Chagas Disease in a Non-endemic Country: A Multidisciplinary Research, Bologna, Italy
Abstract Global processes have brought about a substantial change in the epidemiological landscape of Chagas disease, spreading it to non-endemic areas. Italy is the second country in Europe in terms of Latin American migrants and expected infection rate. Given that scenario, the Bologna University Teaching Hospital undertaken a study aimed at providing preliminary data on the prevalence and investigating the knowledge and the subjective perceptions of Chagas disease, migration pathways and other relevant ill-health experiences. A cross-sectional study was undertaken in association with an ethnographic research. B...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Tuberculosis Treatment Completion Rates in Southern New Mexico Colonias
Abstract TB medication completion treatment rates for active TB patients living in impoverished US-Mexico border communities called colonias in southern New Mexico counties are unknown. It might be suspected that residents of colonias have lower completion rates than those living in incorporated and medically more accessible areas. A retrospective record review of closed TB case records from 1993 to 2010 of southern New Mexico border counties, was conducted using a modified version of the New Mexico Department of Health Tuberculosis Targeted Health Assessment/History form (Appendix 1). Study findings reveal that d...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - May 1, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prevalence of Complementary and Alternative Medicine in Immigrants
This study examines the prevalence of and reason for CAM use in the U.S. population by citizenship status. Data on 34,483 U.S.-born, naturalized, and non-U.S. citizens from the 2012 National Health Interview Survey was used. CAM was categorized into four domains. Analyses controlling for socioeconomic variables were identified patterns of utilization and reasons for use. The prevalence of all CAM domains was lowest among non-U.S. citizens followed by naturalized citizens. The odds of using CAM were also higher for the immigrants who attained citizenship than for non-citizens. Individuals in all groups reported using more C...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 29, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Translation of the Diabetes Prevention Program to Ethnic Communities in the United States
Abstract The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), an evidenced-based lifestyle intervention for type 2 diabetes (T2D), has been translated for use with ethnic minority communities throughout the United States that are disproportionately at-risk for T2D. The present paper sought to critically review ethnic translation studies of the DPP with respect to translation methods utilized, the success of these methods, and alternative or supplemental methodologies for future translation efforts. Manuscripts reviewed were found by searching PubMed and PsycINFO, using the terms: “diabetes prevention program” AND [&...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Role of Social Support in Examining Acculturative Stress and Psychological Distress Among Asian American Immigrants and Three Sub-groups: Results from NLAAS
This study examined the impact of acculturative stress and social support (family and friend) on psychological distress among Asian American immigrants and three Asian sub-groups (Vietnamese, Filipino and Chinese) immigrants. The National Latino and Asian American Study 2002–2003 dataset was used. The study findings were: (1) among all Asian American immigrants high language barrier and discrimination stress were associated with increased level of psychological distress, but similar association was not present for legal stress; (2) among all Asian American immigrants high family social support decreased the levels of...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 24, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Role of Health Literacy in Predicting Multiple Healthcare Outcomes Among Hispanics in a Nationally Representative Sample: A Comparative Analysis by English Proficiency Levels
Abstract Health literacy (HL) research among Hispanics currently focuses on individuals with limited English proficiency but impacts of HL on healthcare outcomes among other English language proficiency groups is relatively unknown. Regression models assessed associations between HL and healthcare outcomes for Hispanics overall (n = 4013) and for proficiency level sub-populations using the 2007 Pew Hispanic Health Survey. Overall, Hispanics with adequate HL percieved US medical care as “excellent,” were more satisfied with their doctor’s help, and reported “excellent” overal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Black–White Health Inequalities in Canada
Abstract Little is known about Black–White health inequalities in Canada or the applicability of competing explanations for them. To address this gap, we used nine cycles of the Canadian Community Health Survey to analyze multiple health outcomes in a sample of 3,127 Black women, 309,720 White women, 2,529 Black men and 250,511 White men. Adjusting for age, marital status, urban/rural residence and immigrant status, Black women and men were more likely than their White counterparts to report diabetes and hypertension, Black women were less likely than White women to report cancer and fair/poor mental health ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Relationship Between Self-Rated Health and Acculturation in Hispanic and Asian Adult Immigrants: A Systematic Review
