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Scientists find new antimalarial drug targets
(The Francis Crick Institute) Researchers have discovered crucial new processes that allow malaria parasites to escape red blood cells and infect other cells, offering potential new treatment targets. The team are already working with pharmaceutical companies to use this knowledge to develop new antimalarial drugs - a critical step in the battle against drug-resistant malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Florida man caught tapeworm from undercooked ham
Sam Cordero from Florida caught a brain-eating worm while eating a Christmas ham feast in December. The parasite traveled through his bloodstream from his stomach to his eye. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

'Evolution in real time': silent crickets still singing for a mate
Scientists are fascinated that Hawaiian crickets still perform their vigorous mating call, despite having evolved to lose their song to avoid a deadly new parasiteMale field crickets traditionally attract a mate by “singing” – creating a sound by rhythmically scraping their wings back and forth.In Hawaii, however, their song attracts a less welcome female: parasitic flies, whose larvae devour and kill the crickets from the inside out.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 14, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Evolution Animal behaviour Biology Science Insects Wildlife Animals Environment World news Hawaii US news Source Type: news

Patients with chagas disease are often infected with an intestinal parasite
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) In patients with Chagas Disease, the odds of being infected by the intestinal worm Strongyloides stercoralis increases by two-fold, according to a study led by the Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal). The study, published in Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases, underlines the potential benefits of performing a combined screening for both infections among Latin American adults living in Europe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CIHR grants to the tune of $1.5 million for Professors Descoteaux and Patten
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) Following their latest grant competition, the Canadian Institutes of Health Research announced a total of $1.5 in funding for two INRS professors. Professor Albert Descoteaux will receive $918,000 over five years to study the parasite Leishmania, specifically the mechanisms it uses to evade our immune system. Professor Kessen Patten will receive $627,300 over five years as well to enhance the understanding of the mechanisms involved in spinal muscular atrophy, a fatal and untreatable illness that is still poorly understood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eye worm found in woman's eye: "I looked at it and it was moving"
An rare case of eye worms in an Oregon woman leads to the discovery that a parasite has made the leap from cattle to people. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blue Dye Kills Malaria Parasites — But There Is One Catch
Methylene blue used to be an anti-malarial treatment but fell out of favor. Researchers wondered, what if it were added to a current medication?(Image credit: Jay Reed/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Courtney Columbus Source Type: news

Global Health: Promising Malaria Drug Has a Striking Drawback: Blue Urine
Methylene blue, a laboratory dye, safely kills parasites before mosquitoes can pass them on — but has a vivid side effect that patients dislike. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DONALD G. McNEIL Jr. Tags: Malaria Parasites Lancet Infectious Diseases, The (Journal) Radboud University Nijmegen Mali Source Type: news

