“Their Stories Have Changed My Life”: Clinicians’ Reflections on Their Experience with and Their Motivation to Conduct Asylum Evaluations
Abstract Many clinicians perform asylum evaluations yet no studies describe the motivation to perform them or their perceived rewards. The number of asylum seekers in the US is increasing and more clinicians are needed as evaluators. A survey to an asylum evaluators’ network asked participants to qualitatively reflect on their experience and motivation. Answers were analyzed for themes and sentiment. Respondents cited commitment to humanistic and moral values, noted personal and family experiences, having skills, expertise, and career interests as drivers. They found the experience very rewarding personally ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 20, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Status of Immigrant Children and Environmental Survey of Child Daycare Centers in Samut Sakhon Province, Thailand
This study aimed to determine the prevalence of intestinal parasitic infections among 372 immigrant children at 8 child-daycare centers during their parents’ work time, by physical examination, fecal examination, and examination of the environment around the centers. Physical examinations were generally unremarkable, except that head-lice and fingernail examinations were positive in two cases (0.8 %). The results showed intestinal parasitic infections to be highly prevalent, at 71.0 %. These infections comprised both helminths and protozoa: Trichuris trichiura (50.8 %), Enterobius vermicularis (25.2&nb...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 11, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

No Differences in Cervical Cancer Stage at Diagnosis for Blacks and Whites in the Mountain West
This study assesses cervical cancer disparities between Blacks and Whites in terms of stage at diagnosis in a Mountain West state. A total of 1,408 women diagnosed with cervical cancer between 1995 and 2010 were identified from the Nevada Central Cancer Registry. Logistic regression modeling examined the effect of race on stage at diagnosis in both Nevada and the Surveillance, Epidemiology and End Results (SEER) population. After controlling for the main confounders, no significant differences in stage at diagnosis were observed between Black and White females in Nevada (aOR 0.91; 95 % CI 0.57–1.43). In contrast...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 11, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Predictors of Sexual Activity in Haitian-American Adolescents
This study examined the impact of individual, peer, family, school, and neighborhood level variables on sexual activity among 276 Haitian-American adolescents. Differences between those who were sexually active and those who were not were analyzed using Chi square and t tests. Significant factors at p ≤ 0.1 were entered into logistic regression for the full group and for girls-only. Half of males and 36.6 % of females were sexually active. The multivariable model revealed that adolescents were more likely to be sexually active if they reported delinquent behaviors; had sexually active friends; and were li...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 10, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Knowledge of Abortion Laws and Services Among Low-Income Women in Three United States Cities
Abstract Low-income women and women of color are disproportionately affected by unintended pregnancy. Lack of knowledge of abortion laws and services is one of several factors likely to hinder access to services, though little research has documented knowledge in this population. Survey with convenience sample of 1,262 women attending primary care or full-scope Ob/Gyn clinics serving low-income populations in three large cities and multivariable analyses with four knowledge outcomes. Among all participants, 53 % were first-generation immigrants, 25 % identified the correct gestational age limit, 41 ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 9, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Differences in Psychopathology Between Immigrant and Native Adolescents Admitted to a Psychiatric Inpatient Unit
This study examined differences in psychopathology between immigrant and non-immigrant adolescents admitted for the first time to a child and adolescent inpatient psychiatry unit. Participants were 234 adolescents (191 non-immigrants and 43 immigrants). There were significant differences between the two groups in relation to certain stressors: parental separation, family breakdown, being under state custody, physical and/or psychological maltreatment and sexual abuse. Differences between the main diagnoses of the two groups were found in relation to schizophrenia and anorexia nervosa. There are differences between immigran...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Intimate Partner Violence and Depression Among Latin American Women in Toronto
