Sleep apnoea 'raises the risk of CANCER in women'
Greek scientists analysed data from 19,000 people to examine if there was a link between OSA and cancer. They found cancer was more prevalent in women with sleep apnoea than those without. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hypermobility: When being flexible may not be such a good thing after all
Performance artist Roxani Eleni Garefalaki, from Greece, suffered for years with joint pain and extreme tiredness - which turned out to be a rare disease. This is her story. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 14, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Google Doodle honors Greek immigrant who invented the test that detects cervical cancer
Pap tests save lives. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - May 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Which supplements can help diabetics manage their blood sugar levels?
(Natural News) People with diabetes have a higher risk of complications, including cardiovascular disease. In a new study, researchers from Greece found that daily supplementation with alpha-lipoic acid (ALA), carnosine, and thiamine not only lowers blood sugar levels but also fights oxidative stress and inhibit platelet aggregation to provide better cardiovascular protection. Published in the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Neuroscientist Dr Hannah Critchlow: ‘Changing the way that you think is cognitively costly’
In her new book, the scientist examines the role of fate in our lives, how our politics are formed and sniffing out Mr RightDr Hannah Critchlow is a neuroscientist at the University of Cambridge. Her debut book,The Science of Fate, examines how much of our life is predetermined at birth and to what extent we are in control of our destiny.How has the slow march of scientific researchaffected our concept of fate? On one hand, we know more about how genetics drives our lives, yet we also have more good evidence for things that we can do to shape our own outcomes.This concept of fate and destiny has around since the Greeks &nd...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ian Tucker Tags: Neuroscience Psychology Source Type: news

Nearly half of public wrongly believe heart failure is normal in old age
(European Society of Cardiology) Low awareness of heart failure among patients and the public is highlighted in surveys to be presented during Heart Failure 2019 the annual congress of the Heart Failure Association (HFA), a branch of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC), taking place in Athens, Greece from May 25-28, 2019. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Measles – European Region
In the first two months of 2019, 34 300 measles cases have been reported in 42 countries of the WHO European Region, including 13 measles-related deaths in three countries (Albania, Romania and Ukraine). The majority of cases are reported in Ukraine, with more than 25 000 cases (>70%)1. As of 28 March 2019, the WHO European Region reported a total of 83 540 measles cases and 74 related deaths for 2018. This is compared to 25 869 cases and 42 deaths in 2017, and 5 273 cases and 13 deaths in 2016. In 2018, eight countries reported over 2 000 cases each including Ukraine (n= 53 218), Serbia (n=5 076), Israel (3 140), Franc...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - May 6, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Asthma substantial economic burden in Greece
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - May 1, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Starwatch: Venus and the moon share the eastern horizon at dawn
The moon and Venus are in conjunction this week, but in June Venus, the morning star, will disappear, and return as evening star in OctoberThe month ends as it began with aconjunction between the moon and Venus at dawn. The chart shows the view looking east at 0515 BST on 1 May, when the moon and Venus will both rise shortly before the sun. The moon will be a slim crescent, with just 14% of its surface illuminated. To make the most of this opportunity, start looking the morning before, when the moon will be a little further from Venus, and its crescent will be a little fatter. Make sure you have an excellent eastern horizo...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 29, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Stuart Clark Tags: Science Astronomy Space Venus The moon Source Type: news

