Autochthonous Chagas Disease - Missouri, 2018
In 2017, a person's blood donation in Missouri screened positive for antibodies to Trypanosoma cruzi, the parasite that causes Chagas disease. Based on the epidemiologic, clinical, and laboratory data, the reported case likely represents the first documented autochthonous case of Chagas disease in Missouri. (Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report)
Source: CDC Morbidity and Mortality Weekly Report - February 20, 2020 Category: American Health Tags: Blood Safety Chagas Disease (Trypanosoma cruzi Infection) MMWR Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report Source Type: news

Woman's 'liver cancer tumor' that was the size of a grapefruit turned out to be a rare parasite
Cassidy Armstrong, 36, of Edmonton, Alberta, Canada, was diagnosed with liver cancer in late 2019 but, after the tumor was removed, it was discovered she actually had a rare parasite. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Eliminating viruses in our food with cranberries and citrus fruit
(Institut national de la recherche scientifique - INRS) Fresh produce is a major vehicle for noroviruses, a group of viruses that are the most common cause of gastroenteritis in developed countries. However, the viruses are quite resistant to cold pasteurization treatments such as irradiation, which are used to destroy bacteria, moulds, parasites, and insects. The irradiation process uses gamma rays or X-rays to destroy these viruses but at the dose needed to eliminate them, it can affect the physicochemical properties of fresh produce. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How malaria detects and shields itself from approaching immune cells
(eLife) Malaria parasites can sense a molecule produced by approaching immune cells and then use it to protect themselves from destruction, according to new findings published today in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fossilized insect from 100 million years ago is oldest record of primitive bee with pollen
(Oregon State University) Beetle parasites clinging to a primitive bee 100 million years ago may have caused the flight error that, while deadly for the insect, is a boon for science today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research shows how the malaria parasite grows and multiplies
(University of Nottingham) Scientists have made a major breakthrough in understanding how the parasite that causes malaria is able to multiply at such an alarming rate, which could be a vital clue in discovering how it has evolved, and how it can be stopped. For the first time, scientists have shown how certain molecules play an essential role in the rapid reproduction of parasite cells, which cause this deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New technique allows scientists to study parasitic infections one cell at a time
(eLife) A new technique may help scientists study the body's immune response to intestinal parasite infections one gut cell at a time, according to a study published today in eLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Local genetic adaption helps sorghum crop hide from witchweed
(Penn State) Sorgum crops in areas where the parasite witchweed is common have locally adapted to have mutations in a particular gene, which helps the plant resist the parasite. A new study led by researchers at Penn State reveals the effects of this mutation, as well as other genes that might confer parasite resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Reaper of death': scientists discover new dinosaur species related to T rex
Species is thought to be the oldest member of the T rex family yet discovered in northern North AmericaScientists in Canada have announced the discovery of a new species of dinosaur closely related to Tyrannosaurus rex that strode the plain of North America about 80m years ago.Related:Dinosaurs had feathers ruffled by parasites, study findsContinue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 10, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Agence France-Presse in Paris Tags: Dinosaurs Canada Science Americas Fossils World news Source Type: news

A tsetse fly ’s bite can be fatal — new YSPH research could change that
New Yale research has identified a family of proteins that significantly reduce the number of sleeping sickness-causing parasites found in the blood. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - February 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Is it UTI or something worse? How to determine the causes of lower abdominal pain
(Natural News) Pain in the lower abdomen can be caused by a bacterial, parasitic or viral infection. The pain can also be due to a UTI (urinary tract infection), but it is best to check your symptoms and what caused the condition to determine the most effective natural remedy for the pain that you are experiencing.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sheep know the grass isn ’ t always greener when it comes to their health
Sheep appear to forage and avoid parasites differently depending on how healthy they are, according to new University of Bristol research published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The study, which used remote GPS sensing data to monitor the foraging patterns of sheep, revealed less healthy animals chose to avoid high-quality vegetation due to a higher prevalence of ticks. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 5, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Feeding bluebirds helps fend off parasites
(University of Connecticut) If you feed the birds in your backyard, you may be doing more than just making sure they have a source of food: you may be helping baby birds give parasites the boot. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High-tech printing may help eliminate painful shots
(Rutgers University) Painful hypodermic needles may not be needed in the future to give shots, inject drugs and get blood samples. With 4D printing, Rutgers engineers have created tiny needles that mimic parasites that attach to tissues and could replace hypodermic needles, according to a study in the journal Advanced Functional Materials. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A roadblock for disease-causing parasites
(University of Pennsylvania) Thread-like parasitic worms cause millions of cases of canine heartworm each year, and more than 100 million cases of lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, in humans. In research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Michael Povelones, ramping up the immune response of mosquitoes blocked their ability to transmit these harmful parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Partnership Seeks to Address Gaps in Diagnosing Sepsis
Sepsis continues to be a serious threat to patients globally. Recent studies estimate that more than 30 million people are impacted worldwide every year and may be implicated in 6 million deaths,1 David Dolinger, VP Product Realisation at QuantuMDx Group Limited, told MD+DI. Infection and drug resistance contribute significantly to sepsis risks. In neonatal care alone, it is estimated that one million newborn deaths each year are associated with maternal infection, such as maternal sepsis,2 pointed out Dolinger. And three out of every ten deaths because of neonatal sepsis are thought to be caused by resistant p...
Source: MDDI - February 1, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Engineered Microbe in Bees' Guts Fends off Deadly Varroa Mite
The genetically modified bacteria spark an RNAi response in the parasite that leads to self-destruction —and perhaps a path to combatting colony collapse disorder. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - January 31, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

