Co-morbid Non-communicable Diseases and Associated Health Service Use in African and Caribbean Immigrants with HIV
AbstractWe sought to characterize non-communicable disease (NCD)-related and overall health service use among African and Caribbean immigrants living with HIV between April 1, 2010 and March 31, 2013. We conducted two population-based analyses using Ontario ’s linked administrative health databases. We studied 1525 persons with HIV originally from Africa and the Caribbean. Compared with non-immigrants with HIV (n = 11,931), African and Caribbean immigrants had lower rates of hospital admissions, emergency department visits and non-HIV specific am bulatory care visits, and higher rates of health service ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Psychopathology and Associated Risk Factors Among Forcibly Displaced Syrian Children and Adolescents
This study investigates prevalence of psychopathology and associated risk factors in refugee children in Turkey. Of a total of 218 children aged 9–15 years, 56.2% lost someone important to them, 55.1% saw dead or wounded pe ople, 70.4% witnessed explosions or gun battles, 42.5% witnessed people being tortured and 25.6% personally experienced cruelty/torture during war. Prevalence of PTSD was 18.3% and that of anxiety-related disorders were as high as 69.0%. Death of an important person (p = .032) and male gender (p  = .040) were associated with PTSD; whilst exposure to cruelty or torture (...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

“Sex Will Make Your Fingers Grow Thin and Then You Die”: The Interplay of Culture, Myths, and Taboos on African Immigrant Mothers’ Perceptions of Reproductive Health Education with Their Daughters Aged 10–14 Years
Discussion of these issues was largely taboo, and most myths the mothers learned growing up pertained to sexual intercourse, pregnancy prevention, and pregnancy termination using non-hormonal ingested substances. Myths and taboos about sexual issues are widespread in Africa an d are propagated to control sexual behavior, especially that of unmarried people, particularly women. By examining these myths and taboos, we are able to somewhat contextualize the mothers’ immigrant experience regarding RHE. Although myths were reported, the majority of mothers did not appear t o believe them. The most significa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Pregnancy-Related Hypertensive Disorders and Immigrant Status: A Systematic Review and Meta-analysis of Epidemiological Studies
AbstractImmigrants are often considered a vulnerable population. Paradoxically, some researchers have reported lower risk of pregnancy-related hypertension (PRH) among immigrants when compared to their non-immigrant counterparts. The lack of consistency and the absence of a synthesis of studies investigating the associations between immigration status and PRH represent a gap in our understanding of socioecological roots of PRH. Of studies published in during the study period, 16 met the inclusion criteria. For each study, we computed relative risks that compared PRH risk by migrant status. The pooled estimate of the relati...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Relation Between Discrimination, Sense of Coherence and Health Varies According to Ethnicity: A Study Among Three Distinct Populations in Israel
AbstractSelf-reported experiences of discrimination and sense of coherence (SOC) have been found to be associated with health. A face-to-face survey of Long Term Jewish Residents (LTJR), Arabs and former Soviet Union (fSU) immigrants in Israel was performed. Respondents reported their physical and mental health, self-reported experiences of discrimination, SOC and socioeconomic status. Multivariable logistic regressions and bootstrapping path analyses were performed. Discrimination was associated with health after adjusting for all other variables. SOC was also associated with health. SOC did not mediate the strong associa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Patient Centered Medical Home Care Among Near-Old and Older Race/Ethnic Minorities in the US: Findings from the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey
AbstractAccess to Patient Centered Medical Home (PCMH) care has not been explored among older racial/ethnic minorities. We used data on adults 55-years and older from the Medical Expenditure Panel Survey (2008 –2013). We account for five features of PCMH experiences and focus on respondents self-identifying as Non-Latino White, Black, and Latino. We used regression models to examine associations between PCMH care and its domains and race/ethnicity and decomposition techniques to assess contribution to d ifferences by predisposing, enabling and health need factors. We found low overall access and significant racial/et...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Comparing Pregnancy Outcomes of Immigrants from Ethiopia and the Former Soviet Union to Israel, to those of Native-Born Israelis