Organic farming found to eliminate plant parasites longer than conventional chemical pesticides
(Natural News) Organic farming practices may help mitigate the proliferation of plant-parasitic nematodes (PPN), a study published in the journal Agriculture, Ecosystems & Environment revealed. According to the scientists, a combination of agriculture intensification and poor agronomic practices led to increased incidence of PPN and other soil pathogens in East Africa. This then resulted in reduced... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Human antibodies undermine parasite sex
(Radboud University Nijmegen) Some people develop an immune response following a malaria infection that stops them from infecting other mosquitos. The antibodies that these people produce are sucked up by the mosquito and destroy the malaria parasite in the mosquito's stomach. Researchers from Radboud university medical center discovered that 1 in 25 malaria patients prevent the disease from spreading in this way. They also unraveled the defense proteins responsible, and these could be used to make a vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 8, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Horrific images show deadly things lurking in 'raw water'  
The latest nutrition trend for 'raw water' encourages people to consume untreated water and everything in it - including bacteria and parasites than can infect the stomach and even kill you. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mind-controlling molecules from wasp venom could someday help Parkinson's patients
(American Chemical Society) After being stung by a parasitic wasp, the American cockroach loses control of its behavior, becoming host to the wasp's egg. Days later, the hatchling consumes the cockroach alive. While this is a gruesome process for the cockroach, scientists now report in ACS' journal Biochemistry the discovery of a new family of peptides in the wasp's venom that could be key to controlling roach minds, and might even help researchers develop better Parkinson's disease treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White cheeks are more titillating
(Springer) Male blue tits with white cheeks are healthier and more likely to mate with higher quality partners than their counterparts with duller cheek feathers. Having purer white cheeks also indicates that a blue tit was better able to overcome an infection with parasites during the previous year. This is according to Elisa P é rez Bad á s (Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Spain) who is lead author of a study published in Springer's journal The Science of Nature. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Dye kills malaria parasites at speed not seen before
(Radboud University Nijmegen) Research shows that the dye methylene blue is a safe antimalarial that kills malaria parasites at an unprecedented rate. Within two days, patients are cured of the disease and no longer transmit the parasite if they are bitten again by a mosquito. This discovery was made by Radboud university medical center scientists and international colleagues during a research project conducted in Mali. The results will be published in The Lancet Infectious Diseases on Feb. 6. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 5, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Raw meat-based products may harm pets and their owners
(Reuters Health) - Although raw meat-based diets for pets have become increasingly popular, the meat may be contaminated with bacteria and parasites, a new study from the Netherlands shows. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Malaria-Causing Parasite Mutating to Resist Multiple Drugs
FRIDAY, Feb. 2, 2018 -- An outbreak of multidrug-resistant malaria in southeast Asia likely stems from two mutations of the malaria-causing parasite that combined a decade ago, according to new research. The parasite and mutations, carried by... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 2, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Infection warning - Couple with ‘burning’ rash had parasitic worms
INFECTIONS can be caused by bacteria and viruses. But, one couple found out there were infected with parasitic worms, after they found burning rashes on their bums while on holiday in the Caribbean. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Small molecules set up security system to defend the genome
(University of Chicago Medical Center) Thousands of short RNA molecules with diverse genetic sequences serve as security guards to identify and silence attempts to invade the genome, such as DNA inserted by viruses or parasitic elements known as transposons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

House dust mites evolved a new way to protect their genome
(University of Michigan) House dust mites are common pests with an unusual evolutionary history. They are tiny, free-living animals that evolved from a parasitic ancestor, which in turn evolved from free-living organisms millions of years ago. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Couple finds worms in their feet after a beach vacation
Dozens of parasitic worms were found burrowing in the feet of a young Canadian couple after a recent trip to the Dominican Republic. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 31, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Projects to develop new approaches to tackle international health challenges
(Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council) Fifteen projects announced today, Jan. 31, 2018, will develop new healthcare technologies to tackle international health challenges, ranging from the prevention of limb loss by Syrian refugees to faster diagnosis and treatment for parasitic diseases such as malaria. The Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) and the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) are committing £ 16 million to the projects: EPSRC through the Global Challenges Research Fund (GCRF) and the NIHR through the NIHR Global Health Research programme. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Couple gets parasitic hookworms in feet on beach trip
What started as itchy feet during a beach vacation quickly turned into a traveling nightmare for one young couple from Canada (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Head lice warning: Signs of infestation include difficulty sleeping - are you at risk?
NITS are tiny parasitic insects that feed on human blood while living in hair. Head lice are easily spread, but a tickling feeling on your head or difficulty sleeping could be signs of the parasites. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Head lice warning: SIX unusual signs that you have nits
NITS are tiny parasitic insects that feed on human blood while living in hair. Head lice are easily spread, but a tickling feeling on your head or difficulty sleeping could be signs of the parasites. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Doctors pull a 9-FOOT tapeworm from man's rectum
The parasite, pulled out the unnamed patient's rectum, had to be folded 18 times so that it could fit into a picture taken at the Singapore General Hospital's Department of Microbiology. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Couple finds worms in their feet after a beach vacation
Dozens of parasitic worms were found burrowing in the feet of a young Canadian couple after a recent trip to the Dominican Republic. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk Of Going Barefoot: Hookworm Parasites Infect Canadian Couple
A Canadian couple were not alone after walking barefoot in the sand during a vacation in the Dominican Republic. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - January 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Canadians say they contracted parasitic hookworms on beach
A young Canadian couple who recently returned from holiday in the Dominican Republic are warning vacationers not to get the 'sand between your toes' after picking up some nasty parasites. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists grapple with worms to improve co-existence with wildlife in Africa
Farming at the border of National Parks in Africa can lead to conflict with wildlife, due to the belief that wild animals bring disease, prey upon livestock, and damage crops. In an unexpected twist, research conducted by the University of Bristol and Queen ’ s University Belfast with the charity ‘ Elephants for Africa ’ and the University of Pretoria has found that grazing livestock with wildlife may benefit farmers by reducing parasitic disease. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - January 29, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: ; Faculty of Health Sciences, Bristol Veterinary School; Press Release Source Type: news

