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Einstein Researchers Awarded Three NIH Grants Totaling $12 Million to Fight Virulent Viruses
August 11, 2017—BRONX, NY—The NIH has awarded Einstein researchers three grants totaling more than $12 million to protect against three deadly viruses—Ebola, Marburg and hantavirus. Research collaborations betweenKartik Chandran, Ph.D., professor of microbiology& immunology and the Harold and Muriel Block Faculty Scholar in Virology, andJonathan Lai, Ph.D., associate professor of biochemistry, have led to novel approaches for developing vaccines and treatments. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - August 11, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Ebola and Marburg Haemorrhagic Fevers: Outbreaks and Case Locations
United Kingdom Department of Health. 05/12/2017 This Web page provides information about incidents and outbreaks of Ebola and Marburg, both viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHF). It describes current incidents and outbreaks, the West Africa outbreak 2014 to 2016, linked Ebola outbreaks and cases in other countries (2014 to 2015), Uganda 2014 (Marburg), Democratic Republic of Congo 2014 (Ebola), and a historic map of outbreaks. (Text) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Personal Protective Equipment for Use in a Filovirus Disease Outbreak: Rapid Advice Guideline (November 2016)
World Health Organization. 11/2016 This 71-page document provides guidelines that are intended for health workers providing direct care to patients with known or suspected filovirus disease, and recommendations for use of personal protective equipment (PPE). Filoviruses (Ebola and Marburg) are highly contagious pathogens that cause severe and often fatal illness in humans. The risk of transmission of Ebola virus can be reduced if appropriate measures are taken, including the use of PPE. The document also includes a chapter on PPE in the framework of infection prevention and control, and health worker safety and well-being....
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

2017 Annual Review of Diseases Prioritized Under the Research and Development Blueprint
World Health Organization. 04/03/2017 This 16-page document summarizes a meeting held on January 24-25, 2017, to review the list of priority diseases for the World Health Organization Research and Development (R&D) Blueprint. The R&D Blueprint focuses on severe emerging diseases with potential to generate a public health emergency, and for which insufficient or no preventive and curative solutions exist. The 2017 annual review determined there was an urgent need for research and development for nine diseases, including Filoviral diseases (including Ebola and Marburg); Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (M...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - May 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Antibody cures animals of Ebola-related viruses
Treatment with a monoclonal antibody cured guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with the Ebola-related viruses Marburg and Ravn. Researchers are now working to advance the treatment to clinical studies. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody cures marburg infection in monkeys
An experimental treatment cured 100 percent of guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with lethal levels of Marburg and Ravn viruses, relatives of the Ebola virus, scientists have found. Although the Marburg and Ravn viruses are less familiar than Ebola virus, both can resemble Ebola in symptoms and outcomes in people, and both lack preventive and therapeutic countermeasures. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - April 5, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody cures Marburg infection in monkeys
NIH-funded groups preparing for next filovirus outbreak. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - April 5, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Researchers develop Marburg virus treatment effective five days after infection
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) An antibody treatment successfully protected nonhuman primates against the deadly Marburg and Ravn viruses even when given five days after becoming infected, according to the latest findings of a collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Mapp Biopharmaceutical Inc., and Vanderbilt University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody cures marburg infection in monkeys
(NIH/National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases) Scientists funded by the National Institutes of Health have found that an experimental treatment cured 100 percent of guinea pigs and rhesus monkeys in late stages of infection with lethal levels of Marburg and Ravn viruses, relatives of the Ebola virus. Although the Marburg and Ravn viruses are less familiar than Ebola virus, both can resemble Ebola in symptoms and outcomes in people, and both lack preventive and therapeutic countermeasures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 5, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