AbstractTo compare pregnancy outcomes of immigrants from Former-Soviet-Union (FSUI) and Ethiopia (EI) to those of Jewish-native-born Israelis (JNB), in context of universal health insurance. Birth outcomes of all singletons born in Soroka-University Medical-Center (1998 –2011) of EI (n = 1,667) and FSUI (n = 12,920) were compared with those of JNB (n = 63,405). Low birthweight rate was significantly higher among EI (11.0 %) and slightly lower (7.0 %) among FSUI, compared to JNB (7.5 %). Preterm-delivery rates were similar to those of JNB. Both immigrant groups had significantly (p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Smoke-Free Multi-unit Housing Policies Show Promise in Reducing Secondhand Smoke Exposure Among Racially and Ethnically Diverse, Low-Income Seniors
AbstractSecondhand smoke (SHS) exposure is a public health issue for residents of multi-unit housing (MUH) properties. We evaluated the impact of smoke-free policy implementation on reported SHS exposure among racially, ethnically diverse seniors living in low-income MUH properties. In Spring 2013 and Summer 2014, we surveyed residents (n  = 960) at 15 MUH properties in Broward and Miami-Dade Counties, Florida. The percentage of residents reporting SHS exposure within their apartments from elsewhere in or around their building decreased from 31.1 %, before policy implementation, to 23.6 % at follow-up (...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Health Care Satisfaction: Effects of Immigration, Acculturation, Language
AbstractDifferences in health care satisfaction can alter patterns of health care utilization and so affect health outcomes, but little is known about variation in satisfaction in relation to immigration status. Health care satisfaction is analyzed with survey data from state public health program patients. Overall health care satisfaction is higher for first generation Hispanic immigrants and lower among those in the second generation compared to white Americans —consistent with the pattern termed the “healthy migrant effect.” This pattern is more pronounced for Portuguese-speaking immigrants and is not ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Drugs Delivery by Charities: A Possible Epidemiologic Indicator in Children of Undocumented Migrants
AbstractDescribing the health status of a population is difficult, especially in the case of irregular migrants who are now a growing population in western Countries. Data for children of these families are almost inexistent. In the absence of databases on this peculiar pediatric population, we analyzed drugs dispensation by a major Charity to have an insight into their health needs. This observational retrospective study was carried out during the entire 2015 and enrolled 628 undocumented children. A cohort of 8438 adult patients belonging to the same ethnic groups was used for comparison. Respiratory drugs were those mos...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Risk Determinants of Dental Caries and Oral Hygiene Status in 3 –15 Year-Old Recent Immigrant and Refugee Children in Saskatchewan, Canada: A Pilot Study
This study aimed to identify the risk determinants of caries and record oral hygiene status in recent immigrant and refugee children residing in Saskatoon and Regina, Saskatchewan, Canada. Convenience samples of 133, 3 –15 year-old recent immigrant and refugee children, and 86 adult guardians were recruited. Clinical examination of children and survey of their guardians explored the presence of at least one decayed tooth in the child’s mouth; and the knowledge, attitudes, behaviors, among other aspects in adu lt participants. Refugee children had statistically significant higher decayed, missing, filled te...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Coping with Pain in the Face of Healthcare Injustice in Patients with Sickle Cell Disease
AbstractTo evaluate the pain coping strategies of patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) who experience healthcare injustice from either physicians or nurses during medical visits for pain management. It is unknown how patients ’ coping with pain relates to their experiences of healthcare injustice from physicians or nurses. This descriptive comparative study included adult outpatients with SCD who completed the PAINReportIt®, Healthcare Justice Questionnaire©, and Coping Strategies Questionnaire-SCD. Data were analyzed using independentt tests. Frequent coping strategies of patients who experiencedhealthca...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Elevated Prevalence of Polycystic Ovary Syndrome and Cardiometabolic Disease in South Asian Infertility Patients
AbstractSouth Asians (SA) develop cardiometabolic disease at elevated rates. We investigate whether reproductive-aged SA women are at higher risk for a precursor condition, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS), as compared to Caucasian controls. 52 SA and 52 Caucasian infertility patients from a single institution were included in a cross-sectional analysis. Outcomes were compared using Student ’s t, Mann–Whitney U, Pearson’s Chi-squared and Fisher’s exact tests. SA women were younger, with six-fold greater odds of PCOS. SA women were not obese, with similar body mass indices to controls. However, when ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Military Weapon Injury Among Illegal Immigrants at the Southern Border of Israel: A Single Level I Trauma Center Series
