Factors Associated with Access to Maternal and Reproductive Health Care among Somali Refugee Women Resettled in Ohio, United States: A Cross-Sectional Survey
This study examined maternal and reproductive health (MRH) access of Somali refugees in the U.S. across four access dimensions (willingness to seek care, gaining entry to the health system, seeing a primary provider and seeing a specialist). We conducted a cross-sectional survey of 427 Somali refugee reproductive-age women in Franklin County, Ohio. Following descriptive statistics of demographics, we conducted multivariate analyses to test associations between demographics and the four access dimensions. Most Somali refugee women were married (68%), attained primary education (92%), employed (64%) and were circumcised (82%...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Utilisation of Healthcare Services and Medicines by Pakistani Migrants Residing in High Income Countries: A Systematic Review and Thematic Synthesis
AbstractMigration, as a global phenomenon, gives rise to many challenges for healthcare professionals providing care to migrant populations. Migrants originating from diverse cultural backgrounds have unique beliefs and healthcare needs, and their utilisation of healthcare services and medicines is influenced by a number of factors. This review aims to assess the factors influencing the utilisation of healthcare services and medicines among Pakistani migrants residing in high income countries. The databases searched included PubMed/Medline, Scopus, EMBASE, Web of Science, CINAHL, and IPA. Of the 2566 publications initially...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Working Below Skill Level as Risk Factor for Distress Among Latin American Migrants Living in Germany: A Cross-Sectional Study
AbstractAbout 84,710 Latin American migrants currently live in Germany. Knowledge about their work situation in relation to their skill level and its association with mental health is limited. Therefore, the aims of this study were to assess the prevalence of working below skill level and its association with the prevalence of distress in Latin Americans living in Germany. This cross-sectional study included a convenience sample of 282 Latin American migrants living in Germany. Participants were recruited by a short online (Facebook, personal contacts) or interview-based questionnaire from November 2015 to April 2016. Ques...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Trauma, Post-Migration Stress, and Mental Health: A Comparative Analysis of Refugees and Immigrants in the United States
AbstractNumerous studies describe mental health effects of pre-migration trauma and post-resettlement stress among refugees, yet less research examines these associations with non-refugee immigrants. Additionally, few studies assess the prevalence and impact of traumatic experiences after settlement in a new country. Using a U.S.-based representative sample of Asian (n  = 1637) and Latino (n = 1620) refugees and immigrants, we investigated how traumatic events prior to and after migration, and post-migration stressors, are associated with mental illness and distress. Pre-migration trauma posed r...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Heterogeneity in Tobacco-Use Behaviors Among U.S. Blacks per Global Region of Origin
AbstractHeterogeneity in tobacco-use behaviors among U.S. blacks by global region of origin and age at immigration was examined. Self-identified black participants from the 2006 –2015 Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey were included (n = 47,857). Countries of origin were classified by global regions (U.S., Africa, Europe, West Indies). Multivariable logistic regression models, adjusted for sociodemographic characteristics, were used to examine th e association of global region of origin and age at immigration with tobacco-use behaviors. Prevalence of current cigarette smoking a...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Health and Healthcare Needs of Koreans in San Francisco Bay Area: The Korean Needs Assessment (KoNA) Project
AbstractKorean Americans (KA) face a significant burden of health disparities. However, limited data are available on their health needs. This health needs assessment includes a community-based sample of 342 KA from the San Francisco Bay Area. The assessment investigated participants ’ sociodemographic characteristics, health status, and their healthcare needs. Nearly half of the survey participants rated their health as fair or poor,>  30% did not have a usual place for healthcare, and chronic conditions were prevalent. Limited English Proficiency (LEP) was significantly associated with low self-rated heal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Correction to: The Prevalence of Mental Illness and Substance Abuse Among Rural Latino Adults with Multiple Adverse Childhood Experiences in California
The original version of this article unfortunately published without acknowledgement section. The complete funding information is given below. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - September 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Barriers to Accessing and Negotiating Mental Health Services in Asylum Seeking and Refugee Populations: The Application of the Candidacy Framework
