HCV Prevalence in Asian Americans in California
AbstractThe World Health Organization estimates that 170  million persons are infected with HCV worldwide, but only 22 million are from the Americas and Europe, compared to 94 million from Asia. HCV prevalence in the general US population is 1.6 %, but data for Asian Americans are limited. Our goal was to examine HCV prevalence in Asian Americans in a large ethnically diverse patient cohort seeking primary care at a free clinic in Northern California. A total of 1347 consecutive patients were seen from September 2009 to October 2012 and were studied via individual chart review using case report forms. H...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Language Barriers Among the Foreign-Born in Canada: Agreement of Self-Reported Measures and Persistence Over Time
AbstractPersistent language barriers are associated with poor health outcomes. The agreement between reporting a language barrier at time of immigration and in the 2007 –2008 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was calculated using kappa scores among foreign-born individuals who arrived to Ontario, Canada between 1985 and 2005. A total of 2323 immigrants were included, with a mean (± SD) time of 10.2 ± 6.4 years between immigration and completing the CCH S. Only 6 % of immigrants reported a persistent language barrier, resulting in a low agreement between the two sources (kappa&n...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Weight Loss Success Among Overweight and Obese Women of Mexican-Origin Living in Mexico and the United States: A Comparison of Two National Surveys
AbstractWe assessed variations in and correlates of weight-loss success (WLS) among overweight/obese women in Mexico (WIMX) and Mexican –American women (MA). We used cross-national data from 2006 ENSANUT (Mexico) and NHANES (2001–2008) to compare 5061 WIMX with 550 MA’s without known metabolic conditions. WLS was defined as losing ≥5 % of body weight over 1 year. MA’s were more likely to attain WLS (OR 1.31; 95 % CI 1.0 1–1.70). WLS among WIMX was higher in those with at least high school, a provider screen of overweight and a lower BMI. Among MA’s, an incomplete high s...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Gender Differences in the Incidence of Depression Among Immigrants and Natives in Arag ón, Spain
AbstractKnowledge of depression among immigrants within Spanish primary care is limited. This database study investigates the incidence of depressive disorders among immigrants and natives within primary care in Arag ón (Spain). Participants were patients registered in an electronic record register, aged above 20 years diagnosed with depression. Incidence of depression was calculated and compared per continent of origin, gender and age with the Mann-Whitney U test and the Kruskal–Wallis test. The population consisted of 11,088 patients with depression of whom 93.0 % natives and 7.0 % immigrants....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Exploring Barriers to Breastfeeding Among Chinese Mothers Living in Madrid, Spain
AbstractIn Spain, immigrant women have high rates for initiating breastfeeding. In contrast, the case of immigrant Chinese mothers stands out, due to the low rate. In China, breastfeeding has historically been the cultural norm. An ethnographic study was conducted to explore aspects related to the low rate of breastfeeding. Field observations and informal interviews were conducted in two hospitals and a primary care center. Semi-structured interviews were performed with Chinese mothers and health workers. Among Spanish health workers, there is a belief that Chinese women do not breastfeed due to cultural reasons. The rapid...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 1, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Barriers to Accessing Testing and Treatment for Chronic Hepatitis B in Afghan, Rohingyan, and South Sudanese Populations in Australia
AbstractThe burden of chronic Hepatitis B (CHB) infection and associated complications such as hepatocellular carcinoma is growing significantly in Australia due to increased migration from countries with a high prevalence of CHB. Significant barriers to screening and engagement with healthcare persist due to stigma and perceptions associated with CHB within these communities. Our study was a pilot intervention aimed at engaging Afghan, Rohingyan, and Sudanese populations into CHB care through an initial needs assessment. Twenty six patients from Afghan, Rohingyan, and Sudanese communities, identified in the Monash Health ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 24, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Second and Thirdhand Smoke Exposure, Attitudes and Protective Practices: Results from a Survey of Hispanic Residents in Multi-unit Housing
This study describes the characteristics, attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors related to SHS, THS and marijuana smoke exposure (MSHS) of a sample of Hispanic tenants in randomly selected MUH units in eastern metro Los Angeles (n  = 402). Although most participants (97%) banned smoking inside their homes, 80% reported infiltration of SHS inside their apartments within the last year. Most (85%) favored a complete ban on smoking in apartment buildings. Twenty-eight percent did not know that marijuana (MSHS) smoke exposure is also harmful to their health. Knowledge scores were higher among Spanish-speakers (p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 10, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Impact of Race on Outcome of Patients Undergoing Rhythm Control of Atrial Fibrillation
AbstractRacial disparities between African American (AA) and White patients have been documented in cardiovascular disease. We investigated whether these disparities exist in patients undergoing rhythm control for atrial fibrillation (AF). 5873 AF patients (241 AA) were followed to the endpoint of death, stroke, or AF recurrence. Invasive procedures for AF rhythm control were examined in both racial groups. Over a mean follow-up time of 40  months, AA patients had a higher adjusted risk of death [HR 1.39, 95% CI 1.00–1.92, p = 0.043] and stroke [HR 1.90, 95% CI 1.13–3.15, p = 0....
