Religious Identity and Health Inequalities in Canada
AbstractIn the past few decades, most new immigrants to Canada have originated from non-Christian countries. During the same period, the unaffiliation rates have sharply increased in Canada. This paper investigates whether there are any health inequalities associated with religious identity, including also the individuals who do not identify with organized religion in the analysis. The study uses the Canadian General Social Survey of 2012 (N  = 23,093), focused on Caregiving and Care-receiving. Employing multivariate regression analysis and controlling for a large set of characteristics inclusive of the degre...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Ethnic Discrimination and Smoking-Related Outcomes among Former and Current Arab Male Smokers in Israel: The Buffering Effects of Social Support
We examined the relationship between two forms of ethnic discrimination —interpersonal and institutional—and smoking outcomes among Arab men in Israel, and whether social support buffered these associations. We used cross-sectional data of adult Arab men, current or former smokers (n = 954). Mixed-effects regression models estimated the association between discr imination and smoking status, and nicotine dependence among current smokers. Interpersonal discrimination was associated with higher likelihood of being a current smoker compared to a former smoker, whereas institutional group discriminati...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Social Support and HIV Risks Among Migrant and Non-Migrant Market Workers in Almaty, Kazakhstan
AbstractMigration processes are listed within the primary factors facilitating the heterosexual spread of HIV. The study examines the relationship between social support, sexual HIV risk behaviors and sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among 1342 male migrant and non-migrant market workers from Barakholka Market in Almaty, Kazakhstan. Results: (1) higher level of perceived social support [Enhancing Recovery in Coronary Heart Disease (ENRICHD) Social Support Instrument (ESSI score)] was associated with a lower likelihood of having sex with a female sex worker (FSW) [OR  = 0.952 (0.927, 0.978) p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Hepatitis B Knowledge Among Vietnamese Americans: A Population-Based Survey
AbstractVietnamese Americans have high rates of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection but low rates of knowledge and screening. A population-based survey conducted in 2011 of Vietnamese Americans in two geographic areas (n  = 1666) was analyzed. The outcome variables were having heard of HBV and a score summarizing knowledge of HBV transmission. Most respondents (86.0%) had heard of HBV. Correct knowledge of transmission ranged from 59.5% for sex, 68.1% for sharing toothbrushes, 78.6% for during birth, and 85.0% f or sharing needles. In multivariable analyses, factors associated with having heard of HBV and highe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Evidence of Local HIV Transmission in the African Community of King County, Washington
AbstractLittle is known about the frequency of ongoing HIV transmission within U.S. African immigrant communities. We used HIV surveillance and partner services data to describe African-born persons newly reported with HIV infection in King County (KC), WA from 1/1/2010 to 12/31/2013. We performed phylogenetic clustering analysis of HIV-1 pol to identify putative transmission events within this population. From 2010 to 2013, 1148 KC adults were reported with HIV, including 102 (9  %) born in Africa. Forty-one African-born cases were interviewed and reported diagnosis after arrival in the U.S. Fourteen (34 %) repo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Self-efficacy for HIV Prevention Among Refugee Hispanic Women in South Florida
AbstractThe number of refugees increased in recent years due to factors worldwide, including violence, wars, political strife, and natural disasters. Refugees who are Hispanic women (RHW) in South Florida are a vulnerable population at risk of acquiring HIV infection. Although studies have shown a relationship between self-efficacy for HIV prevention and behavior changes, none have studied RHW. The purpose of this study was to assess whether predictors suggested by the literature were related to self-efficacy for HIV prevention in a sample of RHW. The study is a secondary analysis that uses baseline data from a randomized ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

HIV Knowledge Among Pregnant Latinas in Rural South Carolina
AbstractTo inform and strengthen culturally-tailored HIV perinatal prevention, we assessed HIV knowledge among pregnant Latinas receiving prenatal care in rural South Carolina. We administered an 11 item HIV knowledge scale (n  = 171). Women who answered 8 of 11 (73 %) items correctly were categorized as having “high” knowledge;
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Health Benefits Mandates and Their Potential Impacts on Racial/Ethnic Group Disparities in Insurance Markets