Abstract We systematically reviewed studies to identify the association between acculturation and self-rated health (SRH) and the impact of nativity and language use in Asian and Hispanic adult immigrants. Six electronic databases were searched. Data on nativity and limited English proficiency (LEP) was extracted and analyzed. Nine studies met review criteria. A positive association between acculturation and fair/poor SRH among Asians and Hispanics was found. For both Asians and Hispanics, six out of eight studies showed nativity and all three studies reporting LEP were associated with worse SRH compared to whites...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 17, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Relationships Between Functional Limitation, Depression, Suicidal Ideation, and Coping in Older Korean Immigrants
This study examined the structural relationships between functional limitation, depression, suicidal ideation, and coping strategies in older Korean immigrants. Using data from 220 community dwelling Korean immigrants (age ≧ 65) in Los Angeles County, path analysis was conducted to test the study hypotheses. The resulting model accounted for 56 % of the variance in suicidal ideation, with functional limitation making significant contribution to suicidal ideation. Meanwhile, depression, which had the strongest direct effects on suicidal ideation, also played a significant role in mediating between functiona...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Reasons for Pacifier Use and Non-Use in African-Americans: Does Knowledge of Reduced SIDS Risk Change Parents’ Minds?
Abstract To investigate African-American parental reasons for pacifier use or non-use, and whether knowledge of the association with decreased SIDS risk changes decisions about pacifier use. We conducted focus groups and individual interviews with mothers. Grounded theory methodology was used. 83 mothers participated; 72.3 % of infants used pacifiers. Reasons for pacifier use included comfort/soothing, safety/SIDS, and preference over digit-sucking. Reasons for pacifier non-use included infant refusal, fear of attachment, nipple confusion, and germs. Many parents were unaware that pacifier use reduces SIDS ri...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Advances in Science and Biomedical Research on Postpartum Depression do not Include Meaningful Numbers of Latinas
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Different Patterns in Health Care Use Among Immigrants in Spain
This study aims to analyze the differences in the use of primary care (PC), hospital, and emergency services between people born in Spain and immigrants. Data were obtained from the 2006 Spanish National Health Survey. The sample was composed of individuals aged 16–64 years from Spain and the seven countries with most immigrants in Spain (n = 22,224). Hierarchical multiple logistic regression models were fitted. Romanian men were less likely to use health care at all levels compared to men from other countries. Women from Argentina, Bolivia and Ecuador reported a lower use of PC. Among women, there wer...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 11, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Turkish and Moroccan Young Adults in the Netherlands: The Relationship Between Acculturation and Psychological Problems
This study investigated the relationship between acculturation and psychological problems in Turkish and Moroccan young adults living in the Netherlands. A sample of 131 healthy young adults aged between 18 and 24 years old, with a Turkish or Moroccan background was recruited using snowball sampling. Data on acculturation, internalizing and externalizing problems, beliefs about psychological problems, attributions of psychological problems and barriers to care were collected and analyzed using Latent Class Analysis and multinomial logistic regression. Three acculturation classes were identified in moderately to highly...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 7, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Stress Factors Contributing to Depression Among Latino Migrant Farmworkers in Nebraska
Abstract Migrant farmworkers represent a structurally vulnerable population coming to rural communities to work, but often are economically disadvantaged and socially isolated. Based on survey data from 200 migrant farmworkers in rural Nebraska in 2013, this study seeks to identify and categorize major stressors that have contributed to depression among farmworkers. Over 30 % of respondents were identified to have high stress levels as indicated by the Migrant Farmworker Stress Inventory (MFWSI). The MFWSI was categorized into eight domains: economics and logistics; acculturation and social isolation; relatio...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - April 3, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Effects of Parental Nativity and Length of Stay in the US on Fruit and Vegetable Intake Among WIC-Enrolled Preschool-Aged Children
