Dengue —an Epidemic Within a Pandemic in Peru
International Year of Volunteers: A volunteer ombudsman in Peru helps a local woman with her problem, 2001. Credit: UN PhotoBy Carmen ArroyoUNITED NATIONS, Jan 15 2021 (IPS) While the world is grappling with the third wave of the COVID-19 pandemic, Peru is still dealing with an epidemic that it has not been able to control—the mosquito-borne viral disease known as dengue. With almost 56,400 confirmed cases as of December, Peru is suffering the worst dengue epidemic since 2017, when the virus infected over 68,000 people. The illness, coupled with the novel coronavirus crisis, has left thousands of people exposed to m...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Carmen Arroyo Tags: Development & Aid Economy & Trade Featured Food Security and Nutrition Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour Latin America & the Caribbean TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Barilla Center for Food and Nutrition F Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson ’s 1-Shot COVID-19 Vaccine Shows Promise in Early-Stage Trials
Johnson & Johnson’s experimental one-shot Covid-19 vaccine generated a long-lasting immune response in an early safety study, providing a glimpse at how it will perform in the real world as the company inches closer to approaching U.S. regulators for clearance. More than 90% of participants made immune proteins, called neutralizing antibodies, within 29 days after receiving the shot, according to the report, and all participants formed the antibodies within 57 days. The immune response lasted for the full 71 days of the trial. “Looking at the antibodies, there should be good hope and good reason that the va...
Source: TIME: Health - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Riley Griffin / Bloomberg Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 overnight wire Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate Interim Phase 1/2a Data Published in New England Journal of Medicine
January 13, 2021 -- Interim Phase 1/2a data were published today in the New England Journal of Medicine demonstrating that the Company’s single-dose investigational COVID-19 vaccine candidate (JNJ-78436735) – being developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson – provided an immune response that lasted for at least 71 days, the duration of time measured in this study in participants aged 18-55 years. A preview of part of these interim data was posted on medRxiv in September 2020.The Phase 1/2a interim analysis showed that the Company’s COVID-19 vaccine candidate induced a...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - January 13, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

New defense against dengue and emerging mosquito-borne viruses
(University of Queensland) New treatments to cut the global death rate from dengue, Zika and West Nile viruses could result from research led by The University of Queensland. Associate Professor Daniel Watterson from UQ's School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences said the team identified an antibody that improved survival rates in laboratory trials and reduced the presence of virus in the blood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 7, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A broadly protective antibody that targets the flavivirus NS1 protein
There are no approved flaviviral therapies and the development of vaccines against flaviruses has the potential of being undermined by antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE). The flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1) is a promising vaccine antigen with low ADE risk but has yet to be explored as a broad-spectrum therapeutic antibody target. Here, we provide the structural basis of NS1 antibody cross-reactivity through cocrystallization of the antibody 1G5.3 with NS1 proteins from dengue and Zika viruses. The 1G5.3 antibody blocks multi-flavivirus NS1-mediated cell permeability in disease-relevant cell lines, and therapeuti...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Modhiran, N., Song, H., Liu, L., Bletchly, C., Brillault, L., Amarilla, A. A., Xu, X., Qi, J., Chai, Y., Cheung, S. T. M., Traves, R., Setoh, Y. X., Bibby, S., Scott, C. A. P., Freney, M. E., Newton, N. D., Khromykh, A. A., Chappell, K. J., Muller, D. A., Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Structural basis for antibody inhibition of flavivirus NS1-triggered endothelial dysfunction
Medically important flaviviruses cause diverse disease pathologies and collectively are responsible for a major global disease burden. A contributing factor to pathogenesis is secreted flavivirus nonstructural protein 1 (NS1). Despite demonstrated protection by NS1-specific antibodies against lethal flavivirus challenge, the structural and mechanistic basis remains unknown. Here, we present three crystal structures of full-length dengue virus NS1 complexed with a flavivirus–cross-reactive, NS1-specific monoclonal antibody, 2B7, at resolutions between 2.89 and 3.96 angstroms. These structures reveal a protective mecha...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 7, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Biering, S. B., Akey, D. L., Wong, M. P., Brown, W. C., Lo, N. T. N., Puerta-Guardo, H., Tramontini Gomes de Sousa, F., Wang, C., Konwerski, J. R., Espinosa, D. A., Bockhaus, N. J., Glasner, D. R., Li, J., Blanc, S. F., Juan, E. Y., Elledge, S. J., Mina, Tags: Biochemistry, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

