Medical Photos, CPR Dolls, and Car Crash Dummies: When Women Aren ’t Represented in Research we Fail Women’s Health
by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.   In May a twitter user posted a picture depicting the muscular system of a female that included milk ducts. It quickly went viral as people realized that in their various health science and anatomy and physiology courses they had never seen a picture of a female muscular system, only a picture of a male muscular system. After thinking back to my own health and anatomy and physiology courses I took during high school and college, I myself was taken aback by the realization that I had never seen a picture like this before.… (Source: blog.bioethics.net)
Source: blog.bioethics.net - July 22, 2019 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Keisha Ray Tags: Education Ethics Featured Posts Gender Disparities Health Disparities Justice Public Health Research Ethics Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Cannabis and cannabinoids for persistent pain?
Over the last 12 months New Zealanders have entered into the debate about cannabis and cannabinoids for medical use. In the coming year we’ll hear even more about cannabis as we consider legalising cannabis for recreational use. There is so much rhetoric around the issue, and so much misinformation I thought it high time (see what I did there?!) to write about where I see the research is at for cannabis and cannabinoids for persistent pain. For the purposes of this blog, I’m going to use the following definitions: Cannabis = the plant; cannabis-based medication = registered extracts (either synthetic or from...
Source: HealthSkills Weblog - July 21, 2019 Category: Anesthesiology Authors: BronnieLennoxThompson Tags: Chronic pain Coping strategies Research Science in practice cannabinoids cannabis medicinal cannabis neuropathic pain persistent pain recreational cannabis Source Type: blogs

How I Created a Treatment App for SLPs, Step-by-Step
I walked into the opening ceremony at the 2016 ASHA Convention in Philadelphia like everyone else—eager to hear the speakers tackle the theme “Everyday leadership. Leadership every day.” My idea that leadership is reserved for a few changed as keynote speaker Drew Dudley explained how we all can show leadership in our daily actions. After Dudley’s talk, I knew it was time to take a shot on a wild idea I’d been considering for two years—creating an app for speech-language pathologists to show patients, clients, or students images of what happens inside the mouth when speaking. My wild ide...
Source: American Speech-Language-Hearing Association (ASHA) Press Releases - July 15, 2019 Category: Speech-Language Pathology Authors: Keri Jones Tags: Academia & Research Health Care Private Practice Slider Speech-Language Pathology Speech Disorders Swallowing Disorders Technology Source Type: blogs

The Storytelling Special | Episode 48
00:49 | Special Series05:24 | Storytelling in the A&P Course20:14 | Storytelling is a Human Skill22:16 | Sponsored by HAPS22:38 | Playful& Serious Stories36:43 | Sponsored by AAA37:01 | Cells Hate Calcium43:52 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program44:18 | Actin& Myosin in Love56:03 | Podcast Award Nomination56:56 | Last Best StoryIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! To be playful and serious at the same time is possible, and...
Source: The A and P Professor - July 15, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Virtual Open House for Master of Science in Human Anatomy & Physiology Instruction
You know that online graduate degree inHuman Anatomy& Physiology Instruction—theHAPIdegree —that I'm always talking about? I just found out that they're offering a virtualOpen House this comingMonday, July 15, at 8 pm ET. This event iscompletely online, like the MS-HAPI degree itself. And it'll give you a better idea of what it's all about. And you can ask all those questions that have been occurring to you.Whether it's because you realize thebenefit of additional training for yourself in "how to teach A&P" or you want to know more so you can pass it along to colleagues or prospective hir...
Source: The A and P Professor - July 13, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, July 8th 2019
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 7, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Propionate Secreted by Gut Bacteria Enhances Exercise Capacity
In this study, we identify a link between members of the genus Veillonella and exercise performance. We observed an increase in Veillonella relative abundance in marathon runners postmarathon and isolated a strain of Veillonella atypica from stool samples. Inoculation of this strain into mice significantly increased exhaustive treadmill run time. Veillonella utilize lactate as their sole carbon source, which prompted us to perform a shotgun metagenomic analysis in a cohort of elite athletes, finding that every gene in a major pathway metabolizing lactate to propionate is at higher relative abundance postexercise. Us...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 2, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Efforts Continue to Understand the Senescence-Associated Secretory Phenotype
While the primary focus for the development of rejuvenation therapies to address the contribution of senescent cells to the aging process is to destroy these harmful, errant cells, many research groups are more interested in modulating or suppressing the senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP). The SASP is a potent mix of inflammatory and other signals that disrupts tissue function and produces a sizable fraction of the chronic inflammation associated with aging, driving the progression of all of the common age-related conditions. In principle, eliminating the SASP should eliminate the contribution of senescent ce...
Source: Fight Aging! - July 1, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

