Brain Sharpens the Hearing of the Blind, Study Finds
WEDNESDAY, April 24, 2019 -- Researchers have long wondered why blind people seem to have a sharpened sense of hearing. Now a Seattle team has pinpointed specific brain adaptations that occur in folks without sight. " There's this idea that blind... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 24, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Lego releases Braille bricks to teach blind and visually impaired children
Lego has unveiled a new project aimed at helping blind and visually impaired children learn Braille in a "playful and engaging way." Lego Braille Bricks, a concept originally proposed to the toy company by two charities, will allow children to learn the touch writing system through play. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Lego bricks designed for children with sight loss
Children at one UK school have been testing them out. Some say other approaches should also be taught. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Tanzania: Refrain From Unhealthy Lifestyles, Minister Cautions Citizens
[Daily News] THE Minister for Health, Community Development, Gender, Elderly and Children, Ummy Mwalimu, has cautioned Tanzanians against unhealthy lifestyles that are likely to cause eyes defects such as arbitrary wearing of glasses and applying eye drops without Opticians' prescription. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - April 23, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Grantchester star James Norton on how he uses a strategically placed glucose monitor for naked shots
James Norton, 33, who plays Sidney Chambers in Grantchester, has type 1 diabetes and has to have a glucose monitor stuck out of sight on his bottom if he is filming a topless scene. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CEO of Cary's Avance: Size matters in health care
A booming primary care group in the Triangle says it sees no end in sight as it eyes not only more cuts of the Triangle patient market, but North Carolina as well. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 22, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Seth Thomas Gulledge Source Type: news

Why swim goggles might help astronauts' eyesight
Lower gravity of space reduces pressure in the eye but goggles and exercise might help (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Big tick energy: how a tiny flea created a revolution in British art
In 1664, scientist Robert Hooke drew a flea and created the first great work of British art. Without it, perhaps, there would be no Stubbs, Constable and HirstOn a January day in 1665 the diarist Samuel Pepys found time to flirt with a servant, go to bed mid-morning with his friend Betty Martin (noting ruefully that he spent “2 s. in wine and cake upon her”), have a massive lunch and finally make his way through filthy streets to a bookshop, where he saw the new work Micrographia by the scientist Robert Hooke. When Pepys got the book – “which is so pretty that I presently bespoke it” – h...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 22, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jonathan Jones Tags: Art Art and design Culture Science Illustration Biology Art and design books Source Type: news

Brains of blind people adapt to sharpen sense of hearing, study shows
(University of Washington) Research from the University of Washington uses functional MRI to identify two differences in the brains of blind individuals -- differences that might be responsible for their abilities to make better use of auditory information. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How blindness shapes sound processing
(Society for Neuroscience) Adults who lost their vision at an early age have more refined auditory cortex responses to simple sounds than sighted individuals, according to new neuroimaging research published in JNeurosci. The study is among the first to investigate the effects of early blindness on this brain region, which may contribute to superior hearing in the blind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anora: The Smart Glove Helping The Blind
Nikola Krstic, a graduate from the Electrical Engineering School in Belgrade, has created a smart glove prototype called Anora- that helps the blind and visually impaired move unaided without a service dog or white cane. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rebecca Banovic, Contributor Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Through my eyes: My first 48 hours with hearing aids
I'm not even 30 years old, and I need hearing aids. The discovery was a shock, but just 48 hours in and an exciting new world of sound is unfolding. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - April 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hearing / Deafness Source Type: news

Height of driver's eye and taillight measurements from a camera-based roadside setup - Dupuis Y, Chabani A, Doucet D, Subirats P.
This paper presents an approach that can be used to measure height of driver's eyes and rear position lamps from a video, i.e., two important metrics used to set sight distance standards. This data plays an important role in the definition of geometric des... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

E-Cigarettes by Laura Uselding, MD
Laura Uselding, MDE-cigarettes are the MOST COMMON tobacco product used by adolescents. According tothe 2018 Monitoring the Future (MTF) survey conducted by the University of Michigan, the prevalence of vaping increased by approximately 1.3 million teens from 2017 to 2018. It found that 37% of 12th graders and 10% of 8th graders reported using e-cigarettes in the last 12 months.  The use of e-cigarettes is likely putting a new generation of teens at risk of nicotine dependence. Here are some important things to know about e-cigarettes: E-cigarettes are electronic devices that heat a liquid containi...
Source: Pediatric Health Associates - April 19, 2019 Category: Pediatrics Source Type: news

