Stem Cell Infusions Investigated for Treatment of COVID - 19 ARDS
Researchers explore possible anti - inflammatory effects of mesenchymal stem cells in COVID - 19 acute respiratory distress syndrome (Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge)
Source: Pulmonary Medicine News - Doctors Lounge - January 15, 2021 Category: Respiratory Medicine Tags: Infections, Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Pathology, Pulmonology, Journal, Source Type: news

Stem Cell Infusions Investigated for Treatment of COVID-19 ARDS
FRIDAY, Jan. 15, 2021 -- Researchers are exploring the potential immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects of umbilical cord mesenchymal stem cell (UC-MSC) infusions for acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19, according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 15, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Retinal stem cells from cadavers may help restore vision in blind, study finds
Retinal stem cells collected from human cadavers offer a potential treatment for blindness, according to the authors of an article published Thursday by Stem Cell Reports. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 14, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stem cells on the ballot
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - January 14, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Goldstein, L. S. B., Klein, R. N. Tags: Editorials Source Type: news

A New Strategy for Making Blood Stem Cells Healthier
January 13, 2021—(BRONX, NY)—The hematopoietic (blood-forming) stem cells (HSCs) residing in our bone marrow produce all of our blood cells, including key immune cells that protect us from bacteria and viruses. As we age, our HSCs become less efficient and less able to make healthy new blood cells. In a study published online today inNature, researchers atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine have found that this reduction in HSC efficiency is caused in part by the deterioration of chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA), the housekeeping process that removes damaged proteins and other waste materials that interfere w...
Source: Einstein News - January 13, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Diabetes Drug Reduces Acute GVHD After Stem Cell Transplant Diabetes Drug Reduces Acute GVHD After Stem Cell Transplant
Adding the diabetes drug sitaliptin to immunosuppression therapies for patients undergoing stem cell transplant reduced the risk of developing acute graft-vs-host disease (GVHD).Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Formula predicts ideal dose of stem cells to cure HIV
(eLife) Scientists have determined the optimal conditions following a stem cell transplant that could control HIV without the need of an everyday pill, according to a study published today ineLife. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Augmented BMP signaling commits cranial neural crest cells to a chondrogenic fate by suppressing autophagic {beta}-catenin degradation
Cranial neural crest cells (CNCCs) are a population of multipotent stem cells that give rise to craniofacial bone and cartilage during development. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling and autophagy have been individually implicated in stem cell homeostasis. Mutations that cause constitutive activation of the BMP type I receptor ACVR1 cause the congenital disorder fibrodysplasia ossificans progressiva (FOP), which is characterized by ectopic cartilage and bone in connective tissues in the trunk and sometimes includes ectopic craniofacial bones. Here, we showed that enhanced BMP signaling through the constitutively ac...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - January 12, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Yang, J., Kitami, M., Pan, H., Nakamura, M. T., Zhang, H., Liu, F., Zhu, L., Komatsu, Y., Mishina, Y. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Update on COVID-19 pandemic, BMJ Best Practice (updated 8th January 2021)
Over 88 million cases have been reported globally, with over 49 million cases recovered so far, and approximately 1.9 million deaths according to data compiled by the Center for Systems Science and Engineering at Johns Hopkins University. What's new at this update: Epidemiology: updated data on children and pregnant women; updated risk factors (residence in a long-term care facility; cardiovascular diseases; diabetes; chronic respiratory diseases). Aetiology: new section on SARS-CoV-2 variants; updated data on secondary attack rates. Investigations: WHO recommends PCR test results are considered in combinatio...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Uncovering basic mechanisms of intestinal stem cell self-renewal and differentiation
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) The gut plays a central role in the regulation of the body's metabolism and its dysfunction is associated with a variety of diseases, such as obesity, diabetes, colitis and colorectal cancer that affect millions of people worldwide. Targeting endocrine dysfunction by stimulating the formation of specific enteroendocrine cells from intestinal stem cells could be a promising regenerative approach for diabetes therapy. For this, a detailed understanding of the intestinal stem cell lineage and the signals regulating the recruitment of intestin...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 11, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

FL Doctors Make Breakthrough Using Stem Cells to Treat Severe COVID Cases
According to a report from CBS4, doctors in South Florida say an experimental treatment involving stem cells has been successful in treating severe cases of COVID. The study, which took place at Jackson Memorial Hospital and the University Miami Tower, involved many patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS). The groundbreaking treatment, using stem cells from a baby’s umbilical cord, was shown to safely reduce the risk of death and increase the speed of recovery time faster for some of the study’s most ill patients. The FDA approved the trial. In a double-blind study involving 24 patients w...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News Source Type: news

