Binge Drinking, Cannabis and Tobacco Use Among Ethnic Norwegian and Ethnic Minority Adolescents in Oslo, Norway
Abstract The aim of the study was to assess prevalence and factors associated with binge drinking, cannabis use and tobacco use among ethnic Norwegians and ethnic minority adolescents in Oslo. We used data from a school-based cross-sectional survey of adolescents in junior- and senior high schools in Oslo, Norway. The participants were 10,934 adolescents aged 14–17 years, and just over half were females. The sample was comprised of 73.2 % ethnic Norwegian adolescents, 9.8 % 1st generation immigrants, and 17 % 2nd generation adolescents from Europe, the US, the Middle East, Asia and Afric...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Chronic Disease Burden Among Bhutanese Refugee Women Aged 18–65 Years Resettled in Northeast Ohio, United States, 2008–2011
This study suggests chronic conditions may be significant health issues among US resettled Bhutanese refugees and a larger population-based study to confirm the findings is warranted. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Longitudinal Associations Between Immigrant Ethnic Density, Neighborhood Processes, and Latino Immigrant Youth Depression
This study examines the pathways by which immigrant density may affect mental health outcomes among Latino youth. Using data from the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we drew a sample of 2,678 Hispanic youth. Multivariate multilevel logistic regression analyses found that Latino immigrant density predicted lower odds of depression among both male and female immigrant but not non-immigrant Latino adolescents. No mediating effects of neighborhood efficacy, perceived safety or perceived contentment were observed in this study. Results reaffirm the need to further explore the mechanisms through wh...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Neighborhood Ethnic Composition and Problem Drinking Among Older Mexican American Men: Results from the Hispanic Established Populations for the Epidemiologic Study of the Elderly
This study investigates the effects of neighborhood co-ethnic density on problem drinking among older Mexican American men. Probability sample of 2,086 community-dwelling Mexican Americans aged 75 or older drawn in 2004–2005 residing in communities in Arizona, California, Colorado, New Mexico and Texas. Problem drinking was found among 15.3 % of men (n = 350). For each percent increase in neighborhood percent Mexican American, men had 2 % lower odds of problem drinking [odds ratio (OR) 0.98; P 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Religious Attendance, Health-Promoting Lifestyle Behaviors, and Depressive Symptoms Among Koreans in the United Arab Emirates (UAE)
Abstract Migrants, who comprise 80 % of the population in the United Arab Emirates, are at risk of developing mental health disorders. To test associations among religious attendance, health-promoting lifestyle behaviors (HPLB), and depressive symptoms, we conducted a cross-sectional survey in Dubai. Measures included frequency of religious attendance, the Health-Promoting Lifestyle Profile, and the Depression, Anxiety, and Stress Scale. Multiple regression analyses were used to explore relationships among religious attendance, HPLB, and depressive symptoms. Religious attendance was significantly associated ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Accommodating Limited English Proficient Spanish Speakers in Rural Hospitals
This study assesses strategies used by rural hospitals to provide care for LEP Spanish speakers. A self-administered survey was sent to 153 rural hospitals in Kansas and Missouri. The survey featured 10 items developed to assess LEP services demand, translation services, interpretation methods used, signage, satisfaction with provided services, barriers, and innovative methods of providing care. Forty-eight surveys (31.4 %) were returned. Hospitals with higher LEP demand were more likely to have translated documents; however, not all hospitals with high demand had key paperwork available in Spanish. Telephonic interpr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Does the Continued Use of the MCAT Hinder Care for Minority Patients?
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Erratum to: Population-Based Comparison of Biomarker Concentrations for Chemicals of Concern Among Latino-American and Non-Hispanic White Children
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Surviving the Distance: The Transnational Utilization of Traditional Medicine Among Oaxacan Migrants in the US
Abstract Transnational health practices are an emergent and understudied phenomenon, which provide insight into how migrants seek care and tend to their health care needs in receiving communities. We conducted in depth interviews with return migrants (N = 21) and traditional healers (N = 11) to explore transnational health practices among Mixtec migrants from Oaxaca, specifically in relation to their utilization of traditional healers, medicinal plants, and folk remedies. In established migrant destination points, folk remedies and plants are readily available, and furthermore, these resources ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Correlates of Condom Use Among Somali and Ethiopian Immigrants in the U.S.