Scientists discover how giardia parasite makes you ill
Giardia parasites mimic human cells to help bacteria feed off nutrients in the gut, a study says. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Parasite mimics human proteins to provide 'ready meals' from the gut
(University of East Anglia) Giardia parasites -- responsible for one of the world's most common gastric diseases -- mimic human cell functions to break apart cells in the gut and feed off them.The secret behind giardia's success has eluded scientists for more than 300 years.Researchers found that the parasite produces two types of protein that enable it to cut through layers of protective mucus in the gut, breaking the links that knit cells together to access the nutrients within them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Forget Ebola, Sars and Zika: ticks are the next global health threat
Ticks carry a wide array of pathogens – and environmental changes mean they are spreadingSince the beginning of our species we have been at war. It ’s a continuous, neverending fight against the smallest of adversaries: armies of pathogens and parasites. As we have developed new ways to survive and stop them, they have evolved ever more complex and ingenious methods to thwart our efforts.Humans have faced numerous attempts to challenge our dominance on planet Earth , and from the Black Death to the Spanish flu, we have weathered them all. However, since the start of the 21st century, with its trend towards glob...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 25, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Mackenzie Kwak Tags: Infectious diseases Science Insects Source Type: news

MMV malaria box phenotyped against plasmodium and toxoplasma
(Singapore University of Technology and Design) A Singapore-India collaborative research project between the Singapore University of Technology& Design (SUTD) and CSIR-National Chemical Laboratories (NCL) completed phenotypic screening of a large collection of potent chemical inhibitors (known as MMV Malaria Box), against pathogenic parasites toxoplasma gondii and plasmodium falciparum, causative agents of human toxoplasmosis and malaria. This knowledge opens up new avenues to study unique stages of infectious cycle that are affected by inhibitor classes towards anti-parasitic drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - I...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 24, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Sushi Lover Pulled a 5-Foot Tapeworm Out of His Body
A daily sushi habit caught up with a California man in a big way, according to one doctor’s story on the medical podcast This Won’t Hurt a Bit. A patient at Fresno’s Community Regional Medical Center recently came to Dr. Kenny Banh, an emergency medicine doctor, complaining of bloody diarrhea and asking to be treated for tapeworms, Banh recalled on the latest episode of the podcast. Banh said he was skeptical of the man’s self-diagnosis — until he produced some startling evidence. “Next to him, he’s got this little grocery bag,” Banh recounted on the podcast. “I open it...
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized California healthytime medicine onetime sushi tapeworms Source Type: news

AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently-used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially-intelligent 'robot scientist'. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

AI 'scientist' finds that toothpaste ingredient may help fight drug-resistant malaria
(University of Cambridge) An ingredient commonly found in toothpaste could be employed as an anti-malarial drug against strains of malaria parasite that have grown resistant to one of the currently used drugs. This discovery, led by researchers at the University of Cambridge, was aided by Eve, an artificially intelligent 'robot scientist.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scale-eating fish adopt clever parasitic methods to survive
(University of Washington) A small group of fishes -- possibly the world's cleverest carnivorous grazers -- feeds on the scales of other fish in the tropics. A team led by biologists at the University of Washington is trying to understand these scale-feeding fish and how this odd diet influences their body evolution and behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can being too social take years off your life?
Large ground squirrels called yellow-bellied marmots live much longer, on average, if they are less social and more isolated than if they are more social and less isolated, a UCLA-led long-term study has found.A team of biologists studied 66 adult female marmots from 2002 to 2015 at the Rocky Mountain Biological Laboratory in western Colorado. The researchers observed them through binoculars up to six hours a day, from mid-April through mid-September, from a distance of about a football field away to avoid influencing their behavior.Marmots are hunted by foxes, coyotes and, to a lesser extent, bears; about 50 percent of ma...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 17, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The Parasite on the Playground
Roundworm eggs, shed by stray dogs, can be ingested by children playing outside. The worm ’ s larvae have been found in the brain, experts say, perhaps impairing development. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: LAURA BEIL Tags: Parasites Dogs Brain Worms Playgrounds Mental Health and Disorders Clinical Infectious Diseases (Journal) SUNY Downstate Medical Center Source Type: news