He Treated The Very First Ebola Cases 40 Years Ago. Then He Watched The World Forget.
This article is part of HuffPost’s Project Zero campaign, a yearlong series on neglected tropical diseases and efforts to fight them. KINSHASA, Congo ― In early 2014, few people worried that the Ebola virus, which is up to 90 percent fatal, would pose a global threat. So the World Health Organization sent shockwaves around the world when it announced that Ebola was spreading out of control in West Africa. Before the epidemic was over two years later, it had killed thousands of people. They died in terrifying and painful ways, often passing the disease on to family members before and even after death....
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - March 24, 2017 Category: Science Source Type: news

Johnson & Johnson Announces World Health Organization will Review Ebola Vaccine Regimen for Emergency Use Assessment and Listing (EUAL)
Preparations also underway to initiate first-in-human study for multivalent vaccine regimen to combat Ebola, Sudan and Marburg viruses (Source: Johnson and Johnson)
Source: Johnson and Johnson - November 21, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Zika's Rapid Rise and the Limp Global Response Reveal Dire Global Health Challenges
With cases rising in Florida, Singapore, Vietnam and Trinidad and Tobago, the Zika virus pandemic is raising public concern in regions across the globe, including the U.S., where about 80 percent of Americans are aware of it but only 40 percent understand how it is actually transmitted. This raises a host of questions not only about the clinical and epidemiological scope of the outbreak, but also about the ability of citizens, public health authorities and politicians at all levels to adequately deal with it.  So far, the response has been slow and the challenge remains serious and unpredictable. We need to understand...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 4, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

A top 10 list waiting to save lives!
By Drs. David Niesel and Norbert Herzog Sometimes I have to remind myself we are in the 21st Century when I hear that infectious diseases are a leading cause of death among adults and remain the leading cause of death in children. While most of these deaths occur in the developing world, a significant number occur in middle income countries. Vaccines are the most cost effective medical intervention known to prevent infectious diseases. An effective vaccine can significantly reduce the mortality associated with them. However, while we have come a long way, the reality is that we have relatively few effective vaccines. O...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - September 29, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

PLOS appoints Dr. Joerg Heber Editor-in-Chief of PLOS ONE
PLOS announced today that after an extensive search, Dr. Joerg Heber has been appointed Editor-in-Chief of PLOS ONE. Heber will be responsible for setting the editorial course of the journal and continue its mission of improving scholarly communication. His appointment is effective November 21, 2016. “Joerg’s deep understanding of scholarly publishing and his passion for Open Access will be tremendous assets to me and our editorial staff, and most importantly to PLOS ONE’s 6,000 Academic Editors and our authors,” said Veronique Kiermer, Executive Editor of PLOS. “PLOS ONE has been a driver of ...
Source: News from STM - September 20, 2016 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured Open Access Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: We can ’t rely on luck to counter public health threats
UCLA Dr. Jonathan Fielding Dr. Jonathan Fielding, is a professor-in-residence of health policy and management in the UCLA Fielding of Public Health and pediatrics in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA. He served as chair of the independent expert panel on the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services response to Ebola. This op-ed appeared in U.S. News and World Report. In 2014, we were lucky. There were only four diagnosed cases of Ebola virus in the United States. But in Africa, there were over 25,000 diagnosed cases of Ebola virus and more than 11,000 deaths, amounting to a public health tragedy. The respons...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 18, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Progress towards protection from highly lethal Ebola, Marburg viruses
Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. However, the recent Ebola epidemic spread to several African countries, and caused 11,000 deaths. That epidemic underscored the need to develop vaccines and therapeutics that could be used to fight future disease outbreaks. Now new research suggests that antibodies to filoviruses from individuals who have survived these diseases may offer protection -- not only against the particular filovirus that infected an individual, but against other filoviruses, as well. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 12, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Progress towards protection from highly lethal Ebola, Marburg viruses
(American Society for Microbiology) Ebola and Marburg filovirus disease outbreaks have typically occurred as isolated events, confined to central Africa. However, the recent Ebola epidemic spread to several African countries, and caused 11,000 deaths. That epidemic underscored the need to develop vaccines and therapeutics that could be used to fight future disease outbreaks. Now new research suggests that antibodies to filoviruses from individuals who have survived these diseases may offer protection -- not only against the particular filovirus that infected an individual, but against other filoviruses, as well. (Source: E...
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 12, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Marburg Disease in Angola
(Source: MSF News)
Source: MSF News - July 7, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Haemorrhagic fever syndrome – South Sudan
Between late December 2015 and early May 2016, the National IHR Focal of South Sudan notified WHO of an outbreak of haemorrhagic fever syndrome. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - May 19, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: marburg [subject], marburg haemorrhagic fever, risk assessment [subject], travel [subject], travel and health, air travel, viral haemorrhagic fever [subject], haemorrhagic, crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, ebola haemorrhagic fever, marburg haemorrhagic f Source Type: news

