Improving Immigrant Populations’ Access to Mental Health Services in Canada: A Review of Barriers and Recommendations
This article emerges from a scoping review of over two decades of relevant literature on immigrants’ access to mental health services in Canada. Key online databases were searched to explore the gaps and opportunities for improving access to mental health services using a review framework provided by Arksey and O’Malley (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8:19–32, 2005). Immigrants and refugees came from diverse religious and cultural backgrounds and had complex mental health-related concerns that were not currently being adequately addressed by existing services. The major barriers to the utilization of mental healt...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review
Abstract It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)’ unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs’ perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs’ perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

History of Persecution and Health Outcomes Among U.S. Refugees
Abstract Our goal was to describe the forms of persecution reported by adult refugees in the U.S. and the relationships between persecution and health status among this population. Data were derived from the 2003 New Immigrant Survey, a representative sample of new U.S. lawful permanent residents. Major depression, impairment in daily activities due to pain, poor self-reported health, and declining health were described for refugees who had and had not reported persecution prior to arrival in the U.S. Health status was also examined for refugees who reported different forms of persecution. Half of refugees (46.7&n...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Contributors to Patients’ Ratings of Quality of Care Among Ethnically Diverse Patients with Type 2 Diabetes
We examined racial/ethnic differences in patients’ ratings of components of interpersonal quality [participatory decision making (PDM) style, being treated as an equal partner, and feelings of trust], and evaluated the association between each of these components and patients’ ratings of overall healthcare quality among non-Hispanic white (NHW), Vietnamese American, and Mexican American patients with type 2 diabetes. The findings indicated that although all three components were significantly associated with ratings of overall healthcare quality, the significant interactions between race/ethnicity and both PDM ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Erratum to: Differences in Psychopathology Between Immigrant and Native Adolescents Admitted to a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

“Can I Ask That?”: Perspectives on Perinatal Care After Resettlement Among Karen Refugee Women, Medical Providers, and Community-Based Doulas
This study characterized the perspectives of Karen refugee women in Buffalo, NY, their medical providers, and Karen interpreters/doulas on perinatal care for Karen women in resettlement. In-depth qualitative interviews with Karen women (14), Karen doulas/interpreters and key informants (8), and medical providers (6) were informed by the social contextual model and focused on women’s questions about and opinions of perinatal care in Buffalo and on providers’ experiences caring for Karen patients. Karen women expressed gratitude for and understanding of perinatal care in Buffalo, and providers described Karen pat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Stress, Place, and Allostatic Load Among Mexican Immigrant Farmworkers in Oregon
Abstract Cumulative exposure to chronic stressors has been shown to contribute to immigrants’ deteriorating health with more time in US residence. Few studies, however, have examined links among common psychosocial stressors for immigrants (e.g., acculturation-related) and contexts of immigrant settlement for physical health. The study investigated relationships among social stressors, stress buffers (e.g., family support), and allostatic load (AL)—a summary measure of physiological “wear and tear”—among 126 adult Mexican immigrant farm workers. Analyses examined social contributors t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Dietary Sources of Calcium Among Parents and Their Early Adolescent Children in the United States by Parent Race/Ethnicity and Place of Birth
Abstract Dietary calcium sources may differ by race/ethnicity and dietary acculturation. A cross-sectional, convenience sample including 587 United States (US) Asian, Hispanic and non-Hispanic White parent–child (10–13 years) pairs completed a calcium food frequency questionnaire. Calcium sources were ranked by mean percent contribution to total adjusted calcium intake, and compared by ethnic group and parents’ location of birth. Five foods (fluid milk, cheese, milk on cereal, yogurt, and lattes) represented 49 % of total calcium intake for parents. The same foods (except lattes) repres...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 20, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Step On It! Workplace Cardiovascular Risk Assessment of New York City Yellow Taxi Drivers