Abstract The study examined correlates of consistent condom use in steady heterosexual relationships among Somali and Ethiopian immigrants in Minnesota. Study participants (n = 205) responded to questions on attitudes, social norms, perceived behavioral control, self-efficacy, behavioral intention, and self-reported male condom use. Participants were neither for, nor against using condoms, and the same was true for social influence and self-efficacy; however, reported moderately favorable attitude toward condom use and little difficulties in using condoms. Self-efficacy emerged as the factor with the str...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 8, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Sleep Quality Among Latino Farmworkers in North Carolina: Examination of the Job Control-Demand-Support Model
Abstract Sleep problems are associated with physical and mental health disorders and place individuals at an increased risk of workplace injuries. The demand-control-support model posits that job demands and the capacity to control work processes influence workers’ level of distress, thereby affecting their physical and mental health; supervisor support can buffer the negative effect of high demands and low control. Data on the sleep quality and the organization of work of Latino men were collected in agricultural areas in North Carolina in 2012. 147 Mexican-born farmworkers ages 30 and older, most of wh...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Institutional Elderly Care Services and Moroccan and Turkish Migrants in Belgium: A Literature Review
Abstract In several European countries, including Belgium, the rapid ageing of the migrant population has emerged only recently on the political agenda. The aim of this literature review is threefold. Firstly, it provides a review of the available studies on the accessibility and use of institutional care services by Moroccan and Turkish migrants in the Flemish part of Belgium including Flanders and Brussels. Secondly, it identifies their specific needs regarding elderly care services. Finally, it provides an overview of the way in which Belgian policy has dealt with the issue of migration and elderly care. Litera...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Depression Among Mexican Americans Living in U.S.–Mexico Border and Non-Border Areas
Abstract Factors associated with CES-D depression among Mexican Americans living on and off the U.S.–Mexico border are examined. Data are from two studies of Mexican American adults. The Border Survey conducted face-to-face interviews in urban U.S.–Mexico border counties of California, Arizona, New Mexico, and Texas (N = 1307). The non-border HABLAS survey conducted face-to-face interviews in Houston, Los Angeles, New York, Philadelphia, and Miami (N = 1288). Both surveys used a multistage cluster sample design with response rates of 67 and 76 %, respectively. The multivariate ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Individual and Contextual Factors Associated with Immigrant Youth Feeling Unsafe in School: A Social-Ecological Analysis
This study examines factors associated with perceptions of school safety among immigrant youth within individual, family, peer, and school contexts. Data were drawn from Wave II of the Children of Immigrants Longitudinal Study (n = 4288) and hierarchical logistic regression analyses were conducted. African–Americans, females, and youth with limited English proficiency were more likely to perceive their school as unsafe. Youth who reported that family cohesion was important and those who had close friends perceived their school as safe. Also, those who experienced illegal activities in school reported feelin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Alcohol Use and Sexual Risk Behaviors in a Migrant Worker Community
This study analyzed how changes in alcohol use was associated with changes in risky sexual behavior and psychosocial variables. Data for this study was drawn from an HIV risk reduction project. Repeated measures ANOVA and Linear mixed model statistical method was conducted to find changes and association between alcohol use, sexual risk and psychosocial variables over time. The sample (n = 203) was composed of African Americans (33.0 %) and Hispanics (77.0 %) men. Both groups, over time, showed reduction in sexual risk in accordance with reduction in alcohol use. Changes in alcohol use and psychosocial ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Scoping Review of Immigrant Experience of Health Care Access Barriers in Canada
Abstract Canadian population-based surveys report comparable access to health care services between immigrant and non-immigrant populations, yet other research reports immigrant-specific access barriers. A scoping review was conducted to explore research regarding Canadian immigrants’ unique experiences in accessing health care, and was guided by the research question: “What is currently known about the barriers that adult immigrants face when accessing Canadian health care services?” The findings of this study suggest that there are unmet health care access needs specific to immigrants to Canada...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 21, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Rural-to-Urban Migration: Socioeconomic Status But Not Acculturation was Associated with Overweight/Obesity Risk
Abstract To investigate whether socioeconomic status (SES) and acculturation predict overweight/obesity risk as well as the mediating effect of physical activity (PA) in the context of internal migration. Cross-sectional study of 587 rural-to-urban migrants participating in the PERU MIGRANT study. Analyses were conducted using logistic regression and structured equation modeling. Interaction effects of SES and acculturation were tested. Models were controlled for age, gender and education. Only SES was a significant predictor of overweight/obesity risk. Lower SES decreased the odds of being overweight/obese by 51....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

