Mental Health of Refugees and Non-refugees from War-Conflict Countries: Data from Primary Healthcare Services and the Norwegian Prescription Database
This study aims to determine whether their mental health differs. Using national registry data, refugees and non-refugees from the same countries were compared on primary healthcare service use for mental health problems and purchase of psychotropic medicine. Refugees had higher odds of using primary health care services than non-refugees. Refugee women were more likely to purchase psychotropic medicine than non-refugee women. Refugee men were more likely to purchase anti-depressants. The findings suggest that refugees have poorer mental health than non-refugees. This may be due to a combination of greater pre-migration tr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Involuntary Tobacco Smoking Exposure Among Korean American Emerging Adults: A Qualitative Study
AbstractHigh smoking prevalence among Korean American (KA) males place KA family members and co-workers at an elevated risk of involuntary tobacco smoke exposure (ITSE). KA emerging adults (EAs) face an additional risk of ITSE by their peers, as emerging adulthood is associated with increased smoking. This paper explores health behaviors, attitudes and beliefs of ITSE among KAEA. Qualitative data analysis was conducted on transcripts from ten focus groups (N  = 67). Themes related toattitudes and perceptions of ITSE were identified: high level of cultural tolerance, lack of knowledge/insufficient information, per...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Indigenous Adolescents ’ Suicidal Behaviors and Risk Factors: Evidence from the National Youth Risk Behavior Survey
AbstractThe study sought to examine indigenous adolescents ’ suicidal behaviors and risk factors in a nationally representative sample and explore potential causes of disparities. The study analyzed the 1991–2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey National Combined Datasets. Suicidal behavior outcomes included suicide consideration, planning, and attempts durin g the past 12 months. Logit regressions were used to estimate the effects of potential suicide risk factors on these suicidal behaviors. The results showed that a high percentage of indigenous adolescents exhibited suicidal behaviors (consideration: 24.6&nb...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Gender Differences in Stressors Related to Migration and Acculturation in Patients with Psychiatric Disorders and Turkish Migration Background
AbstractMigration, acculturation, and psychiatric disorders may cause stress and adaptation processes differently in men and women, but empirical research is scarce. In a retrospective study n  = 62 Turkish migrants and n = 62 native German inpatients with depressive or anxiety disorders, matched for age, gender, and diagnoses, were compared using a 10-item instrument for the assessment of migration- and acculturation related stressors (MIGSTR10). Gender differences in the prevalence of stressors and in the total sum of stressors were calculated and compared between migrants and indigenous patients. Res...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

African Immigrants in Low-Wage Direct Health Care: Motivations, Job Satisfaction, and Occupational Mobility
This study explores motivations, job satisfaction, and overall perceived occupational mobility for African immigrants working in low-wage direct health care occupations. The study uses qualitative semi-structured interviews with a sample of thirty African immigrant workers in the greater Pittsburgh metropolitan area. Results show that four major themes captured the motivations of interviewees for doing direct care work: passion for care work, quick money, easily obtained employment, and direct care work as a pathway to other health occupations. The majority of the interviewees were satisfied with their jobs, yet almost all...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 21, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Medical Care, Screening and Regularization of Sub-Saharan Irregular Migrants Affected by Hepatitis B in France and Italy
This study describes how specific national immigration and health policies impact in a different way the therapeutic and social path of migrants suffering from hepatitis B. The analysis provides useful material for the development of strategies to prevent and control hepatitis B among the migrant population. It also shows how social determinants affect migrants’ health more than values or cultural factors do. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 20, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Alcohol use Exacerbates Acculturative Stress Among Recently Immigrated, Young Adult Latinas