This study on wounded immigrants shows that a conjoint military and civilian system can result in favourable outcomes. The manuscript is an attempt to bring this unique situation, its type of injuries, and the difficulties of the health system in coping with it, to the notice of all au thorities that may address a similar challenge. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Country of Birth and Variations in Asthma and Wheezing Prevalence, and Emergency Department Utilization in Children: A NHANES Study
This study builds on previous research to examine the relationship between country of birth and asthma prevalence and healthcare utilization using a national data set. The National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) Demographic and Questionnaire Files from 2007 to 2012 were used for this study. We used SPSS complex sampling design to estimate the association between country of birth and asthma prevalence, wheezing and emergency department (ED) use. The sample size was 8272 children and adolescents between the ages of 5 and 19  years old. US-born children had more reported episodes of wheezing (p =&n...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Blood Lead Levels and Potential Risk Factors for Lead Exposures Among South Asians in New York City
This study is the first to investigate blood lead levels and risk factors for lead exposures among South Asian New Yorkers. A survey and a finger-stick blood lead test using a portable analyzer were administered to 230 South Asian adults and children. Blood lead levels of 5 µg/dL or higher were found in 20 % of the adults and 15 % of the children, as compared to 5 % of adults and 2.5 % of children citywide. Factors associated with elevated blood lead levels were recent repair work a t home, not speaking English, Bangladeshi or Indian ethnicity, and occupational risk factors. Public health pro...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Patient and Physician Factors Associated with Undisclosed Prostate Cancer Screening in a Sample of Predominantly Immigrant Black Men
This study investigates undisclosed opportunistic screening using prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing in black immigrant and African American men. Participants (N = 142) were insured urban men, 45- to 70-years old. Patients’ reports of testing were compared with medical claims to assess undisclosed PSA testing. Most (94.4 %) men preferred to share in screening decisions, but few (46.5 %) were aware PSA testing was performed. Four factors predicted bein g unaware of testing: low formal education, low knowledge about prostate cancer, no intention to screen, and no physician recommendation (allp’s 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Quality of Life in Community-Dwelling Chinese American Patients with Cancer Pain
AbstractAlthough pain can be a powerful influence on health-related quality of life (HRQL) in cancer populations, culturally-based beliefs and behaviors may directly impact HQRL or modify the association between pain and HQRL. Studies of well-defined ethnic groups may clarify these relationships and inform culturally competent clinical practices intended to reduce illness burden. We evaluated HRQL in 121 non-English-speaking Chinese immigrants with cancer pain using the Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-General (FACT-G) scale. Overall, 91.2  % were born in China and 86.0 % were Cantonese-speaking; 50.8 ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Facilitators and Barriers for Advance Care Planning Among Ethnic and Racial Minorities in the U.S.: A Systematic Review of the Current Literature
AbstractGrowing evidence suggests a low engagement in advance care planning (ACP) among ethnic minorities in the U.S. The purpose of this study was to synthesize findings from prior research about ACP among ethnic minorities. An extensive literature search was conducted using multiple electronic databases. After applying inclusion criteria, 26 studies were included. Four categories of facilitators and barriers to ACP were identified: (1) Socio-demographic factors, (2) health status, literacy and experiences, (3) cultural values, and (4) spirituality. Socio-demographic factors showed inconsistent findings regarding their as...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Development and Psychometric Properties of the Immigration Law Concerns Scale (ILCS) for HIV Testing
AbstractTo develop, pilot test, and conduct psychometric analyses of an innovative scale measuring the influence of perceived immigration laws on Latino migrants ’ HIV-testing behavior. The Immigration Law Concerns Scale (ILCS) was developed in three phases: Phase 1 involved a review of law and literature, generation of scale items, consultation with project advisors, and subsequent revision of the scale. Phase 2 involved systematic translation- back trans lation and consensus-based editorial processes conducted by members of a bilingual and multi-national study team. In Phase 3, 339 sexually active, HIV-negative Spa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Interventions Aimed at Decreasing Obesity in Hispanic Children in the First 1000 Days: A Systematic Review
