Inhibitory effect of kaempferol on skin fibrosis in systemic sclerosis by the suppression of oxidative stress
Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disorder characterized by the development of fibrosis in the skin and internal organs, as well as microvascular dysfunction [1,2]. Vasculopathy occurs at an early step of SSc. Almost all patients present Raynaud's phenomenon as an initial symptom, and frequently show other manifestations of vascular diseases, including ischemic digital ulcers, pulmonary arterial hypertension, and renal arterial involvement associated with malignant hypertension and renal failure. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Akiko Sekiguchi, Sei-ichiro Motegi, Chisako Fujiwara, Sahori Yamazaki, Yuta Inoue, Akihiko Uchiyama, Ryoko Akai, Takao Iwawaki, Osamu Ishikawa Source Type: research

The significance of tumor cells-derived MFG-E8 in tumor growth of angiosarcoma
Angiosarcoma (AS) develops in various soft tissues and organs, but the most frequently affected site is the skin, commonly occurring in the scalp of elderly people and typically presenting as an enlarging bruise-like purpura [1 –5]. In the most of patients, AS is relatively large at the time of diagnosis because of a significant delay in diagnosis. There are some treatment options, however, an effective treatment has not been established yet, resulting in the poor prognosis. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - August 16, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Chisako Fujiwara, Sei-ichiro Motegi, Aoi Ohira, Sayaka Yamaguchi, Akiko Sekiguchi, Masahito Yasuda, Hideharu Nakamura, Takaya Makiguchi, Satoshi Yokoo, Daichi Hoshina, Riichiro Abe, Kenzo Takahashi, Osamu Ishikawa Source Type: research

Clinical characteristics of anti-ro52 α and anti-ro52β antibodies in dermatomyositis/polymyositis
The anti-Ro52 antibody is found in a number of autoimmune diseases, including Sj ögren’s syndrome (SS), systemic lupus erythematosus, systemic sclerosis and dermatomyositis (DM)/polymyositis (PM). It is most frequently found in SS (37.4-66.7%) and second-most frequently in DM/PM (26.3-31.2%) [1]. It is also one of the most common autoantibodies in inflammatory myopathies and is classified as a myositis-associated antibody (MAA), which is frequently found in PM/DM but not specific for this diagnosis [2,3]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - August 12, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mariko Ogawa-Momohara, Yoshinao Muro, Teruyuki Mitsuma, Masao Katayama, Koichi Yanaba, Mizuho Nara, Masato Kakeda, Masashi Akiyama Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Corrigendum to “Keratinocyte-derived TGFβ is not required to maintain skin immune homeostasis” [J. Dermatol. Sci. 94 (2) (2019) 290–297]
The authors regret that they did not include Javed A. Shaik in the original authorship list. Javed A. Shaik created the data that was used in the paper and therefore should have been third in the original authorship list as shown above. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - August 9, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yi Yang, Yukari Zenke, Javed A. Shaik, Toshiro Hirai, Daniel H. Kaplan Tags: Corrigendum Source Type: research

UV-sensitive syndrome: Whole exome sequencing identified a nonsense mutation in the gene UVSSA in two consanguineous pedigrees from Pakistan
UV-sensitive syndrome (UVSS) is a rare disorder resulting from defects in the nucleotide excision repair (NER) system. UVSS is characterised by photosensitivity, pigmentation anomalies in sun exposed areas, and the absence of tumors in the skin and internal organs. Affected patients display normal growth, and intellectual development, and life-span. Cutaneous expression in UVSS resembles that of a mild xeroderma pigmentosum (XP) phenotype [1]. At the cellular level, cultured fibroblasts from UVSS patients show similarities to Cockayne syndrome (CS) cells in terms of response to UV irradiation, including increased sensitivi...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - August 9, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ambreen Ijaz, Sabrina Wolf, Safur Rehman Mandukhail, Sulman Basit, Regina C. Betz, Abdul Wali Source Type: research