AbstractAssociations between theorized sociocultural factors and acculturative stress were examined among Latina immigrants (aged 18 –23 years) during their initial months in the US. Participants’ quantity of alcohol use was hypothesized to be linked with more acculturative stress. Using respondent-driven sampling, 530 Latinas who recently immigrated to Miami-Dade County, Florida, were recruited from community activities, Lat ino health fairs, advertisements at community agencies, and online postings. A path analysis revealed associations between acculturative stress and more time in the US and greater commitme...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Correlates and Predictors of Mobility Limitation in Community-Dwelling Hispanic Older Adults in the United States: A Systematic Review
This article presents a systematic review of the literature on correlates/predictors of mobility limitation among community-dwelling U.S. Hispanic older adults. A search of scientific databases (PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO) was conducted. After abstract and full text review, 20 epidemiologic studies that met all eligibility criteria were included. The theoretical framework of mobility was used to categorize factors related to mobility limitation. The majority of the studies reviewed (n = 17) examined some aspect of physical factors in relation to mobility limitation. Several factors emerged as important infl...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Changing Places, Changing Plates? A Binational Comparison of Barriers and Facilitators to Healthful Eating Among Central American Communities
AbstractTo understand the process by which immigrants adopt dietary practices, this study offers a binational comparison of factors that predispose, enable, and reinforce healthful eating in the sending and receiving countries. Data are from two qualitative studies that examined barriers and facilitators to healthful eating in El Salvador (four focus groups, n  = 28 adults) and in the US (30 in-depth interviews n = 15 mothers recently migrated from Central America). There was a strong emphasis on hygiene and vitamin-content of foods among participants in El Salvador. In both settings, participan...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 19, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Cognitive Function and Vascular Risk Factors Among Older African American Adults
AbstractTo evaluate the association between vascular risk factors and cognitive impairment among older African American (AA) adults in a primary care clinic. Participants included 96 AA adults aged 60 years or older who were evaluated for global and domain-specific cognition. Participants were interviewed using the Computerized Assessment of Memory and Cognitive Impairment (CAMCI). The relationship between CAMCI cognitive domain scores and vascular risk factors were examined using hierarchical regression models. Patients who smoked, those with higher SBP/DBP values had lower accuracy rates on CAMCI cognitive domains (atten...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 17, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Self-management Following a Cardiac Event in People of Chinese Ethnicity Living in Western Countries: A Scoping Review
AbstractHealth outcomes and impact of cardiovascular disease vary between populations, where ethnic minorities and immigrant groups are more likely to be disadvantaged. Compared with the majority residents, health outcomes, especially short-term mortality from coronary heart disease event are worse in people of Chinese ethnicity, potentially due to poor self-management and experiences with the healthcare system in host countries. A scoping review was conducted. Four overarching themes were found: (1) understanding of heart disease, risk factors and symptom recognition, (2) adherence to medication and lifestyle modification...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 13, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Racial/Ethnic Differences in Those Accompanying Medicare Patients to the Doctor: Insights from the 2013 Medicare Current Beneficiary ’s Survey
AbstractSurprisingly little current, population-level detail exists regarding companion accompaniment for health care among Medicare beneficiaries, particularly by race/ethnicity. For respondents in the 2013 Medicare Current Beneficiary ’s Survey Access to Care public use data (N = 12,253), multivariable models predicted accompaniment to the doctor by race/ethnicity, adjusting for confounders. Chi square analyses compared, by race/ethnicity, who was accompanying and why. Overall, 37.5% of beneficiaries had accompaniment. In m ultivariable analyses, non-Hispanic blacks (OR 1.18; 95% CI 1.03–1.36) a...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 12, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Injuries Among School-aged Children of Immigrants
AbstractIn response to a dearth of research on injuries among children of immigrants, this study examined child injury rates by immigrant generation. We used generalized estimating equations and nationally representative data to estimate injury risk for school-aged children of immigrants of different generations compared to children of native, US-born parents. After controlling for multiple other factors including socioeconomic status, citizenship, and children ’s general health, both 1st and 2nd generation school-aged children had significantly lower odds of having injuries compared to children of natives. Additiona...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Unaccompanied Children at the United States Border, a Human Rights Crisis that can be Addressed with Policy Change