An Exploratory Study of Acculturation and Reproductive Health Among Haitian and Haitian-American Women in Little Haiti, South Florida
Abstract There is unmet contraceptive need among Haitian immigrants and Haitian-American women (Haitian women). The study explored associations of three measures of acculturation with contraceptive/reproductive health history among Haitian women residing in the Little Haiti community of Miami. This was a cross-sectional, exploratory study among 57 Haitian women. We conducted descriptive univariate analyses, then bivariate analyses to investigate the association of acculturation with reproductive health risk behavior including contraceptive use, tampon use, and parity, as well as interest in a female-initiated barr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health-Seeking Behaviors of Filipino Migrants in Australia: The Influence of Persisting Acculturative Stress and Depression
This study examined the relationships among the constructs of acculturative stress, depression, English language use, health literacy, and social support and the influence of these factors on health-seeking behaviors of Filipino Australians. Using a self-administered questionnaire, 552 respondents were recruited from November 2010 to June 2011. Structural equation modelling was used to examine relationships. A direct and negative relationship between health-seeking behaviors and depression, and an indirect relationship with acculturative stress, was observed mediated through depression. Social support had an important mode...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Issues in Lung Cancer Screening Among Asian American Immigrants
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Impact of Acculturation Style and Acculturative Hassles on the Mental Health of Somali Adolescent Refugees
Abstract Refugee adolescents often immigrate to a new society because of experiences of persecution and trauma, which can have profound effects on their mental health. Once they immigrate, many refugees experience stressors related to resettlement and acculturation in the new society. The current study examined relationships among acculturation styles and hassles and the well-being of young refugees as well as the role of gender. Data were collected from 135 young refugees (M age = 15.39, SD = 2.2; 62 % male) from Somalia resettled in the United States The findings from our study...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Social, Occupational, and Spatial Exposures and Mental Health Disparities of Working-Class Latinas in the US
Abstract Grounded in ecosocial theory, this paper discusses the mental health disparities of working-class Latinas from multiple perspectives. An overview of working-class Latinas’ prevalent mental health disorders, barriers to care and suggestions for interventions and future studies are provided. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Family Violence and Child Sexual Abuse Among South Asians in the US
Abstract Family violence, including child sexual abuse (CSA), is a significant public health problem in the United States. It is particularly difficult to assess family violence and CSA among South Asians because it is often hidden due to cultural and familial stigma. A web-based survey was administered to a convenience sample (n = 368) of South Asian adults in the US. One-fourth (25.2 %) of the sample reported CSA; 13.8 % reported abuse involving exposure; 21.5 % reported abuse involving touching; 4.5 % reported attempted sexual intercourse; and 3.5 % reported forced sexual inte...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 2, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Status Sensed by the Adult Latin American Immigrant Population in the City of Seville, Spain
Abstract The immigrant population in Seville has grown over the last 10 years, most of which are Latin Americans. Our aim was to describe the health status perceived in this emerging population. In 2011, a cross-sectional study was performed on a representative sample of 190 Latin American immigrants between the ages of 25 and 44 years residing in Seville (Spain). The self-sensed health status was 18 % excellent, 28 % very good, 42 % good, 11 % regular, and 1 % poor. The average number of days of satisfactory health status during the last month was 22. Statistically significant ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Trends in Cancer Screening by Citizenship and Health Insurance, 2000–2010
Abstract While early detection through screenings for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer is essential in improving cancer survival, it is not evenly utilized across class, race, ethnicity, or nativity. Given that utilization of early detection through screenings is not evenly distributed, immigrants who have much lower rates of health insurance coverage are at a disadvantage. We use National Health Interview Survey data linked with the Medical Expenditures Panel Survey to examine the trend in screening rates for breast, cervical, and colorectal cancer from 2000 to 2010, comparing U.S.-born natives, foreign-b...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Incidence Rate of Thyroid Cancer Among Women in Saudi Arabia: An Observational Descriptive Epidemiological Analysis of Data from Saudi Cancer Registry 2001–2008