The Human Microbial System | Episode 47
00:50 | Teachers vs. Robots14:29| Sponsored by HAPS14:57 | Podcast Award Nomination15:50 | Sponsored by AAA16:13 |Featured: The Human Microbial System29:50 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program30:21 | Special Episodes Coming!If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Life did not take over the world by combat, but by networking. (Lynn Margulis and Dorion Sagan) 1 | Teachers vs. Robots | AI in Teaching13.5 minutesArtificial intelli...
Source: The A and P Professor - July 1, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Oslerus osleri
Dr Mike Cadogan Oslerus osleri Sir William Osler was a man of not inconsiderable talent. A pathologist and clinician. A professor successively at McGill University, the University of Pennsylvania, Johns Hopkins University and Oxford University. Historian and bibliographer of medicine. A naturalist, microscopist, proponent of comparative physiology…and a veterinarian The incessant concentration of thought upon one subject, however interesting, tethers […] (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - June 27, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Mike Cadogan Tags: Eponymictionary Infectious Disease Filaria osleri Filaroides osleri Osler node Oslerus Oslerus osleri Sir William Osler Strongylus canis bronchialis Source Type: blogs

Episode 47 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on the human microbiome, teaching in the age of artificial intelligence, and a special summer series of episodes.There's more... someword dissections and Mindi Fried's recommendation forThe A&P Professor Book Club.If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Topics0.5 minuteTeaching A&P in the age of artificial intelligenceThe human microbial system (human microbiome)Special epis...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 27, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Method Makes PET Tracers Out of Common Biomolecules
Researchers from the University of North Carolina Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center have developed new radioactive tracers to track pharmaceuticals in the body and to image cancer. The findings, reported in journal Science, describe the new chemistry they have developed, along with data that demonstrate that the team was able to radioactively tag compounds that have been very difficult, or impossible, to label to date. This method could help advance medical imaging technology and provide additional information when studying pharmaceuticals and cancer. Typically, radioactive molecules are needed for positron em...
Source: Medgadget - June 24, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Materials Medicine Nuclear Medicine Oncology Radiation Oncology Radiology Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 24th 2019
This study sought to investigate what could be learned from how these men have fared. The men were born in 1925-1928 and similar health-related data from questionnaires, physical examination, and blood samples are available for all surveys. Survival curves over various variable strata were applied to evaluate the impact of individual risk factors and combinations of risk factors on all-cause deaths. At the end of 2018, 118 (16.0%) of the men had reached 90 years of age. Smoking in 1974 was the strongest single risk factor associated with survival, with observed percentages of men reaching 90 years being 26.3, 25.7, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 23, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Progression of Atherosclerosis is Slowed in Mice via Targeting Senescent Cells
We reported that plasma levels of angptl2 are elevated in patients with cardiovascular diseases (CVD), were associated with endothelial dysfunction, and were predictive of major cardiac adverse events and death. Recently, we reported a strong relationship between arterial expression of p21, a cell cycle inhibitor overexpressed in senescent cells and maintaining growth arrest, and circulating levels of angptl2 in atherosclerotic patients. Senescent EC are activated and promote aggregation of leukocytes, the initiating step of atherogenesis. We therefore hypothesized that down-regulation of vascular angptl2, preferentially i...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

