Pathogens, Public Health, & Political Will: Why Sustained Leadership is Critical
Two decades of investments in malaria so far have saved a staggering 7.6 million lives and prevented 1.5 billion malaria cases. But progress plateaued by the end of 2019 with political will and funding declining. Credit: Mercedes Sayagues/IPSBy Joy Phumaphi and Sarthak DasApr 23 2021 (IPS) The occasion of World Malaria Day amidst a global pandemic warrants an examination of the intersection between our decades long battle against the world’s oldest known fever and the newest known pathogen fueling a global pandemic. In our estimation, one theme is abundantly clear: effective management of COVID-19 through coherent pu...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Joy Phumaphi and Sarthak Das Tags: Africa Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Malaria Source Type: news

On World Malaria Day, We Must Step Up Efforts to Combat Malaria
Distribution of mosquito nets in Kadiolo, region of Sikasso, Mali June 2020. Credit: PSI, A US based NGO. The UN commemorates World Malaria Day on Sunday April 25. By Hervé VerhooselGENEVA, Apr 23 2021 (IPS) Despite its 229 million cases and 409,000 deaths in 2019, malaria is an overlooked epidemic. The emergence of COVID-19 has thrown health systems into disarray and forced countries to shift their focus from malaria to the pandemic response, threatening to reverse 20 years of malaria gains. Now, as we enter the second year of the pandemic, the global response to COVID-19 must not come at the expense of progress a...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - April 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Herve Verhoosel Tags: Aid Development & Aid Featured Global Global Governance Headlines Health Human Rights Population Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Monkeys are less cuddly with each other when dealing with an infection, study finds
(Purdue University) Wren, a visiting scholar in the Department of Anthropology at Purdue University, spent a year studying wild vervet monkey troops in South Africa, tracking both their social grooming behavior and their parasite load. Her results, some of which were published Wednesday (April 21) in PLOS ONE showed evidence that monkeys carrying certain gastrointestinal parasites do not groom others as much as those without the parasite, and that routes of transmission may not be as clear cut as biologists think. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Environmental DNA and RNA may be key in monitoring pathogens such as SARS-CoV-2
(American Institute of Biological Sciences) Real-world disease and parasite monitoring is often hampered by the inability of traditional approaches to easily sample broad geographical areas and large numbers of individuals. This can result in patchy data that fall short of what researchers need to anticipate and address outbreaks. Writing in BioScience (https://academic.oup.com/bioscience/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/biosci/biab027), Jessica Farrell, Liam Whitmore, and David Duffy describe the promise of novel molecular techniques to overcome these shortcomings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

About 50% of lamb mince sold in Australian supermarkets contains a dangerous parasite that may cause brain damage
(Natural News) A recent study concluded that lamb mince sold in Australian supermarkets might be contaminated with parasites. In the report, researchers from Flinders University tested lamb meat sold in supermarkets three times a week for six months. After testing, they found that 34 out of 79 samples were contaminated by the parasite Toxoplasma gondii. T. gondii is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 19, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Worm infestation in intestine has a remote effect on viral defenses
(University of Bonn) Infection with parasitic intestinal worms (helminths) can apparently cause sexually transmitted viral in-fections to be much more severe elsewhere in the body. This is shown by a study led by the Universities of Cape Town and Bonn. According to the study, helminth-infected mice developed significantly more severe symptoms after infection with a genital herpes viruses (Herpes Simplex Virus). The researchers suspect that these results can also be transferred to humans. The results have now appeared in the journal Cell Host& Microbe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A more complete account
(University of California - Santa Barbara) Even the mention of parasites can be enough to make some people's skin crawl. But to recent UC Santa Barbara doctoral graduate Dana Morton these creepy critters occupy important ecological niches, fulfilling roles that, in her opinion, have too often been overlooked. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 15, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The Lancet Infectious Diseases: First clinical evidence of drug-resistant malaria mutations gaining
(The Lancet) Study finds for the first time, in Africa, that mutations are associated with delayed clearance of the parasite among children with malaria treated with common Artemisinin-based combination therapies (ACTs). While drug efficacy remains high so far, authors call for increased monitoring in the region. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Sex cells in parasites are doing their own thing
Researchers at the University of Bristol have discovered how microbes responsible for human African sleeping sickness produce sex cells. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 13, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Supporters tout anti-parasite drug as covid-19 treatment, but skeptics call it the ‘new hydroxychloroquine’
An NIH trial may settle debate over ivermectin; officials warn people not to take animal formulation of drug. (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - April 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Laurie McGinley Source Type: news

