New technology may significantly reduce diagnostic time of coronavirus
(Bar-Ilan University) The time it currently takes to diagnose coronavirus poses one of the greatest challenges in treating infected patients and increases the risk of exposure. Using a new technology developed by Dr. Amos Danielli, of Bar-Ilan University, saliva tests can be analyzed within 15 minutes. The technology has already been proven to reduce the diagnostic time of Zika virus and is currently being used in the Israel Ministry of Health's central virology laboratory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces Collaboration with U.S. Department of Health & Human Services to Accelerate Development of a Potential Novel Coronavirus Vaccine
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., February 11, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson today announced that its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies will further expedite its investigational coronavirus vaccine program through an expanded collaboration with the Biomedical Advanced Research and Development Authority (BARDA), part of the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Preparedness and Response (ASPR) at the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services. The collaborative partnership with BARDA builds on Johnson & Johnson’s multipronged response to the new coronavirus disease (COVID-19) outbreak. In addition to Janssen’s ef...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - February 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Innovation Source Type: news

2019 Novel Coronavirus Recommendations for Ships
Source: Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Office of Infectious Diseases (CDC OID). Published: 2/10/2020. This web page provides recommendations for ships about the 2019 novel coronavirus (2019-nCoV) in these topics: Investigation Form: Explanation of Key Fields; Ship Sanitation Certificate Information; Definitions: Signs, Symptoms, and Conditions; Federal Regulations: Reporting Illness/Death; and Questions and Answers about Disinsection and Zika for the Shipping Industry and Partners. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Army Inches Closer To Develop Zika And Dengue Virus Vaccine
Mosquito-carried diseases such as the Zika virus and Dengue still continue to thrive in warm temperate parts of the world, but new US army research suggests we are on the cusp of figuring out a vaccine that could potentially work to fight both these infections. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Dana Dovey, Contributor Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Should Bring Out the Best in Humanity
Pandemics are perversely democratic. They’re nasty, lethal and sneaky, but they don’t discriminate. No matter your age, ethnicity, religion, gender, or nation, you’re a part of the pathogenic constituency. That shared vulnerability, and the resulting human collectivism—a universal response to a universal threat—is newly and vividly evident in the face of the now-global outbreak of the novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV. As of writing, there have been over 30,000 diagnosed cases and over 630 related deaths. A virus that emerged in a single city, Wuhan, China—indeed, in a single crowded ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

How Our Modern World Creates Outbreaks Like Coronavirus
“Everyone knows that pestilences have a way of recurring in the world,” observes Albert Camus in his novel The Plague. “Yet somehow we find it hard to believe in ones that crash down on our heads from a blue sky. There have been as many plagues as wars in history; yet plagues and wars always take people by surprise.” Camus was imagining a fictional outbreak of plague in 1948 in Oran, a port city in northwest Algeria. But at a time when the world is reeling from a very real microbial emergency sparked by the emergence of a novel coronavirus in Wuhan, central China, his observations are as pertinent a...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mark Honigsbaum Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV health ideas Source Type: news

New details on how a viral protein puts the brakes on virus replication
(Colorado State University) Researchers used computational chemistry, biochemistry and virology to uncover new information on how viruses such as West Nile, dengue and Zika replicate. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 7, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus surveillance: Regenstrief team creating unique codes for disease tracking
(Regenstrief Institute) As public health leaders work to contain the spread of the 2019 Novel Coronavirus, a team at Regenstrief Institute, an international leader in health information technology, is providing help to track cases of the illness. The team also created codes during the Zika and SARS outbreaks, among others. The codes are part of LOINC, a terminology system, created and maintained at Regenstrief, that is used in 176 countries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