Abstract Multiple factors associated with taxi driving can increase the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) in taxi drivers. This paper describes the results of Step On It!, which assessed CVD risk factors among New York City taxi drivers at John F. Kennedy International Airport. Drivers completed an intake questionnaire and free screenings for blood pressure, glucose and body mass index (BMI). 466 drivers participated. 9 % had random plasma glucose values>200 mg/dl. 77 % had elevated BMIs. Immigrants who lived in the US for>10 years had 2.5 times the odds (CI 1.1–5.9) of havin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Civil Surgeon Tuberculosis Evaluations for Foreign-Born Persons Seeking Permanent U.S. Residence
Abstract Foreign-born persons in the United States seeking to adjust their status to permanent resident must undergo screening for tuberculosis (TB) disease. Screening is performed by civil surgeons (CS) following technical instructions by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. From 2011 to 2012, 1,369 practicing CS in California, Texas, and New England were surveyed to investigate adherence to the instructions. A descriptive analysis was conducted on 907 (66 %) respondents. Of 907 respondents, 739 (83 %) had read the instructions and 565 (63 %) understood that a chest radiograph is requir...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Breast Cancer Amongst Filipino Migrants: A Review of the Literature and Ten-Year Institutional Analysis
Abstract As one migrates from an area of low to high incidence of breast cancer their personal risk of developing breast cancer increases. This is however not equally distributed across all races and ethnicities. This paper specifically examines Filipino migrants. A literature review was conducted to summarize breast cancer incidence, screening practices and trends in treatment amongst Filipino migrants. In addition, a retrospective cohort study was conducted specifically examining the age in which Filipino women were diagnosed with breast cancer compared to Asian and Caucasian counterparts. Filipino women are dia...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 13, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Experiences of Social and Structural Forms of Stigma Among Chinese Immigrant Consumers with Psychosis
Abstract Chinese immigrants tend to rely on family and close community for support given their vulnerable societal position. Yet stigma, especially from structural and familial sources, may have a particularly harmful impact upon Chinese immigrants with psychosis. Using a descriptive analysis based upon grounded theory, we examined stigma experiences of 50 Chinese immigrant consumers with psychosis, paying particular attention to frequency, sources, and themes of social and structural stigma. Although past research indicates that family is a recipient of stigma, we found instead that family members were common per...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Korean American Women and Mammogram Uptake
Abstract A high percentage of Korean American (KA) women have never had a mammogram, which puts them at greater risk for late-stage breast cancer. The aim of this study was to compare health beliefs and spousal support about breast cancer and screening between KA women with and without a history of mammogram completion. Cross-sectional data were obtained from 428 non-adherent married KA women. KA women who never had a mammogram were younger, had less access to health care, had less knowledge, and had lower perceived self-efficacy, benefits, and spousal support, and higher perceived barriers to breast cancer screen...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Help Seeking Attitudes Among Cambodian and Laotian Refugees: Implications for Public Mental Health Approaches
Abstract This is a pilot study of demographic and acculturation factors in relation to attitudes toward seeking psychological help among Lao and Cambodian refugees and immigrants in the United States of America. Cambodian and Laotian American adults in the United States of America were approached to complete help-seeking attitudes and acculturation scales. T test and hierarchical multiple regression analyses were used to analyze the relationships between the demographic and acculturation variables, and attitudes toward seeking psychological help. Out of 270 target subjects approached there were 108 respondents. Of...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Traditional Cautery for Medical Treatment Among the Bedouins of Southern Israel
Abstract Traditional cautery for the cure of disease is an ancient and widespread mode of treatment in various cultures and is a central modality among Israeli Bedouins. To date the use of this treatment has not been assessed systematically. A personal interview was conducted among Muslim Bedouin patients who came to clinics in the Negev region in southern Israel. There were 250 participants including 128 women (51.2 %). The mean age was 45.16 ± 16.2 (range 18–86). Eighty nine (35.7 %) of the participants declared that they had personally undergone curative cautery therapy in t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Diabetes and Cardiovascular Disease Risk in Cambodian Refugees