OHSU study offers hope for people with multiple sclerosis
In multiple sclerosis, the immune system eats away at the sheath that protects the nerves, disrupting signals between the brain and the body and causing problems in walking and eyesight. No drugs have ever been developed to restore that protective layer, called myelin. But a study out Thursday from Oregon Health& Science University offers some hope. Researchers found myelin repair is possible, though their method has not yet been tested in humans. The potential game changer is a compound called… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Can exercise, swimming goggles help protect astronauts against spaceflight-associated changes to eye, vision?
This study included 20 men who on three separate days at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston completed exercises while on their back and tilted back head-first (to simulate the effect of exercise in space); 10 of the participants wore swimming goggles. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Young children judge others based on facial features as much as adults do
(American Psychological Association) Just like adults, children by the age of 5 make rapid and consistent character judgements of others based on facial features, such as the tilt of the mouth or the distance between the eyes. Those facial features also shape how children behave toward others, according to research published by the American Psychological Association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Antimicrobial paints have a blind spot
(Northwestern University) In a new study, Northwestern University researchers tested bacteria commonly found inside homes on samples of drywall coated with antimicrobial, synthetic latex paints. Within 24 hours, all bacteria died except for Bacillus timonensis, a spore-forming bacterium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Supreme Court showdown to rule whether UPMC-Highmark pact can be extended
All eyes are on the Supreme Court for the showdown next month between Attorney General Josh Shapiro and UPMC over whether the UPMC-Highmark consent decree can be extended after a Commonwealth Court judge stayed the rest of the case pending a Supreme Court ruling. The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania late Tuesday granted Shapiro’s request to appeal a 2018 ruling that set the June 30, 2019, end to the consent decree. While specific court dates weren’t set, the order sets into motion a hearing between… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - April 17, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Why Spicy Food Makes Your Nose Run —and Why It’s Great for You
Munch a bit of habanero pepper or hot-sauce-soaked jambalaya, and you’ll notice a tingling numbness in your mouth followed by a burning sensation. If that burning sensation is sufficiently strong, your nose and eyes will start to run, and your mouth and throat will start to generate mucus. You may not be able to feel it, but your stomach and parts of your intestine will also start secreting excess fluid, says Dr. Brett Comer, a surgeon and ear, nose, and throat specialist at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Why does all this happen? Like spraying water on a filthy car, your body turns on the waterworks...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

The 5 things radiology needs to speed up AI use
What's needed to accelerate advances in artificial intelligence (AI) in radiology?...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Nvidia, ACR collaborate on AI for radiology ACR releases AI-LAB platform for AI development FDA eyes new framework for AI that continuously learns 3 ways AI could be integrated into radiology workflow NIBIB teams with radiology societies on AI workshop (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 16, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Glaukos ’ iStent Has Strong Showing in 5-Year Data
This study shows that not only are Glaukos’ iStents as effective as once-daily topical travoprost in controlling IOP, but they also succeed at maintaining IOP reductions over the long-term with fewer additional medications.” The San Clemente, CA-based company has been on full court press for a while now. Earlier this year, at the 37th annual J.P. Morgan Healthcare Conference, the company unveiled a series of products and initiatives that would see it transition into a hybrid surgical, pharmaceutical, and medical device company.     (Source: MDDI)
Source: MDDI - April 16, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

10 Biggest Myths About Sleeping, According To Researchers
(CNN) — Hey, sleepyheads. What you believe about sleep may be nothing but a pipe dream. Many of us have notions about sleep that have little basis in fact and may even be harmful to our health, according to researchers at NYU Langone Health’s School of Medicine, who conducted a study published Tuesday in the journal Sleep Health. “There’s such a link between good sleep and our waking success,” said lead study investigator Rebecca Robbins, a postdoctoral research fellow in the Department of Population Health at NYU Langone Health. “And yet we often find ourselves debunking myths, whether ...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch News CNN Sleep Source Type: news

Building on the success of Grovember
We’re going for growth in May, following on from the success of the Grovember. That month of activity by the whole union made us not only the biggest union in the UK – but a growing one. We’re not resting on our laurels, however. If November showed that by acting together we can push our recruitment into growth, May is about applying what we learned and starting to develop a sustainable union-wide recruitment and retention plan strategy. UNISON is aiming to run two or three month-long campaigns each year where branches, regions and the centre focus on recruitment and retention and make sure our union cont...
Source: UNISON meat hygiene - April 16, 2019 Category: Food Science Authors: Tony Braisby Tags: P.S data Go for growth grovember recruiting recruitment Source Type: news