Mesenchymal stromal cells for sepsis and septic shock: Lessons for treatment of COVID-19. Stem cells translational medicine 9(12): 1488-1494.
Sepsis is defined as life-threatening organ dysfunction caused by a deregulated immune host response to infection. The emergence of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2) has highlighted this multifactorial and complex syndrome. The absence of specific treatment neither against SARS-CoV-2 nor against acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), the most serious stage of this infection, has emphasized the need to find alternative treatments. Several therapeutics are currently being tested, including mesenchymal stromal cells. These cells, already used in preclinical models of ARDS, sepsis, and septi...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Baby to receive stem cell transplant from mom after no mixed-ethnicity match found
A Winnipeg mother is preparing to be the stem cell donor for her baby with a rare immune disease in hopes of saving his life, after a match with his mixed ethnicity couldn't be found. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - January 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Canada/Manitoba Source Type: news

'Invisible' stem cells evade natural killer cells using immune 'off-switch'
(University of California - San Francisco) UC San Francisco scientists have discovered a new way to control the immune system's 'natural killer' (NK) cells, a finding with implications for novel cell therapies and tissue implants that can evade immune rejection. The findings could also be used to enhance the ability of cancer immunotherapies to detect and destroy lurking tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 8, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Sitagliptin Promising Addition for Preventing Acute GVHD
Low incidence of grade II to IV acute GVHD seen in patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - January 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pathology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

NIDCR Science News - January 2021
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. A monthly update of NIDCR-supported science advances, as reported by grantee institutions and NIH. Stem Cells Correct Skull Disorder in Mice Scientists restore brain function in craniosynostosis NIDCR • January 7, 2021 Microbiome Study: Gum Disease-Causing Bacteria Borrow Growth Molecules from Neighbors to ThriveUniversity at Buffalo • December 29, 2020 Microbes in Dental Plaque Look More Like Re...
Source: NIDCR Science News - January 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Sitagliptin Promising Addition for Preventing Acute GVHD
THURSDAY, Jan. 7, 2020 -- For patients undergoing myeloablative allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, sitagliptin combined with tacrolimus and sirolimus results in a low incidence of grade II to IV acute graft-versus-host disease... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - January 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Stem cell treatment corrects skull shape and restores brain function in mouse model of childhood disorder
Scientists regenerate parts of the skull affected by craniosynostosis, a common birth defect. (Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases)
Source: National Institutes of Health (NIH) News Releases - January 7, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

IU research findings could reduce treatment-related complication for blood cancer patients
(Indiana University School of Medicine) Researchers at the Indiana University Melvin and Bren Simon Comprehensive Cancer Center published promising findings today in the New England Journal of Medicine on preventing a common complication to lifesaving blood stem cell transplantation in leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The ISSCR's VISION2030 gathers global leaders in stem cell research and regenerative medicine
(International Society for Stem Cell Research) The ISSCR's VISION2030 is bringing together biotech CEOs who have successfully transformed scientific breakthroughs into thriving businesses that are improving human health. Join us for in-depth executive interviews that explore the next decade for the field on 7-8 January 2021. The event comes at a pivotal moment in regenerative medicine and stem cell science as discovery, translation, and investment intersect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 6, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Designer protein patches boost cell signaling
(University of Washington Health Sciences/UW Medicine) A new class of protein material that interacts with living cells without being absorbed by them can influence cell signaling, a new study shows. The material does this by binding and sequestering cell surface receptors. The discovery could have far-reaching implications for stem cell research and enable the development of new materials designed to modulate the behavior of living systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Exposures and influence on the epigenetics of stem cells
The latest findings on how exposures may influence epigenetic changes to stem cells were shared by leading experts at an NIEHS symposium. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Toxicologists share novel insights on stem cells and epigenetics
The North Carolina Chapter of the Society of Toxicology meeting explored how stem cell and epigenetics innovations may serve toxicology. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Langer awarded prestigious PRAT fellowship
NIEHS trainee Lee Langer won a Postdoctoral Research Associate (PRAT) Program fellowship to further his studies in stem cell biology. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Study sheds light on lead ’s neurotoxic effects
New findings suggest lead may trigger oxidative stress in neural stem cells, which could cause damage at a key point in development. (read more) (Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter)
Source: Environmental Factor - NIEHS Newsletter - January 6, 2021 Category: Environmental Health Source Type: news

Could Umbilical Cord Stem Cells Be a Lifesaver Against Severe COVID-19?
TUESDAY, Jan. 5, 2021 -- Stem cells derived from a baby's umbilical cord can help save the lives of the sickest COVID-19 patients, results from a small new clinical trial suggest. Severely ill COVID patients who received two intravenous doses of... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - January 5, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