AbstractIn recent years, unaccompanied minors have been journeying to the United States (U.S.) –Mexico border in great numbers in order to escape violence, poverty and exploitation in their home countries. Yet, unaccompanied children attempting to cross the United States border face treatment at the hands of government representatives which violates their inherent rights as children. The re sult is a human rights crisis that has severe health consequences for the children. Their rights as children are clearly delineated in various, international human rights documents which merit increased understanding of and recogn...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Trust and Perceptions of Physicians ’ Nonverbal Behavior Among Women with Immigrant Backgrounds
AbstractPrevious findings suggest immigrant patients have lower trust in their physicians, and perceive nonverbal communication differently compared to non-immigrant patients. We tested discrepancies in trust and the impact of non-verbal behavior between immigrants and non-immigrants in The Netherlands. Nonverbal communication of an oncologist was systematically varied in an experimental video vignettes design. Breast cancer patients (n = 34) and healthy women (n = 34) viewed one of eight video versions and evaluated trust and perceived friendliness of the oncologist. In a matched control design...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Restrictive ID Policies: Implications for Health Equity
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 8, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

‘The Healthy Migrant Effect’ for Mental Health in England: Propensity-score Matched Analysis Using the EMPIRIC Survey
AbstractEvidence has demonstrated that immigrants have a mental health advantage over the indigenous population of developed countries. However, much of the evidence-base demonstrating this mental health advantage is susceptible to confounding and inadequate adjustment across immigrant and non-immigrant groups preventing a rigorous assessment of a ’healthy migrant effect’. To compare the risk of common mental disorders in the immigrant population compared to the non-immigrant population in ethnic minority groups in England. A propensity-score matched analysis was carried out to adequately balance immigrant and ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Assessing Hepatitis B Knowledge Among Immigrant Communities in New York City
The objective of this study was to assess the knowledge of Hepatitis B virus (HBV) among New York City immigrants. Data were obtained from cohort of 2385 persons at-risk for HBV, who completed a knowledge assessment survey during HBV screening events in 2010 –2013. HBV knowledge scores were very low among the tested population, with the majority answering every question incorrectly. Participants had higher odds of obtaining a better score if they were fluent in English or born in the US, where participants had lower odds if they were born in Africa or spoke French as their native language. Results show a distinct lac...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 7, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Refugee Acute Healthcare Utilization in Southern Connecticut
We examined associations between any acute care use and collected demographic a s well as health characteristics. Of the 248 refugees in our sample, 57% had a medical evaluation within 30 days of arrival. 102 (41%) had at least one acute care visit within 8 months of arrival. Male sex (OR 1.90, 95% CI 1.09–3.30) and prior history of hypertension (OR 2.87, 95% CI 1.06–7.33) were associated with greater likelihood of an acute care visit within 8 months of arrival, while having a medical evaluation within 30 days of arrival was associated with lower likelihood (OR 0.56, 95% CI 0.32–0.98). Designing systems t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Exploring Predictors of Information Use to Self-Manage Blood Pressure in Midwestern African American Women with Hypertension
AbstractSelf-management of hypertension requires patients to find, understand, and use information to lower their blood pressure. Little is known about information use among African American women with hypertension, therefore the purpose of this study was to examine predictors of self-reported information use to self-manage blood pressure. Ninety-four Midwestern African American women (mean age  = 59) completed questionnaires about information behaviors (seeking, sharing, use) and personal beliefs (attitude, social norms) related to self-management of blood pressure. Linear regression was used to identify sig...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 5, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Colorectal Cancer Screening Compliance among Asian and Pacific Islander Americans