The life-saving medicine she needs is cheap, common and unavailable in Canadian pharmacies
While doctors removed a rare parasite growing on Cassidy Armstrong's liver before it killed her, she doesn't know if she'll receive the medication she'll need for the rest of her life. Her temporary supply of the drug is running out and she's still waiting for Health Canada to provide long-term access.  (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Edmonton Source Type: news

Research team finds possible new approach for sleeping sickness drugs
(Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron DESY) Using ultra-bright X-ray flashes, a team of researchers has tracked down a potential target for new drugs against sleeping sickness: The scientists have decoded the detailed spatial structure of a vital enzyme of the pathogen, the parasite Trypanosoma brucei. The result provides a possible blueprint for a drug that specifically blocks this enzyme and thus kills the parasite, as the team reports in the journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Solving the riddle of strigolactone biosynthesis in plants
(Kobe University) Researchers from Kobe University's Graduate School of Agricultural Science have discovered the orobanchol synthase responsible for converting the strigolactone (SL) carlactonoic acid, which promotes symbiotic relationships with fungi, into the SL orobanchol, which causes root parasitic weeds to germinate. By knocking out the orobanchol synthase gene using genome editing, they succeeded in artificially regulating SL production. This discovery will lead to greater understanding of the functions of each SL and enable the practical application of SLs in the improvement of plant production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Engineered symbionts activate honey bee immunity and limit pathogens
Honey bees are essential pollinators threatened by colony losses linked to the spread of parasites and pathogens. Here, we report a new approach for manipulating bee gene expression and protecting bee health. We engineered a symbiotic bee gut bacterium, Snodgrassella alvi, to induce eukaryotic RNA interference (RNAi) immune responses. We show that engineered S. alvi can stably recolonize bees and produce double-stranded RNA to activate RNAi and repress host gene expression, thereby altering bee physiology, behavior, and growth. We used this approach to improve bee survival after a viral challenge, and we show that engineer...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 30, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Leonard, S. P., Powell, J. E., Perutka, J., Geng, P., Heckmann, L. C., Horak, R. D., Davies, B. W., Ellington, A. D., Barrick, J. E., Moran, N. A. Tags: Microbiology, Molecular Biology reports Source Type: news

Traditional Chinese medicinal plant yields new insecticide compounds
(American Chemical Society) For hundreds of years, practitioners of traditional Chinese medicine have used an herb called Stemona sessilifolia as a remedy for parasitic infections, such as those caused by pinworms and lice. Now, researchers reporting in ACS' Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry have identified 10 compounds that might be responsible for the herb's effectiveness. But there's a twist: The insecticides are produced by symbiotic microbes that live within the plant's cells -- not by S. sessilifolia itself. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UK still free of coronavirus cases
Patients with symptoms advised to call GP rather than attend practice Related items fromOnMedica Warn patients that natural malaria immunity fades Single-dose malaria drug eliminates parasite from liver Should we have compulsory measles vaccination at school entry? Parents still following folklore methods for cold prevention Double check patients with ‘penicillin’ allergy to avoid MRSA risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - January 27, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

With a protein 'delivery,' parasite can suppress its host's immune response
(University of Pennsylvania) The parasite Toxoplasma gondii need not infect a host immune cell to alter its behavior, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For this Alberta woman, the good news was she had contracted a rare, deadly parasite
Alberta is a "hot spot" for rare tapeworm, with 15 of Canada's documented cases. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Edmonton Source Type: news

