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Typhoid vaccine set to have 'huge impact'
Around 22 million people get typhoid fever each year and 220,000 die. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - October 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Africa:New Typhoid Vaccine a Major Boost for Children
[East African] A new vaccine against typhoid has been proven to be safe and effective in preventing the disease, and can be used to protect both adults and children. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 18, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tanzania: Dar to Benefit From Indian Discovered Typhoid Vaccine
[Daily News] TANZANIA and other countries are set to benefit from Indian developed typhoid vaccine, which can protect adults and children against the deadly ailment. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - October 5, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Trial data suggest new typhoid shot could halve infection rate
LONDON (Reuters) - A new typhoid vaccine developed by privately-held Bharat Biotech proved safe and highly immunogenic in a study and could be used to prevent millions of infections if it succeeds in final-stage clinical trials, researchers said on Friday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Global Health: They Swallowed Live Typhoid Bacteria — On Purpose
A clinical trial enlisted some of England ’ s brightest minds, tempted by curiosity and cash. They proved a new typhoid vaccine works and could save children ’ s lives. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Typhoid Vaccination and Immunization Salmonella (Bacteria) Epidemics Gates, Bill and Melinda, Foundation Oxford University Lancet, The (Journal) Mallon, Mary (1869-1938) Oxford (England) Source Type: news

At What Height Do You Consider Preventative Treatment for Acute Mountain Sickness?
Discussion Acute mountain sickness (AMS) is a well-known problem for some people who travel to high altitude, especially altitudes> 2500 m (~8200 feet). Symptoms include headache, nausea or emesis, shortness of breath, dizziness, fatigue, difficulty sleeping and poor appetite. The incidence in adults ranges from 25% at 2975 m to up to 75% at 5896 m. The incidence in children is less clear but it appears that children are more susceptible at 45% for 16-19 year olds for similar altitudes. Risk factors are numerous including age, gender, obesity, ascent rate, altitude for sleeping, previous exposure to high altitude, previ...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - August 21, 2017 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Typhoid Vaccine: New Hope for'Urgent Problem'? Typhoid Vaccine: New Hope for'Urgent Problem'?
Lack of vaccine access--and now antibiotic resistance--make typhoid fever particularly deadly for the most vulnerable. What is the hold-up?Medscape Public Health (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - August 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Article Source Type: news

Typhim (Typhoid Vi Polysaccharide Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - June 12, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Nigeria: Nigerian Produces Vaccine Against Typhoid With Over 90% Efficacy
[This Day] Abuja -A vaccinologist, Dr. Simon Magaji Agwale, has produced a conjugate vaccine for the prevention of typhoid fever which he claims has an efficacy of 90 per cent and once taken, it sustains for a life time and has the capacity of preventing the disease worldwide. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 30, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Disease ‘ superspreaders ’ accounted for nearly two-thirds of Ebola cases, study finds
They are called superspreaders, the minority of people who are responsible for infecting many others during epidemics of infectious diseases. Perhaps the most famous superspreader was Typhoid Mary, presumed to have infected 51 people, three of whom died, between 1900 and 1907. Now scientists studying how Ebola spread during the 2014-2015 epidemic in West Africa […]Related:Common weed could help fight deadly superbug, study findsGet the lead out: Hundreds suffer poisoning from bullet fragments in their bodiesMore than 350 organizations write Trump to endorse current vaccines’ safety (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

International consortium receives $36.9 million grant to fight typhoid
(University of Maryland School of Medicine) Typhoid fever remains a serious global problem: it kills almost a quarter of a million people annually. To help promote typhoid vaccines, the Bill& Melinda Gates Foundation has given a $36.9 million grant to the University of Maryland School of Medicine Center for Vaccine Development. The project is a partnership with the Oxford Vaccine Group and PATH. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Vivotif Oral (Typhoid Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - September 8, 2016 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

