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Lab notes: talkin' 'bout a resolution (sounds like some science)
We ’re far enough into January for most resolutions to have been tested somewhat. I’m one of the many hoping that doggedly sticking to Dry January will atone for December’s sins, and if that rings a bell with you, then here’swhat the experts have to say about the efficacy of temporary abstinence. For those of you freshly committing to pursuits such as yoga, you might be interested in a new vascular studyweighing up the claims made for hot yoga. However, all these healthy January ambitions may come to naught if your office, like mine, is heading forAztec levels of pestilence (oh, all right, it &rsquo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 19, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Tash Reith-Banks Tags: Science Source Type: news

Complex engineering and metal-work discovered beneath ancient Greek 'pyramid'
Latest find on Cyclades ’ Keros includes evidence of metal-working and suggests the beginnings of an urban centre, say archaeologistsMore than 4,000 years ago builders carved out the entire surface of a naturally pyramid-shaped promontory on the Greek island of Keros. They shaped it into terraces covered with 1,000 tonnes of specially imported gleaming white stone to give it the appearance of a giant stepped pyramid rising from the Aegean: the most imposing manmade structure in all the Cyclades archipelago.But beneath the surface of the terraces lay undiscovered feats of engineering and craftsmanship to rival the str...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 18, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Maev Kennedy Tags: Greece Europe World news Culture University of Cambridge Education Higher education Archaeology Source Type: news

Thousands Still Dying at Sea En Route to Europe
Somali refugees on the Tunisian desert. Credit: IPSBy Tharanga YakupitiyageUNITED NATIONS, Jan 15 2018 (IPS)Amid concerns that 160 people may have drowned while attempting to cross the Mediterranean this week alone, the UN refugee agency have urged countries to offer more resettlement places. Though the influx of refugees and migrants has slowed, many are still embarking on dangerous journeys to Europe.“[We] have been advocating for a comprehensive approach to address movements of migrants and refugees who embark on perilous journeys across the Sahara Desert and the Mediterranean,” said spokesperson for the Off...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Tharanga Yakupitiyage Tags: Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Featured Gender Gender Violence Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Migration & Refugees TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

What History And Fiction Teach Us About Women And Power
Psychologist Tania Lombrozo considers two books: In one, we learn what ancient Greece can tell us about Twitter trolls and, in the other, we're shown a world in which women have power over men.(Image credit: FotografiaBasica/Getty Images/iStockphoto) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tania Lombrozo Source Type: news

Alexandria, an emporium in the Silk Road, and the traffic of unusual medicines - Rosso AM.
In Ancient times, an active trade of exotic and peculiar drugs tool place along the Silk Road. Coming through China, India, Central Asia, Armenia, including Colchis, Arabia, Nubia as far as Greece and Rome, it was centered during Ptolemaic and Roman times ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Collective narrative practice with unaccompanied refugee minors: "The Tree of Life" as a response to hardship - Jacobs SF.
During the summer of 2016, in the midst of one of the biggest refugee crises in centuries, the author of this article joined the team from a shelter for unaccompanied refugee minors on Samos, Greece, in an effort to provide young boys seeking asylum in Eur... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Relational victimization, callous-unemotional traits, and hostile attribution bias among preadolescents - Kokkinos CM, Voulgaridou I.
The aim of this study was to investigate the association of callous-unemotional traits, hostile attribution bias, and relational victimization experiences among 228 Greek preadolescent students attending the last two primary school grades. No significant g... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Total and cause-specific mortality before and after the onset of the Greek economic crisis: an interrupted time-series analysis - Laliotis I, Ioannidis JPA, Stavropoulou C.
BACKGROUND: Greece was one of the countries hit the hardest by the 2008 financial crisis in Europe. Yet, evidence on the effect of the crisis on total and cause-specific mortality remains unclear. We explored whether the economic crisis affected the trend ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - December 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Country diary: venerable beech hosts a swarm of microscopic life
Mini-ponds have formed in the surface roots of an ancient tree and provide an environment for minute organisms to thriveThe beech that stands at the end of the stepping stones across Waskerley beck is an elephantine presence, dwarfing surrounding trees. The scarred grey bark of its bole has the colour and texture of pachyderm skin. Its moss-covered surface roots seem to be melting into the earth under the massive burden they support. Over decades they have grown and coalesced, creating hollows between them that retain water, fed by rivulets of rainwater trickling down the trunk.There is a name for these mini-ponds that for...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Phil Gates Tags: Environment Microbiology Trees and forests Science Winter Insects Wildlife UK news Rural affairs Source Type: news

