Why Deep Breathing Helps Calm Anxiety
As someone whose friends and family know I’ve endured a number of heartbreaking challenges and physical and emotional difficulties, I’m often asked how I cope with anxiety. They see my eternal optimism as at odds with the turmoil I’ve gone through in life and wonder what my secret is for dealing with a magnitude of life’s ups and downs. I tell them, quite simply, that it isn’t a secret, yet the most effective technique I’ve discovered to calm anxiety is deep breathing. How and why does deep breathing work in calming anxiety? The Anxiety and Depression Association of America states that a...
Source: World of Psychology - June 29, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Suzanne Kane Tags: Anxiety and Panic Mindfulness Self-Help Breathing Exercise Calm stress reduction Source Type: blogs

Even More Pandemic Teaching Tips | TAPP 72
After acknowledgingracism as thatother major pandemic we must fight, host Kevin Patton carries on with even morepractical tips for teaching remotely—and for taking with usback to campus. Included are tips for creating and using ahome office, even when there is no room, and advice on usingour office space as a media studio. Plus a briefapology.00:59 | Pandemic Teaching. Still. And Again.06:58 | Sponsored by AAA07:43 | Faculty Office in a Box14:42 | Sponsored by HAPI15:36 | The Media-Friendly Faculty Office34:05 | Sponsored by HAPS34:46 | An Apology35:01 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activ...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 29, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 29th 2020
In conclusion, metabolomics is a promising approach for the assessment of biological age and appears complementary to established epigenetic clocks. Sedentary Behavior Raises the Risk of Cancer Mortality https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/06/sedentary-behavior-raises-the-risk-of-cancer-mortality/ Living a sedentary lifestyle is known to be harmful to long term health, raising the risk of age-related disease and mortality. Researchers here show that a sedentary life specifically increases cancer mortality, and does so independently of other factors. This is one of many, many reasons to maintain a re...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 28, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Webinar for Postdoctoral Research Associate Training (PRAT) Program Applicants
We’re hosting a webinar for students and fellows interested in the PRAT Program for the October 2, 2020, receipt date: Tuesday, July 14, 2:00-3:00 p.m. ET PRAT is a competitive 3-year fellowship program that prepares trainees for leadership positions in biomedical careers. Training includes a mentored laboratory research experience and intensive career and leadership development activities. PRAT fellows conduct research in laboratories in the NIH Intramural Research Program (IRP) in basic biomedical research areas within the NIGMS mission. These areas include, but are not limited to, bi...
Source: NIGMS Feedback Loop Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - June 26, 2020 Category: Biomedical Science Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Funding Opportunities Meetings/Events Training/Fellowships/Career Development PRAT Preparing an Application Webinars Source Type: blogs

Research LLM Fellowships at Center for Health Law, Policy, and Ethics
Here some funded LLM Positions in Health Law, Ethics and Policy starting September 2020 or January 2021. Professors Jennifer Chandler, Vanessa Gruben, Colleen Flood, and Marie-Eve Sylvestre are recruiting Centre Fellows who would like to complete their LLM with the Centre on topics associated with the Centre’s funded research programs. Legal Definition of Death in an Age of Techno-Scientific Change – As we learn more about the physiology of the dying process (cessation of circulatory and brain function), and as resuscitation and life-sustaining technologies change, do legal definitions of death need to cha...
Source: blog.bioethics.net - June 24, 2020 Category: Medical Ethics Authors: Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD Tags: Health Care syndicated Source Type: blogs

