Michigan woman contracts rare parasitic eye infection from contact lenses
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT Traci Lawson, 50, from Lansing, Michigan, was diagnosed with Acanthamoeba keratitis, a parasitic infection from poor contact lens hygeine. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New immune pathway involved in resistance to parasite worms found in undercooked pork
(Lancaster University) Scientists from Lancaster University have discovered that immune responses originally found to prevent fungal infections are also important in eliminating Trichinella spiralis, a round worm and the causative agent of Trichinosis. People acquire trichinellosis by consuming raw or undercooked meat infected with the Trichinella parasite, particularly wild game meat or pork. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 18, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Trilobites: Look What the Cat Dragged In: Parasites
Researchers found that house cats that roam outdoors were more likely to pick up diseases than indoor cats. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JOANNA KLEIN Tags: Cats Animal Abuse, Rights and Welfare Parasites Research Biology Letters (Journal) Chalkowski, Kayleigh your-feed-science Source Type: news

Cooking for large numbers: Hygiene rules make foods from commercial kitchens safer
(BfR Federal Institute for Risk Assessment) People who prepare food for others carry a great deal of responsibility. Around 100,000 cases of illness are reported in Germany every year which are most probably attributable to the presence of microorganisms -- especially bacteria, viruses and parasites -- in foods. The actual number is likely to be much higher. Simple but very effective preventive hygiene measures provide protection from illnesses of this kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Termination of USDA's Toxoplasmosis Lab Concerns Parasitologists
Some researchers say the abrupt end of the program will hobble the fight against a common parasite. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 10, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists identify a key gene in the transmission of deadly African sleeping sickness
Life scientists from UCLA and the University of Bern have identified a key gene in the transmission of African sleeping sickness — a severe disease transmitted by the bite of infected tsetse flies, which are common in sub-Saharan Africa.The disease is fatal if untreated, as the parasite responsible moves from the bloodstream to the central nervous system. Tens of millions of people in 36 African countries are at risk. There is no vaccine, and conventional drug treatments, which include an arsenic derivative, are antiquated, not very effective and have severe side effects.The research,  published in the journal N...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 10, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Significant fall in Hepatitis C deaths
And new treatments mean fewer people now require liver transplants Related items fromOnMedica Range of new and costly drugs added to WHO ‘essentials’ list UK joins fight against Ebola GPs should administer Hep C therapy, says WHO UK falls behind other nations in preventing avoidable death Common anti-parasitic could be new tool for malaria control (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - April 9, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Stepping out of the shadow: STIM2 promotes IL-3-induced cytokine release
Basophils are a small population of innate immune cells, but their release of the cytokine interleukin-4 (IL-4) is important for mounting an efficient immune response against distinct parasites. Yoshikawa et al. (in the 9 April 2019 issue) showed that whereas STIM1 is essential for IL-4 release after stimulation of FcRI, STIM2 mediates a delayed IL-3/IL-33–induced IL-4 release independent of STIM1. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - April 9, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alansary, D., Niemeyer, B. A. Tags: STKE Focus Source Type: news

Freshwater Canada ’s Dirty Water Secret
Water jugs in the community water center in Grassy Narrows, Canada. April 13, 2016. © 2016 Human Rights WatchBy Marcos OrellanaWASHINGTON DC, Apr 4 2019 (IPS) While residents across Prince Rupert, British Columbia are once again able to get safe drinking water from their taps, the boil-water advisory lifted there in late January should not be forgotten. Canada is a freshwater-rich country, but the time for complacency on essential water issues has long passed. Most people living in Canada have access to safe water. But drinking water advisories in the country about unsafe water have been concentrated in First Nation c...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Marcos Orellana Tags: Environment Featured Headlines Health Indigenous Rights North America TerraViva United Nations Water & Sanitation Source Type: news

USDA Ends Deadly Cat Experiments, Plans To Adopt Out Remaining Cats
Reports about the agency's research on the Toxoplasma gondii parasite sparked major public backlash. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 2, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Girl catches gruesome infection on soles of her feet after walking through pigpen without shoes on 
WARNING: GRAPHIC CONTENT A 10-year-old girl was infected with Tungiasis, a skin disease, caused by a parasite that burrows in the skin and causes lesions, when she visited rural Brazil. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Some Cancers Become Contagious
So far, six animal species are known to carry transmissible, "parasitic" forms of cancer, but researchers are still mystified as to how cancer can become infectious. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Features Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Infographic: When Cancers Become Parasites
Only a handful of contagious cancers are known to exist, yet they have attracted an increasing number of researchers worldwide trying to understand how and why they arise. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Infographics Magazine Issue Source Type: news