AbstractThis review brought together research investigating barriers asylum seekers and refugees (AS&R) face in accessing and negotiating mental health (MH) services. The candidacy framework (CF) was used as synthesizing argument to conceptualize barriers to services (Dixon-Woods et al. in BMC Med Res Methodol 6:35,2006). Five databases were systematically searched. Twenty-three studies were included and analyzed using the CF. The seven stages of the framework were differentiated into two broader processes —access and negotiation of services. Comparatively more data was available on barriers to access than negoti...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 23, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Correction to: Breastfeeding Practices of Ethnic Minorities in China: A Population-Based Cross-Sectional Study of 10,408 Mothers
The article Breastfeeding Practices of Ethnic Minorities in China: A Population ‑Based Cross‑Sectional Study of 10,408 Mothers, written by Yu Zhang, Hanyu Wang, Yiqing Wang and Kun Tang, was originally published electronically on the publisher’s internet portal (currently SpringerLink) on July 19, 2019 without open access. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Dance Dance “Cultural” Revolution: Tailoring a Physical Activity Intervention for South Asian Children
This study uses a mixed-methods embedded design to investigate factors associated with physical activity (PA) among SAs, and develops a culturally-relevant exercise intervention for SA children ages 8 –11. Twenty-eight (28) participants including children, parents, principals, teachers, and Bhangra instructors across four elementary schools in Surrey, BC participated in semi-structured interviews and a self-report survey. Using the immersion/crystallization approach, four major themes were iden tified: (1) awareness of the importance and benefits of PA, (2) discrepancy between expectations and actual opportunities fo...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Sociodemographic Characteristics Associated with Harmful Use of Alcohol Among Economically and Socially Disadvantaged Immigrant Patients in Italy
This study aimed at exploring sociodemographic and clinical characteristics associated with harmful use of alcohol (HUA) among immigrant patients. A cross-sectional study was conducted in Rome (Italy) on a sample of 330 immigrant patients admitted to the gastroenterology outpatient clinic of the INMP (March 2013 –October 2014). HUA was evaluated through the Alcohol Use Disorders Identification Test (AUDIT) questionnaire. The presence of psychiatric disorders was diagnosed through SCID I–II interviews. The association between sociodemographic characteristics and psychiatric disorders and HUA was evaluate d throu...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Using Electronic Health Record Data to Study Latino Immigrant Populations in Health Services Research
We presented them with a list of patients (masked to the interviewer) with whom they had worked, and asked them to indicate patient ’s immigration status, if they recalled it. We analyzed the correspondence between staff knowledge and our EHR algorithm. Staff described routine conversations with patients about immigration status. The EHR algorithm had fair agreement (66.2%, 95% CI 57.3–74.2) with staff knowledge. When the st aff were more confident of their assessment, agreement increased (77.6%, 95% CI 63.4–88.2). The EHR has potential for studying immigration status in health services research, although...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Gender Differences in Acculturative Stress and Habitual Sleep Duration in Korean American Immigrants
AbstractKorean American immigrants (KAIs) face diverse sociocultural stressors in the acculturation process. While stress is known to cause short sleep, little is known about how acculturative stress affects sleep differently for KAI men and women. The purpose of this cross-sectional study was to examine gender differences in the association between diverse domains of acculturative stress and sleep duration among KAIs. Middle-aged KAIs were recruited in community settings and online. KAIs completed validated measures of acculturative stress (homesickness, social isolation, employment barriers, discrimination, civic disenga...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

South Asian Health: Inflammation, Infection, Exposure, and the Human Microbiome
AbstractThis paper presents the results of the literature review conducted for the working group topic on inflammation, infection, exposure, and the human microbiome. Infection and chronic inflammation can elevate risk for cardiovascular disease and cancer. Environmental exposures common among South Asian (SA) subgroups, such as arsenic exposure among Bangladeshis and particulate matter air pollution among taxi drivers, also pose risks. This review explores the effects of exposure to arsenic and particulate matter, as well as other infections common among SAs, including human papillomavirus (HPV) and hepatitis B/C infectio...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Disease & amp; Cancer Risk Among South Asians: Impact of Sociocultural Influences on Lifestyle and Behavior