July 9th in Toronto, Canada: Latest research findings on Neuroplasticity, Brain Connectivity and Neuropsychological Measures
_______ Event description: Join Barbara Arrowsmith Young as Dr Greg Rose presents his latest research findings about the Arrowsmith Program. Dr Rose at Southern Illinois University is currently undertaking three research studies on the Arrowsmith Program and also involved in an international systematic research effort to understand how the Arrowsmith Program changes brain functioning and how this translates into improved cognitive behaviour. *This event is free and open to the public. All who are interested in learning more about this research are encouraged to attend. Date: Tuesday, July 9th, 2019 Time: 6:30pm ...
Source: SharpBrains - June 18, 2019 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Uncategorized Arrowsmith Program Barbara Arrowsmith-Young brain connectivity brain-functioning cognitive behaviour Greg Rose neuroplasticity Neuropsychology Source Type: blogs

The Wallenda Model of Homeostasis | Episode 46
00:44 | Measles& Immune Amnesia09:16| Sponsored by HAPS09:44 | Bone Growth Update13:55 | Sponsored by AAA14:27 |Featured: The Wallenda Model of Homeostasis40:43 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program41:32 | Hearing from YOUIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! After nourishment, shelter, and companionship, stories are the thing we need most in the world. (Philip Pullman) 1 | Measles and Immune Amnesia8.5 minutesMeasles (MV) is ...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 17, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Episode 46 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on The Wallenda Model of homeostasis, along with other topics. There's more... someword dissections and a special opportunity fromThe A&P Professor Book Club. If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Topics1.5 minuteMeasles and loss of immune memoryUpdate in how long bones growThe Wallenda Model of homeostasis continues Kevin's list of three main analogies for teaching homeo...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 13, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Strategies for Staying Focused at Work When There ’s Stress at Home
Maybe you’re having marital problems, or getting a divorce. Maybe your teen has been getting into more and more trouble lately. Maybe your spouse is struggling with depression. Maybe you are. Maybe you have to move out of your beloved home. Maybe your close friend passed away. Either way, focusing at work is becoming increasingly difficult. And you’re becoming increasingly frustrated—namely at yourself. Why can’t I get it together? I’m such an idiot. Seriously. I’m being ridiculous—and weak. But having a hard time with focusing is absolutely understandable. “You may have hea...
Source: World of Psychology - June 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Margarita Tartakovsky, M.S. Tags: General Industrial and Workplace Mental Health and Wellness Self-Help Stress attention Concentration Focus Work Life Balance Source Type: blogs

Algorithm Uses Individual Medical History to Predict Patient ’s Chance of Survival in ICU
Researchers in Denmark have developed a new algorithm that predicts an individual patient’s risk of mortality in the ICU. Their work, recently published in the journal Digital Health, demonstrates that the algorithm outperforms current non-computational methods of estimating mortality. Algorithms of this nature can help direct resources where they are needed most to best improve patient outcomes, and help catch problems early. In the ICU, doctors and nurses already use various metrics in order to estimate an individual’s chance of survival, so as to determine the best treatment course and deliver optimal care. ...
Source: Medgadget - June 12, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Siavash Parkhideh Tags: Critical Care Informatics Source Type: blogs

Breakthrough Investigation Of People With A Sixth Finger Has Implications For Infant Medicine And Cyborgs
The anatomy of the right hand of one of the polydactyl volunteers, via Mehring et al, 2019 By Christian Jarrett Picture in your mind a futuristic, technologically enhanced human. Perhaps you imagined them with a subcutaneous device in their arm for phone calls and browsing the internet. Maybe they are wearing smart glasses for augmented reality. What I’d wager you didn’t think of is the presence of an artificial sixth digit attached to each hand. However, a breakthrough open-access study in Nature Communications – the first to study the physiology and sensorimotor mechanics of polydactyly volunteers (peop...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - June 12, 2019 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Brain Technology Source Type: blogs