The 8 Things Your Health Insurance DOESN'T Cover
Whether you’re looking to choose a new health insurance policy, going on Medicare, or are unsure of the details of your current health plan, there are several services that you may think are covered but in actuality they’re not. Knowing in advance what services you’re going to have to pay for can help you make smart health choices. First, How to Get Coverage If your employer offers health insurance, you’re generally all set. But if you’re leaving your employer or find yourself recently without health insurance (and are not Medicare age), here are your health insurance coverage options: COBRA ...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 29, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Complete Guide To Staying Healthy During The Summer Olympics
Rio de Janeiro is expecting about 500,000 visitors for the Olympic and Paralympic games this August. If you’re one of them, there are a few things you need to consider in order to have a safe, happy and healthy trip to Brazil this year.   1. Make sure you’re up to date on all your vaccines. This is travel safety 101. Infectious disease loves a crowd, and one way to make sure a nasty bug doesn't hitch a ride with you is to get vaccinated.  What to do:  Make an appointment with a travel doctor now to make sure you’re current on all your regular vaccines (measles, mumps, rubella, etc.) an...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Your Complete Guide To Staying Healthy During The Summer Olympics
Rio de Janeiro is expecting about 500,000 visitors for the Olympic and Paralympic games this August. If you’re one of them, there are a few things you need to consider in order to have a safe, happy and healthy trip to Brazil this year.   1. Make sure you’re up to date on all your vaccines. This is travel safety 101. Infectious disease loves a crowd, and one way to make sure a nasty bug doesn't hitch a ride with you is to get vaccinated.  What to do:  Make an appointment with a travel doctor now to make sure you’re current on all your regular vaccines (measles, mumps, rubella, etc.) an...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - June 1, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

[Feature] The Truest Test
Over the past few years, there has been a surge in studies that intentionally infect volunteers with a wide variety of pathogens to test novel drugs and vaccines. The so-called "human challenge model" has a long and checkered past that began with 18th century experiments by smallpox vaccine developer Edward Jenner and later fell under intense scrutiny when they were conducted by Nazi doctors, military researchers, and academic scientists working with prisoners. Today, challenge experiments follow strict ethical guidelines, minimize risks to volunteers at every turn, and face increased scrutiny from regulatory age...
Source: ScienceNOW - May 19, 2016 Category: Science Authors: Jon Cohen Source Type: news

Talking Science: Facts About Vaccines and Herd Immunity
This week is World Immunization Week and what better way to commemorate it than by discussing the facts about vaccines and the importance of herd immunity. But first... What exactly IS a vaccine? A vaccine is a biological agent that stimulates a person's immune system to produce immunity to a specific pathogen, protecting the person from a disease. That's how vaccines work. You get an inactivated, attenuated, or a portion of the version of the pathogen you're hoping to avoid. According to the CDC, routine vaccines given to children in the last two decades will prevent hundreds of millions illnesses, tens of millions h...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Talking Science: Facts About Vaccines and Herd Immunity
This week is World Immunization Week and what better way to commemorate it than by discussing the facts about vaccines and the importance of herd immunity. But first... What exactly IS a vaccine? A vaccine is a biological agent that stimulates a person's immune system to produce immunity to a specific pathogen, protecting the person from a disease. That's how vaccines work. You get an inactivated, attenuated, or a portion of the version of the pathogen you're hoping to avoid. According to the CDC, routine vaccines given to children in the last two decades will prevent hundreds of millions illnesses, tens of millions h...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 26, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

7 Expert-Backed Tips For Staying Healthy On Your Next Big Trip
As spring approaches, you may be thinking about this year’s summer getaway. Or maybe you’re an Type A planner who is already booking a Thanksgiving or Christmas trip. Whatever your travel style, here's something you probably haven't considered: How to stay healthy while abroad. While you probably won’t make a Pinterest board of vaccinations with the same enthusiasm as you pin must-eat pastries and stylish travel outfits, taking care of your health on a trip might just save your life. Here are seven tips to help keep your vacations as stress- and sickness-free as possible:  1. First, call your doctor....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO Regional Director calls for urgent funding to support Syria health response
Statement by Dr Ala Alwan, WHO Regional Director for the Eastern Mediterranean Cairo, 3 March, 2016 The health situation in Syria continues to deteriorate, not just day by day, but hour by hour. As always in conflict, it is innocent civilians that pay the highest price. Almost two thirds of all Syrians have no access to safe water, putting them at risk of diseases like typhoid and cholera. Throughout the country, almost 300 000 pregnant women are not getting the care they need for a safe and healthy pregnancy. Every month, more than 30 000 people need treatment for injuries. People with chronic diseases are dying of compl...
Source: WHO EMRO News - March 3, 2016 Category: Middle East Health Source Type: news