AbstractAddressing racial/ethnic group disparities in health insurance benefits through legislative mandates requires attention to the different proportions of racial/ethnic groups among insurance markets. This necessary baseline data, however, has proven difficult to measure. We applied racial/ethnic data from the 2009 California Health Interview Survey to the 2012 California Health Benefits Review Program Cost and Coverage Model to determine the racial/ethnic composition of ten health insurance market segments. We found disproportional representation of racial/ethnic groups by segment, thus affecting the health insurance...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Acceptability of Rapid HIV Testing Among Latinos in Washington Heights, New York City, New York, USA
This study assessed the acceptability of rapid HIV testing among a sample of Latinos from New York City. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 192 participants from The Washington Heights/Inwood Informatics Infrastructure for Community-Centered Comparative Effectiveness Research (WICER) study. Participants were interviewed and offered rapid HIV testing and post-test counseling. Seventy-five percent (n  = 143) accepted rapid HIV testing when offered. More religious participants were less likely than less religious participants to undergo testing (RR = 0.73; 95% CI 0.54–0.99). Participa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Community Standard: Equivalency of Healthcare in Australian Immigration Detention
This article argues that the principle of equivalency is not being applied and that this standard of health and healthcare will remain unachievable in Australian immigration detention without significant reform. Alternate approaches to addressing the well documented issues rel ated to health and healthcare in Australian immigration detention are discussed. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Tuberculosis Among Incarcerated Hispanic Persons in the United States, 1993 –2014
We examined the National tuberculosis surveillance system to describe Hispanic persons who were incarcerated at time of tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis and to compare their characteristics with those of non-Hispanic incarcerated TB patients. After declines between 1993 and 2002, the annual proportion of Hispanic TB patients who were incarcerated grew from 4.9% in 2003 to 8.4% in 2014. During 2003 –2014, 19% of incarcerated US-born TB patients were Hispanic, and 86% of the foreign-born were Hispanic. Most incarcerated TB patients were in local jails, but about a third of all foreign-born Hispanics were in the facility cat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

U.S. Citizen Children of Undocumented Parents: The Link Between State Immigration Policy and the Health of Latino Children
AbstractWe examine Latino citizen children in mixed-status families and how their physical health status compares to their U.S. citizen, co-ethnic counterparts. We also examine Latino parents ’ perceptions of state immigration policy and its implications for child health status. Using the 2015 Latino National Health and Immigration Survey (n = 1493), we estimate a series of multivariate ordered logistic regression models with mixed-status family and perceptions of state immigration p olicy as primary predictors. We find that mixed-status families report worse physical health for their children as compared t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Syphilis Among U.S.-Bound Refugees, 2009 –2013
AbstractU.S. immigration regulations require clinical and serologic screening for syphilis for all U.S.-bound refugees 15  years of age and older. We reviewed syphilis screening results for all U.S.-bound refugees from January 1, 2009 through December 31, 2013. We calculated age-adjusted prevalence by region and nationality and assessed factors associated with syphilis seropositivity using multivariable log binomial r egression models. Among 233,446 refugees, we identified 874 syphilis cases (373 cases per 100,000 refugees). The highest overall age-adjusted prevalence rates of syphilis seropositivity were observed amo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Medicaid Expansion and Healthcare Access: Lessons from Asian American and Pacific Islander Experiences in California
AbstractMedicaid coverage increases access to care and improves health outcomes for disadvantaged populations. Yet disparities in enrollment and access to care persist. To understand the facilitators and barriers of Medicaid enrollment and accessing care under the Affordable Care Act for disadvantaged Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders. Focus groups and key informant interviews were conducted. Informational barriers to accessing care were pervasive among most new enrollees. Immigrants with limited English proficiency experienced disproportionate difficulties in enrolling and accessing care post enrollment. The simplifie...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Engaging African and Caribbean Immigrants in HIV Testing and Care in a Large US City: Lessons Learned from the African Diaspora Health Initiative