Lassa Fever – Germany
On 20 April 2016, the National IHR Focal Point for Germany informed WHO that a previously reported case of Lassa fever in Germany has fully recovered and been discharged from hospital in Frankfurt. This secondary case was an employee of the funeral home tasked with handling the primary case’s corpse on 2 March (see DON posted 23 March). (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - April 27, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: risk assessment [subject], travel [subject], travel and health, air travel, viral haemorrhagic fever [subject], haemorrhagic, crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, ebola haemorrhagic fever, marburg haemorrhagic fever, Disease outbreak news [doctype], European Source Type: news

Yellow Fever – Kenya
Between 15 and 18 March 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Kenya notified WHO of 2 imported cases of yellow fever (YF). (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - April 6, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: risk assessment [subject], viral haemorrhagic fever [subject], haemorrhagic, crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, ebola haemorrhagic fever, marburg haemorrhagic fever, yellow fever [subject], yellow fever [subject], African Region [region], Disease outbreak Source Type: news

Bristol team shares grant for cutting edge biological research
An international research team comprising scientists from the Universities of Bristol, Marburg (Germany) and Kinki (Japan) has been awarded a grant from the 2016 Human Frontier Science Program (HFSP). (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 4, 2016 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Health, Research, Grants and Awards; Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Biomedical Sciences, School of Cellular and Molecular Medicine; Press Release Source Type: news

Blueprint for R&D Preparedness and Response to Public Health Emergencies Due to Highly Infectious Pathogens: Workshop on Prioritization of Pathogens
World Health Organization. 02/24/2016This seven-page document summarizes a meeting held on December 8-9, 2015, to prepare a process for prioritization of pathogens under the blueprint for accelerated R&D for severe emerging diseases with potential to generate a public health emergency, and for which no, or insufficient, preventive and curative solutions exist. Diseases requiring R&D include filovirus diseases (Ebola and Marburg), highly pathogenic emerging Coronaviruses relevant to humans (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus and SARS), chikungunya, and Zika virus. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guid...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Nature Communications: How metal clusters grow
(Karlsruher Institut für Technologie (KIT) ) First the nucleus, then the shell: researchers from Marburg and Karlsruhe have studied stepwise formation of metal clusters, smallest fractions of metals in molecular form. The shell gradually forms around the inner atom rather than by later inclusion of the central atom. Knowledge of all development steps may allow for customized optoelectronic and magnetic properties, as is reported by the researchers in the science journal Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2016 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lassa Fever – Benin
On 25 January 2016, the National IHR Focal Point of Benin notified WHO of an outbreak of Lassa fever. The outbreak was initially detected on 21 January following reports of unexplained fever within a cluster of health workers from the district of Tchaourou, Borgou department. On 3 January, these health workers provided care to a patient suffering from haemorrhagic fever. (Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks)
Source: WHO Disease Outbreaks - February 19, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Tags: management [subject], leadership, risk assessment [subject], viral haemorrhagic fever [subject], haemorrhagic, crimean-congo haemorrhagic fever, ebola haemorrhagic fever, marburg haemorrhagic fever, African Region [region], Benin [country], Disease outbre Source Type: news