Overexpression of alkaline phosphatase improves the hair-inductive capacity of cultured human dermal papilla spheres
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mi Hee Kwack, Yae Ji Jang, Gong Hee Won, Moon Kyu Kim, Jung Chul Kim, Young Kwan Sung Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Decreased expression of suprabasin induces aberrant differentiation and apoptosis of epidermal keratinocytes: Possible role for atopic dermatitis
Suprabasin (SBSN), a secreted protein, is expressed in various epithelial tissues. The role of SBSN in epidermal differentiation and atopic dermatitis (AD) pathology remains largely unknown. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Masahiro Aoshima, Pawit Phadungsaksawasdi, Shinsuke Nakazawa, Manami Iwasaki, Jun-ichi Sakabe, Takatsune Umayahara, Tsuyoshi Yatagai, Shigeki Ikeya, Takatoshi Shimauchi, Yoshiki Tokura Source Type: research

Dietary supplementation of omega-3 fatty acid eicosapentaenoic acid does not ameliorate pruritus in murine models of atopic dermatitis and psoriasis
Pruritus, or itch, is an uncomfortable sensation that elicits a desire to scratch. Several dermatologic disorders such as atopic dermatitis (AD) and psoriasis cause chronic pruritus that may greatly reduce the quality of life of those affected. Since scratching damages the skin barrier of the affected area and exacerbates the symptoms, mitigation of pruritus is extremely important for the treatment of these diseases. However, this type of chronic pruritus is generally resistant to antihistamines, the most widely used antipruritic drugs. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Hyeon-Cheol Lee, Mitsutoshi Tominaga, Ken Yasukawa, Mai Ohba, Nobuaki Takahashi, Kotaro Honda, Toshiaki Okuno, Kenji Takamori, Takehiko Yokomizo Source Type: research

Serum squamous cell carcinoma antigen (SCCA)-2 correlates with clinical severity of pediatric atopic dermatitis in Ishigaki cohort
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Satoshi Takeuchi, Norihiro Furusyo, Junya Ono, Yoshinori Azuma, Masaki Takemura, Hitokazu Esaki, Kazuhiko Yamamura, Yasutaka Mitamura, Gaku Tsuji, Mari Kiyomatsu-Oda, Jun Hayashi, Kenji Izuhara, Masutaka Furue Tags: Original article Source Type: research

Thimerosal induces skin pseudo-allergic reaction via Mas-related G-protein coupled receptor B2
A variety of ingredients could induce eczematous pruritic allergic reactions known as contact dermatitis, the prevalence of which is about 27.0% in European general population [1]. Thimerosal is a well-established antiseptic and antifungal agent. It has been used as a preservative in vaccines, immunoglobulin preparations, cosmetics, antivenins, ophthalmic and nasal products, and tattoo inks [2,3]. Most clinically relevant allergic reactions to thimerosal occur with cosmetics use [4 –6] or after contact with ophthalmic preparations, which results in mostly a facial dermatitis [7]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 24, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Bin Peng, Delu Che, Yong Hao, Yi Zheng, Rui Liu, Ye Qian, Jiao Cao, Jue Wang, Yongjing Zhang, Langchong He, Songmei Geng Source Type: research

Anti-IL-17A and IL-23p19 antibodies but not anti-TNF α antibody induce expansion of regulatory T cells and restoration of their suppressive function in imiquimod-induced psoriasiform dermatitis
Psoriasis is a common chronic inflammatory skin disease characterized by clinical features of erythematous and scaly plaques, and pathological features of aberrant hyperproliferation of keratinocytes and infiltration of neutrophils, affecting approximately 2-3% of the world ’s population. A variety of cells such as keratinocytes, dendritic cells, Th1 cells, and Th17 cells are involved in the development of psoriasis and interact with each other through the production of cytokines [1–3]. The importance of the interleukin (IL)-17/IL-23 pathways in psoriasis pathogene sis has been proven by the efficacy of biologi...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 23, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Teruo Shimizu, Masahiro Kamata, Saki Fukaya, Kotaro Hayashi, Atsuko Fukuyasu, Takamitsu Tanaka, Takeko Ishikawa, Takamitsu Ohnishi, Yayoi Tada Source Type: research