This study provides a descriptive epidemiological data of thyroid cancer cases diagnosed from 2001 to 2008 among Saudi women, including the frequency and percentage of cases, the crude incidence rate (CIR) and the age-standardised incidence rate (ASIR) stratified by the region and year of diagnosis. This is a retrospective descriptive epidemiological analysis of all Saudi thyroid cancer cases recorded in the Saudi Cancer Registry (SCR) between January 2001 and December 2008. The statistical analyses were applied using descriptive statistics with the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20.0. A total of 2,930...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Influence of Socio-Demographic Factors on Miscarriage Incidence Among Italian and Immigrant Women: A Critical Analysis from Italy
This study is based on ISTAT database. All data were analyzed through the statistical software SPSS and the following analytical techniques were used: multivariate logistic regression, factorial analysis of variance and Chi square test. Immigrant miscarriage rates resulted higher than Italian ones and they decreased from 2003 to 2009 unlike Italian ones, which remained unchanged. The effect of maternal age on the miscarriage incidence resulted different, depending on the nationality; for Italian women it increased with increasing of age and for immigrant women the opposite trend was found. Moreover, miscarriage incidence r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Smoking Topography in Korean American and White Men: Preliminary Findings
Abstract This is the first study of Korean Americans’ smoking behavior using a topography device. Korean American men smoke at higher rates than the general U.S. population. Korean American and White men were compared based on standard tobacco assessment and smoking topography measures. They smoked their preferred brand of cigarettes ad libitum with a portable smoking topography device for 24 h. Compared to White men (N = 26), Korean American men (N = 27) were more likely to smoke low nicotine-yield cigarettes (p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Impact of Navigation on Knowledge and Attitudes About Clinical Trials Among Chinese Patients Undergoing Treatment for Breast and Gynecologic Cancers
We examined barriers to clinical trials enrollment among Chinese patients, and developed a navigation program for Chinese gynecologic and breast cancer patients. Six bilingual navigators were trained and a navigator assigned to each patient for at least 2 months. All patients received a clinical trials booklet in Chinese and English. Data collection included pre-and post-navigation surveys, intake forms, and documentation of navigation encounters. Between July 2010 and May 31, 2011, we recruited 28 breast and gynecologic cancer patients. Patients averaged 317 min of navigation (range 63–1,852) during 8 sess...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Participation and Risk of High Grade Cytological Lesions Among Immigrants and Italian-Born Women in an Organized Cervical Cancer Screening Program in Central Italy
Abstract Few studies analyzed the risk for high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions or worse (HSIL+) among immigrants and natives attending organized cervical cancer (CC) screening programs (SP). We evaluated participation and diagnosis of HSIL+ by country of birth with logistic models. Overall 540,779 invitation letters were delivered to target women of Florence SP in three screening rounds (years 2000–2002, 2003–2005, 2006–2008). The probability of attending screening was lower for immigrants than natives, but the difference decreased from 35 % (1st round) to 20 % (2nd–3rd r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prostate Cancer Prognostic Factors Among Asian Patients Born in the US Compared to Those Born Abroad
Abstract US surveillance data indicate that incidence of prostate cancer differs by place of birth among Asian men. However, it is less clear if the prognostic factors for prostate cancer also differ by place of birth. The study included 7,824 Asian prostate cancer patients diagnosed between 2004 and 2009 and reported to the Surveillance Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) program. Logistic regression models were used to evaluate the relation of place of birth (foreign born vs. US born) to three outcomes: prostate specific antigen (PSA) level, Gleason score, and T classification, adjusting for age, marital status...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Revisiting the Hispanic Health Paradox: The Relative Contributions of Nativity, Country of Origin, and Race/Ethnicity to Childhood Asthma
This study examined the relationship between race and Hispanic ethnicity, maternal and child nativity, country of origin and asthma among 2,558 non-Hispanic white and Hispanic children across 65 Los Angeles neighborhoods. A series of two-level multilevel models were estimated to examine the independent effects of race, ethnicity, and country of origin on childhood asthma. Lifetime asthma prevalence was reported among 9 % of children, with no significant differences between Hispanics and non-Hispanic whites overall. However, in fully adjusted models, Hispanic children of non-Mexican origin reported higher odds of asthm...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Breast Cancer Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in Trinidad and Tobago
Abstract Trinidad and Tobago (TT) is the country with the highest breast cancer mortality in the Caribbean. It is unknown whether biological, behavioral, environmental, or clinical factors play a significant role in such outcome. A total of 2,614 incident cases, histologically confirmed and recorded in the TT cancer registries between 1995 and 2005, with follow-up through 2009 were analyzed. Half of the cases were diagnosed between the ages of 40–59 years, 12.5 % before the age of 40 years; 45 % of women were diagnosed at localized stage and 43.7 % were hormone receptor positive. Wo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Distribution of Duffy Antigen Receptor for Chemokines (DARC) and Risk of Prostate Cancer in Barbados, West Indies