What's in a name? To name an outbreak, a lot
Guidelines now discourage the use of geographic locations (like Zika virus), animals (swine flu) or groups of people (Legionnaires' disease) in naming diseases. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Past Outbreaks Provide a Roadmap for U.S. Government Response to Coronavirus Threat
While the threat of the new coronavirus in the United States remains limited, a network of U.S. government agencies are already furiously ramping up efforts to contain the disease, should an outbreak occur. “We are working to keep the risk low,” said Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, who is leading the federal government’s response, at a press conference Friday. So far, the overwhelming number of new cases of the virus, which originated in Wuhan, China, remain in China. There are only 11 confirmed cases in the U.S. The good news, some officials and infectious disease experts tell TIME, is t...
Source: TIME: Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Abigail Abrams Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Army-developed Zika vaccine induces potent Zika and dengue cross-neutralizing antibodies
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) A new study led by WRAIR scientists has shown for the first time that a single dose of an experimental Zika vaccine in a dengue-experienced individual can boost pre-existing flavivirus immunity and elicit protective cross-neutralizing antibody responses against both Zika and dengue viruses. Findings were published today in Nature Medicine. Three Phase 1 human clinical trials have shown ZPIV to be safe and well-tolerated in healthy adults and that it induced a robust immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UK government pledges £20 million to help develop coronavirus vaccine
The funding will be used to support work to develop new vaccines for epidemics Related items fromOnMedica Warning on post-Brexit antibiotic use NHS review recommends making childhood vaccination more 'convenient' for parents Doctors can help overcome ‘vaccine hesitancy’ Global measles deaths reach historic low World ‘not prepared’ for Zika and Ebola (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 3, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Is Now a Public Health Emergency of International Concern. Here ’s What That Means
The World Health Organization (WHO) took the rare step Thursday of declaring a novel coronavirus outbreak that originated in Wuhan, China a public health emergency of international concern (PHEIC). But what does that actually mean? The WHO defines a PHEIC as an “extraordinary event” that “constitute[s] a public health risk to other States through the international spread of disease” and “potentially require[s] a coordinated international response.” Since that framework was defined in 2005—two years after another coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), spread through ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV public health Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Launches Multi-Pronged Response to Coronavirus Global Public Health Threat
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., January 29, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is mobilizing resources at its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies to launch a multi-pronged response to the novel coronavirus (also known as 2019-nCoV or Wuhan coronavirus) outbreak. As part of this work, the Company has initiated efforts to develop a vaccine candidate against 2019-nCoV and broadly collaborate with others to screen a library of antiviral therapies. Identifying compounds with antiviral activity against 2019-nCoV may contribute to providing immediate relief to the current outbreak.“J&J has a long-standing comm...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Researchers Are Racing to Make a Coronavirus Vaccine. Will It Help?
New technology and better coordination have sped up development. But a coronavirus vaccine is still months — and most likely years — away. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Knvul Sheikh and Katie Thomas Tags: Vaccination and Immunization Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Epidemics SARS (Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome) MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome) Zika Virus Clinical Trials Moderna Therapeutics Johnson & University of Queensland Inovio Source Type: news

Unique new antiviral treatment made using sugar
(University of Manchester) New antiviral materials made from sugar have been developed to destroy viruses on contact and may help in the fight against viral outbreaks. This new development from a collaborative team of international scientists shows promise for the treatment of herpes simplex (cold sore virus), respiratory syncytial virus, hepatitis C, HIV, and Zika virus to name a few. The team have demonstrated success treating a range of viruses in the lab - including respiratory infections to genital herpes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Consequences of Zika virus attack on glial cells
(D'Or Institute for Research and Education) Few studies have identified the effects of zika virus infection on astrocytes, as well as their association with developmental alterations, including brain malformations and microcephaly. Published in Scientific Reports, a new article sought to unravel the virus reactions on laboratory-created astrocytes, comparing them to the same cells present in the brain tissue of animals and fetuses infected with Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 27, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UMD-led study named Science's most impactful paper of 2019
(University of Maryland) The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) awarded its 2019 Newcomb Cleveland Prize to University of Maryland entomologists Raymond St. Leger, Brian Lovett and their seven West African collaborators for their study describing the development and testing of a genetically engineered fungus to fight mosquito-borne diseases such as malaria, dengue& Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Malaria-fighting technology earns 2019 AAAS Newcomb Cleveland Prize
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A team of nine researchers based in the United States and Burkina Faso will receive the 2019 Newcomb Cleveland Prize, presented by the American Association for the Advancement of Science, for the development of a promising tool in the global fight against malaria and other diseases transmitted by mosquitoes, including dengue and Zika. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Population-Based Surveillance for Birth Defects Potentially Related to Zika Virus Infection --- 22 States and Territories, January 2016--June 2017
This report describes that birth defects potentially related to Zika virus infection during pregnancy increased fourfold in Puerto Rico and the U.S. Virgin Islands, areas with widespread local transmission of Zika virus during the study period. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - January 23, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Birth Defects MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Zika Virus Source Type: news