The Immune Response to Tumors Changes with Age
The interaction between the immune system and tumor is meaningfully different in young and old individuals. The aging of the immune system makes near everything worse in health and physiology. It greatly affects risk of cancer, in the sense of determining whether pre-cancerous cells are eliminated before they can gain a foothold. It also affects the distribution of cancer types, for reasons that are not fully explored. Further, and as discussed here, it affects the efforts of the immune system to destroy an established tumor. Advanced age is strongly correlated with both increased cancer incidence and general immu...
Source: Fight Aging! - June 23, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Faculty Mindsets & Minority Student Achievement Gaps | Journal Club with Krista Rompolski | TAPP 71
Our second Journal Club episode pops in sooner than expected with a mind-blowing study that shows that when faculty believe that student ability is fixed (not flexible), under-represented minority students do not perform as well as in STEM courses taught by faculty with a growth mindset. Journal Club director Krista Rompolski joins Kevin for an important discussion.01:00 | Pandemic Teaching Book (please share!)02:12 | TAPP Journal Club with Krista Rompolski05:18 | Sponsored by AAA05:43 | Fixed& Growth Mindsets19:33 | Sponsored by HAPI20:38 | Applying Mindsets to Teaching31:23 | Sponsored by HAPS31:57 | Book C...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 15, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Test Question Templates Help Students Learn | TAPP 70
Greg Crowther joins host Kevin Patton for a conversation about retrieval practice, online formative testing, andTest Question Templates (TQTs). We learn how TQTs can help students learn and can help teachers prepare effective exams.00:44 | Pandemic Teaching Book (please share!)01:57 | Sponsored by AAA01:46 | Introducing Greg Crowther03:57 | Test Question Templates (TQTs)21:58 | Sponsored by HAPI22:46 | Higher-Level Test Questions49:37 | Sponsored by HAPS50:16 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& ...
Source: The A and P Professor - June 2, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

What does “ Public health ” mean to you ? … I am confused!
After decades into the field of medicine, I am unable to come to terms with one of the most fundamental questions in our profession. What does the term Public health means? Have we erred, by defining health in terms of its delivery rather than a comprehensive biological definition? How do you compare a guy, who gets pride with glittering five-star care in a private hospital , with that of man who humbly accepts the same in a crowded public health facility? “It’s 1 .30 AM past midnight. I am part of the  COVID supervisory team on rounds. I could see a tired-looking corporation worke...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - June 1, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, June 1st 2020
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 31, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A Young Woman with Regular Narrow Complex Tachy at both 160 and 240
This article studied their effect in pediatrics:https://www.ahajournals.org/doi/full/10.1161/CIRCEP.109.901629===================================MY Comment by KEN GRAUER, MD (5/30/2020):===================================Fascinating case presented by Dr. Smith (!) — about this young woman who presented with palpitations and sequential reentry SVT rhythms — initially at a ventricular rate of ~160/minute — and then following administration of 6mg IV adenosine, another reentry SVT at a much faster rate of ~240/minute. HOW could this happen?For ...
Source: Dr. Smith's ECG Blog - May 31, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: Steve Smith Source Type: blogs

Visceral Fat Behaves Differently in Long-Lived Dwarf Mice
A few varieties of dwarf mice exhibit considerable longevity. They are produced via forms of mutation that disable portions of growth hormone metabolism, such as via growth hormone receptor knockout. Most research has thus focused on insulin signaling, IGF-1, and other pathways closely tied to growth hormone. Here, scientists instead focus on the behavior of fat tissue in these long-lived mouse lineages, suggesting that the significant differences they observe in the metabolism of visceral fat may contribute to the impact on aging. It is well known that visceral fat is metabolically active, and excess amounts create...
Source: Fight Aging! - May 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Network Medicine in the Fight Against COVID-19
COVID-19 forced stakeholders in the healthcare landscape to adopt a new perspective in this sphere. Telemedicine rose to fame as a ready-made solution; artificial intelligence’s contribution became more apparent from early outbreak predictions to resource management; and digital health technologies lent a helping hand early on. Another promising area joining the fight is network medicine, a branch of network science. The latter field studies the interaction between actors within a network. Such analyses are applicable to virtually any sector, from the world wide web through social networks to how molecules interac...
Source: The Medical Futurist - May 21, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Network medicine Artificial Intelligence Biotechnology Telemedicine & Smartphones AI MIT coronavirus covid covid19 vaccine research pandemic network science Albert-László Barabási Source Type: blogs