Lockdown for genome parasites
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Researchers at GMI - Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - uncover an ingenious mechanism by which Arabidopsis safeguards the integrity of its genome. The paper is published in the journal Nature Cell Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Team cracks eggs for science
(University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, News Bureau) Avian brood parasites lay their eggs in the nests of other bird species, forcing the hosts to do the hard work of raising the unrelated young. A team of scientists wanted to simulate the task of piercing an egg - a tactic that only a minority of host birds use to help grasp and eject the foreign eggs. Their study offers insight into some of the physical challenges the discriminating host birds face. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers explore the antimalarial properties of a little-known South American plant
(Natural News) Plasmodium falciparum is a protozoan parasite that’s known to cause malaria in humans. It infects certain species of mosquitoes (only females) from the genus Anopheles, which transmit the parasite through their bite. Among the Plasmodium species associated with the disease, P. falciparum is by far the deadliest. Malaria caused by this particular parasite is common in... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experimental therapy for parasitic heart disease may also help stop COVID-19
(University of California - San Diego) UC San Diego researchers found that the chemical inhibitor K777 reduces the coronavirus' ability to infect cell lines by blocking human enzyme cathepsin L; clinical trials are underway. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WHO Joins Europe, Merck in Recommending Against Ivermectin for COVID-19 WHO Joins Europe, Merck in Recommending Against Ivermectin for COVID-19
The World Health Organization on Wednesday recommended against using generic anti-parasite drug ivermectin in patients with COVID-19 except for clinical trials, because of a lack of data demonstrating its benefits.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - April 1, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Tapeworm symptoms: How do you know if you've got tapeworm?
WORMS are parasitic organisms and tapeworm is just one example of a worm infection. How do you know if you've got tapeworm - what are the signs and symptoms? (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - March 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Mysteries of malaria infections deepen after human trial study
(University of Edinburgh) Scientists have discovered that tracking malaria as it develops in humans is a powerful way to detect how the malaria parasite causes a range of infection outcomes in its host.The study, found some remarkable differences in the way individuals respond to malaria and raises fresh questions in the quest to understand and defeat the deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Arsenal used by parasite to affect cellular defense and enhance leishmaniasis is revealed
(Funda ç ã o de Amparo à Pesquisa do Estado de S ã o Paulo) Group affiliated with a FAPESP-supported research center showed that the parasite blocks the action of an enzyme using autophagy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Phytol may be promising for eco-friendly agrochemicals to control root-knot nematodes
(American Phytopathological Society) Even though phytol has been known for several years as a constituent of chlorophyll and is a ubiquitous compound present in almost all photosynthetic organisms, its role as a plant defense-signaling molecule remained unexplored. " Phytol may be a promising material for eco-friendly agrochemicals for the control of RKNs. We are currently investigating its effects on not only other plant parasitic nematodes but also other pathogenic microorganisms. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New findings about immune system reaction to malaria and sickle cell disease
(University of Exeter) The researchers discovered that sugars called mannoses are expressed on the surfaces of both red blood cells infected with malarial parasites and also affected by sickle cell disease. The mannoses cause both infected cells and sickle cells to be eaten in the spleen.The team hope the findings will eventually help inform new treatments for malaria. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 19, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dogs infected with Leishmania parasites smell more attractive to female sand flies
(Lancaster University) Dogs infected with the Leishmania parasite smell more attractive to female sand flies than males, say researchers.Leishmania parasites are transmitted from infected dogs to people by sand flies when they bite. As only female sand flies transmit the parasite, researchers wanted to understand if infection made dogs more attractive to the insect.Globally over 350 million people are at risk of leishmaniasis, with up to 300,000 new cases annually. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Parasites may make dogs smell good to insect vector
(PLOS) The protist parasite Leishmania infantum can alter its host's odor to attract female sand flies, which transmit the pathogen, according to a study published March 18th in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Monica Staniek of Lancaster University and Gordon Hamilton of Lancaster University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Processive RNA polymerization and promoter recognition in an RNA World
Early life is thought to have required the self-replication of RNA by RNA replicases. However, how such replicases evolved and subsequently enabled gene expression remains largely unexplored. We engineered and selected a holopolymerase ribozyme that uses a sigma factor–like specificity primer to first recognize an RNA promoter sequence and then, in a second step, rearrange to a processive elongation form. Using its own sequence, the polymerase can also program itself to polymerize from certain RNA promoters and not others. This selective promoter–based polymerization could allow an RNA replicase ribozyme to def...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 18, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Cojocaru, R., Unrau, P. J. Tags: Biochemistry, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Sapria: the stinking parasitic plant reveals another odd feature
Sapria himalayana has lost about 44% of genes normally found in flowering plantsSapria is an extraordinary plant. It has no leaves, stem or root, can ’t make food by photosynthesis, and exists almost its entire life as threads of cells sucking out all its nourishment from vines growing in the rainforests of Borneo. The only time the parasite reveals itself in the open is when it bursts out as a huge flower the size of a dinner plate, coloured r ed with pale speckles, and stinking of rotting flesh. It’s also a relative of the largest flower in the world,Rafflesia arnoldii, another parasitic plant.Recently, anoth...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 17, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Paul Simons Tags: Plants Environment Science Source Type: news