The lipstick effect: Greeks discover need to pamper in crisis
ATHENS (Reuters) - Eva Vorlioti, a divorced mother of two, was forced to move back in with her parents to make ends meet during Greece's debt crisis. While she cannot change the past, she is trying to efface one of its reminders: Her wrinkles. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - December 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Almost HALF of NHS doctors are now trained overseas
The UK is becoming increasingly reliant on foreign-trained doctors particularly from Greece, Portugal, Spain and Italy, according a report issued by the General Medical Council. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Health Protection for Migrant-Women Healthcare Givers
Credit: UNBy Baher KamalROME, Dec 18 2017 (IPS)While the media may be attracted by images of migrants drowning or sold as slaves, another flagrant but lesser-known drama is that of care workers, who are overwhelmingly women, often migrants, and who make a very large contribution to global public health, but are exposed to great health risks themselves with little or no protection, let alone basic labour rights. Migrant women care workers buttress health systems in countries where there are shortfalls in health-care provision, while their own rights to health and well-being can be eroded and their health-care needs unfulfil...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - December 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Baher Kamal Tags: Development & Aid Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies IPS UN: Inside the Glasshouse Migration & Refugees Poverty & SDGs Projects TerraViva United Nations Women's Health International Organizatio Source Type: news

Empowering local first responders to reach refugee and migrant women
ATHENS, Greece/UNITED NATIONS, New York – Over two years ago, Greece became the centre of a refugee and migration crisis, with hundreds of thousands of people streaming into the country, many of them risking death to escape war, persecution and deprivation. In 2016 alone, some173,000 people arrived in Greece, overwhelming local communities and resources. (Source: UNFPA News)
Source: UNFPA News - December 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: zerzan Source Type: news

New underwater discoveries in Greece reveal ancient Roman engineering
Underwater excavations at Lechaion, the ancient harbour of Corinth, provide insight into engineering by the Roman EmpireNew archaeological excavations at the ancient port of Corinth have uncovered evidence of large-scale Roman engineering. Named Lechaion, the port was one of a pair that connected the city of ancient Corinth to Mediterranean trade networks. Lechaion is located on the Gulf of Corinth, while Kenchreai is positioned across the narrow Isthmus of Corinth on the Aegean Sea. These two strategic harbours made Corinth a classical period power, but the Romans destroyed the city in 146 BC when conquering Greece. Juliu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - December 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Peter B Campbell Tags: Archaeology Greece Science Source Type: news

Ancient feces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts
(University of Cambridge) Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 14, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Neuroscientists show deep brain waves occur more often during navigation and memory formation
FINDINGSUCLA neuroscientists are the first to show that rhythmic waves in the brain called theta oscillations happen more often when someone is navigating an unfamiliar environment, and that the more quickly a person moves, the more theta oscillations take place — presumably to process incoming information faster.In an unexpected finding, theta oscillations were most prominent in a blind person who relied on a cane to move. The scientists hypothesized that a sightless person explores a strange environment through multiple senses, which would require more brain activity to process the extra sensory input.BACKGROUNDThe...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

T Austin professors discover copy of Jesus' secret revelations to his brother
(University of Texas at Austin) The first-known original Greek copy of a heretical Christian writing describing Jesus' secret teachings to his brother James has been discovered at Oxford University by biblical scholars at The University of Texas at Austin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bullying and minorities in secondary school students in Thrace-Greece - Serdari A, Gkouliama A, Tripsianis G, Proios H, Samakouri M.
The aim of the present study is to examine probable heterogeneity in aggressive behaviors and peer victimization among ethnically diverse secondary schools in Thrace. It is a culturally diverse region in Northeastern Greece, which includes Greek Christians... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Illegal building 'played central role' in floods that killed 20 in Athens
Uncontrolled construction in Greek capital has led to many streams being concreted over, leaving rivers no outlet to the seaChaotic urban planning and illegal construction in Athens played a central role in thedeadly flash floods that killed 20 people last week, experts in Greece have claimed as authorities pledged emergency funding for victimsmade homeless by the disaster.About 1,000 owners of homes and businesses are eligible for the assistance, according to government engineers dispatched to inspect the buildings.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - November 21, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Helena Smith in Athens Tags: Greece Flooding Europe Natural disasters and extreme weather World news Environment Geology Science Urbanisation Cities Source Type: news