From allergies to Zika — ABCs of environmental health
A brand new edition of the popular “Environment and Health A to Z” booklet includes eye-catching illustrations and easy-to-understand text. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

NIH launches large study of pregnant women and Zika
NIEHS is joining a National Institutes of Health study of risks that Zika infection poses to pregnant women, their fetuses, and infants. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Natural products with potential efficacy against lethal viruses
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers describe the biology of three families of RNA viruses including Coronavirus, Ebola, and Zika and the natural products that have been shown to have capabilities to inhibit them. The review provides a guide that could accelerate drug discovery in response to future epidemics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Human Fetuses Can Contract SARS-CoV-2, but It's Rare
Compared with Zika and cytomegalovirus, the virus that causes COVID-19 appears to have a harder time penetrating the placenta and moving to a woman's unborn baby. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 1, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Features Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Could Invasive Mosquito Populations Pose Risk For Zika Virus Outbreaks?
A new study finds that despite the low-risk that Asian tiger mosquitoes pose for the Zika virus, active surveillance and eradication programs should be implemented in territories occupied by them to prevent major outbreaks. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - December 31, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Anuradha Varanasi, Contributor Tags: Healthcare /healthcare Innovation /innovation Source Type: news

Asian tiger mosquito poses low risk for Zika virus outbreaks
(PLOS) The Asian tiger mosquito does not pose a major risk for Zika virus epidemics, according to a study published December 31 in the open-access journalPLOS Pathogens by Albin Fontaine of the Institut de Recherche Biom é dicale des Arm é es, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 31, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Zika virus affects eye development before but not after birth
(University of California - Davis) A new study from UC Davis finds that Zika infection during the first trimester of pregnancy can impact fetal retinal development and cause congenital ocular anomalies. The virus does not appear to affect ocular growth postnatally. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH grant funds development of novel biosensor technology for diagnosing viral infections
(University of California - Santa Cruz) For over ten years, Ali Yanik has been working to develop novel biosensor technology to provide rapid, low-cost testing for disease diagnostics and precision medicine. Now, with a five-year, $3.7 million grant from the National Institutes of Health, he and his collaborators are poised to complete the development and validation of a prototype and begin testing it in the field for detection of dengue fever, yellow fever, and Zika virus infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New viral detection technique uses smartphone camera to diagnose various infections
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Scientists have developed a novel smartphone-based technique to diagnose viral infections that uses a deep learning algorithm to identify viruses in metal nanoparticle-labeled samples, enabling rapid virus detection without the need for skilled laboratory workers and expensive equipment. The system correctly identified clinically relevant concentrations of Zika, hepatitis B (HBV), or hepatitis C (HCV) in 134 patient samples with 98.97% sensitivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

$2 million NIH grant to develop Zika virus vaccine
(Virginia Tech) " This grant focuses on a new strategy that we developed to produce safe and effective flavivirus vaccines. It aims to prevent the emergence of these viruses -- in this case Zika virus -- in humans, " said Jonathan Auguste (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 9, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

'SCOUT' helps researchers find, quantify significant differences among organoids
(Picower Institute at MIT) Unbiased, high-throughput 'pipeline' system clears, labels, images and analyzes organoids to improve their utility for understanding development and diseases such as Zika infection. Code available free on GitHub. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

What Will The COVID-19 Vaccine Feel Like?
(CNN) — As the United States inches closer to authorizing a COVID-19 vaccine, many people may now let themselves start wondering what it will feel like to get it. Is it going to be like the flu vaccine? Will it be more painful? And what about side-effects? The two front-runners for getting an emergency use authorization from the US Food and Drug Administration — Pfizer/BioNTech and Moderna — use new mRNA technology. No U.S.-licensed vaccine has ever used it, although researchers have been studying it for decades against infections like flu, rabies and Zika, and even for some types of cancer. The way these...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: CBS Boston Tags: Covid-19 Boston, MA Healthcare Status News Coronavirus Moderna Therapeutics Pfizer Source Type: news