This study examined disparities and predictors of CRC screening compliance in adults age 50 –75 years in Asians and Pacific Islanders in Hawai‘i. Hawai‘i Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System (BRFSS) data for 2011–2014 were analyzed. CRC screening status was dichotomized. Logistic regression was used to examine ethnic differences in and predictors of CRC screening status. Fil ipinos (OR 0.56), Chinese (OR 0.70), and Hawaiians (OR 0.75) were significantly less likely than whites to be CRC compliant. Higher education and income, employment, regular health provider, and routine checkups were ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Solution to Refugee Children Healthcare in Greece
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Utilitarian and Recreational Walking Among Spanish- and English-Speaking Latino Adults in Micropolitan US Towns
DiscussionApproaches to increase walking in micropolitan towns with sizable SSL populations may need to account for this group ’s differences in walking behaviors. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Effects of a Randomised Controlled School-Based Health Promotion Intervention on Obesity Related Behavioural Outcomes of Children with Migration Background
This study investigated a 1-year intervention with focus on increasing physical activity (PA) and fruit and vegetable intake (FVI), decreasing screen media use (SMU) and soft drink consumption (SDC) in children with MB. 525 children (7.1  ± 0.7 years) with MB who participated in the cluster-randomised study were assessed at baseline and after 1 year. Daily SMU, PA behaviours, SDC and FVI were assessed using a parental questionnaire. After one year, significant effects were found in the intervention group for FVI (p ≤ 0.035). Partially strong tendencies but no significant differe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Diet and Blood Pressure Control in Chinese Canadians: Cultural Considerations
AbstractHypertension is highly prevalent in Chinese Canadians and diet has been identified as an important modifiable risk factor for hypertension. The current anti-hypertensive dietary recommendations in hypertension care guidelines lack examination of cultural factors, are not culturally sensitive to ethnic populations, and cannot be translated to Chinese Canadian populations without cultural considerations. Guided by Leininger ’s Sunrise Model of culture care theory, this paper investigates how cultural factors impact Chinese Canadians’ dietary practice. It is proposed that English language proficiency, heal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Predictors of Obesity Among Nigerian Immigrants in the United States
Abstract Obesity is a highly prevalent cardiovascular disease risk factor globally and in African-descent populations. A cross-sectional study of obesity among a Nigerian immigrant sample population in the United States was conducted. Data was obtained through a web-based survey. Spearman ’s correlation and logistic regression were used to determine sociodemographic and behavioral determinants of obesity. The results showed no significant relationship between obesity and education, socioeconomic status, length of stay, and level of physical activity. However, we identified a signif icant association between weekly ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Cultural and Religious/Spiritual Beliefs and the Impact on Health that Fear to Death has on Gender and Age, Among a Romani Minority Group from Southern Spain
AbstractThe Romani cultural minority living in Spain has cultural values and beliefs, religious/spiritual expressions and a particular vision of death. The relationship between these aspects and health is unknown. A sample of 150 people responded to a socio-demographic questionnaire and well-being measures of religious/spiritual experience, paranormal beliefs and fear of death. Age, a negative sense of life, fear of the death of others, being a woman and having low paranormal beliefs have a negative impact on health. Results allow for extending the relationships found in the general population to the Romani population as w...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Comparison of Dietary Quality Among Puerto Ricans Living in Massachusetts and Puerto Rico
AbstractPuerto Ricans are burdened by nutrition-related diseases, with greater disease prevalence among Puerto Ricans residing in the continental U.S. compared to those in Puerto Rico (PR). However, little is known about diet quality of these two groups. To compare diet quality of Puerto Ricans in Massachusetts (MA) and PR. Puerto Rican patients from health centers in MA (n  = 42) and PR (n = 52) completed a food frequency questionnaire. Diet quality was assessed with the Healthy Eating Index-2010 (HEI). Analysis included Mann–Whitney, Chi square and logistic and quantile regressions. 57.1&nb...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Rapid Weight Gain in Pediatric Refugees after US Immigration