The objective of this review was to examine the evidence for interventions designed to reduce obesity in Hispanic children in the first 1000  days of life and to assess and summarize the effectiveness of the interventions. A literature search was conducted using MEDLINE, Scopus, and PubMed. Included in the review were published studies that evaluated an intervention designed to prevent or reduce obesity in Hispanic children in the first 1000 days of life. Quality was assessed using the GRADE system. Out of 134 citations that were retrieved, 11 articles underwent full-text review, and 5 articles met study inclusio...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Developing a Research Agenda on the Political Economy of Immigrants ’ Oral Health
AbstractAcculturation has been widely used in health research to explain oral health disparities between immigrants and their native born counterparts. However, immigrants ’ oral health studies have not clearly defined the acculturation construct. Also, a narrow focus on cultural oral health behaviours is likely to be inadequate for explaining immigrants’ oral health inequities, which are also rooted in societal, political and economic factors produced across the globe. In this brief report, we discuss the use of the acculturation framework in the dental public health literature, note gaps in this approach, and...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Racial Residential Segregation and STI Diagnosis Among Non-Hispanic Blacks, 2006 –2010
AbstractSexually transmitted infections (STI) disproportionately impact non-Hispanic blacks. Racial residential segregation has been associated with negative socioeconomic outcomes. We sought to examine the association between segregation and STI diagnosis among blacks. The National Survey of Family Growth and US Census served as data sources. Five distinct dimensions represent segregation. The association between STI diagnosis and each segregation dimension was assessed with multilevel logistic regression modeling. 305 (7.4%) blacks reported STI diagnosis during the past 12 months. Depending on the dimension, segregation ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Nativity as a Determinant of Health Disparities Among Children
In conclusion, nativity influences disease burdens and should be considered in health disparities studies. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Tho ’ Much is Taken, Much Abides: Asylum Seekers’ Subjective Wellbeing
AbstractThe influence of psychosocial factors on the subjective wellbeing of asylum-seekers residing in host Western countries has scarcely been explored qualitatively. Qualitative data derived from a mixed methods prospective study investigated the subjective wellbeing of 56 community-dwelling asylum-seekers and refugees at baseline and an average of 15.7  months later. Positive and negative experiences over time were explored in relation to self-perceived emotional health. Nineteen positive and 15 negative categories of experience emerged. Distinct psychosocial and protective factors were salient regarding the valen...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 23, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Effect of a Behavioral Weight-Loss Intervention on Depressive Symptoms Among Latino Immigrants in a Randomized Controlled Trial
AbstractEvidence of whether behavioral weight-loss interventions reduce depressive symptoms among Latino immigrants is limited. The effect of a behavioral weight-loss intervention on depressive symptoms was assessed using data from a clinical trial among Latino immigrants. Participants were randomized to a usual care (UC) control (n  = 41), case management (CM) alone (n = 84), or CM with community health worker support (CM+CHW) (n = 82). Generalized estimating equation models were used to compare the impact of each intervention with UC. Effect modification by poverty level was furt...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Learning from UJAMBO: Perspectives on Gynecologic Care in African Immigrant and Refugee Women in Boston, Massachusetts
AbstractAfrican-born immigrant women, and particularly refugees and asylum seekers, are at risk for reproductive health disparities but inadequately use relevant gynecologic services. We sought to elucidate perspectives on gynecologic care in a population of Congolese and Somali immigrants. We conducted a secondary qualitative analysis of focus group data using a grounded theory approach and the Integrated Behavioral Model as our theoretical framework. Thirty one women participated in six focus groups. Participant beliefs included the states of pregnancy and/or pain as triggers for care, preferences included having female ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Acculturation, Acculturative Stress, and Depressive Symptoms in International Migrants: A Study with Vietnamese Women in South Korea