Abstract Exposure to US culture is negatively associated with fruits and vegetables (F&V) intake. Our goal was to investigate how parent’s nativity and length of stay in the US influences preschoolers’ F&V intake. We analyzed survey data from 2,352 children, aged 36–60 months, who participate in the Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children (WIC) in Los Angeles County. Using multiple linear regression, we examined children’s F&V intake by parent’s nativity and years in the US, adjusting for possible confounders. Children of foreign born parents w...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Functional Limitations and Nativity Status Among Older Arab, Asian, Black, Hispanic, and White Americans
Abstract To examine the association between nativity status (foreign and US-born) by race/ethnicity (Arab, Asian, black, Hispanic, white) on having a functional limitation. We used American Community Survey data (2001–2007; n = 1,964,777; 65+ years) and estimated odds ratios (95 % confidence intervals). In the crude model, foreign-born Blacks and Arabs were more likely, while Asians and Hispanics were less likely to report having a functional limitation compared to white. In the fully adjusted model, Blacks, Hispanics, and Asians were less likely, while Arabs were more likely to report having...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Link Between Border Crossing and Obesity
This study explored the relationship between frequency of border crossing, obesigenic behaviors, measured obesity, and chronic disease. Multistage sampling methods were used to recruit 397 Latino adults living in border communities in South San Diego County. Selected participants completed a face-to-face interview and height and weight measurements. More frequent border crossing was associated with more fast food consumption and a greater reported diagnosis of high cholesterol. Understanding the extent to which border crossing is associated with obesigenic behaviors and chronic disease is important for developing relevant ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Breastfeeding or Bottled Milk? Poverty and Feeding Choices in the Native and Immigrant Population in Belgium
Abstract In many European countries, mothers in poverty show a preference for bottled milk over breastfeeding. What remains unknown is whether the impact of poverty on feeding choices differs between immigrants and natives. We first assessed whether being born into poverty indicates a higher chance of being bottle-fed, then evaluated whether region of origin of the mother moderates the impact of poverty on feeding choice. Based on population data from nearly all newborns in Belgium in 2004 (N = 34,314), we performed several binary logistic analyses to answer these research questions. Analyses showed...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Consumption and Nutritional Labeling Among Immigrants to Israel from the Former Soviet Union
In conclusion, it is crucial to clarify immigrants’ perceptions of the concept of “health” and “proper nutrition” in formulating health promotion programs. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Assessment of Stroke Risk in Southern Arizona, the Pairing of Acculturation and Stroke Risk Factor Development
Abstract Stroke is a leading cause of mortality in the United States. Hispanics have the same incidence of stroke, but are more likely to have subsequent strokes than non-Hispanic whites. This difference in outcome may be attributable to differences in stroke risk factor awareness. Patients at a community health center in Tucson, AZ completed an anonymous survey regarding existing and perceived health issues. Patient responses were compared in terms of ethnicity and acculturation, as indicated by language preference. Patient responses (n = 301, Spanish: 150, English: 151) indicated that proportionately ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Food Similarity Index: A New Measure of Dietary Acculturation Based on Dietary Recall Data
This study introduces a flexible indicator of dietary acculturation that measures immigrants’ eating behavior relative to U.S.-born persons. Using 24-hour dietary recall data from the continuous National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey pooled across multiple years from 1999/00 through 2009/10, we developed and tested the validity of the “Food Similarity Index” (FSI), which indicates the similarity of the foods consumed by individuals to the foods most commonly consumed by same-aged U.S-born persons of all racial/ethnic groups. We demonstrate its utility here for children and adults of four racial-...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

The Border of Reproductive Control: Undocumented Immigration as a Risk Factor for Unintended Pregnancy in Switzerland
Abstract Unintended pregnancies reflect an unmet need for family planning, and are part of health disparities. Using the only database to inquire about pregnancy intention among women in Switzerland, this study examined the relationship between immigrant documentation and unintended pregnancy (UP). Among pregnant women presenting to a Swiss hospital, we compared pregnancy intention between documented and undocumented women. We used logistic regression to examine whether undocumented status was associated with UP after adjusting for other significant predictors. Undocumented women had more unintended pregnanci...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Immigrant Status, Acculturation and Risk of Overweight and Obesity in Adolescents Living in Madrid (Spain): The AFINOS Study