How An 18-Year-Old Died From Pork Tapeworm Larvae In His Brain
An 18-year-old man died from a case of cysticercosis, caused by eating the eggs of this parasite. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - March 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Bruce Y. Lee, Contributor Source Type: news

Teen dies of tapeworm egg infestation in brain
An 18-year-old who complained of seizures in the emergency room of an Indian hospital turned out to have parasites in his brain, according to a case study published Thursday in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Man, 18, dies after eating under-cooked pork caused parasitic larvae to invade his BRAIN
The 18-year-old, who has not been named but is known to be from India, was rushed to a hospital after he lost consciousness following a seizure. An MRI scan revealed cysts in his brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can you 'catch' cancer?
(Frontiers) Billions worldwide are infected with tropical worms. Unsurprisingly, most of these people live in poor countries, kept poor by the effects of worm-related malnourishment.What may surprise many is that worms also cause the majority of cases of some cancers in these countries.Published in Frontiers in Medicine as a special article collection on parasite-associated malignancy, new research aims to inform prevention and treatment - and perhaps even turn worms against cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 25, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: This 'caterpillar fungus' may help treat osteoarthritis
A compound derived from a parasitic fungus could lead to the development of new, better treatments for osteoarthritis, according to recent research. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 21, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Osteoarthritis Source Type: news

Cryptosporidium parasite detected in Minnesota groundwater
(American Chemical Society) When consumed in contaminated water, the microscopic parasite Cryptosporidium can cause symptoms of stomach cramps, diarrhea and fever. Now, researchers reporting in the ACS journal Environmental Science& Technology have detected evidence of the parasite in about 40 percent of surveyed wells in public water systems in Minnesota -- even wells not influenced by surface water. The team emphasizes that they don't know whether the parasite levels are high enough to actually cause health concerns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Knowledge of female genital schistosomiasis lacking in Ghana, study finds
(PLOS) Urogenital schistosomiasis (US), a chronic parasitic disease, is endemic in Ghana and policymakers have undertaken efforts to control it, largely through mass drug administration of praziquantel given to school-aged children. Now, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have found that awareness of Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS), a specific gender manifestation of US, is lacking, which affects the ability to control this disease in girls and women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 21, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The USDA Forced Kittens to Become Cannibals for Research, Watchdog Report Says
A shocking watchdog report alleges that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) spent $22.5 million conducting “unnecessary and unjustifiable” research that involved killing cats and forcing “kitten cannibalism,” among other unsavory practices. The report — from the non-profit White Coat Waste Project, which opposes animal testing by the government, and former USDA scientist Jim Keen — says a large chunk of this research relates to toxoplasmosis, an illness spread by exposure to the Toxoplasma gondii parasite. As recently as 2015, the report says, the USDA purchased and killed cats and...
Source: TIME: Science - March 20, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

The USDA Forced Kittens to Become Cannibals for Research, Watchdog Report Says
A shocking watchdog report alleges that the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) spent $22.5 million conducting “unnecessary and unjustifiable” research that involved killing cats and forcing “kitten cannibalism,” among other unsavory practices. The report — from the non-profit White Coat Waste Project, which opposes animal testing by the government, and former USDA scientist Jim Keen — says a large chunk of this research relates to toxoplasmosis, an illness spread by exposure to the Toxoplasma gondii parasite. As recently as 2015, the report says, the USDA purchased and killed cats and...
Source: TIME: Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized onetime Research Source Type: news

Mobile DNA element found in mosquito parasite has potential for infectious disease control
(Marine Biological Laboratory) An interdisciplinary team of scientists has identified a new mobile DNA element in the Wolbachia parasite, which may contribute to improved control strategies for mosquito vectors of diseases such as Dengue and West Nile virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 20, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Nigeria: Over 2 Million Nigerian Children Receive Treatment Against Parasitic Worms
[WHO] "My son had blood in his urine for almost a year and I didn't know what to do," says Rahab Haruna, a 45-year-old mother from Adamawa State. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 15, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Honey bee gut microbiome research -- NSF grant
(Virginia Tech) 'Using the honey bee gut microbiome as a model to study host defense against parasites could have implications for understanding the human microbiome and host defense, as well.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 15, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gut bacteria neutralizes disease-carrying tsetse flies
YSPH ’s Brian Weiss has identified a bacterium that can colonize the gut of tsetse flies and help stop the spread of the deadly African trypanosomes parasite. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - March 14, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Common treatment effective in childhood malaria
New trial shows mosquito killing invermectin cuts cases by one-fifth Related items fromOnMedica Common anti-parasitic could be new tool for malaria control Texting can improve flu jab uptake New insecticide-coated bed net battles malaria A child under 15 dies every five seconds around the world Parents still following folklore methods for cold prevention (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - March 14, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