Zika Was First Discovered in 1947. Why Is it Now a Threat?
Mostly innocuous and fairly unknown until a few weeks ago, the Zika virus is suddenly dominating the news. Under scrutiny is the virus's putative link with a congenital birth defect called microcephaly, which causes babies to be born with abnormally small heads and undeveloped brains. Two recent publications [1,2] have documented finding the genome of the Zika virus in the amniotic fluid and brains of fetuses affected by microcephaly from three different mothers. These numbers are still too small to constitute a proof, and in fact, alternative theories are already cropping up: an organization of Argentinean doctors has pu...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - February 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Nigeria: Institute Honours Nigerian Researchers for Developing Typhoid Vaccine, Micro-Needles, Anti-Snake Venom
[Leadership] The International Institute for Training, Research and Economic Development (IITRED) has awarded prizes to three Nigerian researchers for developing typhoid fever vaccine, micro-needles and anti-snake venom respectively. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 27, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Scientists 'amazed' at spread of typhoid 'superbug'
ConclusionThis study has provided information about the spread of a strain of typhoid called H58, which is commonly antibiotic-resistant, by looking at the genetics of samples collected between 1903 and 2013. It has shown that the strain was likely to have arisen in South Asia and then spread to Southeast Asia and Africa. The strain showed different patterns of antibiotic resistance in different regions – likely driven by different patterns in the use of antibiotics. While this study has not estimated the number of cases or deaths worldwide attributable to this strain specifically, there are reported to be 20-30 mill...
Source: NHS News Feed - May 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medical practice Source Type: news

Updated Recommendations for the Use of Typhoid VaccineUpdated Recommendations for the Use of Typhoid Vaccine
This report presents the latest ACIP recommendations. Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - April 17, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Public Health & Prevention Journal Article Source Type: news

Updated Recommendations for the Use of Typhoid Vaccine — Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices, United States, 2015
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - March 27, 2015 Category: American Health Source Type: news

ACIP Updates Typhoid Vaccination RecommendationsACIP Updates Typhoid Vaccination Recommendations
The typhoid vaccine should not be given routinely in the United States but should be given to patients traveling to certain countries, as specified in the updated ACIP recommendations. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

ACIP Updates Typhoid Vaccine Recommendations (FREE)
By Cara Adler Edited by André Sofair, MD, MPH CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) has updated its typhoid vaccine recommendations — last revised in 1994 — in MMWR. The major change is removal of a discontinued parenteral whole-cell vaccine from … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - March 27, 2015 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Ebola risk remains low as medic flown home
A UK military healthcare worker who was infected with Ebola in Sierra Leone has been flown home and is being treated at the Royal Free Hospital in London. Four other healthcare workers who had been in contact with the infected person are also being assessed. Two were flown home on the same flight as the infected worker and are now being monitored at the Royal Free. The others are being assessed in Sierra Leone. None of the four has been diagnosed with Ebola. The latest case follows that of Glasgow nurse Pauline Cafferkey, who was found to have Ebola after arriving in Glasgow from Sierra Leone in December 201...
Source: NHS News Feed - March 12, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

Typhoid vaccination campaign cost effective in Uganda
(Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News)
Source: PharmacoEconomics and Outcomes News - March 1, 2015 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