Black Death spread by human fleas and lice, research shows
The Black Death, which killed thousands throughout Europe in a pandemic stretching from the 14th to 19th century, was likely spread by parasites such as fleas and lice carried on the human body. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Technology & Science Source Type: news

Scientists criticise trend for raw meat pet food after analysis finds pathogens
Bacteria and parasites often found in raw dog and cat food products can pose health dangers to pets and their owners, researchers warnThe trend for feeding dogs and cats raw meat has been criticised by scientists, who say it often contains bacteria and parasites that could pose dangers to both pets and their owners.A growing trend has seen pet owners plump for products such as meat, bones and organs which can be bought frozen and then thawed before being fed to dogs and cats.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 12, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Microbiology Science Pets Life and style Dogs Cats Animals E coli Source Type: news

Diarrhoea and vomiting bug has been found in tap water
People living in  Clevedon with a postcode of BS21 or BS49 have been told to boil their drinking water until further notice after the parasite Cryptosporidium, was found in local samples. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diarrhoea and vomiting warning: Schools closed and THOUSANDS told to boil tap water
SCHOOLS have closed and thousands of people told to boil tap water after a diarrhoea and vomit inducing parasite was discovered in the system. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers map druggable genomic targets in evolving malaria parasite
(University of California - San Diego) Researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine, with colleagues across the country and around the world, have used whole genome analyses and chemogenetics to identify new drug targets and resistance genes in 262 parasite cell lines of Plasmodium falciparum -- protozoan pathogens that cause malaria -- that are resistant to 37 diverse antimalarial compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 11, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Malaria parasite evolution in a test tube
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Carlton, J. M. Tags: Genetics, Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Mapping the malaria parasite druggable genome by using in vitro evolution and chemogenomics
Chemogenetic characterization through in vitro evolution combined with whole-genome analysis can identify antimalarial drug targets and drug-resistance genes. We performed a genome analysis of 262 Plasmodium falciparum parasites resistant to 37 diverse compounds. We found 159 gene amplifications and 148 nonsynonymous changes in 83 genes associated with drug-resistance acquisition, where gene amplifications contributed to one-third of resistance acquisition events. Beyond confirming previously identified multidrug-resistance mechanisms, we discovered hitherto unrecognized drug target–inhibitor pairs, including thymidy...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 11, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cowell, A. N., Istvan, E. S., Lukens, A. K., Gomez-Lorenzo, M. G., Vanaerschot, M., Sakata-Kato, T., Flannery, E. L., Magistrado, P., Owen, E., Abraham, M., LaMonte, G., Painter, H. J., Williams, R. M., Franco, V., Linares, M., Arriaga, I., Bopp, S., Core Tags: Genetics, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

Malaria parasite packs genetic material for trip from mosquitoes to humans
(Penn State) The parasite that causes malaria has not one, but two, specialized proteins that protect its genetic material until the parasite takes up residence in a new host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 10, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Surgeons separated baby boy from parasitic twin in Riyadh
The twins, who were connected via the abdomen, were finally separated at the hips at the King Abdullah Specialised Children's Hospital in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Surgeons separated a baby boy from his parasitic twin
The twins, who were connected via the abdomen, were finally separated at the hips at the King Abdullah Specialised Children's Hospital in the Saudi capital Riyadh. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news