US 1 of 8 nations where child & adolescent health improved but maternal mortality worsened
(Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation) The United States is one of only eight countries in the world where decreases in child and adolescent mortality over a 27-year period haven't also been matched by reductions in maternal mortality, according to a new scientific study. This divergent trend also was found in American Samoa, Canada, Greece, Guam, Jamaica, St. Vincent and the Grenadines, and Zimbabwe. Of these countries, the United States had the largest increase in maternal mortality rate at 67.5%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 29, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Americans Are Some of the Most Stressed-Out People in the World, a New Global Survey Says
Americans are some of the most stressed-out people in the world, according to Gallup’s annual Global Emotions report. For the report, Gallup polled about 1,000 adults in countries around the world last year about the emotions they’d experienced the day before the survey. Negative emotions and experiences — stress, anger, worry, sadness and physical pain — were common around the world, tying 2017’s record-setting levels, the report found. In the U.S., 55% of respondents told Gallup they’d felt a lot of stress the day before, well above the global average of 35%. Gallup’s research fo...
Source: TIME: Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Vitamin D supplements found to be associated with weight loss in obese children, says study
(Natural News) Vitamin D improves muscle function and keeps your bones and teeth strong. According to a study, vitamin D supplementation could even promote weight loss in obese children. The researchers presented their study findings at the 57th Annual European Society for Paediatric Endocrinology (ESPE) meeting in Greece. Vitamin D supplementation and childhood obesity Childhood obesity is an epidemic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Come and see sculptural delights inspired by faraway shores
A Tuareg musician from the Sahara wearing a traditional tagelmust-turban veil, Greek gods, multimedia figures, stained glass creations and bronze and marble sculptures based on Buddhist prayer wheels, are all waiting to welcome visitors to this year's University of Bristol Botanic Garden Easter Sculpture Festival. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Public engagement; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Africa: Humanitarian Mechanism for Vaccines Used for First Time in Europe to Counter High Prices
[MSF] M édecins Sans Frontières (MSF) has started vaccinating refugee children on the Greek islands of Chios, Samos and Lesvos using a programme set up to allow children in humanitarian emergencies to access the pneumococcal conjugate vaccine (PCV) at an affordable price. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 12, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Health Highlights: April 12, 2019
Here are some of the latest health and medical news developments, compiled by the editors of HealthDay: Baby Created With 3 People's DNA Born in Greece A baby created with the DNA of three people was born in Greece earlier this week, doctors... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 12, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A Baby Was Born With DNA from 3 People. Here ’s How That’s Possible
Researchers at the Institute of Life in Athens, Greece announced that a healthy baby boy was born on Tuesday morning to a 32-year-old woman who had experienced several failed cycles of IVF. The six-pound boy, who the doctors say in a statement is healthy, was born using a technique called maternal spindle transfer. In the procedure, the grouped-together DNA from a mother’s egg was removed and placed inside a donor egg from another woman, which had been emptied of its DNA. The donor’s egg with the mother’s genes was then fertilized and developed into an embryo that was transferred for pregnancy. The techn...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Genetics Reproductive Health Source Type: news

Controversial 'three-person' IVF used for baby boy born in Greece
A team of Greek and Spanish doctors has produced a baby from three people using a controversial IVF technique. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

First three parent baby born
The first three parent baby has been born in Greece, as a result of the pioneering new three person IVF technique that uses a donor egg in addition to the mother's egg and the father's sperm.BBC News (Source: Society for Endocrinology)
Source: Society for Endocrinology - April 11, 2019 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Baby with DNA from three people born in Greece
Experimental IVF, which involves extra egg from female donor, criticised by UK expertsA baby with DNA from three people has been born in Greece following a controversial fertility treatment.The baby boy, weighing 2.9kg (6lb), was born on Tuesday and both he and his mother, who is 32, are said to be in good health.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Devlin Science correspondent Tags: Genetics Greece Science Fertility problems Biology World news Source Type: news

‘Three-person’ baby boy born in Greece
The baby was conceived using an experimental form of IVF that has been criticised by some experts. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Three-parent baby born in first ever clinical trial to test the technique
The 32-year-old Greek woman had four failed IVF attempts before she heard about the trial by Spanish doctors. On Tuesday, she gave birth to a 6.5-pound boy, and both mother and baby are in good health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psychometric properties of the workplace psychologically violent behaviors-WPVB instrument. Translation and validation in Greek health professionals - Koinis A, Velonakis E, Tzavara C, Tzavella F, Tziaferi S.
This study aims to validate the Yildirim& Yildirim's Workplace Psychologically Violent Behaviors (WPVB) instrument (2008) in the Greek language in Greece, as cultural ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

More Reasons to Follow the Mediterranean Diet
MONDAY, March 25, 2019 -- More and more research supports the health benefits of the Mediterranean diet, the way of eating followed by people who live in countries around the Mediterranean Sea, such as Greece and Italy. Various studies have... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 25, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