Abstract Research from the United States suggests that Latin American immigrant and refugee women are one of the groups most greatly impacted by intimate partner violence (IPV) and associated mental health consequences including higher rates of depression than women from other ethno-racial groups. In Canada, little is known about the experience of IPV and mental health among this population. Even in the broader North American context, how Latin American women themselves perceive the connection between IPV and depression is unknown. This paper presents the findings of a pilot study that examined the perceived relat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Infectious Diseases in Immigrant Population Related to the Time of Residence in Spain
Abstract The aim of this study was to evaluate the data on the main imported infectious diseases and public health issues arising from the risk of transmission of tropical and common diseases in the immigrant population. During the period of study, 2,426 immigrants were attended in the Tropical Medicine Unit of the Hospital of Poniente. For each patient, a complete screening for common and tropical diseases was performed. The prevalence and main features of intestinal and urinary parasites, microfilarias, Chagas disease, malaria, hepatitis B (HBV) and C (HCV) viruses, extrapulmonary tuberculosis and syphilis was i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation and Associated Effects on Abused Immigrant Women’s Safety and Mental Functioning: Results of Entry Data for a 7-year Prospective Study
Abstract Intimate partner violence has negative effects on women’s safety and wellbeing. When immigrant women are victimized the danger and poor health may intensify. The purpose was to determine the impact of acculturation on severity of violence, danger for murder, mental health functioning, and safety behaviors of abused immigrant women. Entry data of a 7-year prospective study of 106 abused immigrant women who were first time users of safe shelter or justice services is presented. The interview included the Severity of Violence Against Women Scale, Danger Assessment, Brief Symptom Inventory (BSI), Safet...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation, Gender, and Mental Health of Southeast Asian Immigrant Youth in Canada
Abstract The relationships between mental health, protective factors and acculturation among Southeast Asian youth were examined in this study using a gender-based analysis. Population-based data from the 2008 British Columbia Adolescent Health Survey were used to examine differences in extreme stress and despair by acculturation. Associations between emotional distress and hypothesized protective factors were examined using logistic regression. Stratified analyses were performed to assess gender-related differences. Recent immigrant youth reported higher odds of emotional distress. Family connectedness and schoo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Perceptions of Mental Illness and Related Stigma Among Vietnamese Populations: Findings from a Mixed Method Study
Abstract Mental-illness-related (MIR) stigma is recognized as a major barrier to health care. Yet very little is known about mental illness and stigma among Vietnamese populations, or how emigration and acculturation processes might affect traditional views. Focus group discussions were conducted with Vietnamese Americans in New Orleans (Louisiana) and Vietnamese nationals in Bui Chu (Vietnam), who shared historical and cultural backgrounds, in 2010 to assess differences in their perceptions of mental illness and stigma. Results show several significant differences in mental illness perceptions between Vi...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Specific Trauma Subtypes Improve the Predictive Validity of the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire in Iraqi Refugees
Abstract Trauma exposure contributes to poor mental health among refugees, and exposure often is measured using a cumulative index of items from the Harvard Trauma Questionnaire (HTQ). Few studies, however, have asked whether trauma subtypes derived from the HTQ could be superior to this cumulative index in predicting mental health outcomes. A community sample of recently arrived Iraqi refugees (N = 298) completed the HTQ and measures of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression symptoms. Principal components analysis of HTQ items revealed a 5-component subtype model of trauma that accounted f...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation and Religious Coping as Moderators of the Association Between Discrimination and Depressive Symptoms Among Mexican-American Vocational Students
This study examined whether acculturation and religious coping would moderate the association between past-year perceived discrimination and depressive symptoms in a sample of 247 Mexican-American post-secondary vocational students (59.6 % males; mean age = 26.81). Results from hierarchical regression analyses indicated that perceived discrimination, positive religious coping, and negative religious coping were significantly associated with depressive symptoms. Further analyses indicated that positive religious coping moderated the perceived discrimination–depressive symptoms association. Students repo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Evaluating Patient Acceptability of a Culturally Focused Psychiatric Consultation Intervention for Latino Americans with Depression