A Zika vaccine could save suffering and costs
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) A new study led by researchers at the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) and the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine found that routinely giving the Zika vaccine to women of childbearing age could save money if the risk of Zika is around that of other mosquito-borne diseases like dengue and chikungunya. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 23, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Skin cream used to treat GENITAL WARTS could protect people against diseases carried by mosquitoes
Scientists studied the effect of the cream, which is sold as Imiquimod or Aldara, on four types of virus transmitted by mosquitoes, including Zika and Chikungunya. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers trace Coronavirus outbreak in China to snakes
(Wiley) Emerging viral infections -- from bird flu to Ebola to Zika infections -- pose major threats to global public health, and understanding their origins can help investigators design defensive strategies against future outbreaks. A new study published in the Journal of Medical Virology provides important insights on the potential origins of the most recent outbreak of viral pneumonia in China, which started in the middle of December and now is spreading to Hong Kong, Singapore, Thailand, and Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mosquito-borne diseases could be prevented by skin cream
(University of Leeds) A skin cream used to treat warts and skin cancer could help protect people against viral diseases such as Zika and dengue, according to new research from the University of Leeds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika inhibits the proliferation of prostate cancer cells
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Experiments performed by Brazilian scientists showed that Zika virus inhibits tumor cell proliferation even when inactivated by high temperature. The study was supported by FAPESP and published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika virus' key into brain cells ID'd, leveraged to block infection and kill cancer cells
(University of California - San Diego) Two different UC San Diego research teams identified the same molecule --αvβ5 integrin -- as Zika virus' key to brain cell entry. They found ways to take advantage of the integrin to both block Zika virus from infecting cells and turn it into something good: a way to shrink brain cancer stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Zika Damage Showing Up in Babies Deemed'Normal' at Birth
FRIDAY, Jan. 10, 2020 -- Some infants who appear healthy at birth after being exposed to the Zika virus in the womb develop neurological problems during their first year of life, a new study finds. The study included pregnant women in Colombia who... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 10, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Malnutrition linked with increased risk of Zika birth defects
(University of Oxford) Environmental factors, such as the diets of pregnant women, have been shown to have an effect on the extent and severity of developmental malformations in babies associated with Zika virus (ZIKV) congenital infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Zika-Exposed Babies Who Appear Normal at Birth May Develop Problems Later on Zika-Exposed Babies Who Appear Normal at Birth May Develop Problems Later on
Infants exposed to Zika virus before birth but without congenital Zika syndrome (CZS) are at risk for neurodevelopmental delays as they get older, a new study shows.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - January 8, 2020 Category: Radiology Tags: Pediatrics News Source Type: news

Zika Virus IgM 25 Months After Symptom Onset, Florida, USA Zika Virus IgM 25 Months After Symptom Onset, Florida, USA
A study of cases from a 2016 outbreak in Florida provides insight into Zika virus IgM persistence.Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 8, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Hundreds of novel viruses discovered in insects
(Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin) New viruses which cause diseases often come from animals. Well-known examples of this are the Zika virus transmitted by mosquitoes, bird flu viruses, as well as the MERS virus which is associated with camels. In order to identify new viral diseases quickly and prevent possible epidemics, DZIF scientists at Charit é - Universit ä tsmedizin Berlin are targeting their search at viruses in animals. In a current study, they have now discovered hundreds of novel viruses in insects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ultrasound of infants exposed to Zika predicts long-term risk
Some infants who were exposed to the Zika virus in utero but who appeared normal...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Brain abnormalities on CT, MRI indicate severe Zika Can prenatal ultrasound predict Zika infection outcomes? Digisonics launches website for Zika-related brain disease Zika's effects hard to detect on ultrasound, MRI MRI advances detection of Zika-related brain abnormalities (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 6, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

A'Healthy' Baby With Developmental Delay: Could It Be Zika? A'Healthy' Baby With Developmental Delay: Could It Be Zika?
Infants with congenital Zika virus exposure may appear healthy at birth. How would you monitor such patients? Test your knowledge with these three cases.CDC Expert Commentary (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - January 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Pediatrics Case Challenge Source Type: news

False negatives: Delayed Zika effects in babies who appeared normal at birth
(Children's National Hospital) Colombian infants exposed to Zika virus in the womb showed neurodevelopmental delays as toddlers, despite having 'normal' brain imaging and head circumference at birth, a finding that underscores the importance of long-term neurodevelopmental follow-up for Zika-exposed infants, according to a cohort study published online Jan. 6, 2020, in JAMA Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cost-Effectiveness of Prophylactic Zika Virus Vaccine Cost-Effectiveness of Prophylactic Zika Virus Vaccine
A prophylactic vaccine can help prevent the spread and complications of Zika virus, but how cost-effective is it?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Monkey Study Gives Hope for Zika Vaccine That Might Shield the Fetus
MONDAY, Dec. 23, 2019 -- An experimental Zika virus vaccine that was given before pregnancy protected monkey fetuses, researchers say. The Zika DNA vaccine VRC5283 lowered levels of Zika virus in pregnant rhesus macaques and reduced the risk of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - December 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Researchers discover how Zika virus remodels its host cell to boost viral production
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in China have discovered how a Zika virus protein reshapes its host cell to aid viral replication. The study, which will be published Dec. 23 in the Journal of Cell Biology, reveals that the viral protein NS1 converts an interior cellular compartment called the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) into a protective region where the virus can survive and replicate. Blocking this process could be a novel therapeutic strategy to treat patients infected with Zika or similar viral pathogens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 23, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
Zika virus is primarily transmitted to humans by Aedes mosquitoes. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - December 19, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