Greece Was Hit By Storm Some Called A 'Medicane.' What's That?
European weather sites posted imagery showing the swirling wind patterns and a waterspout over the Mediterranean. The low pressure system shared characteristics of tropical cyclones.(Image credit: Angelos Tzortzinis/AFP/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laurel Wamsley Source Type: news

Floods in Athens Leave At Least 15 Dead, Communities Devastated
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Residents of the western fringes of the Greek capital struggled Thursday to clean up the devastation caused by flash floods that killed at least 15 people, while rescue crews searched for five people who remained missing. The hardest hit area was Mandra, a modest working-class district on the western outskirts of the Greek capital, where nearly all the fatalities occurred. Authorities said about 500 homes and businesses were damaged. Wednesday's flash floods, which came after a severe overnight storm, turned streets into raging torrents of mud and debris that carried away vehicles, collapsed wal...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 16, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elena Bacatoros, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Greek in-service and preservice teachers' views about bullying in early childhood settings - Psalti A.
This article presents the results of a pilot study aiming at exploring preservice and in-service early childhood teachers' views on bullyi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Yorgo ’s Foods Inc Is Recalling All Flavored and Unflavored Food Products (Hommus; Tahini Sauces; Yogurt Dip, Salads, Tzatziki, Grape Leaves; Taboule) Due to Possible Health Risk
Yorgo ’s Foods Inc. of Manchester NH, a family-owned company, started in 1993, is recalling all Greek-style food products it manufactures, out of an abundance of caution, as they have the potential to be contaminated with Listeria monocytogenes, an organism which can cause serious and sometimes fatal in fections in pregnant women, young children, frail or elderly people, those with weakened immune systems and in unborn fetuses. Although healthy individuals may suffer only short-term symptoms such as high fever, severe headache, stiffness, nausea, abdominal pain and diarrhea, Listeria infection can cause miscarriages ...
Source: Food and Drug Administration - November 16, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Rescue Efforts Continue in Athens Outskirts after Massive Flash Flooding
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Flash floods turned roads into raging torrents of mud and debris on the fringes of Greece's capital Wednesday, killing at least 14 people, inundating homes and businesses and knocking out a section of a major highway. There were fears the death toll could rise further as rescue crews searched for potentially missing people in flooded homes and streets on the western outskirts of Athens. The flooding came after a severe overnight storm brought driving rain to the area. Roads turned into muddy rivers that carried away vehicles, tossing them into piles on roadsides and against fences and buildings....
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elena Becatoros, Associated Press Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News Source Type: news

Rescue Efforts Continue in Athens Outskirts after Massive Flash Flooding
ATHENS, Greece (AP) — Flash floods turned roads into raging torrents of mud and debris on the fringes of Greece's capital Wednesday, killing at least 14 people, inundating homes and businesses and knocking out a section of a major highway. There were fears the death toll could rise further as rescue crews searched for potentially missing people in flooded homes and streets on the western outskirts of Athens. The flooding came after a severe overnight storm brought driving rain to the area. Roads turned into muddy rivers that carried away vehicles, tossing them into piles on roadsides and against fences and buildings....
Source: JEMS Operations - November 15, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Elena Becatoros, Associated Press Tags: Rescue & Vehicle Extrication News Source Type: news

Sterigenics parent company is now Sotera Health
Sterigenics International said today that it has changed the name of its parent company to Sotera Health, with Nelson Labs, Nordion and Sterigenics as Sotera’s three operating companies. The new name drew its inspiration from the name of the Greek goddess of safety, Soteria, and is meant to reflect the company’s commitment to global health. Sotera Health (Broadview Heights, Ohio) provides lab and comprehensive sterilization services, and a global supply of radioisotopes, for the the medical device, pharmaceutical, tissue and food industries. The company has 62 facilities in 13 countries – and more than 6,...
Source: Mass Device - November 7, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News News Well Sterilization / Calibration nelsonlaboratories Nordion Inc. soterahealth Sterigenics International Inc. Source Type: news