Geriatric Medicine Recertification Completed
I am happy to announce that I passed the test.  I am referring to the geriatrics examination given by the American Board of Internal Medicine (ABIM).  This means that I am recertified as a Board Certified Specialist in Geriatric Medicine. Recertification is required every 10 years, and this was the third time I succeeded.  You would think it gets easier each time, but the opposite is true.  New drugs, new side effects, new theories of aging, and new statistics had me studying two hours each morning for a good five weeks prior to the exam.  The test itself was a full day, with subject matter that co...
Source: Jeffrey M. Levine MD | Geriatric Specialist | Wound Care | Pressure Ulcers - June 5, 2019 Category: Geriatrics Authors: Jeffrey Levine Tags: An Aging World Art & Medicine Featured Medical Articles Geriatric Medicine Long-Term Care geriatrics gerontology Healthcare Quality Improving Medical Care Jeff Levine MD Jeffrey M Levine MD Source Type: blogs

The Fishbowl Model of Homeostasis | Episode 45
01:03 | Poll Results: Addressing Professors11:23 | Sponsored by HAPS11:43 | Running Concept List Video14:20 | Sponsored by AAA14:41 | TAPP Secret Identity Revealed28:50 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program29:17 |Featured: Fishbowl Model of Homeostasis41:33 | Hearing from YOUIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram!A few years ago, the city council of Monza, Italy, barred pet owners from keeping goldfish in curved bowls... saying that it i...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 4, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Webinar for Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) Program Applicants
We recently reissued the funding opportunity announcement (FOA) for the Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) Program and will host a webinar for interested students and fellows: Wednesday, June 19, 2:00-3:00 p.m. ET PRAT is a competitive 3-year fellowship program that prepares trainees for leadership positions in biomedical careers. Training includes a mentored laboratory research experience and intensive career and leadership development activities. PRAT fellows conduct research in laboratories in the NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) in basic biomedical research areas within the NI...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - June 3, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Funding Opportunities Meetings/Events Training/Fellowships/Career Development PRAT Preparing an Application Webinars Source Type: blogs

Episode 45 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on the Fishbowl Model of homeostasis and other topics. There's more... someword dissections, a lot of them, and a recommendation fromThe A&P Professor Book Club.If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram!  Topics1 minuteAddressing the Professor |  Looking at the Ep. 44 Twitter pollConcept list workshop | HAPS 2019The A&P Professor: who is that, really?Featured: the Fis...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 1, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

History of the Electrocardiogram
Dr Mike Cadogan History of the Electrocardiogram A brief (...and frequently updated) history of electrocardiography and the eponymous names behind the ECG/EKG... (Source: Life in the Fast Lane)
Source: Life in the Fast Lane - May 24, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Dr Mike Cadogan Tags: Cardiology Eponymictionary Eponymythology Physiology ECG Einthoven triangle Fontaine leads Saitengalvanometer string galvanometer telecardiogram Source Type: blogs

The Brain Stage: The Power & Promise of The Cephalic Phase for Health
Listen to the Podcast or Read the Transcript [00:00:03] Hi I’m Dr. Alan Greene pediatrician and I’d like to talk with you tonight about The Brain Stage. [00:00:10] I remember vividly when I was a pediatric resident in training go to a Grand Rounds about a surprising topic. [00:00:18] The function of the brain and the function of the skin and one of the things that dermatologists talked about was a common procedure freezing warts. Freezing warts was then, and is still, one of the most common ways to get rid of warts. What she talked about was how wildly different the results were in different studies. People use...
Source: Conversations with Dr Greene - May 23, 2019 Category: Child Development Authors: Dr. Alan Greene Tags: Dr. Greene's Blog Uncategorized Cephalic Phase Placebo The Brain Stage Source Type: blogs