We examined the longitudinal weight trajectory of 1067 pediatric refugees seen in a single university based refugee health program between the dates of September 3, 2012 and September 3, 2014 to determine how quickly significant weight gain occurs post-arrival. The most recent BMI was abstracted from the electronic health record and charts reviewed to obtain serial BMI measurements in 3 year increments after the date of US arrival. The mean arrival BMI percent ile for all refugees was 47th percentile. This increased significantly to the 63rd percentile within 3 years of US arrival (p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Residential Environment for Outdoor Play Among Children in Latino Farmworker Families
AbstractChild health and development benefit from physical activity. This analysis describes the residential play environment for children aged 2 –4 years in farmworker families, their parent-reported levels of play and media time, and the association of residential environment with play and media time. Mothers with a child aged 2–4 years in farmworker families (n = 248) completed interviews over 2 years. Outcome measures were daily outdoor play time and media time. Measures of the residential environment included physical and social components. The mean min/day for outdoor play was 81....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Living in Two Cultures: Chinese Canadians ’ Perspectives on Health
AbstractChinese people have distinctive perspectives on health and illness that are largely unrecognized in Western society. The purpose of this descriptive study was to develop a profile of Chinese immigrants ’ beliefs and practices related to diet, mental and social health, and sexual health. A quantitative survey with descriptive and correlational analyses was employed to examine 100 first-generation Chinese immigrants living in four urban centres across Canada (Vancouver, Toronto, Halifax, and St. C atharines). Although most Chinese immigrants preferred a Chinese diet, where they resided affected the groceries th...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Dietary Acculturation and Type 2 Diabetes Risk Among Asian Indians in the U.S.
This study examined the relationship between dietary acculturation of Asian Indians in the U.S. and their future risk for type 2 diabetes. A validated Asian Indian Dietary Acculturation Measure (AIDAM) and the Finnish Diabetes Risk Score (FINDRISC) were completed by 153 Asian Indians in t he U.S. via a cross-sectional web-survey. Correlations and relative risk ratios were used to examine the association between AIDAM and FINDRISC. A significantly larger proportion of Non-Indian Oriented participants (44.7 %) had higher FINDRISC scores (scores 7–26) compared to the Asian Indian Ori ented group (27.9 %) (p&nb...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Younger Age and Health Beliefs Associated with Being Overdue for Pap Testing among Utah Latinas who were Non-Adherent to Cancer Screening Guidelines
AbstractFactors associated with being overdue for Papanicoloau (Pap) testing in a Latina community were examined. Female participants aged  ≥ 21 years, who were overdue for one or more cancer screenings (N = 206), were purposively recruited. Descriptive statistics, Fisher’s Exact Tests for count data, and multivariable logistic regressions were conducted. Participants overdue for cancer screening, aged 38–47 years demonstrated lower odds of being overdue for Pap testing compared with those 21 –37 years old (OR = 0.11, 95% CI = 0.01–0.49,p&th...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Intergenerational Conflicts, Cultural Restraints and Suicide: Experiences of Young African People in Adelaide, South Australia
This study aimed to explore determinants of increased suicide deaths among African youth in South Australia. The paper reports on the intersectionality between intergenerational conflicts and fatal suicides in the target population. The study employed a qualitative inquiry approach, studying 31 young people in the African community in Adelaide. Intergenerational conflicts were identified as pervasive, with negative implications for the affected individuals, their families, and the entire African community. These led to turmoil in the community, youth isolation, reduced social interactions, stress and fatal suicides. Interg...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Increasing Cancer Screening Among Old Order Anabaptist Women Through Specialized Women ’s Health and Integrated Cancer Screening Interventions
AbstractOur objective was to develop, deliver, and evaluate a cancer screening intervention focused on rural Anabaptist communities in Ontario, Canada, to increase routine cancer screenings among women. We carried out three cancer prevention and screening interventions with Old Order Anabaptist women. Each intervention consisted of: transportation to the site, pre-arranged screening services, health teachings, fellowship and shopping, and an evaluative survey. Seventy five women  total participated over three interventions. 85% of participants were under or never screened for cancer. This was the first breast screen f...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Culturally Relevant Human Subjects Protection Training: A Case Study in Community-Engaged Research in the United States