A review of addictive behaviors of Greek Cypriots: profiles of associated problematic behaviors - Flora K, Tsagkaridis K, Papakosta L, Vliamos N.
This study presents a systematic recording of addictive behaviors in the Greek-speaking population in Cyprus. Furthermore, it presents the participants' perceptions about the presence of addiction-related dimensions such as negative consequences, negative ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

There Will Be a Super Worm Moon on the Spring Equinox. Here ’s How to See It
Another month, another “supermoon”. On Wednesday, the “super worm moon”—the third supermoon of 2019 to be exact— will light up the sky in all its slightly-larger-than-usual glory. What makes this full moon extra special is that it is coinciding with the Spring Equinox, or the first day of spring in the northern hemisphere, a rare astronomical coincidence. For those who are exhausted by all the recents supermoons, the “super worm moon” will be the last supermoon of the year. However, for those who couldn’t get enough of February’s “super snow moon” or J...
Source: TIME: Science - March 19, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilder Davies Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Bullying in Greek middle school: the role of eight dimensions of school climate in bullying perpetration and exposure to victimization - Kapari KD.
This study investigates the role of eight dimensions of school climate in bullying perpetration and exposure to victimization. Data were collected from 14 year old students (N=667) drawn from sixteen middle schools through an anonymous self-report question... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Nile shipwreck discovery proves Herodotus right – after 2,469 years
Greek historian ’s description of ‘baris’ vessel vindicated by archaeologists at sunken city of Thonis-HeraclionIn the fifth century BC, the Greek historian Herodotus visited Egypt and wrote of unusual river boats on the Nile. Twenty-three lines of hisHistoria, the ancient world ’s first great narrative history, are devoted to the intricate description of the construction of a “baris”.For centuries, scholars have argued over his account because there was no archaeological evidence that such ships ever existed. Now there is. A “fabulously preserved” wreck in the waters around ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Dalya Alberge Tags: Archaeology UK news Science Egypt Source Type: news

The Guardian view on language: the flesh made word | Editorial
Teeth and tongues make the sounds of our speech, but our humanity makes its meaningsBabies have an astonishing talent that adults entirely lose. By the age of one, they can recognise the significant noises in the babble around them and group them into a language. When we have lost this capacity as adults, it becomes enormously difficult to distinguish betweensounds that are glaringly different to a native speaker. It all sounds Greek to us, or, as the Greeks would have it, barbarous. This is because the range of possible sounds that humans use to convey meaning may be as high as 2,000, but few languages use more than 100 a...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Editorial Tags: Language Languages Evolution Children Biology Science UK news Australia news Source Type: news

The impact of occupational accidents and gross domestic product on the sanctions imposed by the Greek OSH Inspectorate - Tatsaki E, Sgourou E, Katsakiori P, Konsta I, Gerasimou S.
The Labour Inspectorate is a globally accepted institution with objectives and operational axes defined by the 81st International Labour Convention between Member States. The constantly changing conditions in the labour market make the need for a monitorin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Inside a tumor: Purple bacteria visualize 'big eaters'
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) A team of scientists from the Helmholtz Zentrum Muenchen, the Juelich Research Center, the Technical University of Munich and the Heinrich Heine University Duesseldorf has shown that harmless purple bacteria (Rhodobacter) are capable of visualizing heterogeneity in tumors. With the aid of optoacoustic imaging, the researchers used these microorganisms to visualize macrophages (Greek for 'big eaters'), that also play a role in tumor development. Their research findings have now been published in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! -...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Daytime Naps May Help Lower Blood Pressure
BOSTON (CBS) — Today is “National Napping Day” which is observed every year on the day following the return of daylight saving time. A new study finds a midday snooze can lower your blood pressure, perhaps as much as other lifestyle changes. Researchers in Greece looked at more than 200 people with relatively well-controlled blood pressure who slept for on average about 50 minutes during the day. They found that a midday nap was associated with a drop in systolic blood pressure by about 5 mmHg. They say that’s about what you would expect from reducing salt or alcohol intake and even low-dose blood p...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local blood pressure Dr. Mallika Marshall Health News Source Type: news

