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Arianna Huffington: 10 Ways to Actually, Finally Improve Company Culture
There are endless truisms about the importance of company culture — so many that the idea of a strong culture has become a cliché. We often just nod our heads and move on. But it matters. So how can we put flesh and blood on the idea to make it more than just a nice saying? How can companies embody the connection between culture and the bottom line? Here are ten ways. 1) End the burnout delusion. Burnout is not the price we must pay for success. Leaders need to realize that taking care of their human capital is just as important as PnL, Ebitda and quarterly earnings. Living a sustainable life, and making sure ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 21, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Arianna Huffington Tags: Uncategorized Careers & Workplace The CEO Initiative Source Type: news

'Labyrinth' chip could help monitor aggressive cancer stem cells
(University of Michigan) Inspired by the Labyrinth of Greek mythology, a new chip etched with fluid channels sends blood samples through a hydrodynamic maze to separate out rare circulating cancer cells into a relatively clean stream for analysis. It is already in use in a breast cancer clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Plants combine color and fragrance to procure pollinators
(Cornell University) Who knew that it's possible to predict the fragrance of a flower by looking at its color?This is true for many of the 41 insect-pollinated plant species growing in a Phrygana scrubland habitat on the Greek island of Lesbos. An international research team   published their findings Sept. 4 in Nature Ecology& Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 20, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Out of Africa: Understanding Economic Refugees
Young African migrants seek opportunities abroad as the World Bank projects that “the world’s extreme poor will be increasingly concentrated in Africa”. Credit: Ilaria Vechi/IPSBy Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame SundaramSYDNEY and KUALA LUMPUR, Sep 19 2017 (IPS)Not a single month has passed without dreadful disasters triggering desperate migrants to seek refuge in Europe. According to the International Organization for Migration (IOM), at least 2,247 people have died or are missing after trying to enter Europe via Spain, Italy or Greece in the first half of this year. Last year, 5,096 deaths were recorded. ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Anis Chowdhury and Jomo Kwame Sundaram Tags: Africa Aid Armed Conflicts Crime & Justice Economy & Trade Europe Headlines Health Human Rights Labour Middle East & North Africa Migration & Refugees Peace Religion TerraViva United Nations Trade & Investment Source Type: news

Obese people trying to slim down should eat six smaller meals per day instead of the normal three, according to experts
(Natural News) Eating six small meals a day may result in more significant weight loss than eating three large meals, a Greek study revealed. To carry out the research, a team of health experts at the Athens University Medical School examined 47 participants with either type-2 diabetes or prediabetes during a 24-week study period. The participants were instructed to follow... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A battle with prejudice: why we overlook the warrior women of ancient times | Natalie Haynes
The Amazons are not alone: from Viking warriors to racy Roman poets, we are only just beginning to find out how little we know about female historyWarrior women have fascinated us for millennia. In ancient Greece,Amazons were the second most popular characters to feature in vase paintings. Only the exploits of Hercules (one of which involved Hippolyta, an Amazon queen) appeared on more pieces of pottery. In the images that survive, Amazons are always shown racing towards danger, never away from it.Related:Harridans, harlots and heroines: women of the classical worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Haynes Tags: Archaeology Science Women Roman Britain UK news Source Type: news

How many more warrior women are missing from the history books? | Natalie Haynes
The recent discovery of female bones in a Viking warrior grave is yet another indication that we ’ve only scratched the surface of female historyWarrior women have fascinated us for millennia. In ancient Greece,Amazons were the second most popular characters to feature in vase paintings. Only the exploits of Hercules (one of which involved Hippolyta, an Amazon queen) appeared on more pieces of pottery. In the images that survive, Amazons are always shown racing towards danger, never away from it.Related:Harridans, harlots and heroines: women of the classical worldContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 18, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Natalie Haynes Tags: Archaeology Science Women Roman Britain UK news Source Type: news