AbstractThe lifting in 2010 of the HIV entry ban eliminated an access point for HIV testing of the foreign-born. The African Diaspora Health Initiative (ADHI) was developed to examine alternative pathways to testing for African and Caribbean persons. The ADHI consists of Clinics Without Walls (CWW) held in community settings. HIV testing is offered to participants along with hypertension and diabetes screening. A survey is administered to participants. Descriptive data were analyzed using SAS 9.2. Between 2011 and 2015, 4152 African and Caribbean individuals participated in 352 CWW. Participants were mostly (67.7  %) ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

HIV-Related Stigma Among Spanish-speaking Latinos in an Emerging Immigrant Receiving City
This study assessed community HIV-related stigma within an emerging Latino immigrant receiving city. We conducted a brief survey among a convenience sample of 312 Spanish-speaking Latinos in Baltimore, Maryland. HIV-related stigma was assessed through six items. Associations between stigma items, socio-demographic characteristics, and HIV testing history were considered. Gender, education, and religiosity were significantly associated with stigmatizing HIV-related beliefs. For example, men were 3.4 times more likely to hold more than three stigmatizing beliefs than women, and were also twice as likely as women to report fe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Exploring Factors Influencing Childhood Obesity Prevention Among Migrant Communities in Victoria, Australia: A Qualitative Study
AbstractDespite the availability of numerous obesity prevention initiatives in developed countries including Australia, rising childhood obesity levels have been found among migrant communities which contribute to widening obesity-related disparities in these countries. We sought to understand the factors influencing the participation of migrant communities in childhood obesity prevention initiatives. We conducted a qualitative study using semi-structured interviews among 48 migrant parents from African, Middle Eastern, Indian and Vietnamese origins living in disadvantaged areas of Victoria, Australia to explore their view...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Living with Diabetes: Personal Interviews with Pakistani Women in Norway
This study aims to assess how they live with the disease and their response to lifestyle and medical information. 120 Pakistani women living in Norway (mean age: 55.7 years) were personally interviewed about their T2D using a structured questionnaire (response rate: 95%). The participants were first-generation immigrants (mean residence time: 28.7 years) of whom 27% were illiterates. Poor health was reported by one-third, and 71% had developed macrovascular comorbidities. A majority reported physical inactivity and an unhealthy diet included religious fasting. One-third was not able to self-measure their blood glucose. The...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Emotional Distress, Medical Utilization, and Disability Claims in Adult Refugees
AbstractThe refugee health screener-15 (RHS-15) is utilized as a diagnostic proxy for common mental disorders in refugees. Studies are needed to determine its clinical and social utility. A retrospective chart analysis of adult refugees compared RHS-15 scores to utilization of medical services and presence of disability claims. Refugees with negative, positive, and highly positive RHS-15 scores attended 3.1, 4.4, and 5.7 mean primary care visits and 1.6, 2.8, and 4.4 mean non-primary care visits, respectively (p  
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Anxiety Sensitivity and Age: Roles in Understanding Subjective Social Status among Low Income Adult Latinos in Primary Care
AbstractOne social determinant of health construct that is reliably related to health disparities among the Latino population is subjective social status, reflecting subjective ratings of social standing. Yet, little research has explored factors that may undergird variability in subjective social status among this population or in general. Accordingly, the present investigation examined one possible etiological model wherein age moderates the relation between individual differences in anxiety sensitivity (fear of the negative consequences of stress sensations) and subjective social status among a Latino primary care sampl...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Impact of Refugee Mothers ’ Trauma, Posttraumatic Stress, and Depression on Their Children’s Adjustment
AbstractThe mechanisms linking refugee parents ’ trauma onto their children’s functioning are not well understood. The current study sought to identify how Somali refugee mothers’ past trauma and current mental health impact their children’s psychosocial adjustment. One hundred and ninety-eight Somali mothers (M age  = 39 years) and their children (M age  = 10 years; 56% male) were studied. On average, mothers spent 7 years in refugee camps, experienced significant trauma, and some had been tortured. Measures of mothers’ posttraumatic stress and depre...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Exploring Health Service Underutilization: A Process Evaluation of the Newcomer Women ’s Health Clinic