Effects on HIV and Ebola
(Helmholtz Zentrum München - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Scientists at the Helmholtz Zentrum München discover that extracts of the medicinal plant Cistus incanus (Ci) prevent human immunodeficiency viruses from infecting cells. Active antiviral ingredients in the extracts inhibit docking of viral proteins to cells. Antiviral activity of Cistus extracts also targets Ebola- and Marburg viruses. The results were published in Scientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 2, 2016 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Meet the Ugandan Scientist Who Developed the Rapid Ebola Test
This article is based on a blog for International Health Policies. Agnes Nanyonjo, Doctoral Student, Karolinska Institute This article was originally published on The Conversation. Read the original article. -- This feed and its contents are the property of The Huffington Post, and use is subject to our terms. It may be used for personal consumption, but may not be distributed on a website. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - November 19, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Study blocks ebola virus budding by regulating calcium signaling
A new study showed that blocking a calcium-signaling pathway could inhibit not only the Ebola virus, but also Marburg, Lassa and Junin viruses, all sources of deadly infections. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - October 30, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

Penn study blocks ebola virus budding by regulating calcium signaling
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine showed that blocking a calcium-signaling pathway could inhibit not only the Ebola virus, but also Marburg, Lassa and Junin viruses, all sources of deadly infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Existing class of drugs may halt Ebola, Marburg viruses
A new study proposes a way to halt Ebola and Marburg viruses is to block their entry into host cells - where they replicate - with a class of drugs already in common use. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 11, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ebola Source Type: news

Drug Stops Marburg Virus in Monkeys, Appears Safe in Humans Drug Stops Marburg Virus in Monkeys, Appears Safe in Humans
AVI-7288, directed against viral messenger RNA and meant for postexposure prevention of Marburg hemorrhagic fever, was effective in monkeys infected with MARV-Musoke and was safe in human volunteers. Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 27, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Infectious Diseases News Source Type: news

Drug Might Fight Ebola-Like Marburg Virus
Study found infected monkeys were less likely to die with treatment Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Page: Hemorrhagic Fevers (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 23, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Antiviral compound protects nonhuman primates against Marburg virus
(US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases) An experimental drug that protected monkeys from the deadly Marburg virus appears to have potential for treating people who have been exposed to the virus, according to a study published in the July 23 edition of The New England Journal of Medicine. Marburg virus is closely related to Ebola virus and also causes a severe hemorrhagic fever. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 22, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New antibody treatment may protect against Marburg and Ebola viruses
Scripps researchers have designed proteins that elicit an effective antibody response in a mouse model against Marburg virus and its viral cousin, Ebola virus. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - June 29, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Ebola Source Type: news

TSRI and Biotech partners find new antibody weapons against Marburg virus
(Scripps Research Institute) A new study led by scientists at The Scripps Research Institute identifies new immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus. The research provides ingredients needed to develop treatments for future Marburg outbreaks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

New antibody weapons against Marburg virus
New immune molecules that protect against deadly Marburg virus, a relative of Ebola virus, have been identified by researchers. The research provides ingredients needed to develop treatments for future Marburg outbreaks, they say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - June 27, 2015 Category: Science Source Type: news

A First Responder's Guide to Ebola
"Filoviridae is the only known virus family about which we have such profound ignorance." -- C.J. Peters & J.W. LeDuc, National Center for Infectious Diseases, CDC Learning Objectives Identify the signs and symptoms of Ebola. Learn the pathogenesis of Ebola. Understand how Ebola is transmitted and how to protect yourself when caring for an infected patient. KEY Terms Cytokine: Proteins important in cell signaling in immune response. Dendritic cells: Immune cells that encourage T-cell response. Macrophages: White blood cells that engulf foreign cells and assist in inflammation and immune processes. Tissue f...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - May 4, 2015 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: James F. Goss, MHA, MICP Tags: Infectious Diseases Operations Provider Wellness & Safety Patient Care Source Type: news