This study compares overweight prevalences in native Spanish and immigrant adolescents living in the Madrid region (Spain), and whether length of residence affects the risk of immigrant adolescents being overweight. The study population was a representative sample of adolescents aged 13–17 years (n = 2,081, 1,055 girls) who lived in Madrid. Data were collected from November 2007 to February 2008 through a cross-sectional survey in which self-reported height and weight were used to calculate BMI. Overall, no significant difference was detected in overweight risk between the Spanish and immigrant adolesc...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Comparison of Eating Habits in Obese and Non-obese Filipinas Living in an Urban Area of Japan
This study compares eating habits among obese and non-obese Filipinas living in an urban area of Japan. We used self-report questionnaires to study 635 Filipinos. Body mass index (BMI) and eating/lifestyle habits were noted. Obesity was defined as BMI ≥25 kg/m2. Seventeen percent (24/140) were obese. Results of the age-adjusted multiple logistic regression analysis show that the following responses were associated with obesity: “frequency of eating high green and yellow vegetables” (every day: 0, not every day: 1) [OR 4.9; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.6–14.8] and “frequency of e...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Relationships Between Children’s Exposure to Ethnic Produce and Their Dietary Behaviors
Abstract The current study examined relationships between children’s ethnic produce exposure and healthy dietary practices among Latino, Hmong and non-Hispanic white children. One hundred Latino, 100 Hmong, and 92 non-Hispanic white parents of children ages 5–8 years old in northern California completed a cross-sectional survey. Children’s exposure to ethnic produce from Hmong and Latino cultures, overall fruit and vegetable consumption, and fast food and ethnic restaurant use were measured. The Kruskal–Wallis and Mann–Whitney tests were used to compare variables across differen...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Self-Reported Discrimination, Diabetes Distress, and Continuous Blood Glucose in Women with Type 2 Diabetes
Abstract We investigated whether self-reported racial discrimination was associated with continuous glucose levels and variability in individuals with diabetes, and whether diabetes distress mediated these associations. Seventy-four Black and White women with type 2 diabetes completed the Experience of Discrimination scale, a measure of lifetime racial discrimination, and the Problem Areas in Diabetes, a measure of diabetes distress. Participants wore a continuous glucose monitor for 24 h after 8 h of fasting, a standard meal, and a 4-h run in period. Higher discrimination predicted higher continuou...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Insecurity, Depression, and Social Support in HIV-Infected Hispanic Individuals
We examined this association in 183 HIV-infected Hispanic adults from the greater Boston area. We measured depression with the Burnam depression screen and food insecurity with the Radimer/Cornell Questionnaire. Dietary intake was assessed with an adapted version of the Block Food Frequency Questionnaire. Logistic regression models were created with depression as the outcome variable and food insecurity as the main predictor. In bivariate analyses, food insecurity was significantly associated with depression [odds ratio (OR) 2.5; 95 % confidence interval (CI) 1.1, 5.5; p = 0.03]. When we accounted for social...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Insecurity and Budgeting Among Liberians in the US: How are They Related to Socio-demographic and Pre-resettlement Characteristics
Abstract Objectives of this study: (1) Examine food insecurity (FI) prevalence and its relationship with sociodemographic and pre-resettlement characteristics; (2) Investigate differences in amount of money spent on food/month by food security status and socio-demographic characteristics. A pilot study with semi-structured in-home interviews was conducted with Liberian caregivers (n = 33). FI was indicated in 61 % of households. FI was higher among women>40, had ≤ high school education and those making ≤$1,000/month. Women arriving in US>15 years of age were more likely to be ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Consumption Patterns of Balearic Islands’ Adolescents Depending on Their Origin
Abstract Over the last decade, the immigrant population of the Balearic Islands archipelago (Spain), in the Mediterranean, has risen to 22 % of its total population. The aim of this study was to assess food consumption patterns among Balearic Islands’ adolescents depending on their origin. A population-based cross-sectional nutritional survey was carried out in the Balearic Islands (2007–2008; n = 1,231; 12–17 years old). Dietary assessment was based on a 145-item semi-quantitative food-frequency questionnaire. Food consumption differences between the adolescents’ point...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Newborn Birth Weights and Related Factors of Native and Immigrant Residents of Spain