AbstractThe BC Women ’s Hospital and Health Centre’s Newcomer Women’s Health Clinic (NWHC) opened in 2014 to fill a gap in services for newcomer women to Canada residing in Metro Vancouver. After 1 year the NWHC was operating at only 50% capacity. An evaluation was conducted to better understand the underutilizat ion of clinic services. Evaluation data was collected via patient intake forms, patient feedback surveys, and one-to-one interviews with both newcomer women and service providers who work with newcomer women. Results highlight the heterogeneity in newcomer women’s experiences including...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Retention of Ethnic Participants in Longitudinal Studies
AbstractWe aimed to identify effective participant retention strategies utilized in longitudinal studies of ethnic groups, specifically those from South Asian and Chinese communities. We conducted a systematic review of the literature focusing on the retention of ethnic minorities in longitudinal studies, up until April 2017. Only peer-reviewed research was included. 11,316 citations were retrieved, of which 4808 were duplicates and 51 met the inclusion criteria. Financial incentives, involving key community members, flexible scheduling, developing trust and personal connections with participants, and having extensive part...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Conceptual Model for Home Based Primary Care of Older Refugees
AbstractThe needs of refugees in the United States can often optimally be met through home based primary care (HBPC). Until recently, however, there has been little research into the methods of best practice and challenges of providing home based care to refugee groups. The model for the HBPC of refugees proposed here is the result of a comprehensive review of the literature combined with professional practice. Emphasis is placed on the elements of care identified as most affecting health and quality of life outcomes for refugees receiving HBPC. The key inputs for positive health and quality of life outcomes identified are...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Comprehensive Health Profile of Guyanese Immigrants Aged 18 –64 in Schenectady, New York
AbstractGuyanese immigrants are the 5th largest foreign-born group in NY State, but sparse literature is available on their health status and health needs. A community-based health interview survey of Schenectady NY residents aged 18 –64 (N = 1861) was analyzed. Bivariate comparisons between Guyanese respondents and White, Black, and Hispanic respondents were made for each variable to identify disparities. As predominantly low SES immigrants, Guyanese adults were less likely to be covered by health insurance, have a usual place for care, and receive cancer screenings. They were more likely to engage in ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Latinas ’ Colorectal Cancer Screening Knowledge, Barriers to Receipt, and Feasibility of Home-Based Fecal Immunochemical Testing
AbstractLatinas ’ high colorectal cancer (CRC) mortality makes them a priority population for CRC screening. CRC screening knowledge, perceived barriers, and feasibility of using the Fecal Immunochemical Test (FIT) was assessed among Latinas in Utah. Participants aged ≥50 (n = 95) were surveyed about knowle dge and barriers to CRC screening. 27 participants completed a FIT and evaluation survey. Fisher’s exact tests assessed sociodemographic correlates of CRC screening outcomes. Most participants were overdue for CRC screening (n = 81, 85%). Age, acculturation, education, and empl...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Associations of Work Stress, Supervisor Unfairness, and Supervisor Inability to Speak Spanish with Occupational Injury among Latino Farmworkers
This study attempts to address these questions. Surveys were administered via interviews to 225 Latino thoroughbred farmworkers. Multivariable logistic regression analyses were performed to calculate odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) of occupational injury in the past year in relation to occupational characteristics. Work stress (OR 6.70, 95% CI 1.84 –24.31), supervisor unfairness (OR 3.34, 95% CI 1.14–9.73), longer tenure at farm (OR 2.67, 95% CI 1.13–6.34), and supervisor inability to speak Spanish (OR 2.29, 95% CI 1.05–5.00) were significantly associated with increased odds of oc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Knowledge, Awareness, and Prevention of Hepatitis B Virus Infection Among Korean American Parents
This study demonstrates a low level of knowledge of HB among Korean American parents electing to attend a hepatitis education program. In addition, many parents are not aware of their children’s screening and immune (or non-immune) status. The lack of health literacy may contribute to poor heal th access in HB care, not only in adults but also in children. This suggests an urgent need for education on HB in Korean American parents as well as in young children. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Challenges in the Provision of Sexual and Reproductive Health Care to Refugee and Migrant Women: A Q Methodological Study of Health Professional Perspectives