The big measles lie: Eradication of measles happened BEFORE the vaccine, not after
(NaturalNews) The general consensus among pro-vaxxers is that vaccines save lives, and if it weren't for their existence, infectious disease would be running rampant. But a closer look at the data reveals that the death rates from conditions like measles, scarlet fever, typhoid, whooping... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 15, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ebola risk remains low after UK nurse recovers
The Scottish nurse found to have Ebola after arriving in Glasgow from Sierra Leone has recovered after specialist care at the Royal Free Hospital in London and has been discharged. She remains the only case confirmed in the UK, and the risk to the general public is very low. Ebola can be transmitted only by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected person. The nurse, Pauline Cafferkey, had been working as a volunteer for Save the Children in Sierra Leone. She left Sierra Leone on December 28 and took flights from Freetown to Casablanca and from Casablanca to London. She then transferred at Heathr...
Source: NHS News Feed - February 2, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

UK Ebola case confirmed but risk remains low
A case of Ebola has now been confirmed in the UK, but the risk to the general public remains very low. Ebola can only be transmitted by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected person. The UK case – in a healthcare worker in Scotland who arrived in Glasgow from Sierra Leone on Sunday – has been confirmed by the Scottish government. The patient was placed in isolation at Glasgow's Gartnavel Hospital and has been transferred for specialised care at the Royal Free Hospital in London. The healthcare worker left Sierra Leone on December 28 and was a passenger on f...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 30, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

UK Ebola case confirmed but risk remains low
A case of Ebola has now been confirmed in the UK but the risk of Ebola to the general public remains very low. Ebola can only be transmitted by direct contact with the blood or bodily fluids of an infected person. The UK case - in a healthcare worker in Scotland who arrived in Glasgow from Sierra Leone on Sunday - has been confirmed by the Scottish government. The patient was placed  in isolation at Glasgow's Gartnavel Hospital and will be transferred for specialised care at the Royal Free Hospital in London. The healthcare worker left Sierra Leone on December 28 and was a passenger on flight AT5...
Source: NHS News Feed - December 29, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

Ebola's True Toll Is Still Untallied As Another Deadly Fever Looms
Dr. Ross Donaldson recalls traveling around the Sierra Leone city of Kenema a decade ago, "telling people not to eat rats." The multimammate rat, which is ubiquitous in sub-Saharan Africa, can carry a deadly hemorrhagic illness akin to Ebola, known as Lassa fever. Yet for many residents of the impoverished region, the animal remains a staple food. "From a foreign perspective, it seems like a no-brainer," said Donaldson, who spent the summer of 2003 at Kenema Government Hospital's Lassa ward as a medical student studying the virus and treating its victims. He now directs the Emergency Medicine Global H...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 11, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Malaria, Pneumonia Going Untreated Due To Ebola Outbreak
MONROVIA, Liberia (AP) — The Ebola outbreak has spawned a "silent killer," experts say: hidden cases of malaria, pneumonia, typhoid and the like that are going untreated because people in the countries hardest hit by the dreaded virus either cannot find an open clinic or are too afraid to go to one. Evidence of what the World Health Organization calls an "emergency within the emergency" is everywhere in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone, the West African countries worst hit by the Ebola epidemic. It can be seen in a decline in the number of kids being vaccinated for preventable diseases. It can be...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - November 5, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

7 Steps To Ensure Ebola Doesn't Disrupt Your International Travel
Is it safe to travel? Should we cancel our long-planned family safari in Botswana? Can I get Ebola from an airplane seat? For the last two decades, I've been helping people find the best doctors, treatments and medical information -- and I've never seen the kind of health panic among clients like I do now. (Yes, No and Extraordinarily unlikely are the short answers to these questions, by the way). For expert advice, I checked in with Dr. Michael Callahan, an associate physician in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School. Callahan ran one of the Department of Defense pr...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 27, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Vivotif Oral (Typhoid Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - October 10, 2014 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Typhim (Typhoid Vi Polysaccharide Vaccine) - updated on RxList
(Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs)
Source: RxList - New and Updated Drug Monographs - October 10, 2014 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Typhoid Fever Surveillance and Vaccine Use — South-East Asia and Western Pacific Regions, 2009–2013
(Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - October 3, 2014 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Vaccine for Ebola? Experts answer questions
To learn more about this outbreak and the creation of new human vaccines, infectious disease experts who have led vaccine studies for such global pathogens as cholera, West Nile virus, dengue, typhoid fever and anthrax speak to reporters and answer questions. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 29, 2014 Category: Science Source Type: news