Content Delivery Style: Journal Club | TAPP 69
Discussion43:16 | Sponsored by HAPS44:25 | Pandemic Teaching Book (please share!)46:00 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook,Blogger,Nuzzel,Tumblr, orInstagram! Student engagement is the product of motivation and active learning. It is a product rather than a sum because it will not occur if either element is missing. (Elizabeth F. Barkley) Running Concept Lists2.5 minutesA strategy based on the const...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 18, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Children Can “Catch” Their Mother’s Stress — Particularly If She Tries To Hide It
By Emily Reynolds The way parents feel and behave often rubs off on their children. Kids’ own life paths can be influenced by the strength of their parents’ romantic relationship, for example, or how often their parents lie to them. We may also pick things up as our parents try to hide them, as new research published in the Journal of Family Psychology suggests. Even when parents try to hide their stress, the team finds, they can still pass on those feelings to their children anyway. To examine how stress is passed on from parent to child, Sara Waters from Washington State University Vancouver and colleagu...
Source: BPS RESEARCH DIGEST - May 12, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: BPS Research Digest Tags: Developmental Emotion Source Type: blogs

Revisiting Retrieval Practice | New Journal Club | TAPP 68
Retrieval practice has strong evidence of its power in learning. Host Kevin Patton tells part of the story of his journey in making online retrieval practice a central part of his courses. Also, we reveal the new TAPP Journal Club with Krista Rompolski! Oh yeah —don't forget to share the new Pandemic Teaching eBook with colleagues.00:52 | TAPP Journal Club with Krista Rompolski03:14 | Sponsored by AAA04:06 | Revisiting Retrieval Practice07:32 | Sponsored by HAPI08:36 | Open-book& Untimed& BEARS —oh my!15:12 | Sponsored by HAPS16:12 | Recipe for Success20:14 | Sponsored by ADInst...
Source: The A and P Professor - May 4, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Prolonged Sitting Counteracts Benefits of Exercise
Most people know that exercise is important for their health. Exercise has been shown to help with weight loss, improve mood, build and maintain strong bones and muscles, increase energy, and decrease the risk of chronic disease. As a result, many of us make it a point to get to the gym or engage in a physical activity to help improve our health. Unfortunately, a new study published in the Journal of Applied Physiology found that sitting for prolonged periods of time decreased the metabolic benefits usually seen by exercising for an hour a day. The study looked at the body’s response to glucose, triglycerides and ins...
Source: Cord Blood News - April 28, 2020 Category: Perinatology & Neonatology Authors: Maze Cord Blood Tags: Health Source Type: blogs

Podcast: How Much Sex Is Psychologically Healthy?
If you were in a perfect relationship with your “perfect” partner, how much sex would you want? Three times a week? Once a day? Never? That number is your “magic sex number,” says today’s guest Marriage and Family Therapist Steven Ing. We all have a magic sex number, just like we all need to sleep a certain amount of hours per night and eat a certain number of calories per day to feel full. But if your magic number is far more or less than your partner’s number, there will be serious relationship problems. How do you know what your magic sex number is? And how big of a difference can t...
Source: World of Psychology - April 23, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: The Psych Central Podcast Tags: General Podcast Relationships Sexuality The Psych Central Show Source Type: blogs