This study establishes differences in birth weight (BW) and related factors among full-term newborn (NB) infants born to native and immigrant women living in Spain during 2007–2008. All NBs from Spanish mothers and mothers from the five nationalities with the highest birth rates in Spain (Morocco, Romania, Ecuador, Bolivia, and Colombia) according to the Statistical Bulletin of Births in Spain were included. BW was classified as low BW (LBW;
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Review on Changes in Food Habits Among Immigrant Women and Implications for Health
Abstract The present article covers the range of various factors that impact dietary change among immigrant women, the consequences for health as well as suggestions for an improved intervention. The factors like: busier lifestyle, lack of social relations, higher level of stress, children’s preferences, taste, food insecurity, lack of traditional foods and others can result in high fat and sugar diets, low consumption of fruits/vegetables, greater portions, consumption of convenience food and inactivity. These unfavorable dietary changes can in turn cause chronic diseases including cardiovascular diseases,...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Food Insecurity, Cigarette Smoking, and Acculturation Among Latinos: Data From NHANES 1999–2008
Abstract Prevalence of food insecurity (FI) among Latinos in the United States is almost double the national average. To better understand FI among Latinos, potential risk factors beyond poverty, including acculturation indicators and smoking status, were explored. Cross-sectional data from 6,681 Latino adults from the 1999–2008 National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys were used. Partial proportional odds (PPO) models were used to estimate associations of FI, including cigarette smoking and acculturation. The PPO models indicated that compared with never smokers, current smokers had significantly h...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Are First-Generation Adolescents Less Likely to be Overweight? Results from a Survey of Boston Youth
We examined the association between generation (i.e. 1st, 1.5, 2nd, and 3rd) and weight indicators among Boston adolescents. Data are from a sample of 1,420 9–12th grade public school students in Boston, Massachusetts. We used self-reported information to calculate generation and weight characteristics (i.e., body mass index (BMI), BMI z-score, overweight status), and ran multivariate analyses to estimate the association between generation and weight characteristics, adjusting for race/ethnicity, gender, age and school. In pooled multivariate models, 1.5 generation, second generation, and third generation youth had s...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 22, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Migrant Selectivity or Cultural Buffering? Investigating the Black Immigrant Health Advantage in Low Birth Weight
This study adds to the relatively scant literature on black immigrant health advantage by comparing the two hypotheses (migrant selectivity and cultural buffering) as related to black immigrant health. The effect of nativity on infant low birth weight is tested using data from the US Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study. Results indicate that immigrant black mothers do have relatively better health outcomes that may result from cultural buffering, which reduces their risky health behaviors. (Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Post-immigration Changes in Social Capital and Substance Use Among Recent Latino Immigrants in South Florida: Differences by Documentation Status
Abstract Changing social capital among recent Latino immigrants (RLIs) influences substance use post-immigration. This was a longitudinal study of 476 South/Central American RLIs examining social capital and substance use changes pre to post-immigration. Self-reported measures of social capital and substance use were compared between surveys administered within 1 year of immigration and 2 years post-immigration. Post-immigration, social capital, hazardous drinking and illicit drug use decreased. Women were less likely to engage in hazardous drinking [adjusted odds ratio (AOR) .32, p 
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 19, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

A Systematic Review of the Physical, Mental, Social, and Economic Problems of Immigrant Women in the Perinatal Period in Japan
Abstract The perinatal mortality of immigrants in Japan is higher than that of Japanese women. However, details of the problems of immigrant perinatal women that contribute to worsening of their health are still unknown. This review describes the physical, psychological, social, and economic problems of immigrant women during the perinatal period in Japan. Medline, CINAHL, PsycINFO, and Igaku-Chuo Zasshi were searched and 36 relevant articles were reviewed. The related descriptions were collected and analyzed by using content analysis. The results showed that immigrant perinatal women in Japan experienced the foll...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Impact of Routine Quantiferon Testing on Latent Tuberculosis Diagnosis and Treatment in Refugees in Multnomah County, Oregon, November 2009–October 2012