Wear protective goggles to play badminton as eye experts warn of 'irreversible vision loss' 
Researchers in Beijing looked at 85 badminton players who had suffered an eye injury. The biggest cause of injury were shuttlecocks and a doubles partner. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Glaukos touts 5-year study of glaucoma stents
This study shows that not only are Glaukos’ iStents as effective as once-daily topical travoprost in controlling IOP, but they also succeed at maintaining IOP reductions over the long-term with fewer additional medications.” Three-year outcomes of this study were published in 2016 in Ophthalmology and Therapy. The most recent article detailing five-year outcomes may be accessed online here. “This latest publication represents the first-ever five-year, protocol-driven, randomized evaluation of standalone iStent implantation in newly diagnosed glaucoma patients,” said Glaukos prez & CEO Thomas Bur...
Source: Mass Device - April 15, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Clinical Trials Featured Implants News Well Optical/Ophthalmic Vision Glaukos Ivantis Source Type: news

Eye warning: Seven signs in the eyes to watch out for - it could be cancer
CANCER symptoms can be mistaken for less serious health conditions, but failing to recognise the condition in its early stages can significantly impact your chances of survival. Seven symptoms to be aware of can appear in the eyes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parkinson’s disease: Experiencing this in your eyes is one of the symptoms
PARKINSON ’S DISEASE symptoms most commonly affect problems with physical movement, but there is also an array of other, less obvious symptoms to be aware of. One such symptom is this sign in your eyes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 15, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Vitamin B12 deficiency symptoms: Three warning signs in the eyes to watch out for
VITAMIN B12 deficiency can lead to serious health problems if left untreated, so being aware of symptoms is very important. One of the most recognised symptoms is feeling very tired. But many of the signs can actually appear in the eyes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Uneducated Youth Twice Likely to Acquire HIV Than the Educated - Report
[263Chat] The Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) has set its sight on ensuring access to HIV prevention services by adolescence from Africa after a report released earlier this week showed that HIV has become the leading cause of death among its adolescence. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - April 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study Sings The Praises Of Choir Membership For Lonely Adults
(CNN) — Isabel Heredi took her place among the altos. “When we sing, we feel this emotion of happiness and enjoyment,” said the member of the 30th Street Older Adult Chorus. With kind eyes and a voice shimmering with joy, she embodies the conclusion of a recent study called “Community of Voices.” “We discovered that older adults singing in a choir for six months had a reduction in their feelings of loneliness and also an increase in their interest in life,” said neuroscientist Julene Johnson of the University of California, San Francisco. The university, along with the nonprofit Sa...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Offbeat CNN Source Type: news

8 consumer-friendly digital tools to support behavioral health
From virtual therapy to mindfulness and meditation aids, there ’s little shortage of digital tools catching investors’ eyes and breaking into the crowded behavioral health market. Although a number of these services are positioning their business to focus on payers and employers, many others are taking their products directly to consumers via monthly subscr iptions, one-time retail purchases or outright free downloads. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - April 12, 2019 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Vitamin B12 deficiency: How you can detect symptoms of B12 deficiency in your eyes
VITAMIN B12 deficiency has a wide range of symptoms, but it ’s important to be able to recognise the signs. One sign you may be lacking the essential vitamin can be detected in your eyes. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA*. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts. Their paper has been published in Genome Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Fake Smiling At Work May Lead To Heavy Drinking, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) — Service with a smile, that’s what many businesses expect of their employees, but a new study finds that workers who force a smile at work may drink more heavily after hours. Researchers at Penn State and the University of Buffalo studied the drinking habits of more than 1,500 people who work with the public such as food service workers, nurses and teachers. They found that the more employees had to fake or exaggerate happy emotions by, say, smiling all the time, or suppress negative ones, by rolling one’s eyes, for example, the less likely they could control their alcohol intake after work....
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 12, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Mental health patients being sent long distances for treatment
Government not on track to end inappropriate placements Related items fromOnMedica NHS is failing patients with mental health problems Child to adult mental health transfer is inadequate Mental health funding gap widens further BMA unveils ‘blind spot’ in mental healthcare ‘No improvement’ in community mental health care (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Consumer Health: Contact lenses -- what to know before you buy
Contact lenses: What to know before you buy  Tired of wearing glasses? Contact lenses might be the answer. The best type for you will depend on your vision problem, lifestyle and budget. Learn the pros and cons of common types of contact lenses and how to keep your eyes healthy while wearing them. *** Also [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 12, 2019 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Katie Bouman: the 29-year-old whose work led to first black hole photo
Bouman is a post-doctoral fellow at MIT whose algorithm led to an image of a supermassive black holeThis week, the world laid eyes on an image that previously it was thought was unseeable.Related:Black hole picture captured for first time in space breakthroughContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Hannah Ellis-Petersen Tags: Black holes MIT - Massachusetts Institute of Technology US news Space World news Science Source Type: news