Simple Ideas for Pandemic Teaching | TAPP 67
Join host Kevin Patton as he provides a simple recipe for remote teaching, reveals his new (free) eBook, explains the value of video walk-throughs, tells why he wants to be like Zoom, and gives sources for resources.00:48 | Book Club: Pandemic Teaching04:01 | Sponsored by AAA04:35 | Simple Ideas for Pandemic Teaching18:54 | Sponsored by HAPI19:57 | Zoombombing Revisited23:08 | Sponsored by HAPS24:00 | Video Walk-throughs27:37 | Pandemic Teaching Resources28:25 | Sponsored by ADInstruments29:43 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the ano...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 20, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Weight-loss surgery may lower risk of heart disease in people with diabetes
Obesity is a serious, chronic, treatable, and global disease epidemic. Over 98 million people currently have the disease of obesity, and in a recent New England Journal of Medicine article, Harvard researchers predicted that by 2030, 50% of the population in the United States will have the disease of obesity. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is significantly associated with obesity. While many people with obesity do not have diabetes, most people with T2D have the disease of obesity. Excess adiposity (body fat storage), which is present in obesity, contributes to many chronic diseases beyond T2D. These include high blood pressure, he...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - April 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Angela Fitch, MD Tags: Diabetes Diet and Weight Loss Health Heart Health Surgery Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, April 13th 2020
This study is par for the course, looking at Japanese Olympic participants. Interestingly, it hints at the upper end of the dose-response curve for physical activity, in that a longer career as a professional athlete may be detrimental in comparison to lesser degrees of exercise and training. From this large, retrospective cohort study targeting 3546 Japanese Olympic athletes, we observed significant lower mortality among Olympians compared with the Japanese general population. The overall standardised mortality ratio (SMR) was 0.29. The results were consistent with previous studies conducted in other non-Asian co...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 12, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

A TAT Peptide Based Approach to Upregulation of Proteasomal Activity
The proteasome is a construct in cells that shreds damaged, misfolded, or unwanted proteins, reducing them to component parts that can be reused. It is a part of the ubuiquitin-proteasome system: molecules to be destroyed are tagged with ubiquitin, and drawn into a proteasome for recycling. Greater proteasome activity is thought to be a good thing, improving cell function. This is of particular relevance to aging, as proteasomal function declines with age, contributing to faltering cell and tissue function, particularly in the long-lived cells of the nervous system. While established drugs exist to inhibit activity ...
Source: Fight Aging! - April 10, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Medicine, Biotech, Research Source Type: blogs

Great cardiac vein aspiration for refractory LAD No-reflow : A hypothesis waiting for proof.
Preamble  The resting coronary blood flow (CBF) is about 5 % of cardiac output. It amounts to 250 ml /min (0.8 ml /mt/gram of myocardium ) It is estimated, blood flow across LAD is 50% . LCX and RCA share 25% each, depending upon the dominance. No need to say , the net return to coronary sinus  should match the CBF at rest or exertion.(Minus a small fraction contributed by  thebesain and vene cardia minimi flow, into the right heart chambers)Great cardiac vein (GCV) is the venous cousin of LAD. It must receive and empty 125ml of deoxygenated blood every minute into the coronary sinus, if LAD flow is normal. ...
Source: Dr.S.Venkatesan MD - April 10, 2020 Category: Cardiology Authors: dr s venkatesan Tags: Uncategorized coronary sinus aspiration great cardiac vein aspiration for no reflow microvascular obstruction retrograde thrombus aspiration for no reflow Source Type: blogs