Commonly used antibiotic shows promise for combating Zika infections
NIH preclinical study suggests FDA-approved tetracycline-based antibiotics may slow infection and reduce neurological problems. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - November 24, 2020 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Commonly used antibiotic shows promise for combating Zika infections
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Recently, National Institutes of Health researchers used a variety of advanced drug screening techniques to test out more than 10,000 compounds in search of a cure. To their surprise, they found that the widely used antibiotic methacycline was effective at preventing brain infections and reducing neurological problems associated with the virus in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 24, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why Does A Virus Cause Problems In One Region But Not Another? A Study Offers Insight
In 2015, the mosquito-borne virus Zika exploded in South America. Health experts predicted it would erupt in Africa. But a major outbreak never happened. Now scientists think they understand why. (Image credit: James Gathany/CDC/Smith Collection/Gado/Getty Images) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - November 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Michaeleen Doucleff Source Type: news

Imaging detects big, rare tumor protruding from fetus's mouth
Doctors recently used prenatal ultrasound to detect a rare 4.6 x 3.6-cm oropharyngeal...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Benefits of ultrasound fetal size estimates questioned 4D MRI could be big leap forward for fetal heart imaging Micro-CT visualizes early fetal development Ultrasound of infants exposed to Zika predicts long-term risk Third-trimester ultrasound finds undetected fetal abnormalitiesComments: 11/20/2020 4:57:31 AMDra.Wittlin Did this pacient had any contact with Covid-19 or another disease diring her pregnancy ? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - November 20, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Mosquitos in Asia and the Americas More Susceptible to Zika Virus
A study explains how Zika was present among mosquitoes in Africa for decades without causing the harm to human health seen outside the continent in recent years. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - November 19, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Greater mosquito susceptibility to Zika virus fueled the epidemic
(CNRS) By experimentally comparing wild populations of Ae. aegyptithe researchers discovered that the invasive subspecies is very effective at transmitting the Zika virus not only because it has more frequent contacts with humans for blood meals, but also as a result of its greater susceptibility to the virus relative to the African subspecies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Domesticating Zika virus
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Ash, C. Tags: Microbiology twis Source Type: news

Enhanced Zika virus susceptibility of globally invasive Aedes aegypti populations
The drivers and patterns of zoonotic virus emergence in the human population are poorly understood. The mosquito Aedes aegypti is a major arbovirus vector native to Africa that invaded most of the world’s tropical belt over the past four centuries, after the evolution of a "domestic" form that specialized in biting humans and breeding in water storage containers. Here, we show that human specialization and subsequent spread of A. aegypti out of Africa were accompanied by an increase in its intrinsic ability to acquire and transmit the emerging human pathogen Zika virus. Thus, the recent evolution and global...
Source: ScienceNOW - November 19, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aubry, F., Dabo, S., Manet, C., Filipovic, I., Rose, N. H., Miot, E. F., Martynow, D., Baidaliuk, A., Merkling, S. H., Dickson, L. B., Crist, A. B., Anyango, V. O., Romero-Vivas, C. M., Vega-Rua, A., Dusfour, I., Jiolle, D., Paupy, C., Mayanja, M. N., Lut Tags: Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Preventing Vector-Borne Zika Transmission During Pregnancy Preventing Vector-Borne Zika Transmission During Pregnancy
Could certain strategies help effectively prevent the transmission of Zika virus from mosquito bites during pregnancy?Emerging Infectious Diseases (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - November 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases Journal Article Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Initiates Second Global Phase 3 Clinical Trial of its Janssen COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate
November 15, 2020 -- The Phase 3 ENSEMBLE study of the single-dose regimen of JNJ-78436735, the investigational vaccine candidate for the prevention of COVID-19 being developed by the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies of Johnson & Johnson, continues to enroll and vaccinate study participants. ENSEMBLE is proceeding to enroll up to 60,000 participants worldwide.In addition to the single-dose regimen ENSEMBLE study, Janssen has now initiated the two-dose regimen ENSEMBLE 2 trial. ENSEMBLE 2 is a complementary, planned, pivotal, large-scale, multi-country Phase 3 trial that will study the safety and efficacy of a two-dose ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - November 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Your Corneas May Be Safe From COVID: Study
Although viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the cornea and Zika has been found in corneal tissue and tears, this does not appear to be the case with COVID-19, according to researchers from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - November 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Corneas May Be Safe From COVID: Study
FRIDAY, Nov. 6, 2020 -- A new study suggests that COVID-19 doesn't infect the eye's cornea. Although viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the cornea and Zika has been found in corneal tissue and tears, this does not appear to be the case with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 6, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Fighting Zika? Call in the T cells
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) In a new Science Advances study, Shresta and her colleagues at LJI report that the immune system's T cells have the power to prevent Zika infection in mice. This finding suggests that effective Zika vaccines need to activate T cells to work alongside antibodies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cornea appears to resist infection from novel coronavirus
(Washington University School of Medicine) Some doctors have worried that the novel coronavirus may be able to infect people by getting into their eyes. Viruses such as herpes simplex can infect the eye's cornea and Zika virus has been found in corneal tissue and tears, but new research from Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis suggests the cornea can resist infection from SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study reveals factors that can make placenta less capable of protecting fetus from zika
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Findings reported by Brazilian researchers in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases help explain why only some babies whose mothers are infected during pregnancy are born with microcephaly and other anomalies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Science - October 20, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U.K. Plans ‘Challenge Trials,’ Which Will Intentionally Give People COVID-19 to Test Vaccines
On Oct. 20, researchers at the Imperial College of London announced plans for the first human challenge study of COVID-19, which involves deliberately infecting volunteers with the virus that causes the disease, in order to test the effectiveness of vaccines. The strategy is controversial, as researchers have to weigh the risks of infection against the benefits of learning how well the various vaccine candidates can fight that infection. The strongest argument in favor of the studies has to do with time. If cases of COVID-19 are waning, then the likelihood that people who are vaccinated would get exposed to and potentially...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