We present a case exemplar of the development of a human subjects protection training for research staff with limited English proficiency and/or no or limited research experience. Seven modules were adapted for language, cultural examples, etc., from the standard Collaborative Institutional Training Initiative (CITI) human subjects protection training. Non-academic research staff completed a day-long training in human subjects protection (six modules) and our research protocol (one module). We assessed comprehension of content with PowerPoint slides and module quizzes. All participants successfully passed each module quiz ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Reconceptulizing Language Discordance: Meanings and Experiences of Language Barriers in the U.S. and Taiwan
AbstractIndividuals with language barriers may face challenges unique to a host society. By examining and comparing the sociocultural conditions that can result in providers and patients not sharing the same language in the United States and in Taiwan, I argue that (a) language discordance is a social phenomenon that may entail diverging meanings and experiences in different countries; (b) language-discordant patients may not share similar experiences even if they are in the same country; and (c) disparities in language concordance may be confounded with other disparities and cultural particulars that are unique to a host ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Barriers to Healthcare among African Immigrants in Georgia, USA
AbstractAfrican-born immigrants are among the fastest growing immigrant groups in the US, yet they are underrepresented in healthcare research, particularly, cancer research and tend to be categorized as African American or Black, obscuring any cultural nuances that exist. A survey designed to provide insight on the barriers to healthcare, knowledge of common cancers, and cancer risks was utilized during a health fair. Data analyses included descriptive statistics to examine participant demographics and other study variables of interest. Most of the participants reported African origin (approximately 97%), were males (59%)...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 18, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Influences of Economic, Social and Cultural Marginalization on the Association Between Alcohol Use and Sexual Risk Among Formerly Incarcerated Latino Men
AbstractFormerly incarcerated Latino men (FILM) have been significantly impacted by the HIV/AIDS and alcohol abuse epidemics in the United States. In this analysis, we examine the role of social, economic and cultural marginalization in the likelihood of alcohol-related sexual risk taking behavior among FILM. We recruited a non-random sample of FILM, ages 18 –49 (n = 259). We performed logistic regression modeling to test four hypotheses examining the direct and moderating effects of socio-cultural factors. Drinking before sex was strongly associated with high likelihood of condomless intercourse (adjus...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Characterization of Foreign-Born vs. Native-Born Worker Fatalities in Kentucky, 2001 –2014
AbstractInformation on foreign-born worker (FBW) and native-born worker (NBW) fatal injuries is scarce. The Kentucky Fatality Assessment and Control Evaluation program analyzed 2001 –2014 worker fatality data. The Kentucky FBW fatality rate was double the US FBW and NBW rates, and 50% higher than the Kentucky NBW fatality rate. FBW average age at death was 38 years; NBW age was 47 years. FBW deaths occurred in construction (26%) and services (22%) industries, and transporta tion [28% (54% due to semi truck crashes)] and construction [26%(48% due to roofing, scaffolding, and ladder-related falls)] occupation...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 15, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Adapting an Autism Screening Tool for Use in the DeKalb County Refugee Pediatric Clinic
DiscussionThe M-CHAT-R/F was adapted into Nepali using a combination of translation protocols, and is publicly available for clinical use. Future validation studies are needed which will aid in clinical screening for and epidemiologic research of ASD in this population. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 14, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Effects of “Bias Based Bullying” (BBB) on Health, Education, and Cognitive–Social–Emotional Outcomes in Children with Minority Backgrounds: Proposed Comprehensive Public Health Intervention Solutions
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 6, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Revisiting the Healthy Migrant Paradox in Perinatal Health Outcomes Through a Scoping Review in a Recent Host Country
Abstract Ample evidence shows that, in many developed countries, immigrants have similar or better perinatal health outcomes than natives despite facing socioeconomic disadvantages in the host country ( “healthy migrant paradox” –HMP). This scoping review aims to: (1) summarize the literature on perinatal health among immigrants and natives in Spain and (2) examine whether there is evidence of the HMP in a context of recent migration. A total of 25 articles published between 1998 and 2014 wer e reviewed. Overall, we found evidence of the HMP in low birthweight and to a lesser extent in preterm, though t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Risk Factors for Varicella Susceptibility Among Refugees to Toronto, Canada