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Social and Spatial Patterning of Life Stress Among Immigrants in Canada
AbstractWhile much literature has examined immigrants ’ health in Canada, less attention has focused specifically on the life stress, an important yet understudied post-migration challenge which may lead to poor coping strategies and negative health consequences. For this study, the pooled 2009–2014 Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) was analy zed, using multilevel logistic regression to examine the compositional effects (at an individual level) and areal effects (at a CMA/CA level) on reported high life stress. Separate models have been run for immigrants and non-immigrants for comparative purposes. The r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Impact of Prosocial Behavioral Involvement on School Violence Perpetration Among African American Middle School and High School Students
AbstractThe purpose of this study was to examine factors associated with school violence perpetration among African American youth. African American students in 7th through 12th grade (n  = 7488) in schools within one Metropolitan area completed the Pride National Drug Survey. Chi square analyses revealed school violence perpetration significantly differed based on grade and prosocial behavioral involvement. Students in 7th–8th grade (54.7%) were more likely to engage in schoo l violence in comparison to 9th–12th grade students (48.8%). Students with low prosocial behavior (52.8%) involvement were...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 4, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Perception of Child Weight and Feeding Styles in Parents of Chinese-American Preschoolers
AbstractParent perception of weight and feeding styles are associated with obesity in other racial groups but have not been explored in-depth in Chinese-American preschoolers. Cross-sectional survey of 253 Chinese-American parents with preschoolers was performed in a community clinic. Regression analysis was used to assess relationships between parental perception of weight and feeding styles. Parent under-perception of weight was common but more likely in boys than girls ( χ2 = 4.91,p = 0.03). Pressuring was also greater in boys [adjusted mean difference (95% CI) 0.24 (0.004, 0.49)]. In gir...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 3, 2017 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Offending Behavior, Drug Use, and Mental Health Among Foreign-Born versus U.S. Born Latino Criminal Justice Clients
AbstractLittle is known about the offending behavior and recidivism factors of Latinos by nativity (U.S. born, foreign-born). The present study focused on Latinos in community corrections (n = 201) in Miami, Florida, and examined differences in criminal activity, drug use, and mental health by nativity. Data were collected utilizing convenience sampling between June 2014 and December 2015. The research question was: what are the offending, drug use, and mental health histories of L atinos involved in community corrections? Participants were mostly male (n = 120; 59.7%), White (n = ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Seroprevalence of Hepatitis B Infection Among Immigrants in a Primary Care Clinic: A Case for Granular Ethnicity and Language Data Collection
This study illustrates the use of granular language data in describing the serologic profiles of HBV infection among non-English speaking patients in primary care setting. The variations in prevalence by language have implications for public health HBV screening efforts, in addition to suggesting potential risk factors for transmission. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 30, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Home Environmental Influences on Childhood Obesity in the Latino Population: A Decade Review of Literature
AbstractLatinos are the largest and fastest-growing ethnically diverse group in the United States. Latino children are also among the most overweight and obese ethnic groups of children in the United States. Research over the last decade has identified the home environment as a key influence on the diet and physical activity of children. To summarize cross-sectional and longitudinal research that has identified factors within the home environment of Latino families that are associated with childhood obesity and to provide recommendations for future research and intervention development with Latino families. A decade review...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Strategies and Challenges in Recruiting Black Immigrant Mothers for a Community-Based Study on Child Nutritional Health in Ottawa, Canada
This study clearly indicates the importance of adopting multiple recruitment strategies. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 15, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Differences in Subjective Well-being Between Older Migrants and Natives in Europe
This study examines disparities in subjective well-being (SWB) among older migrants and natives across several European countries using data from the Survey of Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE). Our results show a significant SWB gap between migrants and non-migrants that diminishes with increasing age. While migrants from Northern and Central Europe have similar SWB levels as natives, Southern European, Eastern European, and Non-European migrants have significantly lower levels of SWB than the native population. The immigrant-native gap becomes smaller but remains significant after controlling for sociodemogr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Self-Reported Type 2 Diabetes and Diabetes-Related Eye Disease in Jews and Arabs in Israel
AbstractPrevalence rates of diabetes and its complications may be higher in minorities. We assessed these rates in Jews and Arabs living in Israel. Data were pooled from the first and second Israeli national health interview surveys. 9625 Jews and 2401 Arabs participated in the analysis. The age adjusted rate of self-reported diabetes was 10.7  % among Arabs and 5.7 % among Jews [odds ratio (OR) 2.14, 95 % confidence interval 1.77–2.60]. After adjustment for risk factors the OR decreased to 1.28 (95 % CI 1.04–1.59). The rate of self-reported diabetes-related eye disease was 37.6 % among...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Afro-Cardiac Study: Cardiovascular Disease Risk and Acculturation in West African Immigrants in the United States: Rationale and Study Design
AbstractCardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of death in the United States (US). African-descent populations bear a disproportionate burden of CVD risk factors. With the increase in the number of West African immigrants (WAIs) to the US over the past decades, it is imperative to specifically study this new and substantial subset of the African-descent population and how acculturation impacts their CVD risk. The Afro-Cardiac study, a community-based cross-sectional study of adult WAIs in the Baltimore –Washington metropolis. Guided by the PRECEDE–PROCEED model, we used a modification of the Wor...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Diabetes Among United States-Bound Adult Refugees, 2009 –2014
We reported diabetes prevalence among all US-bound adult refugees and assessed factors associated with disease. We analyzed overseas medical evaluations of US-bound refugees from 2009 through 2014 by using CDC ’s Electronic Disease Notification System. We identified refugees with diabetes by searching for diabetes-related keywords and medications in examination forms with text-parsing techniques. Age-adjusted prevalence rates were reported and factors associated with diabetes were assessed by using logi stic regression. Of 248,850 refugees aged ≥18 years examined over 5 years, 5767 (2.3 %) had diabe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Differences in Cervical Cancer Screening Between African-American Versus African-Born Black Women in the United States
AbstractAlthough the incidence of cervical cancer has been declining steadily since the Pap smear became standard of care in the U.S., many African immigrants are unfamiliar with this screening test and its potential benefits. Using data from the CDC ’s National Health Interview Surveys, we identified respondents who were black women living in the United States, distinguishing U.S.-born (n = 620) and African-born (n = 36). We constructed a measure of current Pap status and used multivariate logistic regression models to compare Pap status between the two groups. Controlling for income, age, educat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Comparisons of Physical Activity and Walking Between Korean Immigrant and White Women in King County, WA
AbstractImmigrant and minority women are less physically active than White women particularly during leisure time. However, prior research demonstrates that reported household physical activity (PA) and non-leisure time walking/biking were higher among the former. Using accelerometers, GPS, and travel logs, transport-related, home-based, and leisure time PA were measured objectively for 7  days from a convenience sample of 60 first-generation Korean immigrant women and 69 matched White women from the Travel Assessment and Community Project in King County, Washington. Time spent in total PA, walking, and home-based PA ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Disparities in Health Services Use Among Multiracial American Young Adults
This study compares past year health service use of self-identified multiracial (two or more races) young adults with monoracial White young adults. Weighted survey data from Add Health (N = 7296) and multivariate logistic regression analyses were used. Compared to monoracial White young a dults, Black-White multiracial [OR 0.40, 95  % CI (0.17–0.90)] and Black-Native American multiracial [OR 0.23, 95  % CI (0.09–0.63)] young adults are less likely to report primary care service use in the past year. Multiracial young adults have different health care service utilization than their White mon...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

High Rates of Diabetes Mellitus, Pre-diabetes and Obesity Among Somali Immigrants and Refugees in Minnesota: A Retrospective Chart Review
We examined the prevalence of cardiovascular risk factors among Somali refugees at a midwestern hospital in the U.S. This was a retrospective cohort study of 1007 adult Somali patients and an age and frequency-matched cohort of non-Somali patients actively empanelled to a large, academic primary care practice network in the Midwest United States between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2012. Cardiovascular risk factors were obtained by chart review and compared between the two cohorts using a Chi squared test. Median age was 35  years (Q1, Q3; 27, 50). The prevalence of diabetes was significantly higher among Somali v...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Development of Obesity and Related Diseases in African Refugees After Resettlement to United States
AbstractDespite increases in obesity and related diseases in developing nations, initial refugee clinical visits do not address these issues. We explored the development of obesity and related diseases in a longitudinal prospective cohort of African refugees resettling in northeastern US. Using state Department of Health data, refugees were linked to a health system. Body mass index, diabetes, hypertension, and hyperlipidemia status were extracted from charts. US regional controls from NAMCS/NHAMCS data were matched by age, sex, race, and visit year. African refugee BMI increased after resettlement at 1 (1.7  ± 2.9,p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Predictors of Heart Disease Knowledge Among Older and Younger Asian Indian Adults
The objective of this study was to identify the predictors of knowledge of heart disease among younger and older Asian Indians adults. A cross-sectional survey was undertaken in Sydney Australia. One hundred and forty-four participant s of Asian Indian descent who attended the health promotion stall at the Australia India Friendship Fair in Sydney participated in the study. All participants completed a self-administered questionnaire. The Primary outcome of the survey was knowledge of heart disease as measured by the 25 item Hear t Disease Facts Questionnaire. All six modifiable risk factors for heart disease namely smokin...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Neighborhood Social Cohesion and Prevalence of Hypertension and Diabetes in a South Asian Population
AbstractSouth Asians have a high burden of cardiovascular disease compared to other racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Little has been done to evaluate how neighborhood environments may influence cardiovascular risk factors including hypertension and type 2 diabetes in this immigrant population. We evaluated the association of perceived neighborhood social cohesion with hypertension and type 2 diabetes among 906 South Asian adults who participated in the Mediators of Atherosclerosis in South Asians Living in America Study. Multivariable logistic regression adjusted for demographic, socioeconomic, psychosocial, and ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Effects of Interpreter Use on Agreement Between Clinician- and Self-Ratings of Functioning in Hispanic Integrated Care Patients
This study explored whether concordance between self- and clinician- assessment of functioning differs when an interpreter is used in therapy versus when there is language congruence between the clinician and the patient, and whether concordance is affected by patient distress. Participants were 418 Spanish-speaking patients seen at one of three primary care clinics. Patients were primarily Hispanic (94  %), uninsured (65 %), and female (84 %), and ranged in age from 18 to 73 years (M = 41.70,SD = 10.70). Pearson’s correlation coefficients assessed the association between self-...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

HIV Prevalence Among Central American Migrants in Transit Through Mexico to the USA, 2009 –2013
AbstractHIV prevalence was estimated among migrants in transit through Mexico. Data were collected on 9108 Central American migrants during a cross-sectional study performed in seven migrant shelters from 2009 to 2013. Considerations focused on their sociodemographic characteristics, sexual and reproductive health, and experience with violence. Based on a sample of 46.6  % of respondents who agreed to be HIV tested, prevalence of the virus among migrants came to 0.71 %, reflecting the concentrated epidemic in their countries of origin. A descriptive analysis was performed according to gender: the distribution of ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 17, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Is There a Healthy Immigrant Effect Among Women Through Transnational Marriage? Results from Immigrant Women from Southeast Asian Countries in Taiwan
In this study we examine whether there is healthy immigrant effect among women immigrated to Taiwan through transnational marriage. A sample of immigrant women (N  = 246) with original nativity of Southeast Asian countries and Taiwanese-born women sample (N = 201) was recruited from December 2008 to December 2009. Their depressive symptoms, acculturative stresses and family functioning were assessed by a series of questionnaires. Immigrant women had l ower depressive scores than their native-born counterparts when other potential confounders were controlled for in the multiple regression model. ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Riding with Impaired Drivers Among Recent Latino Immigrants in Southern Florida
This report examines a related risk: riding with an impaired driver (RWI). Data came from an ongoing longitudinal sample of Latino immigrants to Miami-Dade County, FL. Descriptive analyses and regression techniques were applied. While DWI rates among Latino immigrants is heavily limited by their access to a car, RWI rates were not restricted by driving limitations, nor related to participants ’ legal immigration status (LIS). RWI rates were linked only to heavy drinking. Because it is not affected by driving limitations, RWI for these Latino immigrants is perhaps a more immediate risk than DWI. Addressing RWI among L...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Cervical Cancer Screening and Its Associated Factors Among North Korean Defectors Living in South Korea
AbstractNorth Korean defectors (NKD) have many health problems related to insufficient nutrition, trauma from escaping, and being exposed to infectious diseases, but little research exists on their cancer screening. A total of 638 NKD participated in this cross-sectional survey. South Korean natives (SKN) who participated in the Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey V were selected using age matching to each NKD. Fisher ’s exact tests and logistic regression were used for data analysis. The cervical cancer screening rate of NKD was significantly lower than for SKN (42 and 70 %, respectively; P 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 13, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Cancer Screening Among Patients Who Self-Identify as Muslim: Combining Self-Reported Data with Medical Records in a Family Practice Setting
AbstractCancer screening is a core component of family medicine but screening inequalities are well documented in Canada for foreign-born persons. Although people of Muslim faith and culture are the fastest growing immigrant population in Canada, there is little information in the literature about their cancer screening practices. Determining screening gaps could inform practice-based quality improvement initiatives. We conducted a retrospective chart review combining patient-level medical record data with self-reported religious affiliation to examine the relationship between religion and cancer screening in a large multi...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 6, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Primary Care Screening Methods and Outcomes for Asylum Seekers in New York City
This study aimed to evaluate disease prevalence and screening methods in this high-risk group. Two hundred ten new clients from 51 countries, plus Tibet, who were accepted into a program for asylum seekers from 2012 to 2014 were included. Screening rates and outcomes for infectious, non-communicable, and mental illnesses were evaluated. Screening rates were highest for PTSD, depression, hepatitis B, and latent tuberculosis. Seventy-one percent of clients screened positive for depression and 55  % for PTSD, followed by latent tuberculosis (41 %), hypertension (10 %), hepatitis B (9.4 %), and HIV ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Differences in Patterns of Mortality Between Foreign-Born and Native-Born Workers Due to Fatal Occupational Injury in the USA from 2003 to 2010
This study assesses differences mortality patterns and relative hazard due to fatal occupational injuries between native and immigrant workers in the US. Fatal occupational injury data from 2003 to 2010 were examined using survival analysis based on proportional hazards models controlling for categorical variables of race, gender, occupation, and industry. Workers are stratified based on whether they are native to the US (n  = 31952) or born abroad (n = 7096). Foreign-born workers are further stratified into region of birth. Foreign-born workers had an adjusted hazard ratio of 1.148 (95 %...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 4, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Interest in Collaborative, Practice-Based Research Networks in Pediatric Refugee Health Care
AbstractOver the last decade, approximately 200,000 refugee children have resettled across the United States. This population is dispersed, resulting in limited data. Collaborative research networks, where clinicians across distinct practice sites work together to answer research questions, can improve the evidence base regarding clinical care. We distributed a web-based survey to pediatric refugee providers around North America to assess priorities, perceived barriers and benefits to collaborative research. We recruited 57 participants. Of respondents, 89  % were interested in collaborative research, prioritizing: ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - October 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Diabetes Risk Factor Knowledge Varies Among Multiracial College Students
Abstract All racial/ethnic groups are at higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to whites, but it is unknown if young adults recognize their risk. Risk knowledge and individual risk perception were examined in 1579 multiracial urban college students. Students have little knowledge of diabetes risk factors; identifying less than three of ten. Considerable variation exists in the understanding of risk; only .02  % of Asian, 14.0 % of Hispanic and 22.8 % of black students recognized that their race increased risk. Among those with ≥3 risk factors (n = 541) only 39 % perceived their risk. T...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Behavioral and Environmental Explanations of Elevated Blood Lead Levels in Immigrant Children and Children of Immigrants
AbstractImmigrant/refugee children sometimes have substantially higher blood lead levels (BLLs) than US-born children in similar environments. We try to understand why, by exploring the relationship between immigration status of mother and the BLLs of US-born children. We compared BLLs of children born in Michigan to immigrant and non-immigrant parents, using the Michigan database of BLL tests for 2002 –2005, which includes the child’s race, Medicaid eligibility and address. We added census data on socio-demographic/housing characteristics of the child’s block group, and information about parents. Low par...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Understanding the Stress Process of Chinese- and Korean-American Breast Cancer Survivors
AbstractGuided by the stress process model (SPM), this study investigated the direct and indirect pathways of primary (negative self-image and life stress), secondary stressors (family communication strain) and family coping (external and internal) on mental health outcomes among Chinese- and Korean-American breast cancer survivors (BCS). A total of 156 Chinese- and Korean-American BCS were surveyed. Results showed primary and secondary stressors had a negative effect on better mental health outcomes. External coping was associated with better mental health. Family communication strain mediated the relationship between lif...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Association Between Postnatal Depression, Acculturation and Mother –Infant Bond Among Eritrean Asylum Seekers in Israel
We examined the association between postnatal depression (PND), acculturation and mother –infant bond among 38 Eritrean asylum seekers in Israel, who were within 6 months of delivery. Participants completed a survey in their native language. A high rate of women (81.6 %) met the clinical threshold for PND on the Edinburgh Postnatal Depression Scale. Higher severity of PND (partialr = −.64,p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Latent Tuberculosis Infection Among Immigrant and Refugee Children Arriving in the United States: 2010
We examined post-immigration TB evaluation and therapy for children arriving with LTBI. We reviewed medical exam data from immigrant children with medical conditions and a ll refugee children arriving during 2010. Medical examination data were available for 67,334 children. Of these, 8231 (12 %) had LTBI pre-immigration; 5749 (70 %) were re-evaluated for TB post-immigration, and 64 % were retested by TST or IGRA. The pre-immigration LTBI diagnosis was change d for 38 % when retested by TST and for 71 % retested by IGRA. Estimated LTBI therapy initiation and completion rates were 68 and 12 %...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Migration, Health Care Behaviors, and Primary Care for Rural Latinos with Diabetes
AbstractMany US Latinos migrate or travel between the US and Mexico on a regular basis, defined as circular migration. Latinos with diabetes (n  = 250) were surveyed about circular migration and their ability to use medications and perform recommended diabetes self-care activities. A review of medical charts was performed. Twenty-eight percent (n = 70) of patients traveled to Mexico during the last 12 months. Older Latinos were more li kely to report traveling to Mexico and back into the US. Among those that traveled, 29 % reported use of less medication than they wanted to or were prescribed ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Worse Breast Cancer Outcomes for Southern Nevadans, Filipina and Black Women
This study aims to accurately characterize breast cancer survival among the diverse women of the flourishing Silver State. Nevada Central Cancer Registry data was linked with the National Death Index and the Social Security Administration Masterfile. Overall 5-year  age-adjusted cause-specific survival, survival stratified by race/ethnicity, and stage-specific survival stratified by region of Nevada were calculated. Adjusted hazard ratios were computed with Cox proportional hazards regression. 11,111 cases of breast cancer were diagnosed from 2003 to 2010. O verall 5-year breast cancer survival in Nevada was 84.4...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 1, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Immigrants ’ Pathways to Outpatient Mental Health: Are there Differences with the Native Population?