Abstract Interferon-gamma release assays have potentially been transformative to screening programs focused on latent tuberculosis infection (LTBI) in foreign-born persons. We sought to add to this assessment by presenting the impact of a well-established refugee screening and treatment program switching from skin testing to Quantiferon®-TB Gold (QFT). We completed a retrospective cohort of refugees screened for tuberculosis between November 1, 2009–April 30, 2011 (pre-QFT) and May 1, 2011–October 31, 2012 (post-QFT). Among 2244 refugees screened that met the inclusion criteria, there was a sig...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Needs, Risks, and Context in Sexual Health Among Temporary Foreign Migrant Farmworkers in Canada: A Pilot Study with Mexican and Caribbean Workers
Abstract Every year Canada hosts approximately 40,000 temporary foreign migrant farmworkers (MFWs). They are predominantly Mexican and Caribbean married men or single mothers who leave their families for months at a time over a span of many years. This pilot study investigated their knowledge about HIV/AIDS, attitudes towards condoms and their use, and perceived barriers to accessing sexual health services. A survey (n = 103) and four focus groups (n = 21) were conducted in Ontario’s Niagara Region. The results suggest that MFWs commonly face vulnerabilities to HIV/AIDS, STIs and other se...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Prayer Marks in Immigrants from Bangladesh with Diabetes Who Live in Greece
Abstract Prayer marks (PMs) are commonly occurring dermatologic changes in muslims who pray and develop over a long period of time as a consequence of repeated and extended pressure. PMs need careful examination especially for patients with diabetes, who are more vulnerable due to predisposing factors such as venous insufficiency and peripheral neuropathy. A total of 166 patients with diabetes (150 males, 16 females) and 65 normal subjects from Bangladesh were examined for the appearance of PMs. Twenty-eight patients (16.9 %) and one normal subject (1.5 %) had PMs. The marks were not itchy or painful and...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Frequency and Perceptions of Herbal Medicine use Among Hmong Americans: a Cross Sectional Survey
Abstract To determine the frequency and perceptions of herbal medicine use among Hmong Americans. Cross-sectional telephone survey. Sacramento, California Hmong community. Out of 118 subjects reached, 77 (65.3 %) reported lifetime use of herbal medicines. A majority of respondents agreed that herbal medicines were able to treat the body as a whole. Respondents felt that a leaflet of information indicating uses/side effects would be important to include for herbal medicines. Herbal medicine use was commonly reported among Hmong Americans. Thus, health care providers should be encouraged to discuss these altern...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Mortality by Cause of Death Among Immigrants and Natives in a South European Country: The Case of Greece, 2011
Abstract The aim of the paper is to examine for the first time in Greece mortality by cause of death among immigrants. The analysis makes use of vital registration statistics for 2010–2012 and census data for 2011; standardised mortality ratios are estimated for four distinct groups: natives, migrants from EU-27 (excluding Greece), other Europeans (mainly Albanians) and those from all other countries (mainly Asia/Africa). All immigrants seem to experience favourable mortality from neoplasms but higher mortality from external causes in comparison to Greeks. The results regarding cardiovascular diseases are mi...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 18, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Immunization Status of Young People Attending a Youth Clinic in Geneva, Switzerland
Abstract Adolescent vaccination coverage is very variable in European countries and data are scarce. The aim of this study was to assess immunization status and analyze potential variations according to sociodemographic variables in a youth clinic in Geneva, Switzerland. Immunization status was assessed retrospectively: Tetanus (number of doses or in absence of data tetanus antibodies) and measles as indicators of childhood coverage as well as hepatitis B and human papillomavirus. All new patients (N = 390) of Geneva University Hospital’s youth clinic were included between January 2010 and June 201...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Domestic Violence: Intersection of Culture, Gender and Context
This study examines South Asian women’s experience of domestic violence in Hong Kong. Despite the proliferation of literature on domestic violence, this issue remain unexplored in the discourse of domestic violence in Hong Kong. A qualitative research approach through face to face interview with 14 women was employed. Participants were recruited through purposive and snowball sampling. Findings from this study highlight the importance of considering the social and cultural influence on how women perceived and construct their experiences of abuse.Implications for practice and policies are highlighted. (Source: Journal...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Self-Efficacy as a Mediator of the Relationship Between the Perceived Food Environment and Healthy Eating in a Low Income Population in Los Angeles County