AbstractGlobally, there have been increasing numbers of migrant women; these women are at an increased risk for depressive symptoms. The purpose of this study was to examine the associations among acculturation, acculturative stress and depressive symptoms in Vietnamese women who migrated to South Korea through marriages. We hypothesized that acculturative stress would serve as a mediator in the relationship between acculturation and depressive symptoms. Our findings from surveys with 217 Vietnamese immigrant women showed that the indirect effect of acculturation on depressive symptoms, mediated through acculturative stres...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Medical Pluralism in the Use of Sobadores among Mexican Immigrants to North Carolina
AbstractMexican immigrants have a rich history of traditional healers. This analysis describes the conditions for which Mexican immigrants seek treatment fromsobadores, and delineates factors that influence seeking treatment from asobador or a biomedical doctor. This systematic qualitative analysis uses interview data collected with 24 adult Mexican immigrants to North Carolina who had been treated by asobador in the previous 2  years. Immigrants are engaged in medical pluralism, seeking care fromsobadores and biomedical doctors based on the complaint and patient ’s age. Using a hierarchy of resort, adults seek ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Determinants of Child Attachment in the Years Postpartum in a High-Risk Sample of Immigrant Women
AbstractOur goal was to examine maternal mental health and associated stresses in a sample of high-risk immigrant mothers, and its association with child insecure attachment in the years following childbirth. Mothers and their child (Mage = 37 months) were recruited through a Health and Social Service organization in the Parc-Extension neighborhood in Montreal, Quebec. Mothers completed the Hopkins Symptoms Checklist (HSCL-25), the Multidimensional Scale of Perceived Social Support (MPSS) and a sociodemographic questionnaire th at included questions on premature delivery and birth weight. Attachment beha...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Associations Between Objective and Self-Report Measures of Traffic and Crime Safety in Latino Parents of Preschool Children
This study examined associations between subjective and objective measures of traffic and crime safety in preschool parents (N  = 240) and potential moderators. Community cohesion, social control, and physical activity parenting practices were measured. Objective measures of crime and traffic were measured at the block-group level. Linear models revealed perceived traffic was negatively associated with the traffic hazar ds (b = −0.03; 95 % CI: −0.05, −0.01; p = .041). Acculturation moderated the relationship between perceptions of disorder and crime (b&thin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Mexican Sobadores in North Carolina: Manual Therapy in a New Settlement Context
This study focuses onsobadores, healers who use manipulative therapy. Goals were to describesobadores practicing in North Carolina, including their background, conditions treated, and their understanding of the pathophysiology of their patients ’ conditions and how their treatments work. The paper also describes whosobadores treat andsobadores ’ understanding of where their treatment fits into patients ’ pursuit of relief from symptoms. This focused ethnography draws from in-depth, semi-structured interviews conducted with sixsobadores from Mexico practicing in North Carolina. Thesesobadores appear to mee...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Colorectal Cancer Screening Preferences among Black and Latino Primary Care Patients
AbstractColorectal cancer (CRC) screening rates in the U.S. have historically been lower among blacks and Latinos than whites. The advent of a new stool-based test, Cologuard, calls for research to determine which CRC screening test minority individuals might prefer. Ninety black and Latino patients who had undergone screening colonoscopy were personally educated about four CRC screening tests and subsequently asked about their test preference, attributes that influenced preference, and strength of preference. Cologuard (31.1  %) and colonoscopy (64.4 %) were preferred over computerized tomographic colonography a...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Substance Use by Immigrant Generation in a U.S.-Mexico Border City
AbstractImmigrant generation status has an impact on substance use, with lower use rates for recent immigrants. Substance use surveillance data are reported at the national and state levels; however, no systematic collection of data exists at the city level for the general population. In particular, rates of substance use have not been published for El Paso, Texas. The aims of this study are to estimate the prevalence of substance use among Hispanics in El Paso and to determine the association between substance use and immigrant generation. Hispanic residents of El Paso (N  = 837) were interviewed. Demographic, i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Beyond Race/Ethnicity: Skin Color and Cardiometabolic Health Among Blacks and Hispanics in the United States