Resilience following emotional abuse by teachers: insights from a cross-sectional study with Greek students - Nearchou F.
An integrative socio-ecological model was developed to investigate the impact of emotional abuse by teachers on children's psychological functioning and test the role of social support and self-confidence as protective factors associated with resilience. E... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Archaeologists unearth 'masterpiece' sealstone in Greek tomb
(University of Cincinnati) Archaeologists with the University of Cincinnati are documenting artifacts contained within their amazing 2015 find, the tomb of the Griffin Warrior in Greece. But the 3,500-year-old treasures include their most stunning historical offering yet: an intricately carved gem, or sealstone, that represents one of the finest works of prehistoric Greek art ever found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Letter from the Editor: Know thyself
The ancient Greeks urged " know thyself. " In this month's letter, Managing Editor Marie Ellis unmasks what that means — for our editors and our readers. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: IT / Internet / E-mail Source Type: news

Employment insecurity, mental health and suicide - Fountoulakis KN.
With the economic crisis an increase in suicidality has been reported across Europe but especially in Greece. Τhese reports hit the mass media headlines and were also included in the debate among political parties. The literature suggests that during peri... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

Ancient tastes: Book examines how Greeks and Romans inspired modern flavors
(University of Kent) Like today, ancient food fads came with dire warnings about the consequences of new arrivals on the scene. For example, when Sicilian sweets were introduced to Greece, some regarded them as a delicious luxury while others -- such as Plato -- said they would destroy the morality of the people. From battlefields and imperial courts to sanctuaries and boudoirs, tasting is a dangerous game in antiquity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Restructuring seriously damages well-being of workers: the case of the restructuring programme in local administration in Greece - Koukoulaki T, Pinotsi D, Geogiadou P, Daikou A, Zorba K, Targoutzidis A, Poulios K, Naris S, Panousi P, Skoulatakis Y, Drivas S, Kapsali K, Pahkin K.
This study examines the impact of "Kallikratis", a major restructuring programme of local administration in Gr... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

The Orionid Meteor Shower Peaks This Weekend. Here ’s What Time You Can Watch
Turn off Netflix this weekend and head outdoors to watch the peak of the Orionid Meteor Shower instead. The starry spectacle is set to take place between Oct. 20 and Oct. 22, offering a dazzling display that should delight veteran and novice stargazers alike. This year’s Orionid meteor shower should be especially good because there will be little moonlight that could otherwise drown out the meteors. Just make sure you have clear skies in your local forecast before heading out. “The Orionids peak on October 20 — a dark, moonless night,” wrote NASA’s Jane Houston Jones in a recent statement. &ld...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Samuelson Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Wear what you want to The Marriage of Figaro | Brief letters
Elitism and opera | Neutron stars | Greek theatre acoustics | Jeremiah and the King James Bible | Three-legged stoolsHoward Jacobson (There is no excuse for a man not to wear a suit …’, Weekend, 14 October) reinforces the view that opera is elitist and unapproachable. Nothing could be further from the truth. If the music moves you it doesn’t matter what you wear. And if Mr Jacobson knew his Marriage of Figaro from his Don Giovanni, he would know that Mozart was one of the mo st anti-establishment of composers, and wouldn’t have cared what anyone wore.Sao Bui-VanLondon• When two neutron stars c...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 19, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Brief letters Tags: Opera Culture Music Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart Astronomy Space Science Greece Europe World news Theatre Stage The Bible Religion Christianity Books Wales UK news Source Type: news

Whisper it – Greek theatre's legendary acoustics are a myth
Tour guides may tell you that a pin dropping can be heard in every seat of the ancient theatre of Epidaurus – but scientists disagreeIt has been held up as a stunning example of ancient Greek sound engineering, but researchers say the acoustics of the theatre atEpidaurus are not as dazzling as they have been hailed.Dating from the fourth century BC, and seating up to 14,000 spectators, the theatre has long been admired for its sound quality, with claims that audiences are able to hear a pin drop, or a match being struck, at any seat in the house. Even the British archaeologist Sir Mortimer Wheelerraved about the thea...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Science Greece Theatre Culture Europe Stage World news Technology History of science Source Type: news