An Exhaustive List of All the References We Could Find in Mother!
Warning: spoilers for the movie mother! follow. Eliza: So the movie mother! was…something else. Eliana: I am shook. Eliza: I am…confused? Infuriated? Discombobulated? Eliana: I’m coping by Googling as many references as possible: there’s the Genesis story, and I kept thinking about The Giving Tree, which is already depressing for a kids’ book. But this movie takes things to a whole new, bloody level. Eliza: Yeah, and it was nearly impossible to avoid chatter in the ether that the whole thing is a warning about our present path to destroying the environment. Eliana: Yes, the director, Darren...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Eliana Dockterman and Eliza Berman Tags: Uncategorized Jennifer Lawrence movies Source Type: news

Family Mourns LSU Freshman Who Died in Possible Frat Hazing: ‘I Will Be Grieving the Rest of My Life’
The close-knit family of a Louisiana State University freshman who died in a possible fraternity hazing incident at the school is grieving the loss of a young man who they said had a big future ahead of him. Maxwell Gruver, 18, died Thursday in what university police are investigating as a possible hazing incident. The teenager from Roswell, Ga. was taken from Phi Delta Theta’s fraternity house to the hospital, where he died before noon, East Baton Rouge Coroner Beau Clark said. The circumstances surrounding Gruver’s death are unclear. Gruver’s grieving family is now waiting for the results of an autopsy,...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Melissa Chan Tags: Uncategorized Louisiana onetime Source Type: news

Busy Philipps Was Mistaken for Sarah Huckabee Sanders. She Was Not Happy.
In conclusion: Sanders was most definitely not a star on Freaks and Greeks. This article originally appeared on People.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Karen Mizoguchi / People Tags: Uncategorized celebrities celebrity Source Type: news

LSU Student ’s Death After Frat House Visit Being Investigated as Possible Hazing Incident
Louisiana State University Police are investigating the death of an 18-year-old student as a possible hazing incident, the university said Thursday, adding that all Greek life activities at the university would be suspended indefinitely. Maxwell Gruver, a freshman from Roswell, Ga., was transported from a fraternity house to Our Lady of the Lake Regional Medical Center Thursday morning, East Baton Rouge Coroner Dr. Beau Clark told TIME. Gruver died in the hospital before noon, but officials have not confirmed the cause of death. Clark will conduct an autopsy on the student Friday. The case involves Phi Delta Theta fraterni...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abby Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Louisiana onetime Source Type: news

Hillary Clinton Writes the First Draft of Her History
Hillary Clinton has spent 40 years trying to be liked. In her new memoir, What Happened, she describes the myriad ways she has tried to modulate herself to fit our expectations of her, which is a tidy but long list of all the usual impossible standards women face. She changed her name, her clothing and her demeanor in response to criticism and rejection. She spent what adds up to a month of time on the 2016 campaign trail having her hair and makeup done; if she showed up without having those things done, she got slammed. She even hired a linguistics expert so she could learn to rev up a crowd by shouting while not sounding...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Susanna Schrobsdorff Tags: Uncategorized Books hillary clinton what happened Source Type: news

The future of EU workers is ‘ a fight that ’ s too important to lose ’
As hundreds of EU migrants, including UNISON members, rallied in Trafalgar Square last night in defence of their rights, London Mayor Sadiq Khan told them: “This is a fight that’s too important to lose.” The rally followed a Westminster lobby, during which dozens of MPs and peers signed a pledge to guarantee the rights of both EU citizens in the UK and British citizens in the EU. It was the second lobby of Parliament this year, with UNISON members from all over the country and from all walks of the public sector again urging their MPs to end the uncertainty of EU citizens over whether they will be able to...
Source: UNISON Health care news - September 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Authors: Demetrios Matheou Tags: Article News BREXIT eu migrant migrant workers NHS NHS staff Source Type: news

How an Outlaw Became the ‘Turkish Lawrence of Arabia’
This post is in partnership with History Today. The article below was originally published at History Today. In the twilight of the Ottoman Empire, 100 years ago, a restless Turkish prisoner of war languished in Malta, then a British possession. With copious leisure time forced upon him, Eşref Bey began to write his adventures as an officer in the Ottoman army. His biography has not survived, yet, from the archival material that has, we can imagine what it might have included: a string of increasingly momentous assignments for the Committee of Union and Progress (Ottoman patriots opposed to the policies of the sultan) and...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Benjamin C. Fortna / History Today Tags: Uncategorized People Source Type: news

