Where Does Diabetes Technology Stand In 2019?

Diabetes management went through a radical transformation in the last years due to technology: the diabetes patient community found a strong voice online, continuous glucose monitors are taking the place of finger pricks, digital patches and insulin pumps make the dosage of insulin more predictable, and connected devices promise the era of artificial pancreas real soon. We looked around where diabetes technology stands today and what could we expect in the next 5-10 years? The diabetes community and digital health tech companies pushing for change Diabetes continues to affect the lives of millions around the globe. According to the latest estimates of the International Diabetes Federation, 425 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide – and the number is growing steadily. It means that one in eleven people has to manage the chronic condition on a daily basis, which might lead to stroke, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure or amputation. In an even more disquieting manner, the number is expected to rise to 629 million by 2045. Luckily, more and more diabetes tech companies are working on providing solutions to ease the everyday struggle with the condition – from big tech companies, such as Google, Amazon, or Apple until small start-ups in incubators. And the diabetes community, one of the most active groups of people online, is also pushing for making disease management simpler, easier, and more efficient. The best example for the persistence of t...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Future of Medicine artificial artificial pancreas blood blood sugar community diabetes diabetes management diabetic digital digital health health management insulin patient technology Source Type: blogs

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This study defines a new clinically relevant concept of T-cell senescence-mediated inflammatory responses in the pathophysiology of abnormal glucose homeostasis. We also found that T-cell senescence is associated with systemic inflammation and alters hepatic glucose homeostasis. The rational modulation of T-cell senescence would be a promising avenue for the treatment or prevention of diabetes. Intron Retention via Alternative Splicing as a Signature of Aging https://www.fightaging.org/archives/2019/03/intron-retention-via-alternative-splicing-as-a-signature-of-aging/ In recent years researchers have inv...
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Diabetes is an adamant condition requiring constant attention. Let me show you how technology can take the burden off the shoulders of suffering patients and their loved ones. One in eleven persons has to cope with diabetes worldwide on a daily basis  According to the latest estimates of the WHO, 422 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide – and the number is growing steadily. It means that one person in eleven has to manage the chronic condition on a daily basis, which might lead to stroke, blindness, heart attack, kidney failure or amputation. There are two types of diabetes: when the body doe...
Source: The Medical Futurist - Category: Information Technology Authors: Tags: Empowered Patients Future of Medicine Health Sensors & Trackers chronic diabetes disease gc2 gc3 management technology Source Type: blogs
This is the fourth in an ongoing series of blogs exposing the rampant misuse of the medications so aggressively promoted by greedy drug companies. I am very lucky in having the perfect partner in this truth-vs-power effort to contradict Pharma propaganda with evidence based fact. Dick Bijl is President of the International Society of Drug Bulletins (ISDB), an impressive association of 53 national drug bulletins from all around the world, each of which publishes the best available data on the pluses and minuses of different medications. Drug bulletins help patients and doctors see through the misleading misinformation ge...
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