Investigation of Morphological, Vascular and Biochemical Changes in the Skin of an Atopic Dermatitis (AD) Patient in Response to Dupilumab Using Raster Scanning Optoacoustic Mesoscopy (RSOM) and Handheld Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS)
Dupilumab is a fully human monoclonal IgG4 antibody that inhibits the IL-4 and IL-13 signal pathways. [1] It was approved on March 28, 2017 by US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treatment of moderate to severe atopic dermatitis (AD). It has a good treatment response with improvements in both physician reported outcome measures such as Eczema Area Severity Index (EASI) and patient reported outcomes measures such as Dermatology Life Quality Index (DLQI) and pruritus scores [2]. Maximal clinical improvement in AD patients treated with dupilumab was seen at about 4 to 6 weeks [3], and improvements in molecular signature...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yik Weng Yew, U.S. Dinish, Ellie Ci En Choi, Renzhe Bi, Chris Jun Hui Ho, Kapil Dev, Xiuting Li, Amalina Binte Ebrahim Attia, Melvin Kai Weng Wong, Ghayathri Balasundaram, Vasilis Ntziachristos, Malini Olivo, Steven Tien Guan Thng Source Type: research

Zinc deficiency exacerbates pressure ulcers by increasing oxidative stress and ATP in the skin
Owing to age-related changes, such as loss of fat and muscle mass, bone protrusion, perceptual loss, and impaired immune function and wound-healing ability, elderly people are prone to develop pressure ulcers (PUs), also known as decubitus ulcers. In aging society, the prevention, treatment, and management of PUs has become important more than ever. In the early stage of PUs formation, non-blanchable erythema and/or purpuric lesions appear in the skin subjected to external pressure, and skin ulcers subsequently develop after 2-3 weeks [1]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 12, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Hideharu Nakamura, Akiko Sekiguchi, Youichi Ogawa, Tatsuyoshi Kawamura, Ryoko Akai, Takao Iwawaki, Takaya Makiguchi, Satoshi Yokoo, Osamu Ishikawa, Sei-ichiro Motegi Source Type: research

Alterations in connexin 26 protein structure from lethal keratitis-ichthyosis-deafness syndrome mutations A88V and G45E
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 10, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Evelyn Lilly, Michael Strickler, Leonard M. Milstone, Christopher G. Bunick Source Type: research

Skin bacterial transplant in atopic dermatitis: Knowns, unknowns and emerging trends
Skin dysbiosis in atopic dermatitis (AD) manifests as alteration of microbial composition with decrease in commensal species, increase in Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus), and overall decreased microbial diversity. Bacterial composition varies with disease severity, with predominance of S. aureus in severe pediatric AD skin samples compared to prominent Staphylococcus epidermidis in milder AD cases [1]. Clonal S. aureus is also associated with severe AD flares [1], suggesting that a loss of bacterial diversity plays a role in pathogenesis. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 5, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Aleksi J. Hendricks, Brandy W. Mills, Vivian Y. Shi Tags: Review article Source Type: research

Topical delivery of mTOR inhibitor halts scarring
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 4, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Liana P. Webber, Brian Yip, Carlos H.V. do Nascimento Filho, Ha B. Park, Rogerio M. Castilho, Cristiane H. Squarize Source Type: research