Britons are among the most depressed in the Western world
The UK is ranked joint seventh out of 25 countries for adults reporting they have depression - more than double the rates in countries including Poland, Italy and Greece. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What Your Dreams Actually Mean, According to Science
If dreams were movies, they wouldn’t make a dime. They’re often banal, frequently fleeting and they’re screened for an audience of just one. As for the storyline? You’re in a supermarket, only it’s also Yankee Stadium, shopping with your second-grade teacher until she turns into Ruth Bader Ginsburg. Then you both shoot a bear in the cereal aisle. Somebody call rewrite. But dreams are vastly more complex than that, and if you’ve got a theory that explains them, have at it. The ancient Egyptians thought of dreams as simply a different form of seeing, with trained dreamers serving as seers ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized behavior dreams Freud health Jung mind psychology sleep the brain Source Type: news

Earthquake faults may have played key role in shaping the culture of ancient Greece
(University of Plymouth) The Ancient Greeks may have built sacred sites deliberately on land affected by previous earthquake activity, according to a new study by BBC presenter Iain Stewart MBE, Professor of Geoscience Communication at the University of Plymouth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pope Francis Urges ‘Pro-Life’ President Trump to Rethink DACA Decision
(ABOARD THE PAPAL PLANE) — Pope Francis is urging President Donald Trump to rethink his decision to end a program protecting young immigrants from deportation, saying anyone who calls himself “pro-life” should keep families together. “If he is a good pro-life believer he must understand that family is the cradle of life and one must defend its unity,” Francis said during an in-flight press conference en route home from Colombia. Francis said he hadn’t read up on Trump’s decision to phase out the Deferred Action for Children Program, which allows some immigrants who were brought to ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicole Winfield / AP Tags: Uncategorized DACA Donald Trump onetime Pope Francis Source Type: news

Thousands Are Expected to Gather at Ground Zero as the U.S. Commemorates the 9/11 Anniversary
(NEW YORK) — While the U.S. contends with the destruction caused by two ferocious hurricanes in three weeks, Americans also are marking the anniversary of one of the nation’s most scarring days. Thousands of 9/11 victims’ relatives, survivors, rescuers and others are expected to gather Monday at the World Trade Center to remember the deadliest terror attack on American soil. Sixteen years later, the quiet rhythms of commemoration have become customs: a recitation of all the names of the dead, moments of silence and tolling bells, and two powerful light beams that shine through the night. Yet each ceremony...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 11, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer Peltz / AP Tags: Uncategorized 9/11 anniversary Source Type: news

Simply Fresh Foods, Inc. Issues Allergy Alert on Undeclared Milk in Single Serve Cups of San Francisco Seafood Salad Made with Greek Yogurt
Simply Fresh Foods, Inc. of Buena Park, CA is recalling 272 cases of one specific lot of its 4-4 ounce packages of " San Francisco Seafood Salad Made with Greek Yogurt " bearing a UPC bar code of 47502 19701 because the individual cups inside the carton may be mislabeled as Seafood Salad with Real Mayonnaise and does not declare " milk " . The outer carton is correct and has the correct ingredient statement which declares " milk " . People who have allergies to milk run the risk of serious or life-threatening allergic reaction if they consume this product. (Source: Food and Drug Administration)
Source: Food and Drug Administration - September 8, 2017 Category: Food Science Source Type: news

Impact of economic austerity and prosperity events on suicide in Greece: a 30-year interrupted time-series analysis (Safety-2016 abstract #67) - Branas CC, Kastanaki AE, Michalodimitrakis M, Tzougas J, Kranioti EF, Theodorakis PN, Carr BG, Wiebe DJ.
Background The recent strain on the Greek public has prompted academic discussion of the potential health effects of the austerity measures. In this regard, suicides in Greece have been a lead topic, with numerous commentators concluding that the recent au... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news