NIH-developed Zika vaccine improves fetal outcomes in animal model
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) An experimental Zika vaccine lowered levels of virus in pregnant monkeys and improved fetal outcomes in a rhesus macaque model of congenital Zika virus infection, according to a new study in Science Translational Medicine. Scientists developed the experimental vaccine and currently are evaluating it in a Phase 2 human clinical trial. The vaccine uses a small circular piece of DNA, or plasmid, containing genes that encode Zika virus surface proteins to induce an immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Addressing the Environmental Determinants of Health in Vector Surveillance and Control Strategies: Promoting Key Interventions
Source: World Health Organization, Pan American Health Organization (PAHO). Published: 12/18/2019. Climate change and other environmental changes are among the main factors that have led to the emergence or reemergence of vector-borne diseases, including dengue and Zika. This 21-page publication offers key interventions to promote vector surveillance and control activities that emphasize environmental health, using interprogrammatic and intersectoral approaches. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U.S. Government and Global Health Security
Source: Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Published: 12/17/2019. This issue brief, updated in December 2019, discusses how attention to global health security - efforts to help prepare for and address pandemic and epidemic diseases - has grown significantly over the past few decades, driven by the ongoing threat posed by emerging infectious diseases (EIDs), including HIV, SARS, influenza, Ebola, and Zika. It details the U.S. Government's efforts in global health security, and the Global Health Security Agenda (GHSA), with agency activity descriptions. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zika vaccine protects both mom and fetus, but mom needs a higher dose when pregnant
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) Researchers from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston showed, for the first time, that a single, higher dose of vaccination to a pregnant mouse safely protects both her and her fetus from the Zika virus.The researchers found that a single, less potent dose was not enough to protect the fetus. The findings are currently available in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Safer viruses for vaccine research and diagnosis
(University of Queensland) A new technology to produce safer 'hybrid' viruses at high volumes for use in vaccines and diagnostics for mosquito-borne diseases has been developed at The University of Queensland.Researchers from UQ and QIMR Berghofer Medical Research Institute have exploited the benign characteristics of the Binjari virus - inert to humans - to produce 'dangerous looking' mosquito-borne viruses such as Zika and dengue, but which cannot grow in humans or animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New insect virus provides a safer platform for flavivirus vaccines and tests
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) A research team has identified a new species of virus specific to insects that can be engineered to house genes from related viruses that cause diseases such as Zika and yellow fever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Preventing Sexual Transmission of Zika During Pregnancy Preventing Sexual Transmission of Zika During Pregnancy
What strategies may help prevent the sexual transmission of Zika virus infection during pregnancy?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - December 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Zika: Annual Epidemiological Report for 2018; Surveillance Report
Source: European Union, European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control (ECDC). Published: 12/2019. This six-page report details how in 2018, in the European Union/European Economic Area (EU/EEA )countries, 51 cases of Zika virus infection were reported; no autochthonous vector-borne cases of Zika virus infection were reported; 56.8 percent percent of Zika virus infections in EU/EEA travelers originated from the Caribbean; 22.3 percent originated from Southeast Asia; and 11.3 percent originated from the Americas. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five Hurdles to Localizing Global Development —and How NGOs Can Help Overcome Them
By Pape Amadou Gaye, President and Chief Executive OfficerNovember 27, 2019Just 20 years ago, we could hardly imagine an AIDS-free generation. And the idea that poor countries would no longer rely on foreign aid to care for their people was inconceivable.But today, I believe both are in sight.The entire field of global health and development is shifting. Major funders, such as the U.S. government, are pushing ahead with an approach called localization, wherein countries manage their own foreign aid, mobilize their own public and private revenues, and eventually become self-reliant.This is what so many of us in nongo...
Source: IntraHealth International - November 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: kseaton Tags: Leadership and Governance Policy & Advocacy Source Type: news

Zika Virus | Medscape Zika Virus | Medscape
The explosive rise in cases of Zika virus infection is of concern worldwide. Stay up-to-date here. (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Resource Center Source Type: news

Mild Zika infection in fetuses may cause brain abnormalities in young despite no symptoms
(University of Saskatchewan) Using a relevant animal model (pigs), University of Saskatchewan researchers have shown that mild Zika virus infection in fetuses can cause abnormal brain development in apparently healthy young animals. The study, published Nov. 14, 2019 in PLOS Pathogens, provides new insights into the potential outcomes of Zika virus infection and could point to new prevention and treatment strategies to alleviate the long-term effects of Zika virus infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 15, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How maternal Zika virus infection results in newborn microcephaly
(Baylor College of Medicine) Researchers have discovered that the Zika virus protein NS4A disrupts brain growth by hijacking a pathway that regulates the generation of new neurons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 14, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news