Abstract Significant disparities exist in both access to and quality of mental health care for Latino Americans with depression compared to Caucasians, resulting in a greater burden of disability in this underserved population. Our aim is to evaluate participant acceptability of a Culturally Focused Psychiatric (CFP) consultation program for depressed Latino Americans. Latino American adult primary care patients endorsing depressive symptoms on a screening questionnaire were targeted in their primary care clinic. The intervention addressed participants’ depressive symptoms using culturally adapted clinical ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Occupational Mobility and Depression Among the Foreign-Born in the United States
Abstract This paper used the 2003 New Immigrant Survey (n = 2,305) to examine the relationship between occupational mobility before and after migration and depression among immigrants. There were two measures of occupational mobility, change in occupational prestige and educational match. For both measures, upward and downward mobility were associated with higher depression. This association was only present among women; for men, there were no significant relationships between the occupational mobility measures and depression. The findings suggest that immigrant occupational mobility may not solely ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Depression, Stress, and Intimate Partner Violence Among Latino Migrant and Seasonal Farmworkers in Rural Southeastern North Carolina
Abstract The purpose of the study is to identify the predictors of depression and intimate partner violence (IPV) among Latinos in rural Southeastern North Carolina. A sample of 291 migrant and seasonal farmworkers was interviewed to complete the demographic questionnaire, HITS (intimate violence tendency), Migrant Farmworker Stress Inventory, Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression Scale (depression), and CAGE/4M (alcohol abuse). OLS regression and structural equation modeling were used to test the hypothesized relations between predictors of IPV and depression. The findings indicated that respondents report...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Self-reported Vicarious Trauma in Asylum Evaluators: A Preliminary Survey
We present preliminary data about VT in asylum evaluators. Recruiters and trainers should make every effort to address the issue and educate their volunteers about means of identifying and managing symptoms. Formal and informal support services and resources should be developed and shared with volunteers. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Stress and Sociocultural Factors Related to Health Status Among US–Mexico Border Farmworkers
This study examines factors relating to farmworkers’ health status from sociocultural factors, including stress embedded within their work and community contexts. A cross-sectional household survey of farmworkers (N = 299) included social-demographics, immigration status descriptors, and a social-ecologically grounded, community-responsive, stress assessment. Outcomes included three standard US national surveillance measures of poor mental, physical, and self-rated health (SRH). Logistic regression models showed that higher levels of stress were significantly associated (Ps 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Employing a Community Based Participatory Research Approach to Bear Witness: Psycho–Social Impact of the 2010 Earthquake on Haitians in Somerville, MA
Abstract We employed a community-based participatory research approach to assess mental health among the Haitian community in the Somerville, MA area. The development of the survey coincided with the 2010 earthquake in Haiti, and so several questions related to the natural disaster were included in the analysis to increase understanding of the impact locally. We surveyed a convenience sample of 64 Haitians recruited with the assistance of the Somerville Haitian Coalition. The survey assessed demographic data, reasons for migrating to the area, response to the 2010 earthquake, and mental health. Mental health meas...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Ethnic and Gender Variations in the Associations Between Family Cohesion, Family Conflict, and Depression in Older Asian and Latino Adults
Abstract To examine the associations between family conflict, family cohesion and late-life depression in Latino and Asian populations and test if these associations vary by race/ethnicity and gender. We used a subsample of older adults from the National Latino Asian American Study (N = 395). All analyses were weighted and adjusted for individual and clinical characteristics. Greater family cohesion was associated with decrease in risk for depression in Latino and Asian older adult populations (OR: 0.68, 95 % CI: 0.54, 0.84). These associations varied by gender, with men being more sensitive to fam...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Depression and Help Seeking Among Mexican–Americans: The Mediating Role of Familism
Abstract Increased depression symptomatology results in a reduced willingness to seek help from family. Focusing on Mexican–Americans, the current study hypothesized that the a reduction in favorable perceptions of familial relations could be partially to blame for limited help seeking among people with depression. Data were collected from 84 Mexican–Americans. Measures assessed depression symptomatology, familism, perceptions of help seeking from family, and demographics. As predicted: (1) depression symptomatology was negatively associated with perceptions of help seeking from family; (2) familism w...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Russian Speaking Immigrants: Drug Use, Infectious Disease and Related Health Behavior