What Developing Countries Can Teach Us About How To Respond To a Pandemic
This article is republished from The Conversation under a Creative Commons license. Read the original article. The post What Developing Countries Can Teach Us About How To Respond To a Pandemic appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: External Source Tags: Global Headlines Health TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

USF receives nearly $1M to use AI to fight mosquito-borne viruses
The University of South Florida has received a $900,000 grant to use artificial intelligence to fight mosquito-borne diseases. The university announced Wednesday it received a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation. Researchers will collect data through smartphone apps, uploading images of mosquitos that will then be identified with their species and potential to transmit viruses, such as Zika. When the phot os are uploaded, the researchers' algorithm analyzes the photos and, over… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - October 15, 2020 Category: Health Management Authors: Lauren Coffey Source Type: news

USF receives nearly $1M to use AI to fight mosquito-borne viruses
The University of South Florida has received a $900,000 grant to use artificial intelligence to fight mosquito-borne diseases. The university announced Wednesday it received a four-year grant from the National Science Foundation. Researchers will collect data through smartphone apps, uploading images of mosquitos that will then be identified with their species and potential to transmit viruses, such as Zika. When the phot os are uploaded, the researchers' algorithm analyzes the photos and, over… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 15, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Lauren Coffey Source Type: news

Oropouche virus disease - French Guiana, France
On 30 September 2020, the French Guiana Regional Health Agency (ARS) reported the first detection of Oropouche virus (OROV) in French Guiana. On 22 September 2020 the Pasteur Institute in Cayenne (a member of the French National Reference Laboratory for arboviruses) notified the France IHR National Focal Point of seven laboratory-confirmed cases of Oropouche virus infection in the village of Sa ül. These cases were identified following clinical investigations of an unusually high number of dengue-like illnesses in the village. Between 11 August and 25 September, there were 37 clinically-compatible cases of Oropouche v...
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - October 13, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: news Source Type: news