AbstractThis Q methodological study was conducted to examine the perspectives of health professionals in providing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care to refugee and migrant women. Forty-seven health professionals rank-ordered 42 statements and commented on their rankings in subsequent open-ended questions. A bi-person factor analysis was performed and factors were extracted according to the centroid method with a varimax rotation. Seven factors each with a distinct and meaningful viewpoint were identified. These factors are: “Communication difficulties—hurdles to counselling”, “Lack of access...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Challenges to the Provision of Sexual and Reproductive Health Care to Refugee and Migrant Women: A Q Methodological Study of Health Professional Perspectives
AbstractThis Q methodological study was conducted to examine the perspectives of health professionals in providing sexual and reproductive health (SRH) care to refugee and migrant women. Forty-seven health professionals rank-ordered 42 statements and commented on their rankings in subsequent open-ended questions. A bi-person factor analysis was performed and factors were extracted according to the centroid method with a varimax rotation. Seven factors each with a distinct and meaningful viewpoint were identified. These factors are: “Communication difficulties—hurdles to counselling”, “Lack of access...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Response to Predictors of Heart Disease Knowledge Among Older and Younger Asian Indian Adults
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Reaching Out for Help: An Analysis of the Differences Between Refugees Who Accept and Those Who Decline Community Mental Health Services
AbstractIn 2012, clinics in Louisville, Kentucky began to use the RHS-15 to screen for mental health issues among refugees. At the same time, mental health outreach programs were developed and implemented by the Mental Health Coordinator. Data from 563 refugee clients referred to the Mental Health Coordinator from 2012 to 2015 was analyzed to examine differences between refugees who accepted referral to community mental health services and those who declined on the variables age, gender, country of origin, time in the U.S., and referral source. Results indicate significant differences with regard to time in the U.S. and re...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Healthful, Cultural Foods and Safety Net Use Among Cambodian and Brazilian Immigrant Communities in Massachusetts
AbstractDeclining health and food security status among low-income immigrants in the U.S. may result from limited access to healthful, cultural foods and safety net programs. We held focus group discussions with low-income Cambodian and Brazilian immigrants (11 groups, n  = 84) living in Massachusetts. Cambodians and Brazilians valued healthful, cultural foods, emphasizing their beliefs that cultural foods are healthier and beneficial for weight management and aging. Although both groups could access these foods, some individuals had difficulty affording them. C ambodians reported that food quality decreased ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

How Have You Been? or ¿Como estás?: Does Language of Interview Influences Self-Rated Health Among Hispanic Subgroups?
AbstractThis paper reports language differences in poor/fair self-rated health (SRH) among adults from six Hispanic groups in the United States. Data are from the cross-sectional 1997 –2013 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). The total sample of Hispanic adults with valid information for the variables considered in the study (n = 156,374) included Mexican-Americans (Mex-Am; n = 43,628), Mexicans (n = 55,057), Puerto Ricans (n = 14,631), Cubans (n = 8,04 1), Dominicans (from Dominican Republican, n = 4,359) and Other Hispanics (n&...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated to Medication Consumption Among the Immigrant Population Residing in Spain
AbstractWe aimed to determine the prevalence of medication use by the immigrant population residing in Spain, and to identify the factors associated with this consumption. Descriptive cross-sectional study was performed using secondary data retrieved from the 2012 Spanish National Health Survey (SNHS). Using logistic multivariate regression analysis, three models were generated: one for immigrants from high income countries (HIC), another for immigrants from low income countries (LIC), and a third one for the native population. The prevalence of total consumption of medicinal products is greater in the native population (6...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Tensions and Coping Strategies in Ethnically Mixed Teams: Findings from a Study in Two Emergency Departments
The objective of the study was to assess tensions and coping strategies among ethnic minority and majority healthcare workers. A questionnaire was delivered to 60 healthcare workers e mployed in emergency departments in two hospitals, where Jewish majority and Arab minority workers care for a mixed Jewish and Arab population. Internal consistency reliability was assessed and the survey data were statistically analyzed. Several differences were found between Arab and Jewish health care workers. The questionnaire may be used to examine tensions in other healthcare systems, characterized by ethnic/racial diversity in the work...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Predicting Sodium Intake of Korean Americans with Type 2 Diabetes