Researchers identify non-coding RNA molecule in trypanosome parasites
(Bar-Ilan University) Researchers have identified a non-coding RNA molecule that regulates protein translation in Trypanosomatids, single-cell parasites that cause major diseases affecting millions of people. The discovery may lead to the development of novel medications, based on anti-sense RNA, to treat, and prevent the spread of, these diseases. Indeed, the recent success in RNA delivery in the vaccine for COVID-19, holds promise for this biotechnological approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 15, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Don't Use Veterinary Drug Ivermectin Against COVID, FDA Warns
TUESDAY, March 9, 2021 -- Desperate for a treatment against COVID-19, some Americans have reached for an anti-parasitic drug aimed at animals, with serious consequences, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration warns. " Never use medications intended... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 9, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Five herbal medicines potent against tick-borne disease babesiosis in lab, says new study
(TellMed Strategies) Bay Area Lyme Foundation, a leading sponsor of Lyme disease research in the U.S., today announced the publication of new data finding that five herbal medicines had potent activity compared to commonly-used antibiotics in test tubes against Babesia duncani, a malaria-like parasite found on the West Coast of the U.S. that causes the disease babesiosis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Health Highlights: March 5, 2021
Anti-Parasite Drug Won't Help Against Mild COVID-19: Study A drug called ivermectin that's typically used to treat parasitic worms and has been viewed as a potential COVID-19 treatment does not shorten the recovery of patients with mild COVID-19, a... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 5, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Africa: Why Community Engagement is Critical in Fight Against Malaria
[allAfrica] Johannesburg -- Partners in malaria elimination have come together on community engagement in malaria control and elimination, and shared tools and experiences on fighting the parasitic disease. The gathering on February 19 included researchers, community leaders, academics and international partners. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - March 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WRAIR, Duke scientists find evidence of monoclonal antibodies activity against malaria
(Walter Reed Army Institute of Research) Scientists at Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, in a collaboration the Duke University, have confirmed that monoclonal antibodies can be an effective tool in the global fight against malaria, identifying two potential mAbs for further development. Decades of malaria vaccine research have shown low efficacy in field trials conducted in several countries in Africa. Many researchers around the world have now focused their attention on using mAbs against the circumsporozoite protein of the parasite. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ivermectin Does Not Alleviate Mild Covid-19 Symptoms, Study Finds
Ivermectin, a drug typically used to treat parasitic worms, has been prescribed widely during the coronavirus pandemic, but rigorous data has been lacking. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily Anthes Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Journal of the American Medical Assn your-feed-health your-feed-science Colombia Source Type: news