Specialty Vaccine Company PaxVax Expands Global Commercial Team
REDWOOD CITY, Calif.--(Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network)--PaxVax, Inc., a specialty vaccine company focused on travel and biodefense, today announced the expansion of its global commercial team with the appointments of Jonathan Klock as Vice President ... Biopharmaceuticals, PersonnelPaxVax, vaccine, Vivotif, typhoid, cholera, anthrax (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - August 7, 2014 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Ebola virus threat to the UK is 'very low'
Health news has been dominated in recent days by the outbreak of the Ebola virus in west Africa, with more than 1,200 confirmed cases and 672 deaths. Cases have been confirmed in Sierra Leone, Liberia and Guinea. The World Health Organization estimates the current outbreak has a mortality rate of 56%. It is important to note there is currently no direct threat to people in the UK from the Ebola virus. Outbreaks of Ebola are nothing new, but health professionals are concerned about the size of the outbreak. The majority of cases are confined to rural areas, but there has been a reported case of a man infected with th...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 31, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: QA articles Source Type: news

What Are Precautions for Someone Traveling to the Middle East About the Risk of MERS?
Discussion Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) is a respiratory illness cause by a coronavirus called MERS-CoV. It was first reported in Saudi Arabia in 2012. People with confirmed cases of MERS have developed severe respiratory illness that includes acute onset of cough, shortness of breath, and fever. Other symptoms include gastrointestinal symptoms such as diarrhea. Pneumonia is common, and patients may progress to respiratory failure. Other end organ failure has occurred, particularly kidney failure and septic shock. The death rate is up to ~30% currently. People with compromised immune systems are more at risk. T...
Source: PediatricEducation.org - June 16, 2014 Category: Pediatrics Authors: pediatriceducationmin Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Typhoid vaccine live oral Ty21a, Vivotif
Title: Typhoid vaccine live oral Ty21a, Vivotif Category: MedicationsCreated: 3/2/2005 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/3/2014 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Medications General)
Source: MedicineNet Medications General - June 3, 2014 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

“Our teams will be busy for some time”
“MSF has been doing consultations in the town of Guiuan. Six hundred patients came on the first day. MSF teams on different islands are doing their first consultations, so we are beginning to build a picture of the needs and the human suffering that has accompanied this disaster. The most serious cases we’ve seen in Guiuan are people with injuries caused by the fierce wind. We’ve seen around 60 people needing minor surgery, suturing, cleaning of infected wounds and setting of broken bones. We also saw people with diabetes who have badly infected wounds. Philippines © Laurence Hoenig/MSF. An ...
Source: MSF News - November 20, 2013 Category: Global & Universal Tags: Philippines NEWS Frontpage Natural Disaster Source Type: news

Indian Firm Develops New Vaccine to Fight Typhoid FeverIndian Firm Develops New Vaccine to Fight Typhoid Fever
Indian pharmaceutical company Bharat Biotech says it has developed a fourth-generation typhoid vaccine that will give long-term protection to infants and adults. Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 28, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Bharat Biotech launches conjugate typhoid vaccine
Bharat Biotech launched the world’s first clinically proven conjugate Typhoid vaccine ‘Typbar-TCV’, which offers long-term protection. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - August 26, 2013 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Uncovering Typhoid's Lethal Secret
Typhoid fever is one of the oldest documented diseases known to have afflicted mankind but what makes it so lethal has remained a mystery for centuries. In a study appearing online in the journal Nature, Yale researchers offer an explanation of how the devastating disease marked by delirium and stupor still kills 200,000 people every year - and also suggests the basis of a future vaccine. The culprit appears to be a powerful toxin possessed by Salmonella typhi, the bacterium that causes typhoid fever... (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - July 12, 2013 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Tropical Diseases Source Type: news