The 2017 MacArthur Fellows Were Just Announced. Here ’s How 6 ‘Genius’ Grant Winners Spent Their Life-Changing Prize Money
Jacob Soll has told this story so many times, he almost sounds removed from it. Not bored, or jaded really. But detached — like it happened to a friend of a friend. Or he read about it in a book, and is a little incredulous. “It was like Oliver Twist or something,” he says. “I was the lowest paid professor at my university. My roof was falling in, pipes were exploding. When I got the call, I was literally walking to the library in the rain, thinking about how ruined I was.” It was fall 2011, and the MacArthur Foundation had just named the historian to its fellowship program, an honor that came...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kristen Bahler Tags: Careers grants Source Type: news

My cat is a monster. Why do I love him so much? | Jules Howard
Be it the tale of the Grenfell fire survivor being reunited with her cat, or the ‘refugee cat’ lost in Greece and found in Norway stories of pets draw us in like no otherWhat could be more heartening than the story of the Grenfell fire survivor who was reported this week to have beenreunited with the cat she thought she ’d lost in the blaze? What could warm the cockles more than the story, also reported this week, of the“refugee cat” lost in Greece and reunited with its family in Norway courtesy of a global social media campaign. For stories of cats and dogs, be they heroes or victims, draw us...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Jules Howard Tags: Pets Cats Dogs Evolution Science Animals Life and style UK news Source Type: news

What mysteries could be unlocked by new Antikythera shipwreck finds?
Excavation has revealed fragments of bronze sculpture and raises the possibility of several buried statues in the area. So what do these discoveries tell us?The shipwreck at Antikythera, Greece, continues to reveal its secrets and surprise archaeologists.As reported last week, recent excavations on the 1st century BC shipwreck have revealed statue fragments, bronze ornamentation, and wooden remains from the ship ’s hull. The finds are sensational, but the artifacts and the project have broader importance.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 10, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Peter B Campbell Tags: Archaeology Science Greece Heritage Culture Sculpture Art Source Type: news

New shot for men and women
Today I want to tell you about a quick, painless procedure that will put the spontaneity back into your sex life. And you don’t have to take a pill and then wait 30 minutes or more… I’m talking about platelet-rich plasma, or PRP for short. I’ve used PRP in my patients to heal sports injuries, aching joints and surgical wounds. It’s better than a facelift to smooth fine lines and wrinkles. But PRP also works if you’re having trouble in the bedroom. More than a third of men suffer from sexual dysfunction. And 40% of women do too. I’m talking about everything from erectile dysfuncti...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - October 5, 2017 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Anti-Aging Men's Health Women's Health Source Type: news

Santa Claus May Have Just Been Found 3,700 Miles From the North Pole
The original tomb of Saint Nicholas, the progenitor of Santa Claus, may have been found beneath a church in Turkey. Archeologists uncovered burial grounds beneath the Saint Nicholas Church in Demre in southwestern Turkey, where St. Nicholas is believed to have lived during the 4th century, the BBC reports. “We have obtained very good results but real works start now,” Cemil Karabayram, Antalya Director of Surveying and Monuments, told local media outlet the Hurriyet. “We will reach the ground and maybe we will find the untouched body of St. Nicholas.” The remains of St. Nicholas were said to have be...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Culture santa Turkey Source Type: news

Antikythera shipwreck yields bronze arm – and hints at spectacular haul of statues
Arm points to existence of at least seven statues from Greek shipwreck, already the source of most extensive and exciting ancient cargo ever foundMarine archaeologists have recovered a bronze arm from an ancient shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera, where the remains of at least seven more priceless statues from the classical world are believed to lie buried.Divers found the right arm, encrusted and stained green, under half a metre of sediment on the boulder-strewn slope where the ship and its cargo now rest. The huge vessel, perhaps 50m from bow to stern, was sailing from Asia Minor to Rome in 1BC when it founde...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Archaeology Art Sculpture Greece Art and design Europe Heritage Culture World news Source Type: news