Africa: Malaria Data Opened Up to Combat Drug Resistance
[SciDev.Net] A huge trove of aggregated data on malaria parasites from around the globe is unlocking genetic secrets on the organism's evolution and could assist in the mounting battle against drug resistance, experts say. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 4, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Agents of food-borne zoonoses confirmed to parasitise newly-recorded in Thailand snails
(Pensoft Publishers) Parasitic flatworms known as agents of food-borne zoonoses were confirmed to use several species of thiarid snails, commonly found in freshwater and brackish environments in southeast Asia, as their first intermediate host. These parasites can cause severe ocular infections in humans who consume raw or improperly cooked fish that have fed on parasitised snails. The study, conducted in South Thailand, is published in the peer-reviewed open-access journalZoosystematics and Evolution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Open data on malaria genomes will help combat drug resistance
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Genome variation data on more than 7,000 malaria parasites from 28 endemic countries is released today. It has been produced by MalariaGEN, a data-sharing network of groups around the world who are working together to build high-quality data resources for malaria research and disease control. This open data release provides benchmark data on parasite genome variation that is needed in the search for new drugs and vaccines, and in the development of surveillance tools for malaria control and elimination. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 24, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Parasites' dispersal capacity and rates of genetic introgression--a study
(University of Granada) The results, recently published in the journal Communications Biology, have important applications in the field of coevolutionary biology (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 19, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

£ 2.3 million grant to uncover more about tropical diseases affecting world's poorest populations
(Oxford Brookes University) Scientists from three UK institutions including Oxford Brookes University have been awarded £ 2.3 million to investigate how a parasite grows in humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 11, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Can Gut Parasites Slow the Aging Process? Can Gut Parasites Slow the Aging Process?
A decline in these microbes in developed nations has been linked to inflammatory illnesses such as asthma, atopic eczema, inflammatory bowel disease, multiple sclerosis, rheumatoid arthritis, and T1D.WebMD Health News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Internal Medicine News Source Type: news

The kinetoplastid-specific phosphatase KPP1 attenuates PLK activity to facilitate flagellum inheritance in Trypanosoma brucei
Trypanosoma brucei, an important human parasite, has a flagellum that controls cell motility, morphogenesis, proliferation, and cell-cell communication. Inheritance of the newly assembled flagellum during the cell cycle requires the Polo-like kinase homolog TbPLK and the kinetoplastid-specific protein phosphatase KPP1, although whether TbPLK acts on KPP1 or vice versa has been unclear. Here, we showed that dephosphorylation of TbPLK on Thr125 by KPP1 maintained low TbPLK activity in the flagellum-associated hook complex structure, thereby ensuring proper flagellum positioning and attachment. This dephosphorylation event re...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - February 9, 2021 Category: Science Authors: An, T., Hu, H., Li, Z. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

HEALTH NOTES: Could parasitic worms become the new weapon in the fight against dementia?  
Hookworms were once a common problem in the UK when drinking water was unclean, but were mostly eradicated in the 1900. Now researchers believe they could help fight disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Merck Warns Against Using Ivermectin to Treat COVID-19   Merck Warns Against Using Ivermectin to Treat COVID-19  
Drugmaker Merck on Thursday said its analysis of available data does not support the safety and efficacy of its anti-parasite drug, ivermectin, for the treatment of COVID-19.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines)
Source: Medscape Critical Care Headlines - February 5, 2021 Category: Intensive Care Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Panicky Mnangagwa Gives Nod to Controversial Covid-19 Drug
[Zimbabwe Independent] Jolted into action by the tragic loss of four ministers, President Emmerson Mnangagwa's administration has approved mass importation of anti-parasitic drug Ivermectin to battle Covid-19. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - February 5, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