Autoantibodies detected in patients with vitiligo vulgaris but not in those with rhododendrol-induced leukoderma
Cosmetics containing a skin-whitening agent, namely, rhododendrol, caused leukoderma in 16,000 users [1,2]. Although the cytotoxic effects of rhododendrol metabolites on the melanocytes and degeneration of melanosomes have been proposed, the reason why only 2% of users develop leukoderma remains unclear [2 –7]. The clinical manifestations of leukoderma are similar to those of vitiligo vulgaris, except that leukoderma is apparent at the topical application site. Vitiligo vulgaris is frequently associated with autoantibody- (autoAb-) dependent autoimmune disorders, such as autoimmune thyroiditis or my asthenia gravis. ...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 2, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Noriko Arase, Atsushi Tanemura, Hui Jin, Megumi Nishioka, Yumi Aoyama, Naoki Oiso, Kayoko Matsunaga, Tamio Suzuki, Chikako Nishigori, Tatsuyoshi Kawamura, Tadamichi Shimizu, Akiko Ito, Kazuyoshi Fukai, Yuko Abe, Lingli Yang, Daisuke Tsuruta, Keiko Takeoka Source Type: research

Baicalein protects normal human epidermal keratinocytes against bullous pemphigoid immunoglobulin G-induced alteration
In the skin, hemidesmosome connects basal keratinocytes to the basement membrane, and two major hemidesmosome proteins, BPAg2/collagen XVII (BP180) and BPAG1/dystonin (BP230), play a pivotal role in adhering basal keratinocytes to the basement membrane [1 –5]. BP230 is associated with intracellular hemidesmosomal plaques and BP180 links basal keratinocytes to the basement membrane [1]. Bullous pemphigoid (BP) is a common autoimmune bullous dermatosis in elderly population, characterized by large and tense blisters. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 2, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Xia Da, Duerna Tie, Yasuyuki Ochi, Eishin Morita Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Editors choice
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - July 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Physiological and pathological roles of kallikrein-related peptidases in the epidermis
Human kallikrein-related peptidases (KLKs) are differently expressed in many tissues, and exist as a subgroup of 15 serine proteases encoded by a tightly clustered multigene family on chromosome 19q13. 4 [1]. According to the comprehensive nomenclature, KLK1 is tissue kallikrein, and the other 14 KLKs (KLK2- KLK15) are kallikrein-related peptidases [2]. Five coding exons of the gene encode these proteases, with the second, third, and last exons containing the histidine, aspartate and serine residues of the catalytic triad [3]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 27, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Mari Kishibe Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

Development of de novo epithelialization method for treatment of cutaneous ulcers
Cutaneous ulcers are a common cause of morbidity. We have developed a de novo epithelialization method for treating cutaneous ulcers by means of reprogramming wound-resident mesenchymal cells in vivo into cells able to form a stratified epithelium: induced stratified epithelial progenitors (iSEPs). Administration of 4 transcription factors (DNP63A, GRHL2, TFAP2A, and cMYC) expressed via adeno-associated viral vectors enabled generation of epithelial cells and tissues, thereby acheiving de novo epithelialization from the surfaces of cutaneous ulcers in a mouse model. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 22, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Masakazu Kurita, Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, Keiichiro Suzuki, Mutsumi Okazaki Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

CD22 and CD72 cooperatively contribute to the development of the reverse Arthus reaction model
The formation and deposition of immune complexes (IC) in particular tissues induces local type III hypersensitivity reaction, termed an Arthus reaction [1,2]. The IgG-containing IC injury is connected with the pathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus, rheumatoid arthritis, and vasculitis syndrome. In the classical model for the Arthus reaction, horse serum was repeatedly injected intradermally into rabbits; the response included edema, hemorrhage, and neutrophil infiltration. In contrast, the “reverse” Arthus reaction model has been used in most experimental models due to its simplicity and reproducibility....
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 20, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Vinh Nguyen Thi Ha, Takashi Matsushita, Chunyan Zhao, Manabu Fujimoto, Kazuhiko Takehara, Thomas F. Tedder, Yasuhito Hamaguchi Source Type: research

Significance of IL-17A-producing CD8+CD103+ skin resident memory T cells in psoriasis lesion and their possible relationship to clinical course
A number of studies have shown the relationship between the pathogenesis of psoriasis and skin resident memory T (TRM) cells. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kazuo Kurihara, Toshiharu Fujiyama, Pawit Phadungsaksawasdi, Taisuke Ito, Yoshiki Tokura Source Type: research