Abstract To determine rates of diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia in Cambodian refugees, and to assess the proportion whose conditions are satisfactorily managed in comparison to the general population. Self-report and laboratory/physical health assessment data obtained from a household probability sample of U.S.-residing Cambodian refugees (N = 331) in 2010–2011 were compared to a probability sample of the adult U.S. population (N = 6,360) from the 2009–2010 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Prevalence of diabetes, hypertension and hyperlipidemia in Cambodia...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Evaluating Provider Advice and Women’s Beliefs on Total Weight Gain During Pregnancy
Abstract Excessive gestational weight gain (GWG) is associated with complications for both mother and child. Minority women are at increased risk for excessive GWG, yet are underrepresented in published weight control interventions. To inform future interventions, we examined the prevalence and accuracy of provider advice and its association with personal beliefs about necessary maternal weight gain among predominantly Latina pregnant women. Secondary analysis examining baseline data (N = 123) from a healthy lifestyle randomized controlled trial conducted in and urban area of the South East. Only 23.6&nb...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 4, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Postpartum Depression Among Immigrant and Arabic Women: Literature Review
Abstract Postpartum depression (PPD) is a major disabling mood disorder that affects women during childbearing years. The purpose of this literature review is to identify the prevalence and risk factors for PPD among immigrant women in industrialized countries and compare it with prevalence and risk factors for PPD among Arab women in their home countries. 26 studies, published between 1995 and 2013 have been included. In this review, prevalence of PPD among Arab women in their countries ranged 10–37 %, and the prevalence of PPD among immigrant women in industrialized countries ranged 11.2–60 ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Analysis of Latent Tuberculosis Infection Treatment Adherence Among Refugees and Other Patient Groups Referred to the Baltimore City Health Department TB Clinic, February 2009–March 2011
Abstract We sought to determine the proportion of refugee patients at the Baltimore City Health Department Tuberculosis program (BCHD-TB) successfully completing latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) treatment, as compared to other referral groups, and to identify factors associated with treatment completion. We completed a retrospective cohort analysis of individuals referred to BCHD-TB program for LTBI care between February 1, 2009 and March 31, 2011. Among 841 patients evaluated by BCHD-TB and diagnosed with LTBI, 81 % of refugees, 50 % of non-refugee foreign-born, and 35 % of US-born patients co...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Substance Use, Age at Migration, and Length of Residence Among Adult Immigrants in the United States
In this study we scrutinize prevalence of current smoking and binge drinking among adult US immigrants, and examine whether age at migration predicts these two behaviors and moderates the effect of length of residence. Immigrant groups include those from Latin America/Caribbean, East and South Asia, Sub-Saharan Africa, Europe/Central Asia, and Middle East/North Africa. Multivariate logistic regressions are estimated using cross-sectional data from the New Immigrant Survey (N = 7,397). Results show that patterns of smoking and binge drinking vary by gender and by region of origins. In addition, arriving at age 0&n...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Development and Initial Testing of Messages to Encourage Tuberculosis Testing and Treatment Among Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) Vaccinated Persons
Abstract Misperceptions surrounding the Bacille Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccine can lead some vaccinated individuals to resist being tested and treated for tuberculosis (TB). Educational messages to best explain the risk of TB to BCG-vaccinated, Hispanic persons were systematically developed and tested. First, TB program staff provided messages they considered effective. These were analyzed and validated by TB experts, and then presented in group interviews initially to foreign-born Hispanic persons with a TB diagnosis, and then persons without a prior TB diagnosis. Based on interviewees’ feedback, preferred ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation-Related Predictors of Very Light Smoking Among Latinos in California and Nationwide
Abstract The prevalence of light smoking has increased among Latinos. The purpose of this study was to identify demographic and acculturation-related factors associated with very light smoking, defined as smoking 1–5 cigarettes per day (CPD), among Latinos in California and nationwide. Latino smokers in the 2007–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) or the 2009 California Health Interview Survey (CHIS) were analyzed. Logistic regression assessed factors associated with very light smoking. Among NHANES smokers, those born in Mexico or who lived fewer years in the US were more l...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Low Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Knowledge Among Latino Parents in Utah