This article focuses on drug use, infectious disease and other factors comparing FSU males who became addicted before and after immigration to Israel. 810 drug users were surveyed in treatment centers from January 2002 to January 2012. The Addiction Severity Index and other data collection instruments were used. Those addicted before immigration have a higher level of infectious disease (i.e., HCV, HIV/AIDS and tuberculosis) and opiate use other than heroin. Those addicted after immigration reported higher rates of last 30 days sedative; cocaine and opiates other than heroin use. Injection drug use and ASI domain prob...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Immigration and Depression in South Africa: Evidence from the First South African National Income Dynamics Study
Abstract Few studies have examined depression among immigrants in post-apartheid South Africa, and factors that strengthen the relationship between immigration and depression. The first wave of the National Income Dynamics Study was used to investigate links between immigration and depression (n = 15,205). Depression symptoms were assessed using a 10-item version of the Center for Epidemiologic Studies Depression (CES-D) Scale. Immigrants in South Africa had fewer depressive symptoms (CES-D ≥ 10) than locally-born participants (17.1 vs. 32.4 %, F = 13.5, p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Prevalence of Torture and Associated Symptoms in United States Iraqi Refugees
This study determines the rates of torture experience, primary and secondary, among Iraqi refugees in the US; and the association to physical and mental health symptoms on arrival. A retrospective review was conducted in 2011 on the post-arrival health screens of Iraqi refugees resettled in Utah in 2008 and 2009. Measures included reports of torture experience as defined by the United Nations; reports of physical and mental health symptoms at the time of screening; and association of torture to the presence of symptoms on arrival. The study included the health screens of 497 (97 %) of eligible Iraqi refugees. Most exp...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Detecting Depression in Pregnancy: Validation of EPDS in British Pakistani Mothers
Abstract Recent reports suggest that antenatal depression is as prevalent as postnatal depression. The Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale (EPDS) is the most widely used tool to detect postnatal depression, which can also detect depression during the antenatal period. Mothers of Pakistani origin have the highest birth rate in the UK. The validity of EPDS has not been assessed in this group. A prospective cohort of 714 women in their third trimester of pregnancy completed the EPDS while waiting for their antenatal visit. Women scoring 12 or more on the EPDS, and a random sample of low scores were assessed with th...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prevalence of Sexual Violence and Posttraumatic Stress Disorder in an Urban African-American Population
Abstract Sexual violence is prevalent nationally and contributes to psychopathology in the general population. Despite elevated traumatic event exposure among economically disadvantaged urban-dwelling African-Americans, there is insufficient information on lifetime sexual violence exposure and associated psychopathology in this population. In 2008–2009, 1,306 African-Americans from a Detroit household probability sample reported on lifetime rape and sexual assault and past-month and lifetime posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Lifetime sexual violence prevalence was 26.3 % for women and 5.1 % fo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Psychological Homelessness and Enculturative Stress among US-Deported Salvadorans: A Preliminary Study with a Novel Approach
Abstract The purpose of this study was to examine the construct psychological homelessness—feelings of not belonging in one’s home country—within the context of deported Salvadorans’ enculturation to El Salvador. Participants (n = 66) who had been deported from the United States completed a set of questionnaires related to their deportation experience. Results indicated that deportees, in various degrees, experienced the phenomenon of psychological homelessness and enculturative stress related to living in El Salvador. As hypothesized, enculturative stress related to re-adapting ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Immigrant Arab Americans and Alcohol Use: Longitudinal Study
This study confirms drinking among recent immigrant Arab Americans varies by subgroups and suggests English proficiency may contribute to the increase in prevalence over time. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 30, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Symptoms of Depression Among Bhutanese Refugees in the United States