Slides Serve the Story of Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 66
Host Kevin Patton talks about ways to improve our teaching slides, the challenge of trying new things, how to make sure our web meetings secure from Zoom bombing, and the Foldit protein folding game. Check out AAA's virtual meeting week, OMES virtual conference, HAPS's virtual town hall meetings.00:58 | Fumbling First Try02:33 | Sponsored by AAA06:19 | Zoombombing11:09 | Sponsored by HAPI12:22 | Foldit Protein Folding Game16:48 | Sponsored by HAPS17:32 | FreeMedEd: OMES Virtual Conference19:33 | Slides Serve Our Story31:27 | Sponsored by ADInstruments32:52 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 6, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Episode 66 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
A brief preview of the upcoming full episode, featuring upcoming topics —plus word dissections (virus, coronavirus, SARS-CoV-2, pandemic, epidemic), a book club recommendation (Presentation Zen), and more!00:19 | ADInstruments Free Offer01:16 | Topics02:56 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program03:29 | Word Dissection10:59 | Sponsored by HAPS11:30 | Book Club14:15 | Sponsored by AAA15:21 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) Follow...
Source: The A and P Professor - April 3, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Twisting and Turning: Unraveling What Causes Asymmetry
Note to our Biomedical Beat readers: Echoing the sentiments NIH Director Francis Collins made on his blog, NIGMS is making every effort during the COVID-19 pandemic to keep supporting the best and most powerful science. In that spirit, we’ll continue to bring you stories across a wide range of NIGMS topics. We hope these posts offer a respite from the coronavirus news when needed. Asymmetry in our bodies plays an important role in how they work, affecting everything from function of internal systems to the placement and shape of organs. Take a look at your hands. They are mirror images of each other, but they&rsqu...
Source: Biomedical Beat Blog - National Institute of General Medical Sciences - April 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Chrissa Chverchko Tags: Cells Chemistry, Biochemistry and Pharmacology Molecular Structures Cellular Processes Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 30th 2020
This study, for the first time, shows that transplantation of non-autologous mitochondria from healthy skeletal muscle cells into normal cardiomyocytes leads to short-term improvement of bioenergetics indicating "supercharged" state. However, over time these improved effects disappear, which suggests transplantation of mitochondria may have a potential application in settings where there is an acute stress. Outlining Some of the Science Behind Partial Reprogramming at Turn.bio https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/03/outlining-some-of-the-science-behind-partial-reprogramming-at-turn-bio/ Tur...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 29, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Loss of Mitochondrial Function with Age in Monocytes may Contribute to the Development of Atherosclerosis
Macrophage cells are derived from circulating monocytes, and, among many other tasks, are responsible for clearing out lipid deposits from blood vessel walls. The conventional view on the age-related nature of atherosclerosis, the build up of fatty deposits that narrow and weaken blood vessels, is that macrophages are vulnerable to oxidized lipids, particularly oxidized cholesterols such as 7-ketocholesterol. These oxidized lipids are far more prevalent in older people, a consequence of the cellular damage of aging. Macrophages in old tissues are overwhelmed by oxidized lipids and become inflammatory, dysfunctional foam ce...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 25, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Why Happiness IS Just a Choice
You're reading Why Happiness IS Just a Choice, originally posted on Pick the Brain | Motivation and Self Improvement. If you're enjoying this, please visit our site for more inspirational articles. When I was a kid, people would ask, “What do you want to be when you grow up?” My response was: “Happy!”  “No,” they would say, “What do you want to be? You know like Doctor? Lawyer?” My response was, “Be happy!” Apparently, this was not the correct response even though it made total sense to me. As I grew up, I tried to get to that place of happy by do...
Source: PickTheBrain | Motivation and Self Improvement - March 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dain Heer Tags: featured happiness self-improvement self improvement Source Type: blogs

Still Moving Our Course to Remote| Episode 65
We lighten our loads and learn to be present with our students as host Kevin Patton continues sharing lessons learned from his own failures and successes in moving from on-campus to distance education. A supportive voice for a troubled time.0:00:48 | The Emergency Continues0:07:06 | Sponsored by AAA0:07:46 | New Skills for New Situations0:23:05 | Sponsored by HAPI0:23:53 | Being Present0:33:49 | Sponsored by HAPS0:34:29 | Leaner Is Meaner0:43:10 | More Tips0:59:27 | Facing the Lion1:04:17 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:t...
Source: The A and P Professor - March 25, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

5 Ways to Restore Your Sense of Emotional Safety During the Coronavirus Crisis
As the spread of the coronavirus threatens our physical health, it is also becoming a real threat to our mental health. As Americans, it is not our norm to see our grocery store shelves empty and to be quarantined and unable to gather in large groups.  When we experience real or perceived threat, our bodies react accordingly and our survival physiology kicks in, leaving us in states of “fight” and “flight.” While these states are meant for acute trauma situations to help us mobilize, in more chronic states of disruption — like the crisis we are experiencing with the coronavirus — ou...
Source: World of Psychology - March 22, 2020 Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Ilene Smith Tags: Anxiety and Panic General Health-related Trauma coronavirus COVID-19 trauma response Source Type: blogs