Warnings over shock dementia revelations from ancestry DNA tests
Companies have been told to accept moral responsibility and provide counselling for people who inadvertently discover health risksPeople who use genetic tests to trace their ancestry only to discover that they are at risk of succumbing to an incurable illness are being left to suffer serious psychological problems. Dementia researchers say the problem is particularly acute for those found to be at risk of Alzheimer ’s disease, which has no cure or effective treatment. Yet these people are stumbling upon their status inadvertently after trying to find their Viking, Asian or ancient Greek roots.“These tests have ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 26, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Robin McKie Science Editor Tags: Genetics UK news Alzheimer's Health Society Genealogy Family Life and style Biology Science Source Type: news

Socioeconomic crisis and aggressive behaviour of Greek adolescents - Lazaratou H, Kalogerakis Z, Economou M, Xenitidis K.
This study aimed to examine the correlation... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

How the Solar Eclipse Could Help Us Solve a Mystery About the Sun
You’ve been drawing the sun’s corona ever since you were in pre-K — and that’s probably the last time it made any sense. The sun is the 865,000-mile ball of gas that was the scribbly yellow circle in your drawing. The corona is the veil of luminous plasma streaming millions of miles into space, where you drew straight yellow rays. Things were never so simple again. Studying the mysteries of the corona is not easy, for the same reason that looking at the sun itself isn’t easy: the brilliance of the solar fires washes out everything else. Coronagraphs — black masks fitted in telescopes and...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized corona eclipse space space 2017 sun The Great American Eclipse Source Type: news

Why People Used to Be Afraid of Solar Eclipses
Americans eagerly anticipating the first total solar eclipse visible in the contiguous U.S. since 1979 — and the first to cross the country from coast to coast in 99 years — may know well know that what they’re watching is the moon simply passing in front of the sun. But even so, as long as eclipses have occurred, humans have interpreted them as a sign of something. As TIME editor-at-large Jeffrey Kluger explains in the above video, the Lydians and the Medes ended a war in 585 B.C. because they took a solar eclipse eclipse as a sign of heavenly disapproval. The Roman author Pliny the elder drew a line fro...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized eclipse Science space space 2017 Source Type: news

Perseid meteor shower seen over Greece – timelapse video
The annual Perseid meteor shower filled the sky will glowing streaks over the weekend near the archaeological site of Mesimvria outside Alexandroupoli in northern Greece. As the meteors burn up, they can appear as green, white or orange streaks across the skyPerseid meteor shower lights up the night sky – in picturesContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - August 13, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Guardian Staff Tags: Meteors Science Space Astronomy World news Greece Europe Source Type: news

Trash To Treasure: How Can We Extract Valuable Resources From Production Waste?
Greek scientists have developed a technology that allows them to obtain rare earth elements (REEs) from waste ore in an economical and environmentally friendly way. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - August 11, 2017 Category: Research Source Type: news

What Solar Eclipses Have Taught Us About the Universe
Total solar eclipses like the one that will cross the U.S. on Aug. 21 have captured the attention of astronomers throughout history — and have often led to advances in our understanding of how the universe works. Astronomers have been studying solar eclipses for centuries. In the late 16th and early 17th centuries, Danish astronomer Tycho Brahe and his apprentice German astronomer Johannes Kepler studied eclipses to try to arrive at a rough estimate of the moon’s diameter. In the 19th century, eclipse observations got even more interesting, thanks in large part to advances in scientific instruments like telesco...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amy Shira Teitel Tags: Uncategorized eclipse Science space space 2017 time original time video universe vintage space Source Type: news