Hour-long snooze keeps high blood pressure at bay and is nearly as effective as drugs 
Greek doctors from Asklepieion General Hospital revealed patients who had a daily nap saw their blood pressure drop by 5mm/HG - a similar effect to taking drugs or cutting salt from the diet. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eat a 400-calorie breakfast ‘may stop plaque from building up in your arteries’ 
Researchers at Kapodistrian University of Athens, assessed nearly 2,000 people - with average age of 63 - from Corinthia, Greece, for the data. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Which one's better for your health – Greek yogurt or regular yogurt?
(Natural News) Both Greek and regular yogurt can be part of a healthy diet: They both contain little calories and are loaded with calcium and live bacterial cultures. It’s worth noting, however, that Greek yogurt — which is more concentrated because of its thorough straining process to remove most of the liquid whey, sugar, and lactose —... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - March 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Brief mental-health training as a suicide intervention in Greek refugee camps - Kavalidou K.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - March 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Featured Review: Mediterranean-style diet for the prevention of cardiovascular disease
In this Q&A we asked the lead author Professor Saverio Stranges from Western University Canada to explain more about the mediterranean diet and its role in preventing cardiovascular disease following the publication of aCochrane Review on this topic. What makes a diet ‘Mediterranean’?Scientific interest in the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern originated in the 1960s because of the observation that populations in countries of the Mediterranean region, such as Greece and Italy, had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease compared with northern European populations or the US, probably as a re...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - February 27, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Katie Abbotts Source Type: news

Creating play atmosphere and time for children in Chinese kindergarten: difficulties and reflection - He M.
Schools' busy situation is far away from its Greek root "Schol é" that means leisure time compared with political duty and war at that era which is also similar in ancient China. From the leisure point of view, school should be relax and free for young chi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

Heat waves occurrence and outdoor workers' self-assessment of heat stress in Slovenia and Greece - Poga čar T, Žnidaršič Z, Kajfež Bogataj L, Flouris AD, Poulianiti K, Črepinšek Z.
Changing patterns of heat waves are part of the global warming effect and the importance of changes is reinforced by their negative impact on society. Firstly, heat waves were analyzed in Brnik (Slovenia) and Larisa (Greece) in the period 1981 ⁻2017 to re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Environmental Issues, Climate, Geophysics Source Type: news

Knowledge and attitudes of healthcare professionals on child abuse in Greece - Gkentzi D, Panagopoulou K, Sinopidis X, Karatza A, Dimitriou G.
[Abstract unavailable] Language: en... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Infants and Children Source Type: news

FDA Head Says the Federal Government May Have to Set Vaccine Policies If State Laws Continue to Allow Outbreaks
Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said the federal government might someday regulate vaccine policies if “lax” state vaccine laws “force [its] hand” by allowing the resurgence of vaccine-preventable diseases like measles to continue. Vaccine laws are currently decided at the state level. While all 50 states require certain vaccines for students, all but three — California, Mississippi and West Virginia — allow non-medical exemptions for people who have either religious or philosophical beliefs contrary to vaccination. But with preventable diseases like me...
Source: TIME: Health - February 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Infectious Disease onetime Source Type: news

Scientists discover new type of immune cells that are essential for forming heart valves
UCLA researchers have identified for the first time the origin of an immune cell that plays a critical role in the formation of healthy heart valves. The findings could pave the way for new treatments for heart valve disorders, which can be caused by congenital defects, aging or disease.Their study, led by Dr. Atsushi “Austin” Nakano, a UCLA associate professor of molecular, cell and developmental biology and member of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA, was published in the journal Developmental Cell.Building on previous research by Nakano, which showed that ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Strong Memorial Ranked Among Top Centers for Heart Pumps, Survival
Frank Rosinski ’s heart stopped three times and doctors were able to revive him. Doctors immediately transferred the Greece man to Strong Memorial Hospital for heart failure care by Upstate New York’s largest and most experienced team. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - February 21, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