Protective and pathogenic roles of resident memory T cells in human skin disorders
The human skin is populated by recirculating T cells and skin-sessile resident memory T cells (TRM). Skin TRM are constructed during immune responses against antigens that the host immune system encounters in the skin. TRM persist in the same sites for a long time and play important protective roles in skin immune responses in collaboration with other skin-composing cells such as dendritic cells and keratinocytes. These TRM with strong effector functions possibly also engender skin inflammatory disorders. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 18, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Rei Watanabe Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

A proinflammatory role of KLK6 protease in Netherton syndrome
Netherton Syndrome (NS) is a severe type of ichthyosis characterized by extensive desquamation, hair shaft defect (bamboo hair) and constant atopic manifestations. NS is caused by inactivating mutations in the SPINK5 gene encoding the serine protease inhibitor LEKTI [1] and is recapitulated in Spink5-/- mice [2]. Due to the atopic manifestations and the associated constitutive inflammation, Spink5-/- mice have served as an atopic dermatitis model [3] and as a model for rosacea [4]. In addition, variants in the SPINK5 gene have been found in cases of atopic dermatitis [5 –7]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 16, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Eleni Zingkou, Georgios Pampalakis, Eleni Charla, Pauline Nauroy, Dimitra Kiritsi, Georgia Sotiropoulou Source Type: research

Transcriptional repression of the tyrosinase-related protein 2 gene by transforming growth factor- β and the Kruppel-like transcription factor GLI2
Tyrosinase-Related Protein 2 (TRP2) is an enzyme involved in melanogenesis, that also exerts proliferative, anti-apoptotic and immunogenic functions in melanoma cells. TRP2 transcription is regulated by the melanocytic master transcription factor MITF. GLI2, a transcription factor that acts downstream of Hedgehog signaling, is also a direct transcriptional target of the TGF- β/SMAD pathway that contributes to melanoma progression and exerts transcriptional antagonistic activities against MITF. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 14, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Marie-Jeanne Pierrat, V éronique Marsaud, Alain Mauviel, Delphine Javelaud Source Type: research

Inhibition of ATP binding cassette transporter B1 sensitizes human hair follicles to chemotherapy-induced damage
Hair follicles (HFs) are sensitive to xenobiotic damage, which can ultimately lead to hair loss such as in chemotherapy-induced alopecia (CIA) [1]. Members of the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter family fulfil a crucial role in xenobiotic, where they actively extrude drugs thereby reducing intracellular drug accumulation and limiting cellular toxicity [2]. Recently, we demonstrated that human scalp hair follicles (HFs) express an array of ABC transporter proteins, many of which localise to the anagen hair matrix (HM) and the bulge [3]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 13, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Ellie Smart, Nilofer Farjo, Bessam Farjo, Iain S Haslam, Ralf Paus Source Type: research

Long-term Western diet intake leads to dysregulated bile acid signaling and dermatitis with Th2 and Th17 pathway features in mice
Psoriasis and atopic dermatitis have been linked to a variety of systemic inflammatory disorders and are associated with increased risk of cardiovascular disease, obesity, hypertension, and diabetes [1]. Psoriasis is an immune-mediated disease characterized by inflammation, epidermal hyperplasia, parakeratosis, and mild spongiosis that affects about 2-3% of the population [2]. There is no question that diet also influences the development of obesity. The so-called Western diet containing moderate-to-high levels of fat and high levels of simple sugars has been thought to contribute to obesity in the Western world [3]. (Sour...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 8, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Prasant Kumar Jena, Lili Sheng, Kyle Mcneil, Thinh Q. Chau, Sebastian Yu, Maija Kiuru, Maxwell A. Fung, Samuel T. Hwang, Yu-Jui Yvonne Wan Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Editors Choice
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Long-term safety and efficacy of rupatadine in Japanese patients with itching due to chronic spontaneous urticaria, dermatitis, or pruritus: a 12-month, multicenter, open-label clinical trial
Eczema, atopic dermatitis, urticaria, and other inflammatory allergic cutaneous reactions cause itch. Itch often makes the patients scratch their skin, and persistent scratching can aggravate dermal conditions. Itch can even cause emotional disturbance and sleep loss. The management of itch is therefore a key component of the clinical treatment of patients with allergies. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - June 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Michihiro Hide, Takamasa Suzuki, Ayaka Tanaka, Hiroshi Aoki Source Type: research