Philips Unveils IntraSight Multi-Modality Imaging Platform
For years, catheter-based minimally invasive procedures have depended on X-ray imaging to guide physicians toward the treatment site. New tools, including intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) and fractional flow reserve (FFR), which measures blood pressure inside a vessel, are giving physicians additional perspectives. Using these modalities in a single procedure therefore requires coherently combining all the information together. Philips is now unveiling its new IntraSight interventional platform that automatically stitches together data from varied imaging modalities to help guide treatment. The system is built on existing ...
Source: Medgadget - May 22, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Medgadget Editors Tags: Cardiac Surgery Cardiology Radiology Vascular Surgery Source Type: blogs

How Our Students Address Us | Episode 44
00:43 | Right and Left, Oh My!04:22 | Sponsored by HAPS06:11 | Semi-Identical Twins12:33 | Sponsored by AAA12:52 | Sorting Student Papers17:50 | Stickers? Really?24:24 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program24:59 |Featured: How Students Address Us42:43 | Hearing from YOUIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! For once, maybe someone will call me "Sir," without adding "...you're making a scene."(Homer Simpson) 1 | R...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 20, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 20th 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 19, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Aging, Metabolic Rate, and the Differences Between Birds and Mammals
There is a strong association in mammalian species between metabolic rate, size, and life span. When pulling in bird species to compare, however, it is observed that they tend to have higher metabolic rates and longer life spans at a given size. So the question here is what exactly is going on in bird metabolism that allows for this more heated operation of cellular metabolism, necessary to meet the demands of flight, without the consequences to life span observed in mammalian species. The open access paper here is illustrative of research in this part of the comparative biology of aging field. Is there anything in this on...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 16, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Episode 44 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on how students address faculty and other topics. There's more... someword dissections, a lot of them, and a recommendation fromThe A&P Professor Book Club.If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Topics1 minuteAnatomical right and leftSemi-identical twinsMethod for sorting student papers quicklyUsing stickers for student feedbackHow students address professorsWord Dissections5.5...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 16, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

MicroRNA-199 Produces Significant Heart Regeneration in Pigs
This is one of the more promising animal studies of heart regeneration that I recall seeing in recent years, particularly given that it is accomplished in pigs, which are a good match in size for human tissues. The heart is one of the least regenerative organs in the mammalian body, and damage, such as that resulting from a heart attack, results in scar tissue and loss of function rather than healing. Here, researchers used a microRNA in order to provoke native cells into regenerative activities that would not normally take place. One of the major goals of the regenerative medicine community over the past two decades has t...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 13, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Wanted: Program Director, Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences Branch
We’re recruiting for an accomplished scientist with interest and experience in inflammation, innate immunity, and the physiological responses to injury, to join the Pharmacological and Physiological Sciences (PPS) Branch of the Division of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Biological Chemistry (PPBC). The successful applicant will have responsibility for scientific and administrative management of a portfolio of research, career development, and training grants. The PPS Branch of PPBC supports research studies that can be basic or clinical in nature. This position offers stewardship of grant awards related to inv...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - May 9, 2019 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Job Announcements Program Director Source Type: blogs

Looking to the Future of Neuro Devices: Exclusive Interview with Alcyone Lifesciences CEO PJ Anand
Alcyone Lifesciences is a medical technology company based out of Lowell, MA, which specializes in central nervous system (CNS) drug delivery platforms for targeted infusions of the brain or spinal cord. Their Thecaflex DRx System was recently awarded Breakthrough Device designation by the FDA, for spinal infusion of therapeutic medications. Medgadget had the opportunity to speak with Alcyone Lifesciences CEO, PJ Anand, about his inspiration for cutting edge medical technology and the future direction of neurological devices.   Kurt Yaeger, Medgadget: Great to talk to you, PJ. Please first give us a sense of your back...
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kurt Yaeger Tags: Exclusive Neurology Neurosurgery Pain Management Psychiatry Source Type: blogs