AbstractA comprehensive literature review revealed cultural beliefs, societal obligations, and gender roles within the South Asian community to be indirect contributors to the health of South Asian immigrants (SAIs). Health professionals need to increase their work with SAI communities to change less beneficial cultural elements such as misconceptions about health and exercise, and lack of communication when using alternative medicines. Community engaged efforts and continuing medical education are both needed to improve the health of the South Asian immigrant population in a culturally appropriate manner. (Source: Journal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

South Asian Health. From Research to Practice and Policy: An Overview
AbstractThe US South Asian population has grown tremendously, and is now over 2.5 million. South Asians often face tremendous cultural, socioeconomic, linguistic and structural obstacles to good health, and face staggering cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer risk. Coupled with this is a paucity of detailed data on the population ’s unique CVD and cancer risk profiles, etiologic mechanisms, and effective interventions to address South Asian health disparities. This data gap compelled an initiative to develop more targeted research and evidence-based practice and policy approaches. The South Asian Health Initiative...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Guest Editorial: The Health of S Asian Communities in the U.S.
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - August 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Association Between Neighborhood Cohesion and Cancer Screening Utilization in Chinese American Older Adults
This study aims to examine the association between neighborhood cohesion and cancer screening utilization in a community-dwelling Chinese American older population. Data were drawn from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly including 3159 Chinese American older adults aged 60 and above in the greater Chicago area. Cancer screening utilization was assessed by asking whether participants had undergone colon, breast, cervical, or prostate cancer screening. Neighborhood cohesion was measured through six questions. Logistic regression analysis showed that greater neighborhood cohesion was associated with higher likelihood of ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Emergency Department and Primary Care Use by Refugees Compared to Non-refugee Controls
We examined data from emergency department (ED) and primary care (PC) visits of 694 refugees and 738 non-refugee controls over a 3 years period at a large academic medical center, comparing visit frequ encies, Emergency Severity Index (ESI) scores, diagnoses, and dispositions. Refugees used emergency care services less frequently than the non-refugee controls (1.19 vs. 2.31, p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Participation of Turkish Migrants in an Epidemiological Study: Does the Recruitment Strategy Affect the Sample Characteristics?
In conclusion, the CBS approach led to a greater representation of persons of Turkish origin with lower language skills and lower acculturation status. Nevertheless, both recruitment strategies provided similar estimates of health status indicators. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Factors Associated with the Presence of Strong Social Supports in Bhutanese Refugee Women During Pregnancy
AbstractSocial support may mitigate stress related to the refugee experience, including during resettlement. For refugee women, social support can play an important role during pregnancy. In-depth interviews were conducted within a sample of 45 Bhutanese refugee women. Perceived social support was measured using the Norbeck Social Support Questionnaire. Averaged social support scores are reported to account for personal network size. Participants were identified as “low support” and “high support” based on their reported score. The mean social support score reported was 18.9. Participants experienci...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Pilot Study Evaluating Organochlorine and Organophosphate Pesticide Exposure in Children and Adolescents of Mexican Descent Residing in Hidalgo County, Texas
AbstractChildren and adolescents of Mexican descent residing in Hidalgo County (TX) were evaluated for exposure to organochlorine (OC) and organophosphate (OP) pesticides. A convenience sample of 60 participants enrolled in our pilot study. The lipid-adjusted serum concentrations of nine OC metabolites and creatinine-adjusted urinary concentrations of six OP metabolites were measured and compared with data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention ’sFourth Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals. Descriptive statistics were used to summarize the concentration levels for each metabolite. Study pa...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Polyvictimization, Related Symptoms, and Familial and Neighborhood Contexts as Longitudinal Mediators of Racial/Ethnic Disparities in Violence Exposure Across Adolescence