Current understanding of the role of dietary lipids in the pathophysiology of psoriasis
Dietary lipids are fundamental nutrients for human health. They are typically composed of various long-chain fatty acids which include saturated fatty acids (SFAs) and unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs). UFAs are further classified into several groups, such as omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and omega-6 PUFAs, depending on their chemical structure. Epidemiological studies have suggested the involvement of dietary lipids in the progression or regulation of psoriasis, a common chronic inflammatory skin disease induced via the IL-23/IL-17 axis. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Tetsuya Honda, Kenji Kabashima Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

Stratum corneum Toll-like receptor 3 expressions correlate with the severity of atopic dermatitis lesions
To the Editor (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 21, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Naomi Nakamura, Risa Tamagawa-Mineoka, Mayumi Ueta, Eiichi Konishi, Risa Yasuike, Koji Masuda, Hiroshi Matsunaka, Yumi Murakami, Emiko Yokosawa, Norito Katoh Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

MicroRNA-664 functions as an oncogene in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (cSCC) via suppressing interferon regulatory factor 2
Epidermal keratinocyte-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the second most common cancer with over one million new cases annually worldwide [1 –4]. Chronic exposure to sunlight ultraviolet (UV) radiation is a major risk factor for skin cancer such as cSCC [5,6]. cSCC is also associated with a substantial risk of metastasis, contributing to approximately 20% of skin cancer-related deaths [7,8]. Nonetheless, metastatic or locally advanced cSCC patients are not applicable for surgical or radiotherapy strategies. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 16, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Xiangzhi Li, Cheng Zhou, Chen Zhang, Xiongxiong Xie, Zhaoming Zhou, Meijuan Zhou, Longhua Chen, Zhenhua Ding Source Type: research

Efficiency of sirolimus delivery to the skin is dependent on administration route and formulation
Since sirolimus (rapamycin) was discovered as an inhibitor of mammalian/mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR), investigators have focused on its potential as an anti-tumor drug because mTOR signaling controls complex cellular processes, including protein synthesis, cell cycle, and cell growth, and is frequently hyperactivated in tumor tissues [1]. Tuberous sclerosis complex (TSC) is an autosomal-dominant disease that results in hamartoma formation in almost all organs, including brain, heart, kidney, lung, and skin. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 13, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kazuko Kitayama, Shinichiro Maeda, Ayumi Nakamura, Ichiro Katayama, Mari Wataya-Kaneda Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

IGF-1R deficiency in human keratinocytes disrupts epidermal homeostasis and stem cell maintenance
Epidermal stem cells (ESCs) are keratinocytes that reside in the basal layer of the epidermis and mediate epidermal homeostasis. Insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) signaling through its receptor (IGF-1R) has been identified as an important regulator in rodent skin development and differentiation. However, the role of IGF-1/IGF-1R signaling in human keratinocytes is not yet well understood. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 11, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Taichi Muraguchi, Daisuke Nanba, Emi K. Nishimura, Tomoko Tashiro Source Type: research