Abstract Latinas have the highest incidence of cervical cancer, yet Latino parents/guardians’ knowledge about and willingness to have their children receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is unknown. Latino parents/guardians (N = 67) of children aged 11–17 were recruited from two community organizations to complete a survey, including HPV vaccine knowledge, child’s uptake, demographic characteristics, and acculturation. Descriptive statistics and correlates of parents’ HPV knowledge and uptake were calculated using Chi square tests and multivariable logistic regressio...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prevalence of Hepatitis B and C Viruses Among Asylum Seekers in Izmir
Abstract Hepatitis B and C virus infections are known to be an important health problem all over the World. According to the data from World Health Organization, 350 million people are estimated to have been chronically infected by hepatitis B virus and 180 million people have been infected by hepatitis C virus. Most of the patients are not aware of their illnesses. Hepatitis B and C virus infections are the most common cause of sequel liver disease related to decompensate liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Many people are obliged to leave their country due to political, economic and social reasons. In...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prevalence and Presentation of Hepatitis B and C Virus (HBV and HCV) Infection in Vietnamese Americans via Serial Community Serologic Testing
This study was based on the data collected by testing for Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core antibody (HBcAb IgG), anti-HBs antibody (HBsAb), and anti-HCV antibody (anti-HCV) in a series of community screening in VAs in Orange County, California. In 1,405 VA participants, the mean age was 51 (17–87) years, 45.1 % were males; 68.2 %, married; 97.2 %, born in Vietnam. Most of the participants were non-US born with their primary language being non-English and with limited access to health care. Of the 1,405 cases, 124 (8.8 %) were confirmed HBV infection by HBsAg+; 81 (5.8&nbs...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Pre-menarche Pubertal Development Following Unique Form of Immigration: The Case of Girls Adopted from China
Abstract Our study tested the hypothesis that drastic social-cultural change has an impact on girls’ pre-menarche pubertal development. We focused on a unique group of Chinese immigrants who migrated out of China in infancy through international adoption. Our sample included 298 Chinese girls who were 7.3–11.1 years in 2011 (Mean = 8.8, SD = 0.9) and were adopted at 7–24 months (Mean = 12.6, SD = 3.4). We found that 34 % showed at least one of four signs of pubertal development: Growth spurt, body fat increase, breast development, and body h...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Frequency of Infectious Diseases in Immigrants in a Western European Country: A Population-Based Study
Abstract The aim of this population-based study was to assess the incidence rates of infectious diseases in native- (Italian) and foreign-born (immigrants) populations in a North Italy area, in 2006–2010. Crude, age-specific incidence rates (IRs) and age-standardised rate ratios (SRRs) between foreign- and native-born subjects and their 95 % confidence intervals (95 % CI) were estimated. A total of 32,554 cases of infectious diseases were found (9.9 % in foreign-born subjects). The highest SRRs between foreign- and nativeborn subjects were found for tuberculosis (SRR = 27.1; 95 ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Parental Awareness and Dental Attendance of Children Among African Immigrants
Abstract To assess parental awareness of their child’s dental status and the relationship between parental awareness and children’s dental attendance. Participants were children aged 6 years or younger and their African parents who had lived in Canada for up to 10 years. Demographics and parents’ perceived dental status were collected. Children’s normative dental status was determined by dental examinations. 125 pairs of parents and children aged 21–72 months were included. 52 % of the children never had a dental visit. Dental status of 44 % of children was r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Deportation History Among HIV-Positive Latinos in Two US–Mexico Border Communities
Abstract Health-related vulnerabilities associated with deportation are understudied. We conducted a cross-sectional study to identify factors associated with history of deportation from the US to Mexico among HIV-positive Latinos. From 2009 to 2010, we recruited a convenience sample from HIV clinics in San Diego, US and Tijuana, Mexico. Of 283 participants, 25 % reported a prior deportation. Factors independently associated with increased odds of deportation history were being male [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) 2.77; 95 % CI 1.18–6.48], having ≤high-school education (AOR 3.87; 95 % CI 1....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Characterization of Chronic Hepatitis B Cases Among Foreign-Born Persons in Six Population-Based Surveillance Sites, United States 2001–2010