AbstractAfrican American and Hispanic adolescent experience more violence exposure relative to White youth. The present study examined the mediating role of posttraumatic stress symptoms (PTSS), delinquency, earlier victimization, and familial and neighborhood factors in disparities in future victimization. The study utilized data from the National Survey of Adolescents-Replication (N  = 3,312), which consists of three waves of data collected approximately 1 year apart. A series of path models, tested polyvictimization, PTSS, delinquency, familial socioeconomic factors, and neighborhood safety as mediato...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Exploring the ‘Patient Experience’ of Individuals with Limited English Proficiency: A Scoping Review
AbstractIndividuals with limited English proficiency (LEP) face barriers to safe and high-quality health care. ‘Patient-experience’ is increasingly viewed as an important component of health care quality. However, the impact of language proficiency on ‘patient-experience’ is not well-described. This scoping review mapped the literature on the patient experience of individuals with LEP. We reviewed si xty qualitative and mixed-methods studies from EMBASE and MEDLINE published between 2007 and 2017. We identified four major themes: (1) Communication, language barriers, and health literacy, (2) Relatio...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cardiovascular Disease Screening Among Immigrants from Eight World Regions
This study seeks to expand knowledge of such preventative-health screening differences by analyzing screening rates for blood sugar, blood pressure, and serum cholesterol among nine groups overall and (for immigrants) at various stages of US residency. Using nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey, we find that immigrants from eight geographic regions receive preventative care at lower rates than US-born Whites and that preventative screening is generally higher after 15  years than during the first 4 years of residency in the United States. Importantly, our data also show that sc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 28, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Prevalence of, and Factors Associated with Intestinal Parasites in Multinational Expatriate Workers in Al Ain City, United Arab Emirates: An Occupational Cross-Sectional Study
AbstractTo estimate the prevalence of, and identify factors associated with intestinal parasites (IPs) in expatriate workers in the United Arab Emirates (UAE). All expatriate workers (N  = 115) in a conveniently selected workplace in the industrial district of Al Ain city were invited to participate in a cross-sectional study. Consenting workers completed an interviewer-led questionnaire and self-collected stool samples. Stool samples were microscopically and molecularly screen ed for the presence of IPs. Univariate and multivariate analyses were conducted. Overall, 102 (88.7%) workers participated in the sur...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 27, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Associations with the  Receipt of Colon Cancer Screening Among a Diverse Sample of Arab Americans in NYC
This study explores associations with the receipt of CRC screening among AA in New York City. A cross-sectional survey was conducted among 100 individuals attending religious and community organizations with interviewer-administered surveys in Arabic and English. Results from 100 participants showed they were more likely to complete CRC screening with a doctor recommendation (74%) and were more likely to get a recommendation with a high school education or higher (86%). Uninsured participants and those with public insurance were the least likely to complete screening. Those with a higher mean score in Spiritual Life/Faith ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Haitian Immigrants and Type 2 Diabetes: An Integrative Review
This study has implications for practice for integrating the unique cultural factors when assessing and intervening with HIs. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Perspectives of Caregivers on the Effects of Migration on the Nutrition, Health and Physical Activity of their Young Children: A Qualitative Study with Immigrant and Refugee Families
AbstractTo explore perspectives on nutrition, health and physical activity among immigrant parents with young children before and after migration. We conducted focus groups in five languages (Arabic, Somali, Dari, Burmese and Nepali), then conducted a phenomenological analysis of the transcripts. Fifty caregivers participated; 42% spent time in a refugee camp. Within the domainChange in Environment, four themes emerged: (1) food access; (2) family experiences with weight and growth; (3) differences in physical activity and perceptions of safety; and (4) health care experience. Within the domain ofParenting Behaviors and Ex...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Association Between Acculturation and Prenatal Psychosocial Stress Among Latinas