Abstract Refugees are at risk for psychiatric morbidity, yet little is known about their mental health conditions. We identified factors associated with depression symptoms among Bhutanese refugees in the US. We randomly selected adult Bhutanese refugees (N = 386) to complete a cross-sectional survey concerning demographics, mental health symptoms, and associated risk factors. The case definition for depression symptoms was ≥1.75 mean depression score on the Hopkins Symptom Checklist-25. More women (26 %) than men (16 %) reported depression symptoms (p = 0.0097). Higher odds of dep...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 28, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Perceptions of Body Habitus and Cultural Health Among Hispanic Adults
Abstract To investigate whether perceptions of health and health outcomes are impacted by acculturation level, nativity, and years in the United States (US) for Hispanic adults in the Nebraska Panhandle. Focus groups (n = 10), surveys (demographics, body image silhouettes, and acculturation), and anthropometric measurements were conducted. US-born (n = 36) had higher household incomes, education level, and acculturation scores compared to foreign-born (n = 23). Years in the US was positively correlated with acculturation and anthropometrics. No significant differences were detected be...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 21, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Healthcare Utilization Among Arab Immigrants and Iraqi Refugees
Abstract Arab migrants—both immigrants and refugees—are exposed to pre- and post- migration stressors increasing their risk for health problems. Little is known, however, about rates of, or factors associated with, healthcare utilization among these two groups. A sample of 590 participants were interviewed approximately 1 year post-migration to the United States. Factors associated with healthcare utilization, including active and passive coping strategies, were examined using logistic regressions. Compared to national healthcare utilization data, immigrants had significantly lower, and refugees h...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 21, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Health Care Experiences and Perceived Barriers to Health Care Access: A Qualitative Study Among African Migrants in Guangzhou, Guangdong Province, China
Abstract Guangzhou, one of China’s largest cities and a main trading port in South China, has attracted many African businessmen and traders migrating to the city for financial gains. Previous research has explored the cultural and economic roles of this newly emerging population; however, little is known about their health care experiences while in China. Semi-structured interviews and focus groups were used to assess health care experiences and perceived barriers to health care access among African migrants in Guangzhou, China. Overall, African migrants experienced various barriers to accessing health care...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 8, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Falling Through the Cracks: Lack of Health Insurance Among Elderly Foreign- and Native-Born Blacks
Abstract Little research examines lack of health insurance among elderly Black immigrants in the US. We use data from the 2008 American Community Survey to describe variation in insurance coverage and conduct multivariate logistic regression analyses of uninsurance. Among elderly Blacks, 1.7 % of the US-born were uninsured, compared to 8.4 % of the Latin American and Caribbean-born, 23.2 % of the African-born, and 9.3 % of those born in other regions. In multivariate models, relative to the US-born, the odds of being uninsured were significantly higher among each immigrant group. Among immigran...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 8, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Infection of the Invisible: Impressions of a Tuberculosis Intervention Program for Migrants in Istanbul
Abstract This paper reviews the experience of the Istanbul Tuberculosis Aid Program, which targeted tuberculosis (TB) disease in the growing irregular migrant populations of Istanbul. This experience illustrated the importance of community-based public health interventions when dealing with an infectious disease like TB among vulnerable groups. Our data is derived primarily from a qualitative study carried out with program stakeholders. We summarize lessons for success of ITAP as: (1) Strengthening impact and outreach of TB intervention among irregular migrant communities through involvement of multiple stakeh...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 4, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Acculturation and Dietary Change Among Chinese Immigrant Women in the United States
We examined acculturation and diet over time in 312 Chinese immigrant women in Philadelphia, recruited October 2005 to April 2008 and followed with interviews and dietary recalls until April 2010. Associations were modeled using generalized estimating equations to account for repeated measures over time. Increasing length of US residence was associated with a small (~1 %/year) but significant increase in acculturation score (p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 3, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Cultural Beliefs and Understandings of Cervical Cancer Among Mexican Immigrant Women in Southeast Georgia