AbstractSeveral outbreaks of varicella have occurred among refugees. We aimed to estimate the prevalence of varicella susceptibility among refugees, and identify risk factors for varicella susceptibility. All refugees rostered at Crossroads Clinic in Toronto, Canada in 2011 –2014 were included in our study. Varicella serology was assessed at the initial visit. Refugees’ age, sex, education, time since arrival, and climate and population density of birth country were abstracted from the chart. Multivariate logistic regression was used to identify risk factors for va ricella susceptibility. 1063 refugees were ros...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation, Income and Vegetable Consumption Behaviors Among Latino Adults in the U.S.: A Mediation Analysis with the Bootstrapping Technique
This study examined whether household income mediates the relationship between acculturation and vegetable consumption among Latino adults in the U.S. Data from the 2009 to 2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were analyzed. Vegetable consumption index was created based on the frequencies of five kinds of vegetables intake. Acculturation was measured with the degree of English language use at home. Path model with bootstrapping technique was employed for mediation analysis. A significant partial mediation relationship was identified. Greater acculturation [95  % bias corrected bootstrap confident inte...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Status of North Korean Refugees in Toronto: A Community Based Participatory Research  Study
This study uniquely uses CBPR methodology to examine the health of NKRs, and can help guide targeted interventions in this population. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Investigation of Knowledge and Perception of Tuberculosis Among Hispanics in Utah County, Utah
This study aimed to assess extent of knowledge and perceptions of TB within the growing Hispanic community of Utah County, Utah, and the need for focused community educational intervention within that demographic. A mixed-method approach was used and included a survey of 166 adult males and females, and two focus groups with Hispanic women. TB was better known for its ability to kill (92.8  %) than for being contagious (64.5 %); while most knew that TB mainly affects the lungs (77.7 %) and is spread through coughing (75.3 %). Few believed that overcrowded living conditions were a risk factor for TB (30....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Barriers to Recruitment and Adherence in a Randomized Controlled Diet and Exercise Weight Loss Intervention Among Minority Breast Cancer Survivors
We examined factors related to recruitment and adherence to a pilot weight loss intervention among Hispanic and black breast cancer survivors. Participants completed a detailed screening interview to assess barriers to enrollment. An index was created to assess adherence at 6  months. 112 potentially eligible women were identified; 66 consented and completed a screening interview. After screening, 9 were ineligible; 15 opted to not enroll; and 42 were randomized. Among eligible women, earlier stage at diagnosis, treatment type, and negative beliefs related to exercise a nd diet after diagnosis were negatively associat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Perceptions of Secondhand and Thirdhand Smoke Among Hispanic Residents of Multiunit Housing
AbstractDespite the progressive adoption of smoking bans in public spaces, children living in multi-unit housing remain at risk of exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS) and thirdhand smoke (THS). Hispanic populations in California are particularly vulnerable to the harmful effects of SHS and THS because a large proportion of Hispanics live in multi-unit housing. Three focus groups were conducted in the fall of 2012 (in Spanish and English, N  = 24) to understand Hispanics’ knowledge of and experiences with SHS and THS, including barriers to avoiding smoke exposure and strategies for protecting their homes from...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

HCV Prevalence in Asian Americans in California
AbstractThe World Health Organization estimates that 170  million persons are infected with HCV worldwide, but only 22 million are from the Americas and Europe, compared to 94 million from Asia. HCV prevalence in the general US population is 1.6 %, but data for Asian Americans are limited. Our goal was to examine HCV prevalence in Asian Americans in a large ethnically diverse patient cohort seeking primary care at a free clinic in Northern California. A total of 1347 consecutive patients were seen from September 2009 to October 2012 and were studied via individual chart review using case report forms. H...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research