Scientists Figure Out How to Merge Single-Cell Datasets for Medical Research
Our cells express a myriad of different genes. So-called “single-cell datasets”, which are profiles of gene expression of a single cell, are very useful in medical research because they explain, in minute detail, ongoing intracellular physiology. But, they can be quite massive and since different labs can use different techniques to create and publish these datasets, they’re hard to use in combination with other datasets. Now researchers at MIT, using a method related to panoramic photography, have come up with a way to reliably merge very large, but very different, single-cell datasets together and make ...
Source: Medgadget - May 7, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Editors Tags: Genetics Informatics Source Type: blogs

Anatomic Variation in Humans | Episode 43
 00:40 | Preview Episodes04:15 | Sponsored by HAPS05:48 | Fabella Bone15:51 | Sponsored by AAA16:11 | Situs Inversus32:18 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program32:57 | Variety of Anatomic Variations42:43 | Nuzzel Newsletter If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! The essence of the beautiful is unity in variety. (Moses Mendelssohn) 1 | Preview Episodes4.15 minutesIf you are skipping over the Preview Episodes, which are...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 6, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, May 6th 2019
This study shows that mRNA levels of the aging related lamin A splice variant progerin, associated with premature aging in HGPS, were significantly upregulated in subjects with BMI ≥ 25 kg/m2. Moreover, our data revealed a significantly positive correlation of BMI with progerin mRNA. These data provide to our knowledge for the first-time evidence for a possible involvement of progerin in previously observed accelerated aging of overweight and obese individuals potentially limiting their longevity. Our results also showed that progerin mRNA was positively correlated with C-reactive protein (CRP). This might suggest an as...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 5, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Episode 43 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which focuses on anatomic variations in the human body.There's more... someword dissections, a lot of them, and a recommendation fromThe A&P Professor Book Club. If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram!] Topics0.5 minuteEpisode 43 is all about anatomic variations, including situs inversus and the human fabella.Word Dissections13 minutesAnatomic vs. anatomicalNgram Viewer:anatomic/anatomic...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 2, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Chronic Inflammation as Proximate Cause of a Large Fraction of Age-Related Disease
This popular science article discusses at length the chronic inflammation that is characteristic of the old, and its role as a proximate cause of age-related disease. Inflammation is a necessary part of the immune response to injury and pathogens, and when present in the short term it is vital to the proper operation of bodily systems. But when the immune system runs awry in later life, and inflammatory processes are constantly running, then this inflammation corrodes metabolism, tissue function, and health. The causes of excess, constant inflammation are both internal and external to the immune system. Internally, ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 30, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 29th 2019
In this study, we report the age-associated differences between fetal MSC (fMSC) populations and MSCs isolated from elderly donors with respect to their transcriptomes. We successfully reprogrammed fMSCs (55 days post conception) and adult MSC (aMSC; 60-74 years) to iPSCs and, subsequently, generated the corresponding iMSCs. In addition, iMSCs were also derived from ESCs. The iMSCs were similar although not identical to primary MSCs. We unraveled a putative rejuvenation and aging gene expression signature. We show that iMSCs irrespective of donor age and cell type re-acquired a similar secretome to that of th...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 28, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