Study gauges efficacy of drugs against pork tapeworm
(PLOS) Taenia solium -- also called pork tapeworm -- is a parasite which causes disease around the world, particularly in very poor communities with deficient sanitation and where pigs roam free. Researchers have now analyzed the efficacy and adverse effects of three chemotherapeutics against T. solium and report their results in a review published in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 16, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bearded men are more attractive to women, study says, unless they're squeamish about hair-borne bugs
A new study could make men think twice about growing a beard, especially around women who are highly disgusted by bugs and parasites. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - January 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists cite parasite factor in beard attractiveness debate
Scientists say women who are more repulsed by lice are less likely to find beards attractivePrince Harry sports one, Justin Trudeauhas recently grown one, and Brian Blessed ’s is almost its own being. But are beards attractive? As the old adage goes: “Depends on the man, depends on the beard.”Now researchers have found there might be another factor: whether a potential partner fears there might be something living in it.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - January 15, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Men's facial hair Science UK news Fashion Source Type: news

Researchers Find Potential New Target for Mesothelioma Treatment
An international research team has identified a novel molecular target with potential to significantly improve future treatment of malignant pleural mesothelioma. The recent findings could lead to a drug that targets key genetic inhibitors often preventing a patient’s own immune system from suppressing mesothelioma tumor growth. Dr. Antonio Giordano, part of the collaborative research team, said the goal is reducing mesothelioma mortality with a combinational therapy that includes this new target. “These findings help us define molecular mechanisms that may be key to mesothelioma aggressiveness and progression,...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 14, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Cat parasite reduces general anxiety in infected mice, not just fear of feline predators
(Cell Press) The cat parasite Toxoplasma gondii is known to cause infected rodents to lose their fear of feline predators, which makes them easier to catch. Predators then spread the parasites through their feces. But this so-called fatal feline attraction theory is flawed, suggests a study publishing Jan. 14 in the journal Cell Reports. Rather than exhibiting a loss of feline-specific fear, infected rodents show decreases in general anxiety and aversion to a range of threats. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UC Davis scientists provide novel strategies for parasitic weed control
(American Phytopathological Society) Parasitic weeds are among the world's most economically damaging agricultural pests. They use an organ called the haustorium to build connections with host plants and draw nutrients from them. While the majority of research on parasitic plant biology and control of root parasitic weeds has been heavily focused on seed germination, scientists at UC Davis focused on the development of haustorium and published their findings in Phytopathology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New grant enables Clemson researcher to further combat widespread parasitic disease
(Clemson University) Clemson University faculty member Zhicheng Dou received new funding from the National Institutes of Health to better understand the molecular mechanisms of the parasite that causes toxoplasmosis, which is the second-leading cause of death among food-borne illnesses in the United States. His findings may someday pave the way for a cure for the disease, while having an important impact on the treatment of malaria, a mosquito-borne disease that is caused by a related parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New study reveals the origin of complex malaria infections
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) New technology employing single cell genome sequencing of the parasite that causes malaria has yielded some surprising results and helps pave the way for possible new intervention strategies for this deadly infectious disease, according to Texas Biomedical Research Institute Assistant Professor Ian Cheeseman, Ph.D. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bed bugs: Have you smelt this odour before? It could be a warning of an infestation
BED bugs are flat, rust-coloured parasites about five millimetres long. The bugs have developed resistance to chemical treatments, making eradication of the pests more difficult. Noticing a change in odour in your bedroom could indicate bed bugs. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Rugby player infected by parasites after falling on dog poo on the pitch
WARNING, GRAPHIC CONTENT: Dan Colbridge, 33, from Wales, was kept in hospital for nine days over Christmas after his leg broke out in sore blisters and left him struggling to walk. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How malaria parasites become resistant to artemisinin antimalarial drugs
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Malaria parasite mutations that inhibit the endocytoic appetite for a host's red blood cells may render them resistant to artemisinin, a widely used frontline antimalarial drug, according to a new study, which reveals a key molecular mechanism of drug resistance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 2, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Parasite perturbation of immunity
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Pujanandez, L. Tags: twis Source Type: news