Will the Effects of COVID-19 Be Mitigated by the Warm Spring Weather?
One of the best articles I have come across lately regarding COVID-19 with a strong scientific orientation is: Why the Coronavirus Has Been So Successful. I have personally been wondering whether our upcoming warmer weather will ameliorate the effects of the pandemic as we have seen with our yearly influenza outbreaks. Here is the answer to this question extracted from this Atlantic article:Coronaviruses, much like influenza, tend to be winter viruses.In cold and dry air, the thin layers of liquid that coat our lungs and airways become even thinner, and the beating hairs that rest in those layers struggle to evict vir...
Source: Lab Soft News - March 21, 2020 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Bruce Friedman Tags: Epidemiology Source Type: blogs

Digital Twins and the Promise of Personalized Medicine
Can you guess the percentage of patients with Alzheimer’s on whom medication is ineffective? What about those with arthritis? Or cardiac arrhythmia? In fact, you don’t have to guess as the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) already has the answers: 70%, 50% and 40% respectively. The percentage of patients for whom medications are ineffective range from 38-75% for varying conditions from depression to osteoporosis.  The main cause is because of the very genetic makeup of every individual. The latter is so different and their interaction so unique that therapies for the “average patient” mi...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 19, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Medicine Personalized Medicine digital health technology healthcare data digital twin technology design Source Type: blogs

Memory Palaces with Chase DiMarco | Episode 64
Host Kevin Patton chats with mnemonist (memory expert) Chase DiMarco, who helps medical students learn. DiMarco describes how to use memory palaces in learning human anatomy and physiology.00:44 | Introducing Chase DiMarco02:33 | Sponsored by AAA (Silverthorn toast)03:53 | What Is a Memory Palace?11:44 | Sponsored by HAPI12:07 | Building a Memory Palace22:53 | Sponsored by HAPS23:16 | Helping our Students27:51 | Staying Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546...
Source: The A and P Professor - March 16, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Quickly Moving to Remote Delivery —The Musical | Bonus Episode 64b
In this "emergency" bonus episode, host Kevin Patton outlines ways to quickly move our courses from on-campus venues to remote delivery during a public health event. And sing along with Greg Crowther to keep our spirits up!00:42 | Let's Move!01:50 | Support Our Sponsors02:36 | Sing a Song. Sing It Loud.11:54 | Sights and Sounds18:18 | Sing It Strong20:41 | Keeping It Real26:11 | Stay Connected If you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Faceboo...
Source: The A and P Professor - March 14, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Accurate Eye-Tracking and AI to Detect Neurological Diseases: Interview with Co-Founders of C. Light
Being diagnosed with any number of neurological diseases can be scary, not only due to the progressive nature of many of these conditions, but also because they often cannot be detected until their later stages of progression. Following the failure of a variety of potential therapies for Alzheimer’s within clinical trials in the past few years, there is an increasing interest in early detection of neurological diseases, with hopes that earlier treatment will be more effective. This has given birth to a wealth of companies interested in identifying biomarkers of early neurological disease progression to enable tim...
Source: Medgadget - March 12, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Mohammad Saleh Tags: Exclusive Neurology Ophthalmology Source Type: blogs