AbstractWe investigated whether darker interviewer-ascribed skin color is associated with worse cardiometabolic health among young adult Blacks and Hispanics in the United States. Our sample was comprised of 2,128 non-Hispanic Blacks and 1603 Hispanics aged 24-32, who were in high school in the United States in 1994. We used logistic and OLS regression to predict obesity, hypertension, diabetes, and cardiometabolic risk. We tested the interaction between Hispanic immigrant generation and ascribed skin color. Darker ascribed skin color predicted worse cardiometabolic health among both young adult Blacks and Hispanics. Among...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Correlates of Dominicans ’ Identification of Cancer as a Worrisome Health Problem
AbstractThere is a paucity of studies centering on the correlates of cancer worry among Hispanics from the Dominican Republic and the potential informatics strategies to address such worries. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics, and logistic regression with the dependent variable of cancer worry. Independent variables for the regression were: age, gender, marital status, education, socioeconomic status, previous diagnosis of cancer, anxiety, depression, sleep disturbance, and chronic burden. Four variables significantly increased cancer worry: married marital status (OR  = 1.19 [...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cuban Americans (CAs) and Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Review of the Literature
AbstractType 2 diabetes is associated with increased morbidity and mortality in Hispanics but few studies have been done to differentiate diabetes effects in Hispanic subgroups, such as Cuban Americans. The purpose of this review was to characterize the studies conducted on Cuban Americans with type 2 diabetes with the aim of updating knowledge related to physiologic factors, psychologic factors, and diabetes selfmanagement. An extensive literature search located 18 studies that met the inclusion criteria for this review. Previous studies provided consistent evidence demonstrating the influence of lifestyle, metabolic, and...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Local-Level Immigration Enforcement and Food Insecurity Risk among Hispanic Immigrant Families with Children: National-Level Evidence
AbstractLocal-level immigration enforcement generates fear and reduces social service use among Hispanic immigrant families but the health impacts are largely unknown. We examine the consequence of 287(g), the foundational enforcement program, for one critical risk factor of child health —food insecurity. We analyze nationally representative data on households with children from pooled cross-sections of the Current Population Survey Food Supplemental Survey. We identify the influence of 287(g) on food insecurity pre-post-policy accounting for metro-area and year fixed-effects. We find that 287(g) is associated with a...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Decomposing the Household Food Insecurity Gap for Children of U.S.-Born and Foreign-Born Hispanics: Evidence from 1998 to 2011
AbstractUsing the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-K, multivariate analysis, state fixed effects, and regression decomposition, we examine changes in food insecurity for Hispanic kindergarteners between 1998 and 2011, a time period of rapid immigration and political/socio-economic changes. During this time the household food insecurity gap between children of U.S.-born and foreign-born mothers increased by almost 7 percentage points. The factors —child, family, and state—that contributed to the nativity gap differed over time. In both periods, lower familial resources among immigrant families, i.e. endowment ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Healthcare Disparities in Hispanic Diabetes Care: A Propensity Score-Matched Study
This study aims to examine the ethnicity disparity in health care utilization and expenditures between Hispanic and non-Hispanics after controlling for confounding variables. Cross-sectional with propensity score-matched design. The study revealed that Hispanics with diabetes had higher poverty rates, lower education, less physical activity, and less health care utilization/expenditures than did non-Hispanics. The assessment of ethnicity differences in health care is challenging because of the potential biases that require careful adjustment. This study successfully identified and controlled for confounding bias and conclu...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Psychosocial Factors Associated with Alcohol Use Among Hispanic Youth
This study examined whether authoritarian parenting, school experiences, depression, legal involvement and social norms predicted recent alcohol use and binge drinking among a national sample of Hispanic youth. A secondary data analysis of the National Survey on Drug Use and Health was performed (N = 3457). Unadjusted odds ratios were computed via univariate logistic regression analyses and significant variables were retained and included in the multivariable logistic regression analyses. Results indicated that in the past 30 days, 13.8 % of Hispanic youth drank alcohol and 8.0 % binge d rank. Hisp...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Erratum to: Black –White Health Inequalities in Canada