AbstractLatinas experience high levels of stress in pregnancy, however few studies have investigated how acculturation affects pregnancy mental health among Latinas. The goal of this study was to determine if acculturation was associated with pregnancy stress among pregnant, predominantly Puerto Rican women. Participants (n  = 1426) were enrolled in Proyecto Buena Salud, a prospective cohort study of Latinas. Acculturation on a bi-dimensional scale that allows for identification with both Latina and continental US cultures (i.e., bi-cultural vs. high or low acculturation) was measured in early pregnancy via t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Preferences of Resettled Refugees on Pictograms Describing Common Symptoms of Illness
AbstractIllustrated health resources are useful for people who have limited English linguistic ability. The aim was to compare the preferences of resettled refugees from Africa and non-African countries, on pictograms describing common symptoms of illness. Data were collected in two cities in Queensland, Australia. Participants indicated their preference for three types of pictograms depicting seven symptoms. Pictogram sources included the International Pharmaceutical Federation, royalty-free stock images, and pictograms designed in South Africa. For all ailments, participants (n  = 81) from Africa preferred ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Effects of Mental Health Paraprofessional Training for Filipina Foreign Domestic Workers in Singapore
AbstractResearch has found that 24% of foreign domestic workers (FDWs) in Singapore have poor mental health (24%), with depressive symptoms being identified as the second most severe psychological symptoms [1]. The study assessed the acceptability and effectiveness of a 4-week cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT)-based paraprofessional training program for FDWs in Singapore on depression literacy and CBT knowledge (primary outcomes), depression-related stigma, as well as attitudes towards seeking professional help (secondary outcomes) immediately and 2  months following the training. Forty female Filipino FDWs were recr...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The 6-D Model of National Culture as a Tool to Examine Cultural Interpretation of Migration Trauma-Related Dissociative Disorder: A Case Series
AbstractDissociative experiences are common in traumatized individuals who can use dissociation as a psychological escape from emotional and physical distress associated with overwhelming traumatic events. Traumatic experiences and the cultural interpretation of trauma-related symptoms often serve to explain the wide range of dissociative phenomenology; in fact, dissociation is a complex and ubiquitous construct present in a variety of mental disorders. The Six-Dimensions Model of National Culture has been used as a tool to compare patients ’ different cultural background that could have accounted for the different c...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Acculturation and Exposure to Secondhand Smoke in the Home Among Vietnamese Immigrants in Metropolitan Atlanta
This study represents the first effort to examine associations between various measures of acculturation and past 30-day secondhand smoke (SHS) exposure among Vietnamese-Americans in metro-Atlanta, one of the areas with the highest number of Vietnamese-Americans in the U.S. Survey data of 96 Vietnamese-American nonsmoking adults attending health fairs/programs hosted by community-based organizations (2017 –2018) were analyzed. Acculturation-related predictors included Vancouver Acculturation Index, language fluency, years in the U.S., and area-level proportion of Asian residents. The sample was an average 37.49 ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - June 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Willingness to Use a Nursing Home in Asian Americans
This study explores factors associated with willingness to use a nursing home in Asian Americans. Focus is given to demographic variables (age, gender, ethnicity, marital status, and education), health-related variables (chronic medical condition and self-rated health), immigration-related variables (time in the U.S. and acculturation), and family-related variables (family network and family solidarity). Cross-sectional study. Data were drawn from  2551 participants in the 2015 Asian American Quality of Life Survey (aged 18–98). Participants were asked to indicate whether they would be willing to use a nursing h...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Prevalence of Possible Mental Disorders in Syrian Refugees Resettling in the United States Screened at Primary Care