Getting Ready for Memory Palaces with Chase DiMarco | Bonus Episode 64
Kevin Patton confesses to a mistaken early release of Preview Episode 64, offering this brief "bonus" to assure listeners that the full episode is coming. And while we're at it, let's not forget about sending in your HAPS Conference stories. Join the TAA writing network. And that survey. Don't forget the survey!00:20 | Mistake!02:30 | HAPS Conference Guide03:21 | Survey Says...04:15 | Word Dissection10:15 | TAA Writing Network10:13 | Survey Says...14:08 | Sponsors14:26 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:t...
Source: The A and P Professor - March 9, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 9th 2020
In this study, we intravenously administrated the young mitochondria into aged mice to evaluate whether energy production increase in aged tissues or age-related behaviors improved after the mitochondrial transplantation. The results showed that heterozygous mitochondrial DNA of both aged and young mouse coexisted in tissues of aged mice after mitochondrial administration, and meanwhile, ATP content in tissues increased while reactive oxygen species (ROS) level reduced. Besides, the mitotherapy significantly improved cognitive and motor performance of aged mice. Our study, at the first report in aged animals, not only prov...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 8, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Episode 64 Intro | TAPP Radio Preview
 A brief preview of the upcoming full episode, featuring upcoming topics —a chat with Chase DiMarco—plus word dissections, a book club recommendation, and more!00:19 | Topics01:19 | Sponsored by HAPI Online Graduate Program01:46 | Word Dissection06:45 | Sponsored by HAPS07:06 | Book Club10:13 | Survey Says...10:42 | Sponsored by AAA11:02 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DEN (1-833-546-6336) FollowThe A&P Professor onTwitter,Facebook...
Source: The A and P Professor - March 5, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

10 Ways Technology Is Changing Healthcare
The future of healthcare is shaping up in front of our very eyes with advances in digital technologies, such as artificial intelligence, VR/AR, 3D-printing, robotics or nanotechnology. We have to familiarize with the latest developments in order to be able to control technology and not the other way around. The future of healthcare lies in working hand-in-hand with technology and healthcare workers have to embrace emerging technologies in order to stay relevant in the coming years. Be bold, curious and informed! Are you afraid that robots will take over the jobs of nurses, doctors and other healthcare professionals? Are y...
Source: The Medical Futurist - March 3, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: berci.mesko Tags: Future of Medicine 3d printing AI artificial intelligence augmented reality genetics Health Healthcare nanotechnology Personalized medicine pharma pharmacology robotics virtual reality wearables GC1 Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Calorie Restriction to be Less Beneficial in Flies than in Other Species
Calorie restriction, eating up to 40% fewer calories while maintaining optimal micronutrient intake, near universally improves health and extends life across species assessed to date. Flies are a noteworthy exception to the reliability of this effect; the evidence is decidedly mixed for intermittent fasting and calorie restriction to work in flies in the same way that it does in nematodes, mice, and other laboratory species. Where it does work, it might not be working for the same reasons as it does in other species. The results here are somewhat characteristic of examinations of dietary restriction in flies, finding anoth...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 2, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Fight Aging! Newsletter, March 2nd 2020
In conclusion, the recently demonstrated protective effects of NMN treatment on neurovascular function can be attributed to multifaceted sirtuin-mediated anti-aging changes in the neurovascular transcriptome. Our present findings taken together with the results of recent studies using mitochondria-targeted interventions suggest that mitochondrial rejuvenation is a critical mechanism to restore neurovascular health and improve cerebral blood flow in aging. Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling as a Point of Intervention to Spur Greater Neural Regeneration https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2020/02/wnt-%ce%b2-catenin-sig...
Source: Fight Aging! - March 1, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Newsletters Source Type: blogs

Job opportunities at the University of Bristol
The School of Psychological Science at the University of Bristol is seeking to appoint a Senior Lecturer with a track record of high-quality research in the areas of neuropsychology/neuroscience of human cognition, emotion and behaviour. The successful applicant will join a collegiate, supportive department with a vibrant research environment and a passion for excellence in research and teaching. Funding for this opportunity follows from the creation of a new MSci programme in Psychology and Neuroscience that will be jointly taught with the School of Physiology, Pharmacology, and Neuroscience....
Source: Talking Brains - February 26, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greg Hickok Source Type: blogs

