Why Whole-Fat Milk and Yogurt Are Healthier Than You Think

For years, experts have recommended low-fat dairy products over the full-fat versions, which are higher in calories and contain more saturated fat. Recent research, however, indicates that full-fat dairy may actually be healthier than its reputation suggests, and that people who eat full-fat dairy are not more likely to develop cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes than people who consume low-fat dairy. They may even be less likely to gain weight. Now, new research published Tuesday in The Lancet, adds to that body of evidence. The research suggests that eating dairy products of all kinds is associated with a lower risk of premature death, cardiovascular disease and stroke. “About three servings of dairy a day is associated with a lower risk of mortality and cardiovascular disease,” says study co-author Mahshid Dehghan, a nutrition epidemiology researcher at the Population Health Research Institute in Canada. “We are suggesting that dairy is healthy, and people should be encouraged to consume dairy.” The Dietary Guidelines for Americans also recommend consuming about three servings of dairy per day, but specify that these foods should be fat-free or low-fat. The new research, however, suggests that full-fat dairy can also be part of a healthy diet. While there was stronger data for milk and yogurt consumption than butter and cheese, dairy eaters in the study consumed more full-fat than low-fat products, suggesting that these results apply particu...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

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Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a metabolic disorder of insulin resistance — a reduced sensitivity to the action of insulin — which leads to high blood sugar, or hyperglycemia. Approximately 12% of American adults have T2D, and more than one-third of Americans have prediabetes, a precursor to T2D. This is a major public health concern, as T2D dramatically increases risk for heart disease, including heart attacks, atrial fibrillation, and heart failure. The development and progression of T2D is affected by many factors. Some, such as a person’s race/ethnicity, age, and gender cannot be modified. Others, including...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Healthy Eating Heart Health Source Type: blogs
Fight Aging! publishes news and commentary relevant to the goal of ending all age-related disease, to be achieved by bringing the mechanisms of aging under the control of modern medicine. This weekly newsletter is sent to thousands of interested subscribers. To subscribe or unsubscribe from the newsletter, please visit: https://www.fightaging.org/newsletter/ Longevity Industry Consulting Services Reason, the founder of Fight Aging! and Repair Biotechnologies, offers strategic consulting services to investors, entrepreneurs, and others interested in the longevity industry and its complexities. To find out m...
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Nearly half of all premature deaths may be due to unhealthy lifestyle choices, such as insufficient exercise, poor diet, and smoking. These risk factors increase the risk of high blood pressure, diabetes, heart attack, and stroke. The good news is that lifestyle changes can make a difference. In a study analyzing over 55,000 people, those with favorable lifestyle habits such as not smoking, not being obese, engaging in regular physical activity, and eating a healthy diet lowered their heart disease risk by nearly 50%. The American College of Cardiology (ACC) and the American Heart Association (AHA) recently published guide...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Alcohol Diabetes Exercise and Fitness Heart Health Hypertension and Stroke Smoking cessation Source Type: blogs
We examined human lung tissue from COPD patients and normal control subjects, and found a substantial increase in p16-expressing alveolar cells in COPD patients. Using a transgenic mouse deficient for p16, we demonstrated that lungs of mice lacking p16 were structurally and functionally resistant to CS-induced emphysema due to activation of IGF1/Akt regenerative and protective signaling. Fat Tissue Surrounds Skeletal Muscle to Accelerate Atrophy in Aging and Obesity https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/09/fat-tissue-surrounds-skeletal-muscle-to-accelerate-atrophy-in-aging-and-obesity/ Researchers her...
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For decades, doctors have known that losing weight can significantly lower risk of heart disease and by extension, reduce the risk of dying from heart-related events such as stroke and heart attack. Studies have shown that both lifestyle changes including diet and exercise as well as medications and weight-loss surgery can improve heart disease risk factors such as obesity and diabetes, for example, but data supporting the benefits of any of these approaches in actually lowering rates of heart events such as heart attack and atrial fibrillation, or in reducing early deaths from heart disease, have been less robust. The dat...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized diabetes Heart Disease Source Type: news
Conclusion Activation of the Nrf2-dependent antioxidant system plays an important role in cell defense against oxidative stress damage, whereas the insufficiency of the Nrf2 system is associated with multiple aspects of the genesis and progression of metabolic diseases, posing a great risk to the cardiovascular system (Figure 1). The systemic increase of Nrf2 activity by several activators may be beneficial in the treatment of metabolic diseases. In addition, selective upregulation of Nrf2 genes may represent a potential therapy in obesity, diabetes and atherosclerosis. Looking to the future, experimental research that el...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
(CNN) — If you’re a healthy older adult looking for ways to reduce your risk of heart attack and stroke, don’t turn to that age-old standby: daily low-dose aspirin. It’s no longer recommended as a preventative for older adults who don’t have a high risk or existing heart disease, according to guidelines announced Sunday by the American College of Cardiology and the American Heart Association. “For the most part, we are now much better at treating risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes and especially high cholesterol,” said North Carolina cardiologist Dr. Kevin Campbell, who wa...
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In this Q&A we asked the lead author Professor Saverio Stranges from Western University Canada to explain more about the mediterranean diet and its role in preventing cardiovascular disease following the publication of aCochrane Review on this topic. What makes a diet ‘Mediterranean’?Scientific interest in the traditional Mediterranean dietary pattern originated in the 1960s because of the observation that populations in countries of the Mediterranean region, such as Greece and Italy, had lower mortality from cardiovascular disease compared with northern European populations or the US, probably as a result...
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About 48% of adults in the U.S. have some type of heart or blood vessel disease, according to a new annual report from the American Heart Association published in the journal Circulation. The finding, based on data collected from 2016, means that almost half of Americans have had a heart attack, stroke, angina, abnormal heart rhythms, or narrowing of the arteries. The new report also shows that deaths from heart disease, after declining in recent years, rose from 2015 to 2016, from 836,546 to 840,678. Dr. Mariell Jessup, chief science and medical officer at the American Heart Association, said much of the increase in the p...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized Heart Disease Source Type: news
Fight Aging! provides a weekly digest of news and commentary for thousands of subscribers interested in the latest longevity science: progress towards the medical control of aging in order to prevent age-related frailty, suffering, and disease, as well as improvements in the present understanding of what works and what doesn't work when it comes to extending healthy life. Expect to see summaries of recent advances in medical research, news from the scientific community, advocacy and fundraising initiatives to help speed work on the repair and reversal of aging, links to online resources, and much more. This content is...
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