal of Oral Health Rehabilitation, call for further clinical studies to track bone- and muscle-related changes with long-term use of ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 21, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Momentum of unprecedented Chilean uprising stalled by COVID-19 pandemic
(Binghamton University) The uprising that erupted in fall 2019 in Chile against the post-dictatorship government may be diminished by the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic, according to faculty at Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers create better material for wearable biosensors
(Binghamton University) Researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York have used electrospinning to make porous silicone that allows sweat to evaporate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 16, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Botox for TMJ disorders may not lead to bone loss in the short term, but more research is needed
(New York University) Botox injections to manage jaw and facial pain do not result in clinically significant changes in jaw bone when used short term and in low doses, according to researchers at NYU College of Dentistry. However, they found evidence of bone loss when higher doses were used. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to make your own luck and turn a mistake into the best thing ever
Seeing meaning in the unexpected can help turn mistakes into opportunities, says researcher Dr Christian BuschDr Christian Busch has had a lucky life. He narrowly escaped a catastrophic car accident at the age of 18. The car was wrecked but he walked away without a scratch. It was just the wake-up call he needed. “I turned my life around. Before that I’d been a reckless teenager who lived in the moment, having fun. The accident instilled a sense of urgency to try to find meaning.”Luck continued to play a positive role in his life. An accidental coffee spillage in Starbucks led to romance and though the pe...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Sharon Walker Tags: Life and style Psychology Science Health & wellbeing Source Type: news

A Marathon, Not a Sprint: Peru Needs Fiscal Reforms to Quell High COVID-19 Death Rate
Intercultural bilingual school at Andahuaylas province, Peru. Photo courtesy Sergio Chaparro Hernández (CESR) By Laura Adriaensens and Sergio Chaparro HernándezANTWERP, Belgium / BOGOTA, Colombia, Sep 11 2020 (IPS) “It’s a major paradox, no?” asks Hugo Ñopo, a researcher at the Peruvian think tank Group for the Analysis of Development (GRADE). Since the beginning of the pandemic, Peru has presented itself as an example for the region: it quickly implemented drastic prevention measures, followed scientific recommendations and prepared an economic support plan for the most vulnerable se...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Laura Adriaensens and Sergio Chaparro Hernandez Tags: Development & Aid Editors' Choice Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Source Type: news

Changing what we eat could offset years of climate-warming emissions, new analysis finds
(New York University) Plant protein foods--like lentils, beans, and nuts--can provide vital nutrients using a small fraction of the land required to produce meat and dairy. By shifting to these foods, much of the remaining land could support ecosystems that absorb CO2, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Children with social anxiety, maternal history of depression more likely to develop depression
(Binghamton University) Although researchers have known for decades that depression runs in families, new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York, suggests that children suffering from social anxiety may be at particular risk for depression in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inside the Dangerous Mission to Understand What Makes Extremists Tick —and How to Change Their Minds
On a cool winter’s day in early 2014, the American academic Nafees Hamid was invited for tea at the second-story at the Barcelona apartment of a young Moroccan man. It started well enough; they sat down at the kitchen table, chatting amiably in French while two acquaintances of the host sat nearby in the living room. Halfway through the conversation, though, things took a turn. “He started saying things like, ‘Why should we trust any Westerner?’” Hamid recalls. “‘Why would we not kill every one of them? Why should I even trust you—you are an American—sitting here? Why s...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Feldman and Malia Politzer Tags: Uncategorized extremism feature Londontime Source Type: news

NYUAD study finds gene targets to combat microorganisms binding to underwater surfaces
(New York University) A group of synthetic biologists at NYU Abu Dhabi (NYUAD) have identified new genetic targets that could lead to safe, biologically-based approaches to combat marine biofouling - the process of sea-based microorganisms, plants, or algae binding to underwater surfaces. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clubs closed? Study finds partygoers turn to virtual raves and happy hours during pandemic
(New York University) People have traded in nightclubs and dance festivals for virtual raves and Zoom happy hours as a result of lockdowns during the COVID-19 pandemic--yet, many are using drugs in these socially distanced settings, according to a new study by researchers at NYU Grossman School of Medicine and the Center for Drug Use and HIV/HCV Research at NYU School of Global Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 26, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post Approval of a Coronavirus Vaccine Would Be Just the Beginning – Huge Production Challenges Could Cause Long Delays appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Why we distort probability
(New York University) A team of scientists has concluded that our cognitive limitations lead to probability distortions and to subsequent errors in decision-making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New deal housing programs dramatically increased segregation, new study finds
(New York University) Housing programs adopted during the New Deal increased segregation in American cities and towns, creating racial disparities that continue to characterize life in the 21st century, finds a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Facebook, NYU collaboration yields faster MRI scans
Researchers from New York University (NYU) Grossman School of Medicine and...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: What will be the killer apps for AI in MRI? Experts recommend Facebook to promote breast screening Fast MRI technique benefits kids with head trauma Facebook, NYU release MRI dataset for AI Facebook, NYU feel need for MRI speed with AI (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