We examined trends by birth country during 2005–2010. Of 36,008 cases, 21,355 (59.3 %) reported birth in a country outside the USA, 2,323 (6.5 %) were US-born. Compared with US-born, foreign-born persons were 9.2 times more frequent among chronic hepatitis B cases. Foreign-born were more frequently female, younger, ever pregnant, and born in China. Percentages of cases among foreign-born persons were constant during 2005–2010. Our findings support information from US surveillance for Hepatitis B screening and vaccination efforts. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Hepatitis B Awareness and Knowledge in Hepatitis B Surface Antigen-Positive Parturient Immigrant Women from West Africa in the Bronx, New York
This study shows that pregnancy-related health interventions may offer unique opportunities to link such women to specialist care and initiate culturally sensitive HBV-relevant education for the index case and her family. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Correlates of Sexual Risk for HIV Among US-Born and Foreign-Born Latino Men Who Have Sex with Men (MSM): An Analysis from the Brothers y Hermanos Study
Abstract Little research has been conducted to examine whether correlates of sexual risk vary by nativity among Latino men who have sex with men (MSM). We used cross sectional data collected from 870 Latino MSM recruited with respondent-driven sampling techniques. For each sub-sample (US-born and foreign-born), we assessed the association between each of the potential correlates (substance use, acculturation, social support, and social discrimination) and sexual risk behavior. Illicit drug use was associated with increased odds of sexual risk behavior in both US-born (OR = 2.17, 95 % CI 1.17–...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Status, Perceptions and Needs of Hispanics in Rural Shelbyville, Kentucky
Abstract This cross-sectional study was completed to characterize the health status, perceptions and needs of Hispanics in Shelbyville, KY, USA. Community Health Workers interviewed 668 Hispanic residents in Shelbyville, KY, USA. Data were collected from 2009 to 2010 and analyzed from 2011 until present. Hispanic immigrants from Mexico and other Central American countries completed the survey. The most common self-reported diseases were allergies, asthma, diabetes, lung disease and cardiovascular disease. High blood pressure and diabetes were the two most common diagnoses among insured, older females. Health educ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Small for Gestational Age and Low Birth Weight Term Admissions to a Tertiary Perinatal Centre in Northern Queensland, Australia
Abstract Northern Queensland is unique in that the proportion of Aboriginal and Torres Straits Islander (ATSI) communities is higher than the rest of Australia. The aim of this study was to describe the characteristics of term admissions of low birth weight (LBW; birth weight
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

International Migration from Non-endemic Settings as a Protective Factor for HIV/STI Risk Among Female Sex Workers in Vancouver, Canada
Abstract Given heterogeneous evidence regarding the impacts of migration on HIV/sexually transmitted infections (STIs) among female sex workers (FSWs), we explored factors associated with international migration among FSWs in Vancouver, Canada. We draw on baseline questionnaire and HIV/STI testing data from a community-based cohort, AESHA, from 2010-2012. Logistic regression identified correlates of international migration. Of 650 FSWs, 163 (25.1 %) were international migrants, who primarily worked in formal indoor establishments. HIV/STI prevalence was lower among migrants than Canadian-born women (5.5 vs. ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Fair Report of Asian Americans in Michigan
Abstract There is little information about Asian American health in Michigan. This highlights an urgent need to collect their health data to understand and help this fastest growing ethnic group live healthier lives and reduce health disparities. Data for about 300 individuals attending two major health fairs were collected to study older Chinese and Vietnamese immigrants. The analyses show that they have high prevalence rates of hypertension, high cholesterol and diabetes, even though their body mass index is relatively low. The report of these analyses is a starting point to understand the study groups. Such da...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Increasing HIV Testing Among African Immigrants in Ireland: Challenges and Opportunities