South Africa: Teamwork and Infrastructure Behind Local Malaria Discovery, Researchers Say
[spotlight] Local scientists, as part of an international research collaboration, identified chemical compounds with antitubercular and anti-cancer properties that can now help in the fight against malaria. The compounds could halt a malaria parasite in its tracks during different stages of the parasite's life cycle. (Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria)
Source: AllAfrica News: Malaria - February 3, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fungus that eats fungus could help coffee farmers
(Stockholm University) Coffee rust is a parasitic fungus and a big problem for coffee growers around the world. A study in the birthplace of coffee - Ethiopia - shows that another fungus seems to have the capacity to supress the rust outbreaks in this landscape. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 3, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

South Africa OKs limited use of parasite drug for COVID-19
South Africa is allowing the limited use of a tropical disease medicine to treat COVID-19 (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - January 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Malaria threw human evolution into overdrive on this African archipelago
(Duke University) Malaria is an ancient scourge, but it's still leaving its mark on the human genome. And now, researchers have uncovered recent traces of adaptation to malaria in the islanders of Cabo Verde -- thanks to a genetic mutation, inherited from their African ancestors, that prevents a type of malaria parasite from invading red blood cells. The findings represent one of the speediest, most dramatic changes measured in the human genome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Zimbabwe: Govt Conducting Trials On Ivermectin for Covid-19 Treatment
[New Zimbabwe] An anti-parasite drug, Ivermectin, has not been banned in the country and is being allowed for individual Covid-19 applications, the acting health ministry secretary Robert Mudyiradima has said. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 26, 2021 Category: African Health Source Type: news

New study: Malaria tricks the brain's defence system
(University of Copenhagen - The Faculty of Health and Medical Sciences) Malaria is one of the most common causes of death in children in Africa. When the parasite builds up in the blood vessels of the brain, it develops into one of the most dangerous forms of the disease, cerebral malaria. Though it wasn't certain if the parasite was able to penetrate the brain tissue, now researchers from the University of Copenhagen have found parasites can do that and have mapped the mechanism they utilise. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 26, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

WormBase webinar series: latest webinar available for viewing
The recording of the WormBase webinar “Parasite Biomart” is now available for viewing. Please check out this page for the relevant links to past and coming webinars as well as for webinar registration. (Source: WormBase)
Source: WormBase - January 19, 2021 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Authors: Ranjana Kishore Tags: brief communication news tutorials Uncategorized webinar Source Type: news

FDA-approved anti-parasitic drug ivermectin can kill the coronavirus within 48 hours, reports new study
(Natural News) An anti-parasitic medication approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) can be used against the Wuhan coronavirus (SARS-CoV-2), reports a new study. Australian researchers discovered that ivermectin, a semi-synthetic drug commonly used to treat head lice, scabies, ascariasis and other parasitic infections, can effectively kill SARS-CoV-2 within 48 hours in culture. “We found that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 18, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NexGard COMBO for cats EMA marketing authorization
Boehringer Ingelheim receives EMA marketing authorization  for NexGard® COMBO, the first isoxazoline-based full endectocide for catsThe product features a triple action formula that includes esafoxolaner – the newly developed form of afoxolaner - combined with eprinomectin and praziquantel.This innovative broad spectrum topical parasiticide is easy and convenient for cat owners.It kills a wider range of parasites than any other product on the market, covering core external parasites like fleas and ticks as well as internal parasites, including tapeworms. (Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News)
Source: Boehringer Ingelheim Corporate News - January 12, 2021 Category: Research Source Type: news