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Erratum to: Ethnic/Racial Disparities in the Fetal Growth Outcomes of Ecuadorian Newborns
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Patients ’ Mental Health Journeys: A Qualitative Case Study with Interactive Computer-Assisted Client Assessment Survey (iCASS)
AbstractDespite growing concerns about common mental disorders (CMDs), challenges persist in accessing timely and appropriate care, especially for immigrant, refugee, racialized and low-income groups. Partnering with a community health centre serving these populations in Toronto, we examined the Interactive Computer-assisted Client Assessment Survey (iCCAS) that screens for CMDs (depression, generalized anxiety, post-traumatic stress, and alcohol overuse) and related social factors. In this case study design with embedded units, we explored the mental health care journeys of patients who screened positive for a CMD. The an...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Adolescent Burmese Refugees Perspectives on Determinants of Health
AbstractOver 70,000 Burmese refugees have resettled in the United States in the past decade. While Burmese adolescents quickly acculturate into American society, their perspectives on health are not well-known. The purpose of this study was to identify adolescent Burmese refugee perspectives on determinants of health and health-related experiences after resettlement. In this qualitative study, Burmese adolescents took photographs depicting health-related experiences that were used as elicitation tools during focus groups. These discussions were recorded, transcribed, and analyzed for themes. Participants described positive...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Acceptability of Friday Sermons as a Modality for Health Promotion and Education
This study underscores the potential utility of mosque sermons for health education programs and for health behavior interventions in American mosques. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Primary Care Physicians ’ Role in Parental Decision to Vaccinate with HPV Vaccine: Learnings from a South Texas Hispanic Patient Population
AbstractHispanic populations have low HPV vaccination rates, although the vaccine is safe and efficacious. We surveyed a low-income Hispanic population to characterize knowledge gaps about the HPV vaccine and understand factors associated with the decision to vaccinate a child to determine how physicians can enhance vaccination rates. Surveys in English and Spanish were distributed to parents of children under age 18. Statistical analysis included logistic regression. Knowledge that the vaccine can prevent invasive cervical cancer most impacted intent to vaccinate. Physician recommendation to vaccinate was far more influen...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Health in St. Louis Bosnian-Americans
AbstractIn Bosnia and Herzegovina, cardiovascular disease accounts for nearly 50% of deaths. Cardiovascular health of resettled Bosnian-Americans has not been well-characterized. Our study aimed to quantify cardiovascular risk in Bosnian-Americans in St. Louis, the largest non-European center of resettlement. Seven community screenings focused on Bosnian-Americans were held. Cardiovascular risk was calculated to stratify individuals into low (20%) risk. Those with self-reported coronary heart disease (CHD) or risk equivalent were considered high-risk. Two-hundred fifty Bosnian-Americans were screened; 51% (n  =&thin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Knowledge, Beliefs and Attitudes of Somali Men in Olmsted County, Minnesota, U.S., on the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine and Cervical Cancer Screening: January 17, 2015
This study explores the general knowledge of Human Papillomavirus vaccine (HPV) and cervical cancer screening (CCS) among Somali men in the U.S., who are major decision-makers in Somali households. HPV infects both men and women, and causes genital warts and cervical cancer (CC). High mortality from CC persists among minorities due to low uptake of preventive tools. Eleven questions assessed general knowledge of HPV and CCS among 30 Somali male respondents. The knowledge of HPV and CCS by education level, age, and years lived in the U.S., was assessed using the health belief model. Most respondents had no knowledge of HPV ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Sociodemographic and Lifestyle Factors, and Health Conditions of Dominican Adults Living in Puerto Rico
AbstractDominicans are the largest migrant community in Puerto Rico, yet understudied. We compared risk factors and health conditions of Dominicans versus Puerto Ricans (PRs). Cross-sectional survey of Dominicans (n  = 55) and PRs (n = 310) aged 30–75 years, assessed with validated questionnaires and standardized anthropometric measurements. Significantly, more Dominicans than PRs had attained
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research