AbstractThe increasing prevalence of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and its complications including cardiovascular disease and chronic kidney disease threaten Korean Americans (KAs). High dietary sodium intake contributes to both conditions. The purpose of the study was to assess dietary sodium consumption and to examine the predictors of sodium intake among KA with T2DM. A total 232 KA who had uncontrolled diabetes participated in this study. The majority of the sample (69%) consumed more sodium than current national guidelines. A high level of energy intake was the strongest predictor for sodium intake with gender and m...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Changing SNAP-Participation Trends Among Farmworker Households in the U.S., 2003 –2012
AbstractWe investigated Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) participation among citizen, documented and undocumented immigrant hired crop farmworkers for ten recent years. We analyzed population representative data from the National Agricultural Workers Survey for 2003 –2012 (N = 18,243 households). Time-chart, simple mean differences, and logistic regressions described farmworker household participation in SNAP. The 2008 financial crisis almost doubled SNAP-participation by agriculture households (6.5% in 2003–2007 vs. 11.3% in 2008–2012). The increasin g SNAP-participation was...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Health of International Marriage Immigrant Women in South Korea: A Systematic Review
AbstractInternational marriage migration is now one of the most prominent forms of migration in Asia, and the number of women migrating to South Korea for marriage has increased dramatically in the last two decades. In this article, we provide a systematic review regarding the health status and health-related issues of international marriage immigrant women. The literature search identified 620 articles, of which 53 studies are presented in the article. Three overarching categories including six subcategories were identified according to the research focus; ‘Environmental factors of health’ including social sup...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Preventing Tuberculosis in a Low Incidence Setting: Evaluation of a Multi-lingual, Online, Educational Video on Latent Tuberculosis
AbstractTreating latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in those at risk is an important yet challenging cornerstone of TB elimination. We evaluated a culturally-tailored, multi-lingual, 4.5-min, health promotional video on LTBI. Mixed methods study assessed use of the video with web-analytics, acceptability of content through interviews and survey questions, and compared knowledge scores in viewers and non-viewers using a survey. The video was viewed 6999 times in six languages over 1  year. Of 1598 survey respondents, 193 viewers had a mean knowledge score of 59%, compared to 38% in non-viewers. Eighty-four percent of...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Qualitative Study of Latino Cancer Patient Perspectives on Care Access and Continuity in a Rural, U.S.-Mexico Border Region
AbstractAccess to quality cancer care for cancer patients living in the rural U.S.-Mexico border region is complex due to common binational health care-seeking behaviors and regional socio-economic and cultural characteristics. But little is known about the challenges border dwelling residents face when navigating their cancer care systems. In-depth interviews were conducted with 22 cancer patients in Southern California. Thematic analysis was applied to identify patterns of meaning in the data. Emerging themes were: (1) delays in cancer care coordination: (a) poor coordination of cancer care (b) U.S. and cross-border disc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Psychological Consequences of Pre-Emigration Trauma and Post-Migration Stress in Refugees and Immigrants from Africa
AbstractOver 50 million people have been displaced, some as a result of conflict, which exposure can lead to psychiatric sequelae. The aims of this study were to provide estimates of pre-emigration trauma, post-migration stress, and psychological sequelae of immigrants and refugees from predominantly Sub-Saharan Africa who immigrated to  Sweden. We also examined the predictors of the psychiatric sequelae as well as acculturation within the host country. A total of 420 refugees and immigrants were enrolled using stratified quota sampling. A battery of questionnaires including the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire, Post-Migr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Sensitivity and Specificity in Three Measures of Depression Among Mexican American Women