Abstract In 2012, immigrants constitute 63 % of new cases of heterosexually transmitted HIV among individuals born outside Ireland. Current strategies to encourage testing can be ineffective if immigrants perceive them as culturally insensitive. We obtained qualitative data to explore challenges to voluntary HIV-testing for immigrants in Ireland. Content analysis was undertaken to identify and describe pertinent themes. Widespread beliefs that HIV is primarily a disease of African immigrants were identified as challenges that constrain access to testing and care. The organization and location of testing serv...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Sun Protection Attitudes and Behaviours Among First Generation Australians with Darker Skin Types: Results from Focus Groups
Abstract Despite residing in a country that has the highest rates of skin cancer in the world, little is known about the knowledge, attitudes and sun protection practices of first generation Australian-born individuals with olive and darker skin types. Six focus groups with first generation Australian-born individuals of Asian, Mediterranean, Middle Eastern and Indian background were conducted. Participants had good knowledge of the dangers of skin cancer. Most correctly perceived darker skin types as protective and believed they were at low risk of skin cancer. Most participants could recall high profile mass me...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Exploring the Role of Ethnic Identity on the Attitudes Towards HPV Vaccine Advertising Among Puerto Ricans: A Qualitative Analysis
Abstract Despite the existence of guidelines recommending vaccination against the human papillomavirus (HPV) and widespread availability of the vaccine through the Vaccines for Children program, HPV vaccination rates among island Puerto Ricans are suboptimal. Advertising plays a central role in promoting HPV vaccination by increasing awareness of and knowledge about the vaccine; however, little is known about the influence of cultural factors on the impact of HPV messages delivered through the media. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the role of ethnic identity on the attitudes towards HPV vaccine ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Filariasis in Sub-Saharan Immigrants Attended in a Health Area of Southern Spain: Clinical and Epidemiological Findings
Abstract Filariasis is still an endemic disease in several countries worldwide. Patients with mansonellosis result in only relatively mild symptoms, but these infections could produce many visits to health care providers. In Spain, this infection is imported due to the increase of immigrant population reaching our country during last years. The health area of the Hospital of Poniente has a rate of immigrants around to 20 %, with a high percentage coming from sub-Saharan countries, being Mansonella perstans the main filarial infection in the majority of cases. In the protocol for the immigrants, it has been i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Validation of Arabic and English Versions of the ARSMA-II Acculturation Rating Scale
Abstract To translate and adapt the Acculturation Rating Scale of Mexican–Americans II (ARSMA-II) for Arab Americans. A multistage translation process followed by a pilot and a large study. The translated and adapted versions, Acculturation Rating Scale for Arabic Americans-II Arabic and English (ARSAA-IIA, ARSAA-IIE), were validated in a sample of 297 Arab Americans. Factor analyses with principal axis factoring extractions and direct oblimin rotations were used to identify the underlying structure of ARSAA-II. Factor analysis confirmed the underlying structure of ARSAA-II and produced two interpretable fa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Qualitative Assessment of HIV Prevention Challenges and Opportunities Among Latino Immigrant Men in a New Receiving City
Abstract Changing demographics in new receiving communities contributes to a lag time between the arrival of new immigrants and the development of appropriate services. This scarcity of services can exacerbate existing disparities in health conditions such as HIV, which disproportionately affects Latinos. Focus groups were conducted in Baltimore with 59 Latino men who had immigrated to the U.S. within the past 10 years to explore the challenges and opportunities to accessing HIV testing and preventative services. Transcripts were analyzed through a modified thematic constant comparison approach. Four themati...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 25, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Impact of Gender Differences in Attitudes and Beliefs Concerning HBV Vaccination and Screening in the Lao Community
Abstract Liver cancer incidence is increasing among Asian Americans. Laotians in the US have greater risk of liver cancer death compared to other Asian American groups. However, ethnicity is not the only disparity; Laotian men are at increased risk of liver cancer compared to Laotian women. Use of hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccination and screening is low among Laotians. The impact of gender differences in attitudes and beliefs concerning HBV vaccination and screening is unknown. This secondary analysis of a cross-sectional community-based participatory research study. Although men were more likely to believe that i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation and Drug Use Stigma Among Latinos and African Americans: An Examination of a Church-Based Sample