Abstract While previous studies have described psychosocial and environmental factors that contribute to healthy eating, much remains unknown about the interactions between them. We assessed the relationship between the perceived food environment, self-efficacy and fruit and vegetable consumption, using data from a sample of racially diverse, low-income adult clientele of five public health centers in Los Angeles County (n = 1503). We constructed a negative binomial regression model to examine the association between perceived food environment and the number of fruits and vegetables consumed. For eve...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 14, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

HIV-Risk Related Attitudes and Behaviors Among Older Impoverished Women Living in Puerto Rico
This study examines the relationship between age and HIV-related attitudes and risk behaviors among female public housing residents in Puerto Rico. Using a self-administered survey instrument, 1,138 female public housing residents were surveyed between April and August 2006. Bivariate results showed that older women (aged 50+ years) were significantly less likely to report HIV testing and to discuss safer sex with their most recent “steady” sex partner than women under the age of 50 years. Older women were also more likely to express anxiety associated with condoms and more barriers to using condoms. The o...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Erratum to: Korean American Women and Mammogram Uptake
(Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health)
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 12, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Physical Activity Disparities Between US-born and Immigrant Children by Maternal Region of Origin
We examined and compared patterns in physical activity participation for children of US-born and immigrant mothers from seven world geographic regions, and tested whether the physical activity differences were attenuated by socioeconomic status or maternal language proficiency. Using the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study-Kindergarten data (N = 18,850) we utilized logistic regression to predict adequate vigorous physical activity and participation in group and individual sports for kindergarten children. US-born children of US-born parents have significantly higher rates of physical activity compared to immigrant...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Misidentification of English Language Proficiency in Triage: Impact on Satisfaction and Door-to-Room Time
We examined triage nurses’ assessment of patients’ language proficiency compared to patients’ self-reported proficiency and the impact of language discordance on door-to-room time and patient satisfaction. This was a prospective study of emergency department walk-in patients. Patients completed a survey in which they identified their language proficiency. On a Likert scale, patients ranked how well they felt they were understood and how satisfied they were with the triage process. Nurses completed surveys identifying the patient’s primary language and how well they felt they understood the patient. ...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Improving Immigrant Populations’ Access to Mental Health Services in Canada: A Review of Barriers and Recommendations
This article emerges from a scoping review of over two decades of relevant literature on immigrants’ access to mental health services in Canada. Key online databases were searched to explore the gaps and opportunities for improving access to mental health services using a review framework provided by Arksey and O’Malley (Int J Soc Res Methodol 8:19–32, 2005). Immigrants and refugees came from diverse religious and cultural backgrounds and had complex mental health-related concerns that were not currently being adequately addressed by existing services. The major barriers to the utilization of mental healt...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 6, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research

Incorporating Cultural Perspectives into Diabetes Self-Management Programs for East Asian Immigrants: A Mixed-Study Review
Abstract It is important to understand East Asian immigrants (EAIs)’ unique perspectives in managing diabetes in order to provide culturally-competent care. However, it is not known whether EAIs’ perspectives are addressed in diabetes self-management interventions developed for EAIs. Therefore, a mixed-study review was conducted to identify EAIs’ perspective from qualitative research (n = 9 studies) and to evaluate the components of EAI diabetes self-management interventions (n = 7). Themes from the qualitative synthesis demonstrated that EAIs have unique cultural values and t...
Source: Journal of Immigrant and Minority Health - March 5, 2015 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: research