He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.

This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death. Doctors and aid workers died, people who should have been able to stay safe while offering care. But not everyone who is exposed to the Ebola virus, which spreads through contact with blood or other bodily fluids, falls ill. Such is the case of Dr. Jean-Jacques Muyembe-Tamfum, who in 1976 became the first scientist to come into contact with Ebola and survive. The Congolese virologist, now 74, placed himself square in the path of the disease as he worked in harrowing and hazardous conditions to identify what was killing some of its earliest victims. “I am like Johnnie Walker,” he quipped, referencing the well-known Scotch whisky slogan, “Born 1820 ― Still going strong.” Muyembe giggled as he strode around his office imitating the brand’s iconic “Striding Man.” It’s a joke in service of a very seriou...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - Category: Science Source Type: news

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Longer, lighter days can help us banish old habits, sleep better and improve our mental health, even during the lockdownThank goodness that, in this time of crisis, it is now spring. In the northern hemisphere, at least, we can say hello to green shoots, flowers, bumblebees and butterflies. Finally, the clocks have gone back to British Summer Time. We ’ve lost an hour of sleep, but hello, light.The greatest hope for the new season this year isthatbetter weather will start to makeit harder for coronavirus to spread. And for those lucky enough to still have their health, spring can provide other consolations. Its stron...
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Human trials will begin imminently – but even if they go well and a cure is found, there are many barriers before global immunisation is feasibleCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageEven at their most effective – and draconian – containment strategies have only slowed the spread of the respiratory disease Covid-19. With the World Health Organization finally declaring a pandemic, all eyes have turned to the prospect of a vaccine, because only a vaccine can prevent people from getting sick.About 35 companies and academic institutions are racing to create such a vaccine, at least...
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Authors: Petrella TM, Fletcher GG, Knight G, McWhirter E, Rajagopal S, Song X, Baetz TD Abstract Background: Previous versions of the guideline from the Program in Evidence-Based Care (pebc) at Ontario Health (Cancer Care Ontario) recommended that the use of high-dose interferon alfa 2b therapy be discussed and offered to patients with resected cutaneous melanoma with a high risk of recurrence. Subsequently, several clinical trials in patients with resected or metastatic melanoma found that immune checkpoint inhibitors and targeted therapies have a benefit greater than that with interferon. It was therefore conside...
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Daniel Griffin MD joins TWiV from a hospital parking lot to provide updates on COVID-19 diagnostics, clinical picture, and therapeutics, and then the TWiV team continues coverage of the coronavirus pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. Click arrow to play Download TWiV 595 (71 MB .mp3, 117 min) Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Show notes at microbe.tv/twiv
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Daniel Griffin MD joins TWiV from a hospital parking lot to provide updates on COVID-19 diagnostics, clinical picture, and therapeutics, and then the TWiV team continues coverage of the coronavirus pandemic caused by SARS-CoV-2. Hosts: Hosts: Vincent Racaniello, Dickson Despommier, Alan Dove, Rich Condit, and Kathy Spindler Guest: Daniel Griffin, MD Subscribe (free): iTunes, Google Podcasts, RSS, email Become a patron of TWiV! Links for this episode Tocilizumab (Wiki) Nares swab for SARS-CoV-2 (Star Trib) US SARS-CoV-2 epidemic curve (CDC) Cleaning and disinfecting (CDC) Cleaning fru...
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Patients, carers and NHS staff could receive experimental antibody treatmentCoronavirus – latest updatesSee all our coronavirus coverageDoctors have drawn up plans to infuse British coronavirus patients and their carers with blood plasma harvested from “hyperimmune” people who have recovered from the infection in an attempt to save lives.The experimental treatment will be directed at patients who are admitted to hospital with pneumonia caused by the virus in the hope that it reduces the number who end up on ventilators in intensive care units (ICUs).Continue reading...
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Publication date: Available online 28 March 2020Source: International Journal of Surgery Case ReportsAuthor(s): Yu Zhang, Eric C.H. Lai, Chong Yang, Hongji Yang, Jun Liu, Guo Zhou, Di Xian, Shaoping Deng, Wan Yee Lau
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This pandemic is throwing into stark relief a treacherous fact: we depend on employment, both for survival and a sense of selfOffices empty, restaurants and cafes closed, performance venues dark, schools and universities shut down. Across the world, numerous industries have entered a state of suspended animation, imposing a sharp and involuntary brake on the working lives of millions of people.This week, having moved my psychoanalytic practice online, I ’ve sat in an empty consulting room talking to patients via video-conference, many of them struggling to process what life in the shadow of Covid-19 might mean in the...
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Sometimes, businesses have to go to court. Maybe there is a dispute with another company over a contract, or an employee who made claims about issues in the workplace. But what happens to legal claims and other disputes when the courthouses in Texas are closed, as they are now in response to the coronavirus outbreak? With the courthouses closed, is trial work shut down? With the courthouses closed, if your company had a trial scheduled, it is postponed. We’r e going to have to wait and see what…
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The coronavirus pandemic has just made it incredibility difficult to script an endgame for the “Big Three” killer epidemics. But global leaders and agencies dedicated to AIDS, TB, and Malaria are gearing up to stem the tide.
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