Mid-Winter Winterizing of Our Courses | Bonus Episode 63
Host Kevin Patton alerts us to the potential impact of influenza and other outbreaks on our courses and provides advice and options for preparation, handling impacts, and more! In the absence of outbreaks, these tips also help cope with normal winter absences resulting from illnesses.00:42 | Why Winterize in Mid Winter?04:16 | Sponsored by AAA04:33 | Learning from Past Epidemics and Pandemics08:49 | Sponsored by HAPI09:11 | Staying Home. I Mean It!16:04 | Sponsored by HAPS21:49 | Survey Says...22:19 | Final Thoughts26:56 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here.Pl...
Source: The A and P Professor - February 26, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

5 Things That Will Dominate The 2020s For Pharma Companies
What’s worth some 1,204.8 billion USD? Well, it’s the worldwide pharmaceutical market, of course! With such a capital at stake and with the pace of technological disruption, the pharma industry is quick to adapt to the changing times. In fact, leading drug companies are re-investing as much as 20.8% of drug sales into new drug development.  We’ve analyzed the trends shaping the future of pharma before, but how can we expect to see the landscape evolve in this new decade? With leaps in A.I., patient empowerment and 3D printed drugs, here are the 5 aspects that will be the focus of pharmaceutical co...
Source: The Medical Futurist - February 25, 2020 Category: Information Technology Authors: Prans Tags: Future of Pharma digital health future of medicine pharmaceutics digital health companies Source Type: blogs

Evidence for Better Blood Supply to the Hippocampus to Slow Cognitive Decline
As outlined in the research reported here, the variable physiology of the hippocampus allows for an interesting natural experiment to determine the degree to which blood supply is important in the aging of the brain. It is known that capillary density declines with age throughout the body, and this affects the supply of oxygen and nutrients to tissues. The brain is a particularly energy hungry organ, and reduced supply produces consequences. It isn't just capillary density that is important in aging, however, but also the general decline in physical fitness and ability of the heart to pump blood uphill to the brain. This l...
Source: Fight Aging! - February 24, 2020 Category: Research Authors: Reason Tags: Daily News Source Type: blogs

Making Mistakes Teaching Anatomy & Physiology | Episode 63
Host Kevin Patton discusses the fact that mistakes in teaching anatomy& physiology happen —and that it'sokay. And how to deal with the embarrassment. Also: how stress makes our hair turn gray and a newly discovered immune lymphocyte.00:47 | How Stress Grays Our Hair05:16 | Sponsored by AAA06:54 | New Type of Immune Cell13:02 | Sponsored by HAPI13:49 | Making Mistakes27:23 | Sponsored by HAPS28:08 | Survey Says...28:34 | Staying ConnectedIf you cannot see or activate the audio playerclick here. Please take the anonymous survey:theAPprofessor.org/survey Questions& Feedback:1-833-LION-DE...
Source: The A and P Professor - February 24, 2020 Category: Physiology Authors: Kevin Patton Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Rads: Dr. Supriya Gupta MD
Dr. Supriya Gupta MD is a Radiologist at AMITA Health St. Mary ’s Hospital - Kankakee, IL Tell us about your area of clinical expertise within your practice/organization: I am responsible for pretty much all radiology studies except vascular IR, with a focus on neuroradiology and breast imaging, two image-intensive subspecialties. Along with that I look at the IT and dose sub-committee at the local site, advising solutions which benefit us and integrate the best technology with the highest benefit to cost ratio. I am also responsible for supervising quality metrics in the radiology department, with emphasis on m...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs

Renaissance Radiologists: Meet AJ Gunn, MD
AJ Gunn, M.D. graduated magna cum laude from Brigham Young University in Provo, UT, earning a BS in exercise physiology with a minor in sociology. He then returned home to South Dakota to attend medical school at the University of South Dakota. During medical school, he participated in the competitive Howard Hughes Medical Institute – National Institutes of Health Research Scholars Program and was awarded the Donald L. Alcott, M.D. Award for Clinical Promise. He graduated summa cum laude in 2009. He completed his diagnostic radiology residency at the Massachusetts General Hospital of Harvard Medical School in Boston,...
Source: radRounds - February 21, 2020 Category: Radiology Authors: Robin Pine Miles Source Type: blogs