A cure for malaria? One-dose experimental drug cured 7 volunteers of malaria parasite
A new study from the University of Basel in Switzerland found one dose of a drug called DSM265 can clear the asexual stage parasites, called merozoites, which cause disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 11, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Access to Water Is a Daily Battle in Poor Neighborhoods in Buenos Aires
Julio Esquivel and two children in the La Casita de La Virgen soup kitchen in Villa La Cava stand next to the filter that removes 99.9 percent of bacteria, viruses and parasites, with a capacity of up to 12 liters per hour. The purifier became the starting point for raising awareness in this shantytown on the outskirts of the Argentine capital about access to water as a human right. Credit: Daniel Gutman/IPSBy Daniel GutmanBUENOS AIRES, Mar 11 2019 (IPS) “Look at this water. Would you drink it?” asks José Pablo Zubieta, as he shows a glass he has just filled from a faucet, where yellow and brown sediment...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Daniel Gutman Tags: Civil Society Development & Aid Editors' Choice Environment Featured Headlines Health Integration and Development Brazilian-style Latin America & the Caribbean Population Poverty & SDGs Projects Regional Categories TerraViva Unit Source Type: news

To slow malaria, cure mosquitoes with drug-treated bed nets
(Virginia Tech) Researchers found that they could use the same drug -- atovaquone -- used to treat the malaria parasite when a person gets sick, coat mosquito bed nets with it, and let mosquitoes ingest the anti-malarial drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 11, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What do skin infections look like?
A skin infection occurs when parasites, fungi, or germs such as bacteria break into the skin. Some examples of these invaders include scabies, the herpes virus, and lice. Here, learn more about skin infections and what they look like. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Source Type: news

Medical News Today: What does scabies on the penis look like?
Scabies is an infestation of the skin by tiny parasitic mites. On the penis, scabies can cause crusty, blister-like sores and intense itching that may get worse at night. Scabies mites spread through close, prolonged contact between people, such as during sex. Learn more about scabies on the penis here. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - March 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Sexual Health / STDs Source Type: news

Could CRISPR Diagnostics Provide a Valuable Weapon in the Fight against Pandemic Flu?
The flu season is up and running in the Northern Hemisphere, and early signs in both the United States and Europe are that the effects might not be quite as severe as the brutal 2017/18 season. The United States is predominantly seeing H1N1 circulating, while monitoring in Europe has identified co-circulation of H1N1 and H3N2—both varieties of Influenza A that should be covered by the seasonable vaccine. What if they weren’t though? Influenza A can be found in both human and animal populations, and it evolves rapidly through genetic mutation. Each year many humans rely on their country&a...
Source: MDDI - March 8, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Paul Wilkins Tags: IVD Source Type: news

How does the body respond to diffuse cutaneous leishmaniasis?
(PLOS) In diffuse cutaneous leishmanisis (DCL), a rare form of leishmaniasis, parasites grow uncontrolled in skin lesions across the body. For the first time, researchers reporting in PLOS Neglected Tropical Diseases have now profiled how the human immune system responds to a DCL infection and, in turn, how Leishmania amazonensis adapts to the human host. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 7, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