Keratinocyte-derived TGF β is not required to maintain skin immune homeostasis
Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF β) is a pleiotropic cytokine belonging to the transforming growth factor superfamily [1]. TGFβ is secreted as a biologically inactive dimer. It becomes active when mature TGFβ disassociates from its latency associated peptide (LAP) [2]. Dissociation of LAP from TGFβ is primarily mediated by the RGD binding integrins αvβ6 and αvβ8 [3–5]. Active TGFβ binds to a heterodimeric TGFβ receptor complex and plays an essential role in cell cycle [6], tissue repair [7], and immune homeostasis and tolerance [8]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 7, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yi Yan, Yukari Zenke, Toshiro Hirai, Daniel H. Kaplan Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Editors Choice
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Meeting Report: Japan – Singapore International Skin Conference, Singapore April 10-12, 2019
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research

Systemic Sclerosis: Is the Epithelium a Missing Piece of the Pathogenic Puzzle?
Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a multisystem connective tissue disease characterized by three cardinal pathological features, such as autoimmunity/inflammation, vasculopathy and extensive organ fibrosis. Therefore, numerous interests have been put on the roles of immune cells, vascular cells (endothelial cells and pericytes/vascular smooth muscle cells) and interstitial fibroblasts as well as their precursors in the field of SSc research. However, recent studies with clinical samples and animal models have drawn much attention to the potential role of epithelial cells as a member of critical drivers and/or modifiers in the pa...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - May 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yoshihide Asano, Takehiro Takahashi, Ryosuke Saigusa Tags: Invited Review Article Source Type: research

Toll-like receptor 2 utilizes RAB11A for melanosome transfer from melanocytes to keratinocytes
Epidermal cells including keratinocytes express TLRs to sense the signals from the outer world and induce cytokines and antimicrobial peptides to protect the human body. TLR2 recognizes bacterial lipoprotein, lipopeptide, and peptidoglycan, and TLR2 agonists activate the MyD88-dependent pathway. We previously reported that stimulation of TLR2 and TLR3 enhances melanogenesis in melanocytes and melanosome transfer to keratinocytes [1]. TLR2 agonist HKLM increases melanin contents and melanosome release from melanocytes by enhancing expression of melanogenic genes, tyrosinase (TYR) and dopachrome tautomerase (DCT) [1]. (Sourc...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Saaya Koike, Kenshi Yamasaki, Takeshi Yamauchi, Ryoko Shimada-Omori, Kenichiro Tsuchiyama, Setsuya Aiba Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

3D in vivo imaging of the keratin filament network in the mouse stratum granulosum reveals profilaggrin-dependent regulation of keratin bundling
Keratins are epithelium-specific intermediate filaments ˜10 nm in diameter. Sequential expression of type I and II keratin genes correlates with epidermal differentiation [1]. Keratin 5 and 14 are first expressed in the stratum basale (SB). In the stratum spinosum (SS), keratin 1 and 10 begin to be expressed. In the stratum granulosum (SG), some kerat ins form amorphous aggregates called keratohyalin granules (KHGs) [2]. Filaggrin (Flg) is first expressed as profilaggrin and localizes to KHGs in the SG layers [3]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 30, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Keiko Usui, Nanako Kadono, Yuki Furuichi, Keiichiro Shiraga, Takashi Saitou, Hiroshi Kawasaki, Kiminori Toyooka, Hiroomi Tamura, Akiharu Kubo, Masayuki Amagai, Takeshi Matsui Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

TRIF and MAVS signaling pathways regulate RAB27A induction and melanosome transfer by TLR3 signaling in human epidermal melanocytes
Human epidermis is a barrier defending human internal organs from outer environment such as microbes, ultraviolet, dryness, etc. Epidermal melanocytes localize in basal layer of the epidermis and express Toll-like receptors (TLR) to sense innate immune stimuli [1,2]. We previously reported that TLR2 and TLR3 are involved in melanocyte functions such as melanogenesis, intra/extra cellular melanosome transfer, and melanosome transfer to keratinocytes [3]. TLR3 agonist Poly(I:C) increases RAB27  A mRNA and protein expression and enhances co-localization of RAB27 A and Gp100+melanosome at cell periphery in human ...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 19, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Saaya Koike, Kenshi Yamasaki, Takeshi Yamauchi, Ryoko Shimada-Omori, Kenichiro Tsuchiyama, Setsuya Aiba Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research