Edwards Lifesciences wins CE Mark for Pascal mitral repair device
Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW) said late yesterday that it won CE Mark approval in the European Union for its Pascal transcatheter valve repair system intended to treat mitral regurgitation. The Pascal system is designed to reduce mitral regurgitation while maintaining native anatomy and features contoured, broad paddles to maximize coaptation of the mitral leaflets and a central spacer to fill the regurgitant orifice area, the Irvine, Calif.-based company said. The newly launched system also includes a delivery system intended for independent leaflet capture to optimize leaflet position, Edwards said. “Mitral v...
Source: Mass Device - February 20, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Cardiovascular Featured Regulatory/Compliance Replacement Heart Valves Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

FDA Warns Against Using Young Blood As Medical Treatment
(CNN) — Wannabe vampires, beware: The US Food and Drug Administration warned Tuesday against using plasma infusions from young blood donors to ward off the effects of normal aging as well as other more serious conditions. Plasma, the liquid portion of the blood, contains proteins that help clot blood. The infusions are promoted to treat a variety of conditions, including normal aging and memory loss as well as serious conditions such as dementia, multiple sclerosis, heart disease and post-traumatic stress disorder. “There is no proven clinical benefit of infusion of plasma from young donors to cure, mitigate, t...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat Blood Donations CNN Source Type: news

Tonight ’s Super Snow Moon Will Be the Biggest Supermoon of 2019. Here’s How to Watch
Good news for sky watchers and selenophiles, tonight’s full moon is set to be the biggest and brightest of the year, according to NASA. The “super snow moon” as it is being called, will cross the skies this Tuesday evening, Feb. 19. While the “super snow moon” won’t be the extravagant astronomical spectacle that January’s “super blood wolf moon eclipse” was, it will be larger and brighter, and definitely command attention in the sky. If that isn’t enough, the subsequent full moon in March will also be a “supermoon,” rounding off 2019 with a total of th...
Source: TIME: Science - February 17, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Wilder Davies Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

The impact of the long-lasting socioeconomic crisis in Greece - Stylianidis S, Souliotis K.
Since 2009, Greece has experienced a long-lasting socioeconomic crisis that has had substantial consequences on the health and mental health of the population. Unemployment, financial hardship and income loss constitute the hallmarks of the socioeconomic l... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

A Fresco of Narcissus Has Been Discovered Among the Ruins of Pompeii
Archeologists have made another major artistic discovery amid the ruins of ancient Pompeii, finding a well-preserved fresco depicting the Greek mythological figure of Narcissus. The Guardian reports that the fresco was discovered in the atrium of a house where an earlier excavation yielded another fresco painting portraying the eroticized Greek myth of Leda and the Swan. Narcissus, who according to the myth was so mesmerized by his own beauty that he fell in love with his reflection and died from desire burning inside him, was reportedly a popular subject of art in the first-century Roman city. “The beauty of these r...
Source: TIME: Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Casey Quackenbush Tags: Uncategorized Archaeology onetime overnight Source Type: news

Seas of Death and Hope
By Jan LundiusSTOCKHOLM / ROME, Feb 11 2019 (IPS)The Mediterranean Sea is currently a sea of death. On the 20th of June every year, i.e. The World Refugee Day, an organization called UNITED for Intercultural Action publishes a “List of Deaths”, summarising information on where, when and under which circumstances a named individual has died due to the “fatal policies of fortress Europa”. The data are collected through information received from 550 network organisations in 48 countries and from local experts, journalists and researchers in the field of migration. The list issued in 2018 accounted for ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jan Lundius Tags: Armed Conflicts Arts Crime & Justice Economy & Trade Education Featured Global Globalisation Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Migration & Refugees Religion TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Measles cases in Europe tripled last year, WHO says
More than 90% of cases were reported in 10 countries, including France, Italy and Greece. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When a lost "Petit Prince" meets Antoine de Saint Exup éry: an anthropological case report - Costedoat C, Adalian P, Bouzaid E, Martinet A, Vanrell L, von Gartzen L, Castellano P, Signoli M, Tzortzis S, Stevanovitch A.
This case study reports the anthropological analysis of bones remains discovered on Riou Island (Marseille, France) and the story of two World War II fighter pilots. The discovery of bones on "The Fountain of the Greeks" square on Riou Island occurred in t... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Commentary Source Type: news