Zika Epidemic Was More Widespread Than Thought: Study
THURSDAY, Oct. 8, 2020 -- The Zika epidemic, which began as a mosquito-borne viral infection and led to severe birth defects, affected far more people than previously thought, new research shows. For the study, researchers analyzed data from 15... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 8, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces European Commission Approval of Agreement to Supply 200 Million Doses of Janssen ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate
New Brunswick, N.J., October 8, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced the European Commission (EC), acting on behalf of the European Union (EU) Member States, has approved an Advance Purchase Agreement in which the Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies will supply 200 million doses of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate to EU Member States following approval or authorization from regulators. The EU Member States also have the option to secure up to 200 million additional doses.“The COVID-19 pandemic continues to threaten communities worldwide and we have a responsibility to ensure access ...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - October 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Zika infections drastically underreported during 2015 epidemic
(University of Notre Dame) More than 100 million infections of Zika virus within Central and South America and the Caribbean went undetected between 2015 and 2018, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 1, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How zika virus degrades essential protein for neurological development via autophagy
(University of Maryland) Researchers at the University of Maryland (UMD) shed new light on how Zika virus hijacks our own cellular machinery to break down an essential protein for neurological development, getting it to " eat itself " . By triggering this process known as autophagy, Zika virus is able to degrade an important protein, a process that may contribute to the development of neurological or brain deficiencies and congenital birth defects in the newborns of infected pregnant women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 28, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

J & J ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Will Enter Phase 3 Testing, the Fourth To Reach That Stage
Johnson & Johnson announced today (Sept. 23) that it is launching a large-scale Phase 3 test of its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, which was developed based on science supported by the National Institutes of Health. The vaccine, being tested through the company’s Janssen Pharmaceuticals arm, will be the fourth to enter late stage studies, following candidates from Moderna, Pfizer-BioNTech and AstraZeneca. Unlike those vaccine candidates, which all require two shots, J&J’s vaccine involves a single injection. That means it could require half the number of doses to immunize the same number of people. J&J...
Source: TIME: Health - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson ’ s Coronavirus Vaccine Enters Phase 3 Trial With Beth Israel
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Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - September 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Beth Israel Deacones Medical Center Coronavirus Johnson & Johnson Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Initiates Pivotal Global Phase 3 Clinical Trial of Janssen ’s COVID-19 Vaccine Candidate
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J., September 23, 2020 – Johnson & Johnson (NYSE: JNJ) (the Company) today announced the launch of its large-scale, pivotal, multi-country Phase 3 trial (ENSEMBLE) for its COVID-19 vaccine candidate, JNJ-78436735, being developed by its Janssen Pharmaceutical Companies. The initiation of the ENSEMBLE trial follows positive interim results from the Company’s Phase 1/2a clinical study, which demonstrated that the safety profile and immunogenicity after a single vaccination were supportive of further development. These results have been submitted to medRxiv and are due to be published online i...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 23, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Zika and ubiquitin
Ubiquitylation of the Zika virus envelope protein drives viral entry and pathogenesis. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - September 21, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Foley, J. F. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

'Why wait for it?' How to predict a pandemic
Strides are being made towards an open access atlas that could predict where dangerous animal-borne viruses will next appearHow do you predict where a deadly tropical disease such as Ebola, possibly the most virulent in the world, will appear next? Since it first emerged in a small town on the edge of a Congolese forest, it has broken out in seven other African countries, often thousands of miles apart.Sometimes it has spilled out of remote rainforest and then disappeared for years. Other times it has turned up in cities, baffling world bodies and governments that can only try to respond as fast as possible. But actually, ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Authors: John Vidal Tags: Infectious diseases Ebola Zika virus Coronavirus outbreak Microbiology Medical research Science World news Animals Farming Environment Climate change Source Type: news

Lab-on-paper strip: Small, inexpensive platform for diagnosing tropical fevers
(GIST (Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology)) Dengue, zika, and chikungunya viruses are transmitted by mosquitoes and cause tropical fevers with similar symptoms, making accurate diagnosis complicated. Now, researchers from Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology in Korea have developed a simple and low-cost diagnostic platform--a lab-on-paper strip--that can readily detect the specific RNA of these viruses from a small blood sample. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

How the Coronavirus Attacks the Brain
It ’s not just the lungs — the pathogen may enter brain cells, causing symptoms like delirium and confusion, scientists reported. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Apoorva Mandavilli Tags: your-feed-science Stroke Delirium Brain Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Immune System Nerves and Nervous System Zika Virus Muotri, Alysson Stevens, Robert Source Type: news