Abstract Blood typing across different racial groups has revealed that Caucasians predominantly test positive for the Duffy antigen/receptor for chemokines (DARC), while 70–95 % of African-origin populations lack expression of DARC on their erythrocytes. Since men of African descent are known to have higher rates of prostate cancer (PC) and some animal studies have indicated anti-angiogenic effects associated with Duffy-positive mice, DARC-negativity may help to explain some of the racial differences in prostate tumorigenesis. The Prostate Cancer in a Black Population (PCBP) Study, a large case–...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Longitudinal Study of Changes in Asylum Seekers Ability Regarding Activities of Daily Living During Their Stay in the Asylum Center
Abstract The aim was to assess change in activities of daily living (ADL) ability amongst asylum seekers and if there were any difference between tortured and non-torture following a 10 months post-arrival period, and if self-reported health and exposure to torture were factors related to change in ADL-ability. The study was a combined baseline, follow-up correlational study amongst individuals from Afghanistan, Iran and Syria, living in Danish asylum centers. Forty-three persons aged 20–50, were invited and participated in the baseline study. Twenty-two were still in asylum center at the follow-up...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Pharmacy Students’ Use of and Beliefs About Traditional Healthcare
This study aimed to explore New Zealand pharmacy students’ knowledge and beliefs about traditional healthcare, and to examine whether these changed during the course. A questionnaire was administered to students in 2011 and again in 2013. Students were from a wide range of ethnic groups. Their reported use of traditional healthcare increased (from 48 % in 2011 to 61 % in 2013) and was usually for minor illness or prevention. Non New Zealand European students were more likely to use traditional healthcare. Use of traditional healthcare was relatively common, and after exposure to a biomedical curriculum stud...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Feasibility of Cervical Cancer Screening Utilizing Self-sample Human Papillomavirus Testing Among Mexican Immigrant Women in Harris County, Texas: A Pilot Study
In conclusion, self-HPV is highly acceptable to Mexican immigrant women who otherwise do not attend for Pap testing. While the approach addresses critical barriers to primary screening, questions remain as to whether uninsured HR–HPV positive women are able to attend for clinical follow-up. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

What is Known About Health and Morbidity in the Pediatric Population of Muslim Bedouins in Southern Israel: A Descriptive Review of the Literature from the Past Two Decades
Abstract The Bedouins comprise one of the ethnic groups in Israeli society. They are Muslims, most of who live in the Negev desert region of southern Israel and live by their unique traditions and customs. At the present they are going through a period of “society in transition”, a unique condition that has ramifications for health and morbidity. In recent years the number of publications on the health of Bedouins in the Negev has increased. Recognition of unique socio-economic features, characteristics of health and diseases can help the medical team treat various health problems in this populati...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Women Supporting Patients, Men Curing Cancer: Gender-Related Variations Among Israeli Arab Practitioners of Traditional Medicine in Their Treatment of Patients with Cancer
Abstract The use of complementary traditional medicine (CTM) is prevalent among patients with cancer. An understanding of cultural and religious values is needed to design an effective patient-centered supportive treatment program. To examine gender-related demographic and professional characteristics; treatment goals and approaches; and attitudes toward integration among Arab practitioners of CTM. Male and female Arab CTM practitioners treating patients with cancer were located by snowballing through practitioner and clientele networks. Participants underwent semi-structured, in-depth interviews which were analy...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Erratum to: Breast Cancer Clinical Characteristics and Outcomes in Trinidad and Tobago
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Stress and Personality Development Among US-Immigrating Youth
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Work Conditions and Health and Well-Being of Latina Hotel Housekeepers
Abstract Hotel housekeepers are exposed to a plethora of disproportionately high work-induced hazards that can lead to adverse health consequences. Latina hotel housekeepers are rendered particularly vulnerable to elevated occupational hazards and resultant health strains due to their socioeconomic status, immigration status, language barriers, and lack of access to healthcare services. The findings from the 27 interviews with Latina hotel housekeepers indicated that the interviewees were exposed to physical, chemical, and social hazards in the workplace and suffered musculoskeletal injuries. In terms of psycholog...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

HPV Vaccine and Latino Immigrant Parents: If They Offer It, We Will Get It