The NYC 2019 Ending Age-Related Disease Conference is Coming Up In July
It isn't long now until the Life Extension Advocacy Foundation will be hosting their second Ending Age-Related Diseases conference in New York City. The event takes place on July 11th and 12th this year, and features a mix of noted researchers, investors, and entrepreneurs involved in the present development of means to treat aging as a medical condition. Last year's conference was a great event for networking with new members of our growing longevity science and advocacy community, and video of the presentations can be found online. Aging research is on the cusp of some major breakthroughs in the battle against a...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 22, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Kevin's Unofficial Guide to the HAPS Annual Conference | 2019 Edition | Episode 42
00:40 | Welcome01:20 | Introduction to Kevin's Guide06:27 | Sponsored by HAPS07:19 | Way Before the Conference11:23 | Just Before the Conference26:42 | Sponsored by AAA27:12 | Structure of the Conference30:25 | Musical Interlude: Greg Crowther33:29 | Update Days48:22 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program49:31 | Professional Development Approach54:36 | Workshop Days (with Jerry Anzalone)1:03:46| Mindi Calls In1:06:08 | Other Stuff at the Meeting1:11:31 | After the Conference If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-D...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 22, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 22nd 2019
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 21, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Proteomic View of the Slowing of Muscle Loss with Aging via Physical Exercise
Regular physical exercise acts to slow the characteristic loss of muscle mass and strength that occurs with aging, a condition known as sarcopenia once it reaches the point of frailty. In this, strength training appears to work more effectively than aerobic exercise, but both have their place in the overall picture. In the paper here, researchers report on their assessment of proteomic changes with both aging and exercise. They find that, much as expected, the changes in protein levels that occur with age are largely opposed by the changes in protein levels caused by physical activity. The decline in muscle streng...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 18, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Episode 42 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, a longer bonus episode, on the upcomingHAPS Annual Conference in Portland OR.There's more... someword dissections, and a recommendation fromThe A&P Professor Book Club. If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Topics1 minuteThe next episode is an updated, expanded, new-and-improved version of Kevin's Unofficial Guide to the HAPS Annual Conference. It gives advice and insights useful for f...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 18, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Calorie Restriction Affects the Plasticity of Fat Tissue, Not Just the Amount of Fat Tissue
The practice of calorie restriction, a reduction of up to 40% below the usual ad libitum calorie intake, while still obtaining optimal levels of dietary micronutrients, is well known to slow aging and extend life in near all species and lineages tested to date. Calorie restriction produces sweeping changes in the operation of cellular metabolism, such as upregulation of a range of cellular stress responses, including the maintenance processes of autophagy. It also, however, has the obvious outcome of greatly reducing body fat, particularly the visceral fat that clusters around the organs of the abdomen. Visceral fat...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 15, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 15th 2019
In this study, we found that senescent chondrocytes isolated from OA patients secrete more EVs compared with nonsenescent chondrocytes. These EVs inhibit cartilage ECM deposition by healthy chondrocytes and can induce a senescent state in nearby cells. We profiled the miR and protein content of EVs isolated from the synovial fluid of OA joints from mice with SnCs. After treatment with a molecule to remove SnCs, termed a senolytic, the composition of EV-associated miR and protein was markedly altered. The senolytic reduced OA development and enhanced chondrogenesis, and these were attributable to several specific differenti...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 14, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

An Interview with Vittorio Sebastiano of Turn.bio
Turn.bio is working on an interesting approach to induction of pluripotency in the tissues of living animals. They use a form of temporary reprogramming to take cells only some of the way to a pluripotent state, far enough that they issue the sort of beneficial signaling expected of induced pluripotent stem cells, and potentially also repair some of their internal damage, such as via the clearance of dysfunctional mitochondria, but not so far they they actually become induced pluripotent stem cells. The cells revert back to their original state, but with the benefit of some damage repair, and a changed signaling environmen...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 8, 2019 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

More on Eponyms in A & P Terminology | Episode 41
00:40 | Adult Brain Neurogenesis05:36 | Sponsored by HAPS06:17 | Finding Media for Teaching A&P | Adam Rich10:42 | Sponsored by AAA11:21 | Eponyms Again! | Mike Pascoe27:58 |  Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program28:39 | Personal Names and Pronouns If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! The sweetest sound in the world is the person's own name.(Dale Carnegie) 1 | Adult Brain Neurogenesis5 minutesA recurring topic in this episo...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 8, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Episode 41 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
Host Kevin Patton previews the content of the upcoming full episode, which features a follow-up discussion ofeponyms in scientific terminology from the previous full episode.There's more... someword dissections, and a recommendation fromThe A&P Professor Book Club. If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Topics1 minuteLooks like we're revisiting some topics from earlier episodes.Update on growing new neurons in the adult brainUpdate on finding media to us...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 5, 2019 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs