Body Image, Assimilation, and Weight of Immigrant Adolescents in the United States: A Person-Centered Analysis
AbstractAdolescence is a critical developmental period as youth explore their body image and work to establish an identity. The stress of identity and body image development can be exacerbated by acculturative stress faced by immigrant adolescents. Using a person-centered analysis, we investigated immigrant adolescents ’ (n = 57) profiles based on assimilation to the United States (US), weight, and body image dissatisfaction. Analyses included an exploratory two-step clustering technique using maximum likelihood estimation procedures to assign class membership. Follow-up analyses then examined latent cl...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Diet, Physical Activity and Weight-Related Behaviors, Changes and Risks with Newly-Arrived ( & lt; 1 Year) Immigrant and Refugee Adolescents (Ages 12 –17)
This study examined: (1) weight status, behaviors and perceptions, (2) diet patterns and changes, (3) sociodemographic and dietary factors associated with BMI. Cross sectional survey, anthropometric measures were conducted at a school for newcomer youth in North Carolina. Data analysis included descriptive, frequency, bivariate and linear regression. Participants (n  = 68, 55% female,
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Urgent Medical Aid and Associated Obstetric Mortality in Belgium
This study, conducted in a hospital which cares for a large number of undocumented immigrants, looked at the proportion of women benefiting from either “AMI” or “AMU” and those who have “ No coverage” and addressed obstetrical outcomes in each of the three groups. Design: retrospective observational study. We collected data of all singleton pregnancies and deliveries from the CHU St Pierre maternity ward, between 1.10.2015 and 31.3.2016. Women were classified, prospectively, by our social workers, as having access to AMI, AMU or having “No coverage”. Demographic, obstetrical ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Associations of Parental Monitoring and Violent Peers with Latino Youth Violence
This study aimed  to examine the associations of parental monitoring and violent peers with violence among Latino youth, and whether these associations varied by acculturation. 133 adolescents were surveyed. Associations between parental monitoring, peer violence, and physical and non-physical violence were examin ed using bivariate and multivariable negative binomial regression. Multivariable analysis was stratified by age and acculturation. A path model examined whether peer violence mediated the relationship between parental monitoring and youth violence. Stratified analysis demonstrated that peer violence inc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Reported Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Lao-American Immigrants in Minnesota
AbstractColorectal Cancer (CRC) is common in Lao Americans, but screening is suboptimal. To investigate CRC screening rates of Lao Americans in Minnesota, and how predisposing characteristics, enabling resources, and perceived need are associated with screening. We conducted a convenience-sample cross-sectional survey of 50 –75-year-old Lao Americans, using step-wise multivariate logistic regression to identify factors associated with ever being screened. Of the 118 survey participants, 45% ever received CRC screening. In univariate regression, some enabling resources (having a primary care provider, higher self-effi...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Termination of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) Protections and Medical Education in the U.S.
AbstractThe termination of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) immigration policy poses unique challenges for medical education and healthcare. A survey on DACA was administered online using Qualtrics Software System to 121 unique U.S.-MD granting medical school admissions leadership using e-mails between January 2018 and April 2018. A total of 39 individuals out of 121 (32%) responded to the survey; 23 (59%) of respondents identified as medical school admissions deans, 11 (28%) identified as directors and 5 (13%) as staff/officers. During the past 4  years, 19 (49%) reported having accepted DACA student...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Educational Attainment and Health Care Access and Use Among Mexicans, Mexican Americans, and U.S. –Mexico Migrants
AbstractThe aim of the study was to assess the relationship between educational attainment and health care access and use among Mexican-origin populations. Data from the 2012 Mexican National Health and Nutrition Study, the 2013 Project Migrante Health Care Access and Utilization Survey, and the 2013 –2014 California Health Interview Survey were used to examine educational gradients in health insurance, medical home, and hospitalization among Mexicans in Mexico, northbound, southbound, and deported migrants, and U.S.-and foreign-born Mexican Americans. College graduates had greater odds of bei ng insured relative to ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Asian-White Health Inequalities in Canada: Intersections with Immigration
AbstractThree approaches to addressing factors associated with immigration were applied in a cross-sectional investigation of Asian-White health inequalities in Canada. Ten cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey (2001 –2013) were combined to produce a sample of 8122 Asian women, 365,702 White women, 6830 Asian men and 298,461 White men aged 18 and older. Binary logistic regression modelling was applied to self-reported hypertension, diabetes, fair/poor self-rated health and fair/poor self-rated mental health. B efore adjusting for factors associated with immigration, Asian Canadians had relatively low risks o...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Mental Health Service Utilization Among Ethiopian Immigrants and Refugees
This study assesses factors associated with mental health service utilization by Ethiopian immigrants and refugees in the U.S. A cross-sectional survey, based on Anderson and Newman ’s Framework of Health Services, which examines facilitators and barriers of service utilization, was implemented to gather data from 297 Ethiopian immigrants and refugees in the U.S. from February to March 2018. Descriptive statistics, chi-squared tests, and logistic regression were calculated. A pproximately 13.3% of participants sought mental health services from healthcare professionals; while 17.3% utilized non-healthcare professiona...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Nutritional Status of Syrian Refugees in Early Adolescence Living in Turkey
This study evaluated the nutritional status of Syrian refugees in the early adolescent period living in different vulnerable settings. Nutritional assessment of Syrian refugee adolescents is often neglected but essential for a healthy physical, pubertal and mental development. Growth parameters of Syrian refugee adolescents going to a public school in an urban area and in a temporary protection center (TPC) were recorded along with the Turkish adolescents. Stunting percentages were similar between the groups (p  = 0.811). While the proportion of children with a BMI over 85th percentile were significantly high...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Using Three Delay Model to Understand the Social Factors Responsible for Neonatal Deaths Among Displaced Tribal Communities in India
AbstractIn the tribal region, risk of death among neonates is influenced to a great extent by factors related to the mother such as situation of the mother prior to and post pregnancy, care received before, during and after pregnancy, birth order, and care received by the child during the first few years of his/her life. There is paucity of basic epidemiological data on reproductive health outcomes of displaced people (Hynes in JAMA 288(5):595 –603, 2002). Therefore, this study aims to examine the social factors responsible for neonatal deaths among displaced tribal communities in India. Sequential exploratory study ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Estimating Social Gradients in Health for UK Mothers and Infants of Pakistani Origin: Do Latent Class Measures of Socioeconomic Position Help?
This study aims to compare latent class measures to conventional measures of socioeconomic position (SEP) in the estimation of social gradients in health for women and infants of Pakistani origin in the Born in Bradford cohort. We compare social gradients in birth outcomes, smoking during pregnancy, and maternal mental health using various measures of SEP (including latent class analysis groups) with multivariate regression models. Social gradients in maternal mental health and low birth weight were more clearly defined than before. Otherwise, the latent class SEP variables did not reveal social gradients in health that we...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Culturally-Appropriate Orientation Increases the Effectiveness of Mental Health First Aid Training for Bhutanese Refugees: Results from a Multi-state Program Evaluation
AbstractPoor mental health remains a significant source of morbidity and mortality in the Bhutanese refugee community. Mental Health First Aid (MHFA) is a promising intervention that has been used in other immigrant communities to prepare individuals to recognize and respond to mental health warning signs. This was a non-randomized program evaluation. Using pre- and post-training questionnaires developed for prior evaluations of MHFA, we examined the effectiveness of training offered with and without culturally-appropriate orientation to mental health terminology and concepts (N  = 458). Pre- to post-training...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Capacity Building for Refugee Mental Health in Resettlement: Implementation and Evaluation of Cross-Cultural Trauma-Informed Care Training
This study emphasizes that culturally-responsive trauma-informed approaches can help bridge gaps between mental health care and resettlement services and promote exchanges of knowledge and expertise to build collaborative care and community partnership. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Context and Timing Matter: Language Brokering, Stress, and Physical Health
AbstractUsing a bioecological perspective, the current study explored the dynamic relationship between a proximal process (i.e., language brokering [LB]), LB perceptions, environmental stress context, and timing of LB experiences on well-being. College students (N = 559; 19.6% Asian American, 32.0% European American, 33.5% Latino, and 14.9% multiracial/other ethnicity) reported on LB frequency, feelings about LB as a burden or source of role reversal, perceived stress, age of LB onset, and health (i.e., height, weight, somatic symptoms). Among brokers (M = 23.13,SD = 5.66; 78.3% fe...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Community-Based Mindfulness Intervention Among Latino Adolescents and Their Parents: A Qualitative Feasibility and Acceptability Study
This study supports the feasibility of a MBMI among Latino family dyads. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Understanding Access to and Utilisation of Sexual Health Services by South Asian Immigrant Men in Western Countries: A Scoping Review
AbstractSouth Asian communities comprise one of the fastest growing populations in Western countries. However, the sexual health of immigrant men in particular remains vastly understudied and little is known about how and if men access these services. Four multi-disciplinary electronic databases were searched to between 1998 and 2018. The search yielded 586 articles; 407 duplicate articles were removed, and 376 did not meet the inclusion criteria. A total of 10 articles were included in this review. Herein we report the factors shaping sexual health service access and use, namely: (1) cultural and psychological factors; (2...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Healthcare Access, Quality, and Satisfaction Among Albanian Immigrants Using the Emergency Department in Northern Greece
AbstractBackgroundGreece constitutes a main point of entry for the EU but also a final destination for a large number of immigrants. The present research aims to illuminate the relationship of Albanian immigrants with the public health system in Greece. Cross sectional study of 167 Albanian immigrants who referred to the emergency department (ED) of a tertiary general hospital. The average age of the study population was 38.96  years (SD: ± 12.53), with 62.1% being familiar with health services. 54.9% referred to the ED for chronic problems. 41.9% were dissatisfied regarding the level of care provided; A...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated with Attrition: Analysis of an HIV Clinic in Japan
This study evaluated the impact of a public medical interpreter on the follow-up clinic attendance rate of foreign-born people with HIV who live in Japan. Participants were patients who visited Nagoya Medical Center from 2009 to 2016. Lost to follow-up was defined as an absence from follow-up visits for more than six months without any notification. A log-rank test was conducted to compare the lost-to-follow-up rates by patients ’ nation of origin and medical interpreter use. Of the 931 participants, 114 were foreign patients, whose overall attendance rate at 5 years was 75.5%, which was significantly lower than...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Perceptions of a Spanish language Reproductive Health Self-assessment Tool Among Spanish-Speaking Women at a Federally Qualified Health Center
AbstractLatinas face barriers to contraceptive and preconception care. Using a Reproductive Health Self-Assessment Tool (RH-SAT) before primary care visits may help overcome these barriers. Twenty Spanish-speaking women at a Federally Qualified Health Center in Chicago received the RH-SAT before their visit then completed a phone interview about their perceptions of the RH-SAT. Transcripts were thematically analyzed using a modified grounded theoretical approach. All participants self-reported Hispanic/Latina ethnicity, either of Mexican (N  = 19) or Puerto Rican (N = 1) origin. Participants (1)...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - February 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Scoping Review of the Health of East and Southeast Asian Female Marriage Migrants
AbstractThe number of female marriage migrants in East and Southeast Asia has grown significantly over the past three decades. However, little is known about the health of this population. Following Arksey and O ’Malley’s (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8(1):19–32,2005) framework, a scoping review of English language research databases was used to synthesize knowledge on the health of Asian marriage migrants. This will be used to inform recommendations for health care practice and research. Fifty-five eligible studies were included and presented using five identified categories —mental health, women’s...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Rides for Refugees: A Transportation Assistance Pilot for Women ’s Health
This study assesses the efficacy of a healthcare-directed rideshare application for overcoming these barriers at an urban health clinic. A pilot study was conducted at Boston Medical Center ’s Refugee Women’s Health Clinic from June 2018 to February 2019. Women with gynecologic visits reporting transportation difficulties were offered rides. The primary outcome was no-show rates. Secondary outcomes included cost, and patient/provider experiences. Of 102 eligible visits, 31 reported transportation insecurity and received rides. Those women had a 6% no-show rate, compared to 30% in women denying transportation ba...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Are Trained Medical Interpreters Worth the Cost? A Review of the Current Literature on Cost and Cost-Effectiveness
AbstractThe treatment of migrants with limited language proficiency poses major challenges to health care professionals. The use of professional interpreters in medical settings is still limited, which is, among other reasons, due to cost concerns. We performed a literature search in PubMed and included 11 articles examining cost and cost-effectiveness of using professional interpreters. Despite mixed findings, most studies indicated improvement of medical care and the investigated treatment outcome at limited additional cost or cost-savings. The interpretation of findings is limited by the sparsity of available studies, m...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Mental Health Needs of Refugee Children in Specialized Early Education and Care Programs in Germany
AbstractRefugee children are at risk to develop mental health problems, which have rarely been investigated in educational contexts. We conducted three studies in childcare programs for refugees in Germany. Children ’s behavior was assessed by educators on site (n = 84) and online (n = 50) using a two-stage-cluster sampling and on site (n = 107) using complete samples. In Study 1 and 2, children showed elevated attention problems ranging from medium to large effect sizes,r  =  0.2 andr  =  0.5, respectively, and aggressive behavior problems ranging...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Noncommunicable Diseases Among Syrian Refugees in Turkey: An Emerging Problem for a Vulnerable Group
In this study, we examined the status of noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors among Syrian refugees in Turkey. The data for the study come from the 2016 Health Status Survey of Syrian Refugees in Turkey. We used logistic regression and descriptive statistics to analyze four major noncommunicable diseases and their risk factors to assess the health status of Syrians under temporary protection in Turkey. Combined risk factor analysis showed that, as age increases, the risk of having a noncommunicable disease increases: Syrians in Turkey 60 –69 years old have the highest risk of noncommunicable diseases ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Assessing Predictors of Emotional Distress by Immigrant Type: An Exploration of Adult Refugees, Asylees, and SIV Holders in Maryland
This study assessed predictors of elevated distress among newly arrived refugees, asylees, and Special Immigrant Visa (SIV) holders in Maryland. A secondary analysis of Refugee Health Screener-15 data from 4385 refugees, asylees, and SIV holders arriving in Maryland from 2014 to 2017 was conducted. Mean scores were compared across immigrant groups, and positive screening predictors were identified using logistic regression. Mean scores were highest among SIV holders and lowest among asylees. Compared to refugees, SIV holders had greater odds of screening positive; significance was reduced after adjusting for covariates. A ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The HBCU Medical School Visiting Professorship: A New Approach for Supporting Professional Development of Underrepresented Minority Faculty
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Preventive Cancer Screening Among Resettled Refugee Women from Muslim-Majority Countries: A Systematic Review
This study examines screening rates and socio-cultural factors influencing screening among resettled refugee women from Muslim-majority countries of origin. A systematic and integrative review approach was used to examine articles published from 1980 to 2019, using PubMed, CINAHL, and PsycINFO. A total of 20 articles met the inclusion criteria. Cancer screening rates among refugee women are lower when compared to US-born counterparts. Social and cultural factors include religious beliefs about cancer, stigma, modesty and gender roles within the family context. The findings of this review, suggest that resettled refugee wom...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Preliminary Evaluation of Educational Outreach to Promote Colorectal Cancer Screening Among South Asians in the San Francisco Bay Area
AbstractCulturally-tailored interventions increase rates of colorectal cancer (CRC) screening in diverse populations. South Asian Americans have very low rates of CRC screening. Targeted interventions may improve community awareness and likelihood of undergoing screening. We identified and recruited multiple South Asian-serving community and religious centers to conduct South Asian physician-led presentations about CRC screening. A post-presentation survey tool was used to evaluate CRC screening history, intent to screen, and acceptance of a tailored brochure. In a convenience sample of 103 surveys, many participants had n...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Language Assistance for the Care of Limited English Proficiency (LEP) Patients in the Emergency Department: A Survey of Providers and Staff
AbstractMany ED patients have limited English proficiency (LEP). Under Title VI of the 1964 Civil Rights Act, LEP patients are entitled to language assistance, however, multiple studies demonstrate that language assistance is underutilized. We aimed to characterize the knowledge, practice patterns, and preferences of ED providers and staff regarding language assistance for LEP patients. We performed a self-administered, anonymous questionnaire in an urban, public ED where most patients have LEP. Subjects included all ED providers and staff with substantial patient contact. We recorded ED role, knowledge of language assista...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Latinx Undocumented Older Adults, Health Needs and Access to Healthcare
AbstractAn estimated 10.5 million undocumented immigrants reside in the U.S.; 10% are 55 and older. Undocumented older adults do not qualify for Medicaid or Social Security benefits even though many pay taxes. The study examines undocumented older adults ’ perceptions on their health status and their experiences in accessing health care. In-depth semi-structured interviews were used to facilitate dialogue with undocumented older adults (N = 30) ages 55–63 (M = 61.67,SD = 5.50). Most of the participants were Mexican (n = 26, 87%) and had lived in the U.S. on average 21&nbs...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Immigrant Status and Undiagnosed Dementia: The Role of Limited English Proficiency
This study investigates whether immigrant status is a risk factor for developing dementia and having undiagnosed dementia, as well as the role of limited English proficiency (LEP) as a mediator in the association. Data were drawn from the 2011 wave of the National Health and Aging Trends Study. The sample consisted of 7385 adults aged 65  years and older (6567 U.S.-born and 818 foreign-born). Step-wise logistic regression analyses were performed. Older immigrants had 70% greater odds of having dementia compared to U.S.-born participants. Among those with dementia (n = 1920), older immigrants showed 119% ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - January 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Induced Abortion and Migration to Metropolitan Paris by Sub-Saharan African Women: The Role of Intendedness of Pregnancy
AbstractMigration can affect reproductive outcomes due to different socioeconomic and cultural contexts before and after migration, to changes in the affective and conjugal status of women and to their life conditions. The aim of this study is to investigate the association between international migration and abortion. The data came from a retrospective life-event survey from sub-Saharan African women living in Île-de-France. Differences in abortion distribution before and after migration were assessed using the Pearson chi-square test, and the association between the predictor and the outcome was investigated using ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Prevalence of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Among Asylum Seekers in Italy: A Population-Based Survey in Sicily
AbstractItalian coasts are docking berths for the majority of boats carrying asylum seekers coming from Middle East and Sub-Saharan countries. These people escaped from their home countries in an effort to survive war, hunger and torture. These experiences might have affected their mental health, which became more endangered during their journey. The main aim of our work was to assess the prevalence of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in asylum seekers in a first aid facility, where immigrants were aided after their arrival. Thus, we designed a cross-sectional survey with paper-and-pen questionnaires. The setting was ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Long-Term Impact of Political Activism on Mental Wellbeing in the Context of Adult Immigrants Who Experienced Childhood Political Trauma
AbstractThere is limited literature on the long-term impact of political activism on mental wellbeing in the context of childhood political trauma and subsequent forced migration. Such information is important for developing mental health services suitable to this population. This qualitative study contributes to this gap by exploring the experience of an understudied population: adult Jewish Argentinian immigrants to Israel, who as children experienced the military dictatorship in Argentina (1976 –1983). Thematic textual analysis of narrative interviews revealed that in the case of participants who escaped with thei...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Violence Victimization Among Adolescents from Culturally or Ethnically Diverse South Korean Families
This study compared the prevalence of violence victimization requiring hospital treatment among adolescents that are culturally or ethnically diverse and those that are South Korean living in South Korea. This study used a nationally representative data set of 63,376 adolescents obtained from the Korean Youth Risk Behavior Web-based Survey conducted in 2015 by the Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Hierarchical multivariable logistic regression was conducted to calculate the odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for violence victimization in each group of culturally diverse adolescents compare...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Nepali Migrant Workers and the Need for Pre-departure Training on Mental Health: A Qualitative Study
This study aims to identify triggers of mental ill-health among Nepali migrant workers and their perceptions on the  need of mental health components in the pre-departure orientation programme. We conducted five focus group discussions (FGD) and seven in-depth interviews with Nepali migrant workers and eight semi-structured interviews with stakeholders working for migrants. Participants were invited at Kathmandu ’s international airport on return from abroad, at hotels or bus stations near the airport, through organisations working for migrants, and participants’ network. All FGD and interviews were conduc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Antenatal Care Utilization and Obstetric and Newborn Outcomes Among Pregnant Refugees Attending a Specialized Refugee Clinic
AbstractTo characterize the antenatal care utilization and obstetric and newborn outcomes among refugee women at a specialized refugee clinic and determine whether these outcomes varied between refugees (government-assisted or privately-sponsored) and asylum seekers. This retrospective cohort study included women receiving antenatal care at a specialized refugee clinic between 2011 and 2016. Time from arrival to first clinic visit, Adequacy of Prenatal Care Utilization Index, and obstetric and newborn outcomes were examined, stratified by refugee category. Amongst 179 women, median time from arrival to first clinic visit w...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Acculturation and Perceived Ethnic Discrimination Predict Elevated Blood Glucose Level in Sub-Saharan African Immigrants in Australia
This study aimed to investigate associations between acculturation, PED and EBGL in a sub-Saharan African migrant population in Australia. Face to face survey using a purposive sampling method was used to collect data from 170 adults, aged 18 –72 years. A large proportion (41.8%) of the study group was in the integration mode of acculturation, which strongly correlated positively with EBGL/T2DM, although traditional mode correlated inversely with EBGL/T2DM. PED correlated positively with EBG/LT2DM. Immigrants manifesting the integrati on mode were 4.2 times more likely to have EBGL/T2DM than other acculturation ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Identifying Urban Immigrant Food-Cultivation Practices for Culturally-Tailored Garden-Based Nutrition Programs
AbstractGarden-based nutrition programs are used to address food access and nutrition in low-income communities. In urban immigrant communities, food-growing practices may be shaped by environmental and cultural factors, and may not reflect the assumptions behind these curricula. Built-environment research was adapted to develop a protocol for assessing a community ’s gardening practices. A random sample of census blocks was generated and mapped, observational protocols developed, iteratively tested and refined, then fieldworkers trained and deployed. Daily debriefings were conducted to identify challenges in field i...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

HPV Self-sampling in Indigenous Communities: A Scoping Review
AbstractIndigenous women have higher rates of cervical cancer and cervical cancer mortality compared to non-Indigenous women, as well as unique challenges to accessing screening services. Human papillomavirus (HPV) self-sampling has been demonstrated as an effective measure to reach under-screened women. A scoping review identified 19 sources matching selection criteria through a systematic search of PubMed and Scopus completed in May 2018. Analysis revealed that this is a limited field of research; albeit one that has undergone growth in the last 7  years. HPV self-sampling is identified as easy, convenient, comforta...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Mental Health Problems Among Adolescents in Sweden from 1995 to 2011: The Role of Immigrant Status and the Proportions of Immigrant Adolescents in Their Surrounding Community
AbstractWe compared the mental health of native and immigrant adolescents in Sweden from 1995 to 2011 and examined whether the municipality-level proportion of immigrant adolescents moderated the association between individual-level immigrant status and mental health. The sample (14,189 adolescents aged 15 –16) was obtained from a repeated cross-sectional study conducted from 1995 to 2011. Adolescent self-report data (gender, immigrant status, economic situation, and mental health) and municipality-level data (proportion of immigrant adolescents) were used in multilevel linear regression analyses. I mmigrant adolesce...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Predictors of Awareness, Accessibility and Acceptability of Pre-exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP) Among English- and Spanish-Speaking Latino Men Who have Sex with Men in Los Angeles, California
We examined awareness, accessibility, acceptability and use of PrEP among LMSM. LMSM were recruited using social/sexual networking apps. Multiple Logistic regressions identified significant predictors of PrEP awareness, accessibility and acceptability. Among 276 participants, only 6% reported current PrEP use. Among non-PrEP users, 85% reported PrEP awareness, 71% indicated high likelihood of future PrEP use, but only 35% reported knowledge about accessing PrEP. In multiple logistic regressions, a lower likelihood of PrEP awareness was associated with lower level education, whereas a higher likelihood was associated with r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Adverse Childhood Experiences in Non-Westernized Nations: Implications for Immigrant and Refugee Health
AbstractAs the immigrant and refugee population continues to increase in the United States, healthcare providers need to be aware of Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) these populations may have endured, and the potential health effects of these events. ACE research has been conducted with predominantly highly-educated, older Caucasians living in high-income countries which limits generalizability. A systematic review examined ACE prevalence and outcomes in persons living in poor, low-, and middle-income nations, often the home countries of U.S. immigrants and refugees. Fourteen studies conducted in 17 nations were inclu...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Co-occurrence of Daily Smoking, Binge Drinking and IPV Among Latino Expectant Fathers
We describe the co-occurrence of daily smoking, binge drinking, and intimate partner violence (IPV) behaviors among Latino expectant fathers and examine factors associated with the co-occurrence of these behaviors. We conducted a secondary analysis of baseline data from the Parejas Trial, a randomized controlled trial testing a culturally tailored couples-based smoking cessation intervention. We used Kruskal –Wallis test statistics to explore the relationship of the co-occurring behavior and demographic and cultural factors. All participants smoked as was a requirement of being in the trial, but only 39% smoked daily...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - December 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Work Stress and Depressive Symptoms in Chinese Migrant Workers: The Moderating Role of Community Factors
This study aimed to examine depressive symptoms in ruralurban migrant workers in mainland China, with a focus on the moderating roles of community factors (i.e., community support network, community cohesion and community composition) in the relation between work stress and depressive symptoms. This study used secondary data from a national representative study conducted by the Social Survey Center at SUN-YETSEN University of China in 2014. The final sample contained 1434 participants from 29 provinces of China (Mean age  = 36.47, SD = 11.91). Being female, lower self-rated health, lower levels ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Relationships Between Perceived Discrimination and Utilization of Mental Health Services Among African Americans and Caribbean Blacks
This study contributes to the emerging body of evidence demonstrating that perce ived discrimination has a strong connection with the utilization of mental health services. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Immigration Legal Services as a Structural HIV Intervention for Latinx Sexual and Gender Minorities
AbstractLack of legal immigration status is associated with poor HIV-related outcomes for immigrant Latinx sexual and gender minorities (LSGM). LSGM often meet eligibility criteria for legal immigration relief. A Medical-Legal Partnership (MLP) may thus be strategic to improve their health. We know little about the challenges LSGM face during the immigration legal process. We conducted in-depth interviews with six key informants and sixteen LSGM who recently applied for immigration legal relief. We coded and analyzed the data for emergent themes. Challenges to instituting an MLP for LSGM included lack of specialized traini...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Barriers to and Interest in Lung Cancer Screening Among Latino and Non-Latino Current and Former Smokers
AbstractLung cancer is a leading cause of cancer death in Latinos. In a telephone survey, we assessed perceptions about lung cancer and awareness of, interest in, and barriers to lung screening among older current and former smokers. We compared Latino and non-Latino responses adjusting for age, sex, education, and smoking status using logistic regression models. Of the 460 patients who completed the survey (51.5% response rate), 58.0% were women, 49.3% former smokers, 15.7% Latino, with mean age 63.6  years. More Latinos believed that lung cancer could be prevented compared to non-Latinos (74.6% vs. 48.2%, OR 3.07, C...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Church-Based Sleep Screenings to Detect Mental Health Problems Among Korean-Americans
AbstractKorean-American mental health is poorly understood, and screening for sleep disturbances may be an effective means of identifying at-risk individuals. In partnership with a Korean-American church in Los Angeles, an online survey was administered. The study was conducted at a Korean-American church in Los Angeles, California. The sample consisted of 137 Korean-Americans drawn from the church congregation. Sleep disturbances were measured using a single ordinal variable, and mental health outcomes included nonspecific psychological distress, perceived stress, loneliness, suicidal ideation, hazardous drinking, treatme...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - November 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research