Abstract Rural Mexican immigrant women in the U.S. are infrequently screened and experience health disparities from cervical cancer. We explored cancer-related cultural beliefs in this population. We administered a cross-sectional survey to 39 Mexican immigrant women due for screening. We conducted univariate and bivariate analyses of participants’ characteristics, Pap test history, cancer-related knowledge and beliefs, and cultural consensus analysis about causes of cervical cancer and barriers to screening. For all the cultural consensus tasks, there was consensus (Eigenratios >3:1) among surve...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Evaluating the Effectiveness of an Illustrated Permission/Assent Form
This study was designed to explore whether illustrating the permission/assent (P/A) document offers an alternative strategy for communicating study related information to underserved populations. Participants were verbally introduced to a mock study and asked to review the corresponding P/A form with companion pictorials. Questionnaires were used to examine whether the form addressed essential elements of a P/A (as defined under the Code of Federal Regulations) and evaluate the effectiveness of the companion pictures. Over 93 % of participants agreed that the form addressed the required basic elements of a P/A. Pictur...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Erratum to: Social Determinants of Physical Activity Among Adult Asian-Americans: Results from a Population-Based Survey in California
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 2, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Nutritional Status of Refugee Children Entering DeKalb County, Georgia
This study determines the nutritional status among refugee children entering one of the largest resettlement counties in the United States and identifies differences between incoming populations. Medical records of all newly arriving pediatric refugees (0–18 years) entering DeKalb County, Georgia between October 2010 and July 2011 were reviewed. Refugee children were grouped as African, Bhutanese, or Burmese (resettling from either Thailand or Malaysia) for comparative analysis. Approximately one in five refugees were anemic or malnourished, while a quarter had stool parasites, and nearly half had dental caries....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Gender Preference for the Endoscopist Among Hispanics: The Results of a Prospective Study
Abstract We aim to assess the gender preferences for endoscopists among Hispanics and factors influencing such preferences. Cross-sectional study in prospectively enrolled Hispanic patients using a pre-endoscopy questionnaire regarding their gender preferences for the endoscopist and the reasons for such preferences. Multivariate logistic regression model was used for the statistical analysis. We enrolled total 200 Hispanic patients (100 males, 100 females) in our study. Their mean age was 51 ± 14 years. 30 % of Hispanics expressed a gender preference for the endoscopist. Gender prefere...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Premigration Harm and Depression: Findings from the New Immigrant Survey, 2003
Abstract Studies examining refugees from conflict areas have found that persecution in the place of origin is a risk factor for depression. No studies have looked at this association between mental health and the experience of premigration harm due to race, gender or religion in the general population of United States immigrants. The New Immigrant Survey baseline questionnaire was administered to a random sample of adults receiving legal permanent residency in the U.S. in 2003 (n = 8,573), including refugees, asylees and other immigrants. In multivariate analysis controlling for visa type, premigration ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Strategies to Recruit Minority persons: A Systematic Review
Abstract To identify and describe strategies used to recruit persons of ethnically and culturally diverse backgrounds and to examine their reported effectiveness. Studies (n = 26) reporting on recruitment of persons of different cultural and ethnic backgrounds, published in English between 1995 and 2012, were included in this systematic review. Data on the type of recruitment strategies and overall reported effectiveness of the strategy in recruiting participants were extracted. The vote counting method was used to synthesize the findings on effectiveness. Both proactive (face-to-face) and reactive recr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Malnourished Children in Refugee Camps and Lack of Connection with Services After US Resettlement
Abstract Identifying and addressing malnutrition among US-bound refugee children is an important human rights issue. Failure to address childhood malnutrition can impair cognitive development and productivity. The target population was children aged 6–59 months, originating from eight countries representing 51 % of US-resettled refugees for 2005–2011, living in 22 camps prior to potential US-resettlement. The corresponding camp-level nutritional survey data were evaluated. State Refugee Health Coordinators were surveyed on nutritional assessment, reporting and referrals for their US-refugee ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Caregiver Reported Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in Young American Indian Children