NASA twins study reveals space flight can cause genetic changes
From his eyes to his immune system, astronaut Scott Kelly's body sometimes reacted strangely to nearly a year in orbit, at least compared to his Earth-bound identical twin, but newly published research shows nothing that would cancel even longer space treks, such as to Mars. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Technology & Science Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Health - April 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

We Finally Learned What a Year in Space Did to Astronaut Scott Kelly ’s Body
Traveling in space looks like all kinds of fun, and in a lot of respects, it is—provided you can overlook a few downsides. There’s the loss of muscle mass, for one thing. Then there’s the decalcification of bones and the stress on the heart and the damage to the eyes and the changes in the immune system and the disruption of the genome and an actual shortening of your overall life expectancy. It was, in part, to study all of those biological problems that astronaut Scott Kelly spent 340 days in space from 2015 to 2016 (chronicled in TIME’s Emmy-nominated series A Year in Space). Now, just over three...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Year in Space Source Type: news

Second Sight Medical releases early feasibility data on Orion cortical implant
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) today announced preliminary results from a small feasibility study of its Orion cortical implant, which is designed to give eyesight to the blind. Sylmar, Calif.-based Second Sight’s Orion is designed to connect the camera in a pair of eyeglasses with an implant that receives the camera signal and translates it to the visual cortex in the brain, bypassing the eye and the optic nerve entirely. The company’s Argus II device, which uses a retinal implant to receive the camera’s signal, is already on the U.S. market. Interim data from a five-year early feasibility study, prese...
Source: Mass Device - April 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Featured Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Meet Katie Bouman, One Woman Who Helped Make the World ’s First Image of a Black Hole
The space was tiny and hot. On a fateful day last summer, Katie Bouman and three fellow researchers filed into a small room at Harvard University, safe from prying eyes, in order to see an image that had been years in the making. Researchers from all over the world had combined forces to gather masses of astronomical data — enough to fill a half ton of hard drives — that they hoped to turn into the world’s first image of a black hole. In order to do that, the team needed algorithms that could distill all that noisy, messy information into one comprehensible picture. And Bouman, whose expertise is not in a...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Katy Steinmetz Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Wake Forest School of Medicine dean touts Atrium Health partnership
Dr. Julie Freischlag, CEO of Wake Forest Baptist Health and dean of Wake Forest School of Medicine, eyes a second School of Medicine campus at Atrium Health in Charlotte as a potential draw for more medical students from out of state, a solution to a growing statewide doctor shortage and a boon for clinical research and innovation. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 10, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

Wake Forest School of Medicine dean touts Atrium Health partnership
Dr. Julie Freischlag, CEO of Wake Forest Baptist Health and dean of Wake Forest School of Medicine, eyes a second School of Medicine campus at Atrium Health in Charlotte as a potential draw for more medical students from out of state, a solution to a growing statewide doctor shortage and a boon for clinical research and innovation. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - April 10, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John Joyce Source Type: news

How sci-fi beams saved my eyesight by zapping cancer
A YOUNG sportsman has told how his sight was saved by a pioneering cancer treatment machine "like something out of science fiction". (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors Discover 4 Bees In Woman's Left Eye Living Off Her Tears
The Taiwan patient's vision was likely saved because her contact lenses kept her from rubbing her eyes. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Model 'was left BLIND' after her battle with Crohn’s disease
Natalie-Amber Freegard, from Swindon, revealed she was just 'hours away from dying' when she was rushed to hospital after collapsing and losing her sight at home. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taiwan doctor finds four sweat bees living inside woman's eye
The small sweat bees flew into her eyes and may have been drinking her tears as a source of food. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

CPPIB eyes emerging companies in financial services, healthcare & education
Focus is on firms using technology to define and determine fast-changing consumer habits. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - April 10, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news