US Students Line Up for Coronavirus Testing as Universities Open US Students Line Up for Coronavirus Testing as Universities Open
Hundreds of New York University students and staff waited in line outside a white tent for coronavirus testing ahead of the resumption of some classesReuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Pathology Headlines - August 20, 2020 Category: Pathology Tags: Public Health & Prevention News Source Type: news

Women less likely to receive pay for college internships
(Binghamton University) The odds of women receiving pay for a college internship are 34% lower than for men, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do we prioritize what we see?
(New York University) It is known that different regions of the brain help us prioritize information so we can efficiently process visual scenes. A new study by a team of neuroscientists has discovered that one specific region, the occipital cortex, plays a causal role in piloting our attention to manage the intake of images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Moms' Obesity May Affect Fetal Brain Development
WEDNESDAY, Aug. 12, 2020 -- Obesity during pregnancy may hinder fetal brain development, a new study suggests. Development of brain areas involved in decision-making and behavior may be affected as early as the second trimester, New York University... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 12, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Dr. Neville Sanjana receives 2020 Cancer Research Institute Technology Impact Award
(New York Genome Center) Neville Sanjana, Ph.D., Core Faculty Member at the New York Genome Center, Assistant Professor of Biology, New York University, and Assistant Professor of Neuroscience and Physiology, NYU School of Medicine, is the recipient of a 2020 Technology Impact Award from the Cancer Research Institute (CRI). Dr. Sanjana received this award to support his research study utilizing a new, high-throughput approach to overcome T-cell immunosuppression in pancreatic cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

What Drives Social Behavior During The COVID-19 Pandemic
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro speaks with economist Plamen Nikolov from State University of New York at Binghamton, about how the pandemic is altering the way we behave. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - August 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reduced coral reef fish biodiversity under temperatures that mirror climate predictions
(New York University) A team of researchers, led by Simon Brandl and Jacob Johansen, recently studied cryptobenthic reef fishes in the Arabian Gulf and the Sea of Oman and found that the more thermally extreme coral reef habitat in the Arabian Gulf adversely impacted the diversity and productivity of these important fishes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 31, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Even in Wealthy Areas of the U.S., People of Color Are More Likely to Get and Die from Coronavirus, Study Says
COVID-19 has had a disproportionately heavy toll on U.S. communities of color across income levels, according to a new research letter published in JAMA Network Open. Poverty is one of the clearest consequences of structural racism, and one of the easiest to link to health inequity. You can trace an unbroken line from racist real estate and employment policies to the struggle of many Black and brown families to afford things like fresh food, insurance and quality medical care. These disadvantages always have a direct impact on health—but especially during a pandemic. The new study, however, shows that structural rac...
Source: TIME: Health - July 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

2nd bone density test doesn ’t help gauge fracture risk in postmenopausal women
FINDINGSFor postmenopausal women who have undergone an initial bone mineral density test, having a standard second assessment three years after the first does not improve physicians ’ ability to determine their risk of osteoporosis-related hip, spine, forearm and shoulder fractures, a study has found.In addition, the study authors say, the initial testis more predictive of fracture risk than the second test, regardless of race, ethnicity and age.BACKGROUNDPhysicians routinely perform afollow-upbone density tests in postmenopausalwomen approximately three years after the first test todetect any loss in bone mass and t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Increased attention to sad faces predicts depression risk in teenagers
(Binghamton University) Teenagers who tend to pay more attention to sad faces are more likely to develop depression, but specifically within the context of stress, according to new research from Binghamton University, State University of New York. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

These Maps Show How Drastically COVID-19 Risk Varies By Neighborhood
One of the scariest parts of the coronavirus pandemic is the idea that anyone could get infected at any time. With the virus circulating as widely as it is, anyone could be unlucky. But while we are all at risk of COVID-19 infection, we are not all at equal risk. You’re clearly more likely to get sick if you live in an area currently experiencing a surge in cases, like Florida, Arizona and Texas. But even within the same city, your risk of getting infected is deeply tied to where you live. New data from the City Health Dashboard, a project run by New York University Langone Health, shows how drastically the risk of C...
Source: TIME: Health - July 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Research explores the link between wages, school and cognitive ability in South Africa
(Binghamton University) Using data sets that only became available in recent years, researchers at Binghamton University, State University of New York analyzed the wage impact of cognitive skills in South Africa. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Banks could get up to $24 billion in "free money" from the CARES Act
(Natural News) The CARES Act, the economic stimulus act designed to help businesses weather the Wuhan coronavirus pandemic, is set to make banks up to $24 billion just from fees for processing small business Paycheck Protection Program (PPP) loans. According to Edwin Hu of the New York University School of Law’s Institute for Corporate Governance and Finance, more than 4,000... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news