This Newly Discovered Dinosaur Makes T. Rex ‘Look Like a Dwarf’
(WASHINGTON) — A study proclaims a newly named species the heavyweight champion of all dinosaurs, making the scary Tyrannosaurus rex look like a munchkin. At 76 tons (69 metric tons), the plant-eating behemoth was as heavy as a space shuttle. The dinosaur’s fossils were found in southern Argentina in 2012. Researchers who examined and dated them said the long-necked creature was the biggest of a group of large dinosaurs called titanosaurs. “There was one small part of the family that went crazy on size,” said Diego Pol of the Egidio Feruglio paleontology museum in Argentina, co-author of the study p...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - August 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Associated Press Tags: Uncategorized dinosaurs onetime Science Source Type: news

Development and implementation of walkability audits in Greek medium-sized cities: the case of the Serres' city centre - Sdoukopoulos A, Verani E, Nikolaidou A, Gavanas N, Pitsiava-Latinopoulou M, Mikiki F, Mademli E, Pallas C.
The conventional approach in transport planning aims at the expansion of road transport infrastructure to cope with the increasing transport demand. However, this car-based planning approach not only fails to fulfill the mobility needs due to the limited s... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Community-Based Prevention Source Type: news

Cycling: utilitarian and symbolic dimensions - Lourontzi E, Petachti S.
This study explores the various factors, both of utilitarian and symbolic nature, associated with the use of bicycles in the city of Volos, a medium-sized Greek city. Deviating from relevant studies carried out to date in Greece, it is based on a different... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Sustainable urban mobility indicators: policy versus practice in the case of Greek cities - Tafidis P, Sdoukopoulos A, Pitsiava-Latinopoulou M.
Nowadays, the significant economic and social changes that are taking place as well as the emergence of environment protection makes the need for sustainable urban mobility planning more and more necessary. Although sustainability is difficult to be measur... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Road Safety in urban areas in Greece during economy downturn. A before - after comparison - Mpogas K, Kopelias P, Mitropoulos L, Kepaptsoglou K.
The deep economic recession in Greece has significant effects on urban lifestyle. Negative economic conditions with serious consequences in everyday life, such as the loss of 25-30% of GDP within five years and an unemployment rate over 25% have impacts on... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Pedestrians and Bicycles Source Type: news

Bitcoin money laundering ringleader arrested, facing years in U.S. prison for running popular Bitcoin exchange
(Natural News) Greek authorities have captured 38-year-old Russian national Alexander Vinnik, who is wanted on United States soil for allegedly masterminding an illegal money laundering operation which involved at least $4 billion through bitcoin transactions. Following an investigation that was led by the United States Justice Department, Vinnik was brought into custody from a small... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 5, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The first civilizations of Greece are revealing their stories to science
(Howard Hughes Medical Institute) A new analysis of genome sequences from the ancient Minoans and Mycenaeans by HHMI investigator and colleagues offers insight into the origins of these Bronze Age cultures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA analysis reveals Minoan and Mycenaean origins
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) DNA analysis of archaeological remains has revealed that Ancient Minoans and Mycenaens were genetically similar with both peoples descending from early Neolithic farmers. They likely migrated from Anatolia to Greece and Crete thousands of years before the Bronze Age. Modern Greeks are largely descendants of the Mycenaeans, the study found.The Minoan civilization flourished on Crete beginning in the third millennium B.C.E. and was advanced artistically and technologically. The Minoans were also the first literate people of Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ancient DNA reveals origins of the Minoans and Mycenaeans
(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The question of the origins of the Minoans and their relationship to the Mycenaeans, Europe's first literate societies, has long puzzled researchers. A paper published today in Nature suggests that, rather than being advanced outsiders, the Minoans had deep roots in the Aegean and were closely related to the Mycenaeans, and to modern Greeks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The existing school transportation framework in Greece - barriers and problems comparing to other European countries - Kotoula K, Botzoris G, Morfoulaki M, Aifandopoulou G.
School Transportation is a crucial issue for society, as it ensures that all children have access to schooling and brings students of all ages to schools and other educational facilities where they can study. An inefficient provision of such a service void... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Huffington Post: Mental Health Situation Deteriorating for Refugees on Greece ’s Lesbos Island
In the NewsHuffington Post: Mental Health Situation Deteriorating for Refugees on Greece ’s Lesbos IslandJuly 27, 2017Mental health care resources are deteriorating in Lesbos, Greece, where  Doctors Without Borders/Médecins Sans Frontières has seen extreme vulnerability of the asylum seekers that arrive on the island.View External Media.  Read More: A Dramatic Deterioration for Asylum Seekers on Lesbos (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Jess Brown Source Type: news