University of Utah biologists experimentally trigger adaptive radiation
(University of Utah) Using host-specific parasites isolated on individual pigeon 'islands,' the scientists showed that descendants of a single population of feather lice adapted rapidly in response to preening. They found that preening drives rapid and divergent camouflage in feather lice transferred to different colored rock pigeons. Over four years and 60 generations, the lice evolved heritable color differences that spanned the full color range of the lice genus found on 300 bird species worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 5, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A quick path to antimalarial resistance
(Barcelona Institute for Global Health (ISGlobal)) Resistance to antimalarial drugs is thought to result mainly from changes in the parasite's genome. However, P. falciparum can also develop resistance to some antimalarial compounds by epigenetic changes, according to a new study led by ISGlobal, an institution supported by 'la Caixa,' and the Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp. This is of concern because resistance acquired at the epigenetic level can arise quickly, even during the course of a single infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists expose hidden risks of diarrhoeal disease
(University of East Anglia) New research identifies a rapidly evolving new subspecies of the cryptosporidium parasite -- a leading cause of diarrhoeal disease in children worldwide.The study sheds new light on how this parasite has evolved the ability to spread more easily between people. Researchers sequenced and compared whole genomes from over 20 different cryptosporidium cases to find out more about the parasite and how it infects people.Their work will help public health interventions aimed at preventing the spread of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Scientists expose hidden risks of diarrheal disease
(University of East Anglia) New research identifies a rapidly evolving new subspecies of the cryptosporidium parasite -- a leading cause of diarrheal disease in children worldwide.The study sheds new light on how this parasite has evolved the ability to spread more easily between people. Researchers sequenced and compared whole genomes from over 20 different cryptosporidium cases to find out more about the parasite and how it infects people.Their work will help public health interventions aimed at preventing the spread of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 4, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Emily Derbyshire Looks for Malaria ’s Vulnerabilities
The Duke University professor studies the parasite to find a way to thwart infection before it takes hold. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Scientist to Watch Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Infographic: Fighting Malaria Drug Resistance
The parasite that causes malaria has evolved to evade many of the drugs that researchers have developed to fight the tropical disease. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Infographics Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Infographic: How General Anesthesia Works
The parasite that causes malaria has evolved to evade many of the drugs that researchers have developed to fight the tropical disease. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 1, 2019 Category: Science Tags: Infographics Magazine Issue Source Type: news

Should you make room for mushrooms in your coffee, chocolate or energy bar?
Reishi, boletus, cordyceps and lion ’s mane may sound like something you would take to clear up a patch of eczema – but now the fungi are appearing in snacksMy barista hands over a cup filled with grey-tinged milk and a few tiny pieces of fungus bobbing around in it. “Enjoy,” he says with a beaming smile. Enjoy might not be the first thing that springs to mind, but it might be time to get onboard as, over the past year or so, adding a handful of mushrooms to your hot drink, chocolate or energy bar has become an increasingly normal thing for people to do.Reishi, boletus, cordyceps and lion ’s m...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tim Jonze Tags: Food Fungi Biology Science Snacks Chocolate Coffee Source Type: news

Ant societies' arms race: Gene activity in defenders depends on invading slavemaking ants
(Johannes Gutenberg Universitaet Mainz) Temnothorax americanus is a slavemaking ant found in northeastern America. In a new study, biologists from Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz (JGU) examined the special relationship between the parasites and their host and made an exciting discovery: The ability of the host ants to defend themselves depends crucially on whether the raiding slavemakers come from an area with a successful or less successful parasite population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

ESA tipsheet for March 4,5, 2019
(Ecological Society of America) Get a sneak peek into these new scientific papers, publishing on March 4,5, 2019 in the Ecological Society of America's journal Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment.Digging for ancient parasites in museum archives; Species origin is linked to extinction risk; Pollinator-friendly cities need to be human community-friendly, too; and Is North America's " old growth " forest concept less important than we think? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Namibia: The Burden of HIV On Health Budget
[New Era] Windhoek -Infectious and parasitic diseases including HIV/AIDS received the highest allocation of funds taking up 23 percent of the total health expenditure in the 2015/2016 financial year. (Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs)
Source: AllAfrica News: HIV-Aids and STDs - February 27, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medicating mosquitoes to fight malaria
(Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health) Mosquitoes that landed on surfaces coated with the anti-malarial compound atovaquone were completely blocked from developing Plasmodium falciparum, the parasite that causes malaria, according to new research led by Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 27, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UTA biology researcher looks for new ways to eliminate parasitic disease
(University of Texas at Arlington) A biologist at the University of Texas at Arlington is using a new grant to look for ways to finish off a disease that has stubbornly resisted all attempts to eradicate it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preventing parasites with new vaccines
Preventing parasites in poultry, cattle and other livestock is a major concern for Europe's farmers. As current treatments prove less effective or desirable, EU-funded scientists are working on new vaccines to keep animals healthy and safeguard our food supply. (Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre)
Source: EUROPA - Research Information Centre - February 21, 2019 Category: Research Source Type: news

Extracellular vesicles in parasite survival
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Ofir-Birin, Y., Regev-Rudzki, N. Tags: Microbiology perspective Source Type: news

Tiny modulators of parasite infection
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 21, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Alderton, G. Tags: twis Source Type: news