Antikythera shipwreck yields bronze arm – and hints at spectacular haul of classical statues
Arm points to existence of at least seven statues from Greek shipwreck, already the source of most extensive and exciting ancient cargo ever foundMarine archaeologists have recovered a bronze arm from an ancient shipwreck off the Greek island of Antikythera, where the remains of at least seven more priceless statues from the classical world are believed to lie buried.Divers found the right arm, encrusted and stained green, under half a metre of sediment on the boulder-strewn slope where the ship and its cargo now rest. The huge vessel, perhaps 50m from bow to stern, was sailing from Asia Minor to Rome in 1BC when it founde...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - October 4, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Archaeology Art Sculpture Greece Art and design Source Type: news

These Consumer Technologies Could Show Us What ’s Next in Medical Devices
As the consumer technology industry moves forward it constantly invents, develops, and produces a myriad of amazing technologies. Some of these innovations have important applications in medical devices. These technologies aren’t necessarily vital to effective medical treatment, but they do play a big role in usability and convenience, which are important factors in efficient and effective care. As they become more widely available and cheaper, the opportunities for medical devices to also become better, cheaper, and more readily available also grow. Here are two technologies that you may not immediately connect...
Source: MDDI - October 4, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nigel Syrotuck Tags: Design Source Type: news

Fewer Than Half Of Pregnant Refugees In Greece Have Prenatal Care
Greece is undergoing a refugee crisis, and their public health system is struggling to cope. (Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post)
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

‘What Gets Remembered’: How Visiting a Cemetery Can Teach You About History
When planning vacation itineraries, graveyard visits may not be top of mind. But Loren Rhoads, author of the new book 199 Cemeteries to See Before You Die, makes the case for going out of your way to see burial grounds. “I think it adds a depth to travel that you can’t find anywhere else,” Rhoads tells TIME. “I see cemeteries as kind of open air museums full of art and history and stories and nature and wildlife, gardening… When you go to a graveyard, you see what’s important to a society, what gets remembered.” Rhoads’ book features cemeteries large (like Père Lachai...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sarah Begley Tags: Uncategorized Books Source Type: news

Refugees' health problems in Greece mostly unmet: medical charity
ATHENS (Reuters) - Refugees and migrants in Greece receive little or no medical care for most health problems they face and fewer than half of those pregnant had access to maternal care, aid group Doctors of the World said on Tuesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Breakthrough in invisibility technology: Scientists have created a material that allows light waves to pass straight through
(Natural News) Scientists developed a new idea for invisibility technology that would allow light waves to pass straight through a special material without any obstruction, as reported by Science Daily. Researchers from University of Technology (TU Wien) in Vienna, together with colleagues from Greece and the United States, discovered a new idea for cloaking technology in which... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Raccoons solve an ancient puzzle, but do they really understand it?
(Springer) Scientists have been using an ancient Greek fable written by Aesop as inspiration to test whether birds and small children understand cause and effect relationships. A group of US scientists led by Lauren Stanton of the University of Wyoming have now extended this body of work to study raccoon intelligence. Their research in Springer's journal Animal Cognition is the first to use the Aesop's Fable paradigm to assess if mammalian carnivores understand the principles of water displacement. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Promised Land
In the summer of 2015, a curious piece of world news brought a flicker of hope to the wretched Syrian city of Palmyra. Islamic State fighters had taken over the ancient town, toppling its monuments and executing anyone who resisted their draconian rules. And yet at one of the city’s darkest moments, rumors of a sanctuary far away began to filter in, generating dreams among a populace that had already lost everything. On Aug. 31 of that year, German Chancellor Angela Merkel declared that her country was prepared to take in hundreds of thousands of refugees fleeing war in the Middle East. “We can do this,” ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aryn Baker / Berlin Tags: Uncategorized finding home Germany Refugees Source Type: news

Coping strategies of Greek 6th grade students: their relationship with anxiety and trait emotional intelligence - Antoniou AS, Drosos N.
The aim of this study was to investigate children's coping strategies and explore their relationship with anxiety and trait emotional intelligence using a sample of 245 Greek 6th Grade students. Coping strategies are estimated with Kidcope - Children versi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news