AbstractLittle is known about mental health problems among newly arrived Syrian refugees in the US. It is important to determine the prevalence of common consequences of exposure to trauma and high stress, and provide needed interventions, as these conditions if untreated, can be detrimental to mental and physical health. Adult Syrian refugees (n  = 157, 47.1% women, 52.9% men) were screened at one-month mandatory primary care health visit for Posttraumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD), anxiety and depression using PTSD Checklist, and Hopkins Symptoms Checklist. Prevalence of possible diagnoses was high for PTSD (3...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Direct-Acting Antiviral Therapy for Hepatitis C Infection in a Large Immigrant Community
AbstractHepatitis C treatment has rapidly evolved with the arrival of direct-acting antiviral therapy. Sustained virologic response (SVR) rates in clinical trials are high but it is unknown how this translates to the immigrant community. Data from December 2013 to September 2015 was collected from a Midwest academic and community practice with a large immigrant population. There were 802 patients with an overall SVR rate of 88%. Ledipasvir/sofosbuvir was associated with favorable response among genotype 1 and 4 patients compared to other regimens (p  
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Guards in Prisons: A Risk Group for Latent Tuberculosis Infection
AbstractTo determine the prevalence and incidence of LTBI among prison guards and to the risk factors associated with infection. Two male prisons in Medell ín and Itaguí, Colombia. A cohort study was conducted in adult prison guards that consented to participate. Exclusion criteria included: previous or current active TB, or conditions that preclude TST administration. We screened 194 guards and completed 155 TST administrations. The prevalence of LT BI was 55.8% in prison one, and 39.1% in prison two. The risk factors associated with LTBI diagnosis included drug use at least once in a lifetime (PR: 1.75; 95%...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Cultural Considerations in the Assessment of Survivors of Torture
Discussion centers around the utility of a cross-culturally valid measure of distress, and it is hoped that this review will encourage collaboration between clinicians and psychometricians to develop assessments for use with this vulnerable population. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Uptake of Gynecological Cancer Screening and Performance of Breast Self-Examination Among 50-Year-Old Migrant and Non-migrant Women in Germany: Results of a Cross-Sectional Study (InEMa)
AbstractOur aim was to provide data regarding uptake of gynecological early detection measures and performance of breast self-examinations among migrant women in Germany. Cross-sectional self-reported data were collected using paper-and-pencil questionnaires. Descriptive analyses, Chi square-tests, and logistic regression were applied. Results were adjusted for educational level. Of 5387 women, 89.9% were autochthonous, 4.1% German resettlers, 2.8% Turkish, 3.1% other migrants. Participation rates regarding cancer screening differed significantly, with the lowest proportion in Turkish migrants (65.0%), resettlers (67.8%), ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Scoping Review of Undocumented Immigrants and Palliative Care: Implications for the Canadian Context
AbstractApproximately 30 –40 million undocumented immigrants worldwide suffer restricted health care. A scoping review was conducted to determine what is known about this population’s palliative end-of-life care experiences. The scoping review followed Arksey and O’Malley’s methodological framework. Databases searc hed included CINAHL, Medline, ProQuest, Scopus, and PHRED. Search terms included uninsured care, palliative care, undocumented immigrants, and terminally ill. The search revealed limited peer-reviewed and grey literature on the topic. A total of six articles met inclusion criteria, o...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Preventive Health Screening Disparities Among Immigrants: Exploring Barriers to Care
This study advances knowledge in this area by investigating the explanatory strength of such factors for cardiovascular risk screening across eight immigrant groups. Using nationally representative data from the National Health Interview Survey, we test the hypothesis that known correlates of preventive healthcare seeking differ in their ability to predict screening behavior depending on region of origin. Results show that health service factors (lack of insurance and no place for care) are fairly consistent predictors of preventive screening while socioeconomic and immigration-related factors are less so. These findings s...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

The Health Needs of Female Labor Migrants from Central Asia in Russia
AbstractThere has been an increasing number of women migrating for work from Central Asia to Russia in recent years, yet very little is known about their specific health needs. We conducted a scoping study to understand what is known about their health and to identify the gaps and research priorities among this population. We conducted a literature review and key informant interviews. Our findings were grouped around general health issues, access to and utilization of health care services, and sexual and reproductive health concerns. Through our review, we identified the following priority research areas: stress, accultura...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Loneliness, Cardiovascular Disease, and Diabetes Prevalence in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study