Abstract Substance use patterns among Latinos likely reflect changes in attitudes resulting from acculturation, but little is known about Latinos’ attitudes regarding drug addiction. We surveyed a church-based sample of Latinos and African Americans (N = 1,235) about attitudes toward drug addiction and socio-demographics. Linear regression models compared Latino subgroups with African-Americans. In adjusted models, Latinos had significantly higher drug addiction stigma scores compared to African Americans across all subgroups (US-born Latinos, β = 0.22, p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 23, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Substance Use Across Different Phases of the Migration Process: A Survey of Mexican Migrants Flows
This study examined the levels of substance use and changes across different migration stages, including pre-departure, travel, destination, and return, among Mexican migrants converging on the US–Mexico border. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Tijuana, Mexico, between 2009 and 2010 among Mexican migrants returning from the US and those travelling from other Mexican regions. The overall prevalence of last 12-month at-risk drinking, illicit drug use, and current smoking, was 42.3, 17.7 and 31.4 %, respectively. Compared to pre-departure migrants, males were at increased risk for illicit drug use at the d...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Comparison of Health Care Resource Utilization by Immigrants Versus Native Elderly People
Abstract To compare the utilization of health care resources (drug prescriptions, hospital admissions and health care services) by immigrant versus native elderly people (65 years or more), by using administrative database of the Lombardy Region. For each immigrant (an older people born out of Italy), one person born in Lombardy (native) was randomly selected and matched by age, sex and general practitioner. The 25,508 immigrants selected were less prescribed with at least one drug (OR 0.72, 95 % CI 0.67–0.76) and had a lesser use of health care services (OR 0.79, 95 % CI 0.75–0.84) than...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Use of Regional Data to Validate and Recalibrate Self-reported Hypertension: Highlighting Differences in Immigrant Groups in New York City
The objectives were to assess validity of self-reported hypertension in Hispanic and Asian American adults, and to recalibrate self-reported hypertension with measured values. Data were from the New York City Community Health Survey 2005–2008 and the Heart Follow-Up Study (HFUS) 2010 (included measured hypertension). Sensitivity and specificity were calculated in the HFUS data; recalibration was conducted using a previously described method by Mentz et al. Sensitivity was similar in Puerto Ricans and Dominicans versus whites. The differences in hypertension prevalence after recalibration were largest in Hispanics. No...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Breastfeeding and Asthmatic Symptoms in The Offspring of Latinas: The Role of Maternal Nativity
Abstract Previous research has generally found exclusive breastfeeding to protect against asthma in young children. However, maternal nativity in a Latina population has not been assessed as a potential confounder or effect modifier. Using cross-sectional data restricted to Latina mothers (n = 704) from a birth cohort in Los Angeles interviewed in 2003 and 2006, we estimated risk ratios (RR) for exclusive breastfeeding and asthmatic symptoms in the offspring. 56 children (8 %) had asthmatic symptoms at age 3.5 years. We found a 49 % reduction in risk of asthmatic symptoms with>3 mo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 10, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Assessing Lung Cancer Incidence Disparities Between Puerto Ricans and Other Racial/Ethnic Groups in the United States, 1992–2010
This study compared the incidence of lung cancer among Puerto Ricans (PRs) with that of Whites, Blacks, and Hispanics in the United States. We computed age-standardized rates of lung cancer during 1992–2010 and percentages of change over time. Standardized rate ratios (SRR) were estimated to assess racial/ethnic and gender differences. All men groups showed a significant decline in lung cancer over time but PRs observed the smallest change (−1.2 %). For both men and women, PRs had lower incidence rates compared to other racial/ethnic groups (SRR 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Healthy Migrant Effect on Smoking Behavior Among Asian Immigrants in the United States
This study used three waves of Current Population Survey–Tobacco Use Supplement data, 1998–1999, 2005–2006, and 2010–2011, to compare the rates of being a current smoker among Asian immigrants and United States born citizens. Further, the odds ratios of gender, age, marital status, socioeconomic status, years of migration, and citizenship status on the likelihood of being a current smoker were examined. Across the three waves, Asian immigrants smoked at a much lower rate than their native-born counterparts. The gender gap of being a current smoker was much wider among Asian immigrants. The longer th...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research