A Kelch13-defined endocytosis pathway mediates artemisinin resistance in malaria parasites
In this study, we identified proteins located at a Kelch13-defined compartment. Inactivation of eight of these proteins, including Kelch13, rendered parasites resistant to ART, revealing a pathway critical for resistance. Functional analysis showed that these proteins are required for endocytosis of hemoglobin from the host cell. Parasites with inactivated Kelch13 or a resistance-conferring Kelch13 mutation displayed reduced hemoglobin endocytosis. ARTs are activated by degradation products of hemoglobin. Hence, reduced activity of Kelch13 and its interactors diminishes hemoglobin endocytosis and thereby ART activation, re...
Source: ScienceNOW - January 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Birnbaum, J., Scharf, S., Schmidt, S., Jonscher, E., Hoeijmakers, W. A. M., Flemming, S., Toenhake, C. G., Schmitt, M., Sabitzki, R., Bergmann, B., Fröhlke, U., Mesen-Ramirez, P., Blancke Soares, A., Herrmann, H., Bartfai, R., Spielmann, T. Tags: Cell Biology, Microbiology r-articles Source Type: news

A new breakthrough in developing effective antimalarial drugs
(Institut Pasteur) Parasites in the genus Plasmodium, which cause malaria, are transmitted to humans through bites from infected mosquitoes. The parasites manage to acclimatize to these two completely different hosts because the plasticity of their genome enables them to adapt as necessary. Scientists decided to investigate the epigenetic mechanisms behind this plasticity, in particular DNA methylation. They identified molecules capable of inhibiting DNA methylation and effectively killing even the most resistant Plasmodium falciparum parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 31, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vampirecups are parasitic plants with antioxidant and antimicrobial potential
(Natural News) Different plants possess different beneficial properties. While some are edible and serve as great sources of nutrients, others are simply plants that serve another purpose in nature. Despite this, both types are equally rich in compounds that are of some value to human health. For instance, a recently published study in the journal BMC Complementary and Alternative Medicine described two species of wild,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 30, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers map malaria parasites proliferate in human blood cells
(Tohoku University) Malaria parasites transform healthy red blood cells into rigid versions of themselves that clump together, hindering the transportation of oxygen. The infectious disease affects more than 200 million people across the world and causes nearly half a million deaths every year, according to the World Health Organization's 2018 report on malaria. Until now, however, researchers did not have a strong understanding of how the parasite so effectively infiltrated a system's red blood cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Rapid diagnostic tests accurately diagnose Chagas disease
(PLOS) Chagas disease, caused by the parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is the neglected tropical disease with the highest burden in Latin America. Now, researchers report in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases that two commercially-available rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) can be combined for conclusive diagnosis of Chagas disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene drives work faster than non-drive approaches to control problem insects
(PLOS) When controlling mosquitoes that spread malaria, gene drives, which force genetic changes to proliferate in a population, are faster and more efficient than simply releasing mosquitoes that are immune to the parasite, according to a new study published Dec. 19, 2019 in PLOS Genetics by Anthony James at University of California, Irvine and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 19, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers uncover genetic mystery of infertility in fruit flies
(Boston University School of Medicine) Researchers have discovered a novel parasitic gene in fruit flies that is responsible for destroying the eggs in the ovaries of their daughters. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Agricultural parasite avoids evolutionary arms race, shuts down genes of host plants
(Penn State) A parasitic plant has found a way to circumvent an evolutionary arms race with its hosts, allowing the parasite to thrive on a variety of agriculturally important plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Malaria under arrest: New drug target prevents deadly transmission
(Walter and Eliza Hall Institute) Australian researchers have found a new drug target for stopping the spread of malaria, after successfully blocking the world's deadliest malaria parasite -- Plasmodium falciparum -- from completing the 'transmission stage' of its lifecycle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 17, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bedbugs MIGHT have been around since the time of the dinosaurs, but you can still get rid of them with these natural remedies
(Natural News) Here’s an interesting nugget on bedbugs, the little bloodsuckers that both the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) consider a public health pest. A recent study from the University of Sheffield in England indicated that bedbugs had been parasites to different species other than humans for over 100 million years.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Insight into the neglected tropical disease sleeping sickness
(Lancaster University) Researchers have shed light on how the parasite which causes sleeping sickness multiples inside its host. Human African Trypanosomiasis or sleeping sickness, only occurs in Sub-Saharan Africa where an estimated 60 million people in 36 countries are at risk. The infection attacks the central nervous system and is fatal without treatment. Lancaster University researchers have found that the parasite's cell division differs from that of humans and animals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 12, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Almost half of lamb mince 'contains infectious parasite'
Researchers from Flinders University in Adelaide tested shop-bought lamb mince in Australia 79 times and found 34 of the samples - 43 per cent - contained the Toxoplasma parasite. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How sand fly mating habits are helping tackle tropical disease in £ 2.5 million project
(University of Warwick) The tropical disease Leishmaniasis is being tackled by catching female sand flies who carry the parasite that causes the disease.There are now plans to commercialise the research which involves using male pheromones to attract female sand flies towards insecticide-treated areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news