The role of physical activity in life happiness of Greek drug abusers participating in a treatment program - Nani S, Matsouka O, Tsitskari E, Avgerinos A.
PURPOSEExercise may offer a further opportunity to achieve pleasant conditions, without the use of substances or addiction supporting the promotion of a healthy lifestyle that is incompatible with the use of drugs. The aim of the present study was to explo... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Book Review: The Posttraumatic Growth Workbook
If you told most people that after a traumatic event, they could feel stronger, more open to new experiences, more appreciative of life, a deepened sense of spirituality and closer, more authentic relationships, they might tell you that it sounds unbelievable. But according to the authors of The Posttraumatic Growth Workbook Richard Tedeschi and Brett Moore, what I am describing is indeed very real, and very relevant. In the mind-nineties, Tedeschi and Lawrence Calhoun identified posttraumatic growth as “the positive psychological change that results from the attempt to find new meaning follo...
Source: Psych Central - July 26, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Claire Nana Tags: Book Reviews PTSD Stress Trauma brett moore posttraumatic growth Posttraumatic Stress Disorder Richard Tedeschi Survivors Source Type: news

Type 2 diabetes cure - substance mentioned in Greek mythology could reduce symptoms
TYPE 2 diabetes risk is increased by metabolic syndrome, a condition triggered by four risk factors, increase blood pressure, high blood sugar, excess body fat and high cholesterol. Now experts believed they have found a substance which could treat the condition. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - July 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Aftershocks Rattle Greek Island Recovering from Deadly Earthquake
KOS, Greece (AP) — Crews of experts began examining the damage to cultural monuments and infrastructure on the eastern Greek island of Kos on Saturday, a day after a powerful earthquake killed two tourists and injured nearly 500 others in the Aegean Sea region that stretches to Turkey's sprawling coast. Residents and tourists were still jittery as a series of aftershocks Saturday night continued to rock the island. A tremor measuring a preliminary 4.4 magnitude struck at 8:09 p.m.  (1709 GMT) Saturday, sending residents and restaurant customers scurrying toward the middle of the town's main square, as far away a...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 24, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Costas Kantouris, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

Greece: New Report Finds Dire Neglect of Asylum Seekers on Lesbos
The EU and Greece are making it more difficult for vulnerable people to access basic medical care, even as the needs are increasing.Language English (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Kavita Menon Source Type: news

Greece: New Report Finds Dire Neglect of Asylum Seekers on Lesbos
Press releaseGreece: New Report Finds Dire Neglect of Asylum Seekers on LesbosJuly 24, 2017The EU and Greece are making it more difficult for vulnerable people to access basic medical care, even as the needs are increasing. (Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Clinton Krute Source Type: news

Earthquake Strikes Greece, Turkey, 2 Killed, Over 500 Hurt
KOS, Greece (AP) — A powerful overnight earthquake shook holiday resorts in Greece and Turkey, injuring nearly 500 people and leaving two tourists dead on the Greek island of Kos, where revelers at a bar were crushed in a building collapse. Some of the injuries were caused as tourists and local residents scrambled out of buildings and even leapt from balconies after the 6.5-magnitude quake struck at about 1:30 a.m. local time. Several hundred thousand vacationers and locals in the two countries were kept awake by dozens of aftershocks that followed the main quake, with many sleeping outdoors on sunbeds or slumped on ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michael Probst, Derek Gatopoulos and Zeynep Bilginsoy, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Source Type: news

How may external information affect traffic risk perception? - Antoniou C, Kostovasilis K.
More than 1.2 million people die each year on the world's roads, and between 20 and 50 million sustain injuries. Although road safety has been improving over the last decade, Greece is still by far the worst performing country among the older European Unio... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news