We examined whether loneliness was associated with CVD and DM, and whether age, sex, marital status, and years in U.S moderated these associations. Participants were 5,313 adults (M (SD) age  = 42.39 (15.01)) enrolled in the Hispanic Community Health Study/Study of Latinos Sociocultural Ancillary Study. Loneliness was assessed via the 3-item Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale. Level of reported loneliness was low. Loneliness was significantly associated with CVD: OR 1.10 (CI 1.01–1.20) and DM: OR 1.08 (CI 1.00–1.16) after adjusting for depression, demographics, body mass index, and smoking status. Age,...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Childhood Adversity and Psychosocial Health Outcomes in Later Life Among Immigrants in Canada
In conclusion, the findings show that experience of physical and sexual abuse during childhood is associated with negative mental health outcomes in later life. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Five Years Later: The Impact of a Hunger Strike on Undocumented Migrant Workers in Brussels
AbstractFive years after a hunger strike of undocumented migrant workers, participants were interviewed to find out about the long term consequences and what the post-factum evaluation of their participation was. A longitudinal observational study was set up, interviewing 46 of the 100 ex-hunger strikers and combining quantitative and qualitative research. This grassroots study shows that one out of six did not derive any benefit from their participation. Half regretted their participation, especially the ones who lost again their legal permit, mentioning health consequences and the fact that their situation hadn ’t ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Vaccine-Preventable Disease-Associated Hospitalisations Among Migrant and Non-migrant Children in New Zealand
AbstractMigrants may experience a higher burden of vaccine-preventable disease (VPD)-associated hospitalisations compared to the host population. A retrospective cohort study from 2006 to 2015 was conducted that linked de-identified data from government sources using Statistic NZ ’s Integrated Data Infrastructure. VPD-related hospitalisations were compared between three cohorts of children from birth to 5 years old: foreign-born children who migrated to NZ, children born in NZ of recent migrant mothers, and a comparator group of children born in NZ without a recent migrat ion background. VPD-related hospitalisat...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 3, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

A Qualitative Exploration of Somali Refugee Women ’s Experiences with Family Planning in the U.S.
AbstractThe purpose of our study was to explore the knowledge, attitudes, and experiences of Somali refugee women with family planning in the U.S. We conducted focus groups of Somali refugee women and used grounded theory methodology to identify emergent themes. Fifty-three women, aged 18 –49 years, participated. Somali refugee women’s cultural and religious beliefs and social identities strongly influence their conceptualization of family planning. Participants agreed that a woman’s fertility is ultimately decided by Allah and identified environmental changes after immigratio n and the desire to opt...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Stress and Health of Internally Displaced Female Yezidis in Northern Iraq
AbstractBurden and vulnerability factors after the genocide by ISIS accumulate to a high risk of health for displaced Yezidi women having survived or escaped the “ISIS” persecutions and massacres 2014. In May 2017, standardized interviews, including tests for the acquisition of healthrelated quality of life (SF12), stress (PSS10) and experienced trauma were performed with 29 and a medical anamnesis with 10 displaced female Yezidi in camps for internally displaced people (IDP) and unofficial settlements in Northern Iraq. 58, 62% stated their general health as “poor”, 17.24% each as “fair”...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research

Emerging Lingo-Cultural Inequality in Infant Autopsy in Quebec, Canada
AbstractWe investigated trends in infant autopsy for Francophones and Anglophones in Quebec, Canada. Using death certificates, we extracted 8214 infant deaths between 1989 and 2013. We computed rates of non-autopsy by language, socioeconomic disadvantage, age at death, and period. Using Kitagawa ’s method, we decomposed non-autopsy rates over time for both language groups. Infant non-autopsy rates increased from 38.6 to 56.2 per 100 for Francophones, and from 41.2 to 57.2 per 100 for Anglophones, between 1989–1995 and 2008–2013. Trends in English-speakers were driven by socioeconomica lly disadvantaged An...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: research