In this study, we sought to elucidate Latino immigrant parents’ barriers to obtaining the HPV vaccine for their children. Five focus groups were conducted with Latino immigrant parents of minors (i.e., 9–17 year old) who had not yet initiated the HPV vaccine series. Three major findings were identified from the focus groups: (1) low levels of awareness and knowledge of HPV and the HPV vaccine, (2) high confidence that parent can get the vaccine for their eligible child and (3) lack of provider recommendation as the main barrier to vaccination. Children of Latino immigrant parents could benefit from increas...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Factors Correlated to Protective and Risk Dietary Patterns in Immigrant Latino Mothers in Non-metropolitan Rural Communities
Abstract Immigrant Latinos face conditions which over time negatively impact their nutritional behaviors and health outcomes. Our objective was to evaluate associations between environmental and lifestyle factors and both protective dietary patterns (e.g., intake of fruits and vegetables) and harmful dietary patterns (e.g., consumption of salty snacks and fast food). Surveys were individually and orally administered to 105 foreign-born Latina mothers living in rural locations in a Midwestern state. Principal component analysis created composite variables for each construct and Spearman correlations were cond...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 20, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Health Beliefs of Migrant Farmworker Parents: An Ethnographic Exploration
Abstract The purpose of this study was to explore the health beliefs of migrant farmworkers parents by approaching and interviewing the sample population in a health clinic where they seek care for their children. It is impossible to plan, implement care, or create health care delivery models without knowledge of health beliefs. An understanding of parental health beliefs in the vulnerable population of migrant farmworkers will assure a more informed approach to health matters of their children, while also improving health care delivery and providing culturally specific health care models. Collecting data in locat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Impact of Education and Socioeconomic and Occupational Conditions on Self-Perceived and Mental Health Inequalities Among Immigrants and Native Workers in Spain
Abstract There is limited evidence on the influence of social determinants on the self-perceived and mental health of immigrants settled at least 8 years in Spain. The aim of this study was to examine differences between workers related to migrant-status, self-perceived and mental health, and to assess their relationship to occupational conditions, educational level and occupational social class, stratified by sex. Using data from the Spanish National Health Survey of 2011/12, we computed prevalence, odds ratios and explicative fractions. Mental (OR 2.02; CI 1.39–2.93) and self-perceived health (OR 2.64...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Duration of US Residence and Obesity Risk in NYC Chinese Immigrants
Abstract We evaluated whether duration of time in the US is associated with obesity risk in NYC Chinese immigrants. We analyzed cross-sectional survey data on 2072 men and women. Duration of US residence was categorized into ≤5, 6–15, and 15 years and over. Obesity was defined using WHO Asian standards: BMI of 27.5 kg/m2 or greater. Diet and physical activity (PA) were assessed as potential explanatory variables. After adjusting for covariates, increased time in the US was associated with an increased obesity risk (OR 1.49; 95 % CI 1.06, 2.08 for 15 years or more vs. ≤5 years);...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Multilevel Approach on Self-Reported Dental Caries in Subjects of Minority Ethnic Groups: A Cross-Sectional Study of 6440 Adults
Abstract Regional contextual factors and dental caries using multilevel modeling related to adults in minority ethnic groups have been scantily explored. The influence of the socioeconomic context on self-reported dental caries (SRDC) in individuals of minority ethnic groups (IEG) in Colombia was studied. Data from the 2007 National Public Health Survey were collected in 34,843 participants of the population. The influence of different factors on SRDC in IEG was investigated with logistic and multilevel regression analyses. A total of 6440 individuals belonged to an ethnic group. Multilevel analysis showed a signi...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Family and Work Influences on Stress, Anxiety and Depression Among Bisexual Latino Men in the New York City Metropolitan Area
In this study we focus on the family and work environments. We conducted a mixed-methods study to examine the impacts of these social environments among behavioral bisexual Latino men in New York City (N = 142). Using the Brief Symptom Inventory we measured stress, depression, and anxiety, and used specific scales to measure familial and work social environmental stress factors. We also measured four cultural factors to assess their potential influence on our hypothesized stressors. To test our hypothesis we used linear regression with stress, depression and anxiety as the primary outcome variables. Our results i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Nativity and Perceived Healthcare Quality
The objective of the study was to identify possible explanations for this disparity. Data were from 6202 respondents to cycles 1 and 2 of the Health Information National Trends Survey 4 conducted 2011–2013, including 5425 US-born and 777 foreign-born respondents. Perceived quality of healthcare was lower among foreign-born than US-born respondents, accounted for, to some degree (19.5 %), by foreign-born respondents experiencing relatively less patient-centered healthcare provider communication than US-born respondents. More patient-centered provider communication was associated with receiving higher quality heal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 9, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research