This study suggests that the K-10 and MDD CIDI-SF measures are complementary to each other for screening of depressive symptomatology. Implications for cultural and linguist ic assessment of depression are further discussed. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Mental Health Status of Double Minority Adolescents: Findings from National Cross-Sectional Health Surveys
This study aimed to provide an overview on their mental health. Analysis of data from a total of 17,607 high school students from New Zealand ’s 2007 and 2012 cross-sectional nationally representative Adolescent Health Surveys, including a total of 1306 (7.4%) SG minority participants, of whom 581 (3.3%) were also an ethnic minority. SG minority status, minority ethnicity, and female sex were associated with higher mental distress and p oorer well-being. Generally speaking, double minority students reported poorer mental health than SG majority students of the same ethnicity, but reported better mental health than SG...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Chronic Physical Illness Burden and Suicidal Ideation Among Dominicans in New York City
This study used data from a community survey of 2753 Dominican adults in New York City. SI included thoughts of self-harm or being better off dead in the past month. Chronic physical illness burden was categorized as having 0, 1, or 2+ diagnosed conditions. Adjusted logistic regressions evaluated the association between number of conditions and SI, overall and stratified by sex and age. Adjusted models yielded a strong association between chronic illness burden and SI among men [odds ratio (OR) 5.57, 95  % confidence interval (CI) 2.19–14.18] but not women (OR 0.80, 95 % CI 0.50–1.29; interactionp&nbs...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Barriers Accessing Mental Health Services Among Culturally and Linguistically Diverse (CALD) Immigrant Women in Australia: Policy Implications
This article proposes recommendations for policies to better address the mental health needs of immigrant and refugee women. Key policy recommendations include: support for gender specific research, implementation and evaluation of transcultural policies, cultural responsiveness in service delivery, review of immigration and refugee claims policies and social integration of immigrants. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

An 11-Year Analysis of Emergency Presentations of Melioidosis in Northeastern Malaysia
AbstractA neglected tropical disease, melioidosis is known to have variability in clinical presentations. Here, we described clinical features that should alert the physicians on the possibility of melioidosis. In this review of 86 cases from 2001 to 2011, the common presentations of melioidosis in the Emergency Department (ED), Hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia were; male gender (79.1  %), in working age group (47.8 ± 15.2 year-old), worked in contact with soil (73.3 %), presented with fever (91.9 %), in rainy season (55.8 %), have underlying diabetes mellitus (79.1 %), have...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Social Capital and the Paradox of Poor but Healthy Groups in the United States
AbstractIncreased income strongly correlates with improved health and lower mortality risk. Yet in spite of having a lower mean and median income, both Hispanics and the foreign-born living within the U.S. have higher longevity compared with native-born, non-Hispanics. We explored the role of structural social capital in conferring protection against poor health outcomes among Hispanics and the foreign-born in the US. We used the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey III 1988 –1994 linked to prospective mortality follow up to examine the relationship between five measures of structural social capital and: ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Insecurity and Risk of Depression Among Refugees and Immigrants in South Africa
AbstractSouth Africa ’s refugee population has grown considerably over the last decade. Both food insecurity and mental illness are common in developing countries, but this relationship remains unexamined in an African refugee population. 335 adult refugees in Durban, South Africa were interviewed using a self-report of food insecurity and the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. The proportion of those who responded ‘often true’ to not having enough food and eating less was 23.1 and 54.3 %, respectively. The proportion of individuals with a significant level of anxiety and depressive symptomatology was 49....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Postpartum Depression Among Somali Women in Norway
AbstractPostpartum depression (PPD) has been described as the most common complication experienced postpartum, affecting about 10 –15 % of all new mothers. Factors like a history of mental illness, and experienced recent adverse life events has been associated with an increased risk for developing PPD. Immigrant women in Western countries have been found to have a marked higher prevalence of PPD compared to the general pop ulation. In Norway the prevalence of PPD in the general population has been found to be around 8–10 %, and among Pakistani immigrants a rate of 7.6 % was found. Somali pe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research