Abstract American Indian/Alaska Native (AI/AN) children experience high rates of dental decay, yet their pediatric oral health-related quality of life (POQL) has not been described. We measured POQL in AI children and compared it in children with reported excellent/very good/good versus fair/poor oral health status (OHS) and assessed association of OHS, child’s age, dental service utilization, and dental insurance on POQL scores. Caregivers of 143 AI (100 %), young (mean age 25.1 months) children reported their POQL score as 4.2 (scale 0–100, lower score indicates better POQL); OHS as excell...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Oral Health of Foreign Domestic Workers: Exploring the Social Determinants
Abstract Foreign domestic helpers constitute a significant proportion of migrant workers worldwide. This population subgroup provides an opportunity for understanding social determinants of oral health in immigrant community. A random sample of 122 Indonesian domestic helpers in Hong Kong completed a questionnaire on their demographic background, social characteristics (competency in local languages, immigration history, living condition, social connections, and leisure activities) and oral health behaviours (knowledge, attitudes, practice and self-efficacy). Their tooth status and periodontal health were assesse...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Parental Perception of Child Bodyweight and Health Among Mexican-American Children with Acanthosis Nigricans
This study assesses mother–father differences in perception of child’s bodyweight and health by Mexican-American parents with AN-positive children. The study used medical records in conjunction with survey data collected between 2011 and 2012 for 309 Mexican-American children with AN in South Texas. Multivariate logit models were estimated to assess mother–father differences in perception of child bodyweight and health controlling for selected child- and parent-level covariates. About 91 % of the children in the sample were obese and 6.5 % were overweight. One fifth of mothers and 38.5 % of...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Recruiting and Retaining Indigenous Farmworker Participants
This article describes the strategies used in a community-based participatory research project with indigenous agricultural workers. Participants were recruited through consulting with indigenous relatives and friends, identifying and meeting with indigenous leaders from hometown associations in countries of origin, and asking current participants to recruit fellow farmworkers. Adjustments were initiated to the second year protocol to enhance recruitment and retention. The difference in attrition rates between years one and two was statistically significant, a difference partially attributed to modifications to recruitment...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Recruitment and Retention of Under-Represented Groups with Health Disparities into Clinical Trials: A Formative Approach
Abstract We evaluated the perceived success of recruitment and retention protocols for Native Hawaiian/Pacific Islander/Filipino populations. These three groups were found to have a significantly higher incidence of health disparities than the general population. Training applications of selected vignettes were also generated. Focus groups and questionnaires were used to achieve the objective: identification of themes related to facilitators and deterrents to participation in clinical trials in these populations. This mixed methods approach evaluated promotional materials preferred. Responses to animated videos a...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Nicotine Dependence More Strongly Correlates with Psychological Distress in Disadvantaged Areas of Kazakhstan than Germany
Abstract The aim of this study was to describe the association of current smoking and nicotine dependence with psychological distress in socially disadvantaged urban areas of Germany and Kazakhstan. Random samples of people living in disadvantaged areas of Berlin, Germany, and Almaty, Kazakhstan, were assessed using the General Health Questionnaire with 28 items and the Fagerström Test for Nicotine Dependence. The association of both current smoking and nicotine dependence with psychological distress was assessed for each sample using linear regression analyses and compared between the two samples calculatin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Noninfectious Disease Among the Bhutanese Refugee Population at a United States Urban Clinic
Abstract A large number of Bhutanese are currently being resettled to the United States. A high prevalence of noninfectious diseases has been noted in some refugee groups, but data on the Bhutanese refugee population are lacking. A retrospective, chart review study was conducted to determine proportion of noninfectious disease among ethnically Nepali Bhutanese refugees (n = 66) seen at the Grady Refugee Clinic (GRC). GRC disease proportions included the following: 52 % of the patients were overweight/obese (n = 34), 23 % were hypertensive (n = 15), 12 % had vitamin B12...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 26, 2014 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research