Real-life healthy dinners (for real people with real busy lives)

At the end of a long workday, my husband and I will often trade texts figuring out who will pick up the kids at my mother’s, and who will deal with dinner. Thankfully, we’re equal partners in all responsibilities (except spider-killing, which is strictly Hubby’s job) and dietary preferences. We’re both health-conscious foodie types. We want good food that’s good for us. An unvarnished look at family dinner The kids, on the other hand… I’m not sure how this happened, but we somehow raised creatures with tastes vastly different from ours, and each other. We’ve never tried to cook an evening family meal that everyone would eat, because such a meal does not exist. Instead, we stock up on parent-approved kids’ faves that they can essentially get for themselves, or that can be prepared with minimal time and fuss, on a moment’s notice. And we try to all eat in the same room, at sort of the same time. Do our kids eat as healthfully as we do, or we would like them to? No, but they eat healthfully enough, they’re developing well, and that’s fine. On a “good” night, their dinners may consist of: an apple with cinnamon/a yogurt/a bag of pea puffs for my five-year-old daughter, and scrambled eggs with cheddar/pita bread/a fresh peach for my seven-year-old son. On a “bad” night, it may be a warmed-up blueberry pancake with extra blueberries and extra butter for my daughter, and bacon (lots of b...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Healthy Eating Source Type: blogs

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Conclusion: The median peripheral perfusion index at high altitude was not lower than at sea level, while the mean oxygen saturation, in contrast, was lower than at sea level. The low partial oxygen pressure found at high altitudes leads to a variation in postnatal adaptation and an increased prevalence of PDA. Accordingly, oxygen saturation screening may serve to identify babies with PDA at high altitudes.What is Known:• Oxygen saturation is known to be low at high altitudes, and thus the rates of false positivity are high when screening for critical congenital heart disease.• High altitudes are also associated ...
Source: European Journal of Pediatrics - Category: Pediatrics Source Type: research
(Children's National Hospital) A distinguished panel of medical experts, state and federal health officials, and congenital heart disease parent advocates published recommended updates to the current American Academy of Pediatrics' protocol for detecting critical congenital heart disease (CCHD) in newborn babies using pulse oximetry. The recommendations appear in the June 2020 issue of Pediatrics.
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news
Some things you may need to know.  Nothing last week as I was " on holiday " , so two weeks'worth this time.COVID-19A systematic scoping review of COVID-19 during pregnancy and childbirth (International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynecology)ResearchProgression to type 2 diabetes in women with a known history of gestational diabetes: systematic review and meta-analysis (BMJ)**Leicester authors**Comparative impact of pharmacological treatments for gestational diabetes on neonatal anthropometry independent of maternal glycaemic control: A systematic review and meta-analysis (PLoS Medicine)Maternal cardiovas...
Source: Browsing - Category: Databases & Libraries Tags: midwifery Source Type: blogs
In today’s Psych Central Podcast, Gabe talks with Jamie Tworkowski, the founder of To Write Love on Her Arms, a non-profit movement dedicated to helping people who are struggling with addiction, depression, self-injury and suicide. Jamie shares how the idea for the non-profit was born in 2006 after he spent 5 days with his new friend Renee who’d recently been turned down for rehab. After writing about the experience and posting it on Myspace, people began to respond with their own stories, and the seeds for the non-profit were planted. Tune in to find out how To Write Love on Her Arms helps people struggling w...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Addiction Depression General Interview Podcast Policy and Advocacy Recovery Substance Abuse The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs
  Should people with mental illness have children? In today’s Not Crazy Podcast, Gabe and Lisa discuss their own reasons for not having kids, while also giving a platform to Amy Barnabi, a mother of two with bipolar disorder. Amy discusses her decision to have children and shares her experiences, joys and challenges thus far. What if you can’t be a good parent when your illness flares up? What if the child inherits your diagnosis? If you are a parent with mental illness, you’ve likely heard these questions. Tune in to hear these topics discussed (and much more!) on today’s podcast. (Transcript...
Source: World of Psychology - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Bipolar Children and Teens Disorders Family General Interview Mental Health and Wellness Not Crazy Podcast Source Type: blogs
It’s been enough for a bit, isn’t it? For three months now, there has been little space in the world for any other kind of news. That is, news without the word ‘coronavirus’. But there was innovation, there is excitement and, well, even some weird (although useful!) inventions that appeared while the world has been in lockdown. So here’s an outlook on such news, all, promise, without that particular C-word. Hospitals have been facing great challenges recently. But they are on the verge of a new era that brings better care and more focus on the patient. This is a trend we have been talking a...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Artificial Intelligence Robotics Telemedicine & Smartphones Virtual Reality amazon diabetes smart contact lens Stanford University pharmacies Fitbit fitness trackers genome sequencing diabetes management genomic data 5G robot Source Type: blogs
MONDAY, May 25, 2020 -- Skin-to-skin contact between parents and babies -- often called " kangaroo care " -- provides major benefits to preemies'hearts and brains, Australian researchers say. They assessed 40 babies born about 10 weeks early with an...
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - Category: General Medicine Source Type: news
Source: Heart and Vessels - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
Source: Heart and Vessels - Category: Cardiology Source Type: research
This briefing paper highlights the need for policymakers to put families with young children, and especially those with newborns, at the heart of coronavirus planning. It shows that the risks to babies and young children can be reduced if the government and services think creatively to find ways to bring vital support to new parents, and takes proactive steps to ensure that different agencies routinely share data on these children – now more important than ever.
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
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