Abstract A poor use of mental health services has been described in immigrants. We compared the sociodemographic, clinical and treatment features of immigrants and natives attending a Community Mental Health Centre (CMHC). 191 immigrants and 191 randomly selected natives applying to the Borgomanero CMHC between 1 January 2003 and 31 August 2013 were compared. Our sample consisted mainly of the so-called “economic” immigrant. Adjustment disorders and reaction to stress were the most frequent diagnoses; in most cases symptoms onset occurred after migration. Although treatment features overlapped in the two group...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - July 22, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Beyond Trauma: Post-resettlement Factors and Mental Health Outcomes Among Latino and Asian Refugees in the United States
Abstract War-related traumas impact refugees’ mental health. Recent literature suggests that structural and sociocultural factors related to the resettlement also become critical in shaping refugees’ mental health. So far, there is limited empirical evidence to support this claim among resettled refugees. Resettlement contextual factors that influence mental health outcomes were examined using Latino and Asian refugees (n = 656) from a nationally representative survey. Linear and logistic regressions predicted factors associated with the study’s outcomes (self-reported mental health, m...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Foreign-Born Latinos Living in Rural Areas are more likely to Experience Health Care Discrimination: Results from Proyecto de Salud para Latinos
This study provides evidence that health care discrimination is prevalent among young-adult Latinos living in rural areas, particularly the foreign-born. Effective approaches towards reducing discrimination in health care settings should take into consideration the need to reform our broken immigration system. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Latino Mother/Daughter Dyadic Attachment as a Mediator for Substance Use Disorder and Emotional Abuse
Abstract To date, no studies have investigated emotional abuse of adult Latina women by their mothers despite evidence that emotional maternal abuse may significantly contribute to the emotional abuse experienced by Latina women in their lifetime. Cross-sectional data including 316 women was analyzed using mediation and logistic regression. Overall, 7.1 % of mothers and 24.1 % of daughters abused drugs; and, 19.5 % of daughters were emotionally abused by their mothers. Mother’s attachment to her daughter mediated the association between mother’s drug abuse and emotionally abusing her ad...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Drinking and Driving Among Undocumented Latino Immigrants in Miami-Dade County, Florida
Abstract There is concern that by failing to understand fully the risks associated with driving under the influence (DUI), some Latino immigrants—undocumented in particular—may be overrepresented in alcohol-related crashes. Until now, data on undocumented immigrants has been absent. Data came from an ongoing longitudinal sample of Latino immigrants to Miami-Dade County, FL. Descriptive analyses and regression techniques were applied. Compared with permanent residents, undocumented drivers are more likely to binge drink, less likely to understand DUI laws, and less likely to perceive the risks associat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Characteristics of Low-income Racial/Ethnic Minority Pregnant Women Screening Positive for Alcohol Risk
This study underscores the need for screening for alcohol risk, smoking, and illicit drug use among low-income, racial/ethnic minority pregnant women and highlights the usefulness of the TWEAK in identifying alcohol risk in WIC settings. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 14, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

What Does it Mean to be Healthy? Hispanics in the Southeastern Idaho Agricultural Industry
Abstract In contrast to many studies of first generation Hispanics residing in the U.S., our study focused on participants of both genders who were formally employed outside the home. The purpose of this study was to explore the meaning of health among southeast Idaho Hispanics employed in the agro-industry. Using qualitative methodology, we interviewed twenty participants employed at a potato processing plant. We found that men and women had differing concepts of health based upon their gender roles and the value placed on work outside the home, which influenced their willingness to access formal health care. Bas...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 11, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Wanting and Getting Help for Substance Problems on Both Sides of the US-Mexico Border
Abstract The US-Mexico border presents potential cultural and logistic barriers to obtaining substance abuse treatment. We compare the prevalence and correlates of wanting and getting help between border and non-border residents in both the US and Mexico. Data come from the 2011 to 2012 US-Mexico Study on Alcohol and Related Conditions which surveyed 3214 border and 1582 non-border residents in the US and Mexico. Multivariate logistic regressions estimate the effect of border residence on desire for and receipt of help. In both countries, border substance users were about half as likely as nonborder substance user...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 10, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research