Classification of 3097 patients from the Japanese Melanoma Study database using the American Joint Committee on Cancer Eighth Edition Cancer Staging System
The American Joint Committee on Cancer (AJCC) released the 8th Edition of its Cancer Staging Manual in 2017[1] and it was first implemented in January 2018. The new edition includes several major changes to TNM categories, prognostic stage groups, and criteria, especially among the Stage 3 subclasses. This latest new staging system was created based on data for 43792 patients who had Stage I through III melanoma at initial diagnosis and had received treatment since 1998. The database included patient data from 10 institutes in the United States, Europe, and Australia; thus, less Asian populations were perhaps underrepresen...
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 17, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yasuhiro Fujisawa, Shusuke Yoshikawa, Akane Minagawa, Tatsuya Takenouchi, Kenji Yokota, Hiroshi Uchi, Naoki Noma, Yasuhiro Nakamura, Jun Asai, Junji Kato, Susumu Fujiwara, Satoshi Fukushima, Jiro Uehara, Toshihiko Hoashi, Tatsuya Kaji, Taku Fujimura, Kenj Source Type: research

Cyto/chemokine profile of in vitro scratched keratinocyte model: Implications of significant upregulation of CCL20, CXCL8 and IL36G in Koebner phenomenon
Psoriasis is an immune-mediated inflammatory skin disease with a prevalence of approximately 0.1% to 3% in the general population [1,2]. Histopathologically, it is characterized by epidermal hyperproliferation and intraepidermal neutrophilic infiltration [3,4]. The infiltrating dermal immune cells include dendritic cells and T cells [2,5]. The TNF- α (TNF)/IL23/IL17A axis appears to be a major driver in the pathogenesis of psoriasis because this disease exhibits excellent responses to biologics targeting TNF, IL23, and IL17A [1,2,6]. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 12, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Kazuhisa Furue, Takamichi Ito, Yuka Tanaka, Ayako Yumine, Akiko Hashimoto-Hachiya, Masaki Takemura, Maho Murata, Kazuhiko Yamamura, Gaku Tsuji, Masutaka Furue Source Type: research

Identification of genetic alterations in extramammary Paget disease using whole exome analysis
Extramammary Paget disease (EMPD) is a rare cutaneous adenocarcinoma that most commonly affects the genital and the perianal area of elderly patients [1]. Cancerous cells are thought to originate from apocrine glands in the epidermis and subsequently invade the dermis. Metastatic EMPD is difficult to control using cytotoxic agents and radiation therapy, and the development of novel systemic therapies would be very beneficial. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 10, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Yukiko Kiniwa, Jun Yasuda, Sakae Saito, Rumiko Saito, Ikuko Motoike, Inaho Danjoh, Kengo Kinoshita, Nobuo Fuse, Masayuki Yamamoto, Ryuhei Okuyama Source Type: research

Berberine protects immortalized line of human melanocytes from H2O2-induced oxidative stress via activation of Nrf2 and Mitf signaling pathway
Oxidative stress plays important roles in the pathogenesis of vitiligo. The removal of hydrogen peroxided (H2O2) has been established to be beneficial to vitiligo patients. Berberine (BBR), a natural isoquinoline alkaloid, has antioxidant activity, however, whether BBR can defend human melanocytes against oxidative injury remains to be elucidated. (Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 2, 2019 Category: Dermatology Authors: Jiang Wei, Shuli Li, Chen Xuguang, Zhang Weigang, Chang Yuqian, He Yuanmin, Zhang Shaolong, Su Xin, Gao Tianwen, Li Chunying, Jian Zhe Source Type: research

Editorial board
(Source: Journal of Dermatological Science)
Source: Journal of Dermatological Science - April 1, 2019 Category: Dermatology Source Type: research