GeoVax and NIH to develop vaccines against Ebola and Marburg viruses
Biotechnology firm GeoVax Labs has signed a research collaboration agreement with the National Institutes of Health’s (NIH) National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID) to develop its vaccines against Ebola and Marburg viruses. (Source: Pharmaceutical Technology)
Source: Pharmaceutical Technology - April 16, 2015 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

West Africa: Potential Ebola Treatment Mechanism Discovered
[SciDev.Net] A possible mechanism to treat infection by the deadly Marburg and Ebola viruses has been uncovered by scientists working in the United States. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - March 5, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Potential Ebola treatment mechanism discovered
Antibody research set out in two papers shows a possible way to tackle Ebola and Marburg viruses. (Source: SciDev.Net)
Source: SciDev.Net - March 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Researchers identify how humans can develop immunity to deadly Marburg virus
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A collaborative team from The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, Vanderbilt University and The Scripps Research Institute have identified mechanisms involved in antibody response to the deadly Marburg virus by studying the blood of a Marburg survivor. Using blood samples from a Marburg survivor, the researchers were able to determine how a person's immune system can fight against the virus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

Human antibodies target Marburg, Ebola viruses; 1 step closer to vaccine
(Vanderbilt University Medical Center) Researchers at Vanderbilt University, the University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston and The Scripps Research Institute for the first time have shown how human antibodies can neutralize the Marburg virus, a close cousin to Ebola. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 26, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Airport screening for viruses misses half of infected travelers but can be improved, says UCLA-led study
In the past decade, the H1N1 virus and Ebola are just two of the diseases whose spread was spurred by international airline travel. Screening passengers at airports, therefore, could be one key method for slowing the global spread of infectious diseases. And although a team lead by UCLA researchers has found that airport screening misses at least half of infected travelers, the scientists say that rate could be improved. Their research was published in eLife, a highly regarded open-access online science journal. The life scientists used a mathematical model to analyze screening for six viruses: the SARS coronavirus, the Eb...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 25, 2015 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Airport screening for viruses misses half of infected travelers but can be improved
(University of California - Los Angeles) Airport screening for diseases often misses at least half of infected travelers, but can be improved, scientists reported Feb. 19 in eLife, a highly regarded open-access online science journal. The life scientists used a mathematical model to analyze screening for six viruses: SARS coronavirus, Ebola virus, Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus, Marburg virus, Influenza H1N1 and Influenza H7N9. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 24, 2015 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Airport screening for diseases like Ebola and swine flu misses around HALF of infected travellers because people 'lie about exposure to avoid delays'
Scientists in California and London examined screening programmes for six viruses, including Ebola, Marburg virus swine and avian flu. They found questionnaires most effective in early stages. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Experimental Ebola Drug From Sarepta Protects 75 Percent Of Monkeys In Study
By Sharon Begley NEW YORK, Feb 10 (Reuters) - An experimental Ebola drug from Sarepta Therapeutics Inc protected 75 percent of lab monkeys injected with the virus, scientists from the company and the U.S. Army reported on Tuesday. The drug, called AVI-7537, joins ZMapp from Mapp Biopharmaceutical and a compound from Tekmira Pharmaceuticals Corp as the agents shown to cure non-human primates given otherwise-lethal injections of Ebola virus. The ZMapp and Tekmira drugs protected 100 percent of lab monkeys in studies, giving them a possible edge. But, unlike those drugs, Sarepta's drug has been formally t...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - February 10, 2015 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Nigeria: Trial Confirms Ebola Vaccine Candidate Safe
[Guardian]TWO experimental DNA vaccines to prevent Ebola virus and the closely related Marburg virus are safe, and generated a similar immune response in healthy Ugandan adults as reported in healthy US adults earlier this year. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - January 8, 2015 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Promising results from new Ebola vaccine trial
In an early human trial, experimental vaccines for Ebola and the Marburg virus were shown to be safe and relatively effective (Source: Health News: CBSNews.com)
Source: Health News: CBSNews.com - December 23, 2014 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news