University of Miami leads groundbreaking trial for COVID-19 treatment
(University of Miami Miller School of Medicine) University of Miami Miller School of Medicine researchers led a unique and groundbreaking randomized controlled trial showing umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cell infusions safely reduce risk of death and quicken time to recovery for the severest COVID-19 patients, according to results published in STEM CELLS Translational Medicine in January 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Airway stem cells sense hypoxia and differentiate into protective solitary neuroendocrine cells
Neuroendocrine (NE) cells are epithelial cells that possess many of the characteristics of neurons, including the presence of secretory vesicles and the ability to sense environmental stimuli. The normal physiologic functions of solitary airway NE cells remain a mystery. We show that mouse and human airway basal stem cells sense hypoxia. Hypoxia triggers the direct differentiation of these stem cells into solitary NE cells. Ablation of these solitary NE cells during hypoxia results in increased epithelial injury, whereas the administration of the NE cell peptide CGRP rescues this excess damage. Thus, we identify stem cells...
Source: ScienceNOW - December 31, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Shivaraju, M., Chitta, U. K., Grange, R. M. H., Jain, I. H., Capen, D., Liao, L., Xu, J., Ichinose, F., Zapol, W. M., Mootha, V. K., Rajagopal, J. Tags: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology r-articles Source Type: news

Discovery of aging mechanism for hematopoietic stem cells
(The Institute of Medical Science, The University of Tokyo) By transferring mouse aged hematopoietic stem cells (aged HSCs) to the environment of young mice (bone marrow niche), it was demonstrated that the pattern of stem cell gene expression was rejuvenated to that of young hematopoietic stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leaders in stem cell research chart the next decade of breakthroughs at ISSCR's VISION2030
(International Society for Stem Cell Research) The ISSCR is bringing together successful biotech CEOs who have transformed scientific breakthroughs into thriving businesses that are improving human health into one program 7-8 January 2021. VISION2030 comes at a pivotal moment in regenerative medicine and stem cell science as discovery, translation, and investment intersect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Too much of a good thing - persistent IFN & #947; depletes progenitor blood cells via BST2
(Baylor College of Medicine) Long-term exposure to IFNγ stimulates the production of protein BST2 on blood stem cells, which resulted in their emergence from the quiescent state, persistent proliferation and finally exhaustion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 22, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Delivering innovative stem cell therapy to slow vision loss
The regenerative eye scientist, Alan Marmorstein, Ph.D., is drawn to research by the need to find new cures for diseases. As an aspiring researcher, he never envisioned his investigative journey would take him down the path of testing ways to prevent or restore loss of eyesight. However, a post-doctoral lab assignment, a National Eye Institutes grant [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - December 22, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

The Achilles' heel of cancer stem cells
(Max Delbr ü ck Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Colon cancer stem cells have one weak spot: the enzyme Mll1. An MDC team led by Walter Birchmeier has now shown in Nature Communications that blocking this protein prevents the development of new tumors in the body. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First patient enrolled in stem cell therapy trial for traumatic injury
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The first patient has enrolled in a Phase II clinical trial evaluating a stem cell therapy for the potential early treatment of traumatic injuries and their subsequent complications at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SARS-CoV-2 induces inflammation, cytokine storm and stress in infected lung cells
(Heinrich-Heine University Duesseldorf) The researchers Wasco Wruck and Prof. James Adjaye from the Institute of Stem Cell Research and Regenerative Medicine, Medical Faculty of Heinrich-Heine-University Duesseldorf, Germany, employed a bioinformatic approach on transcriptome data pertaining to human lung epithelial cells infected with SARS-CoV-2. The meta-analysis unveiled several adversely affected biological processes in the lung which no doubt also applies to other infected organs such as the heart and kidney. Their study is published inScientific Reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Stem cell treatment for vascular diseases can be predicted through real-time observation
(National Research Council of Science& Technology) The Korea Institute of Science and Technology(KIST) recently announced that the collaborative research team led by Dr. Kwangmeyung Kim from Center for Theragnosis and Sung-Hwan Moon from Stem Cell Research Institute, T&R Biofab Co. Ltd developed a method that can predict the therapeutic efficacy based on the distribution of the initial transplantation of hEPCs by tracking the initial distribution and migration of the transplanted cells using fluorescence romographic images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New Protocol Advances Toward Lab-Made Universal Red Blood Cells
Researchers report a new way of generating the cells from induced pluripotent stem cells in hopes they will one day be used in blood transfusions. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 17, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

UMD paves the way for growing human organs for transplantation with new proof-of-concept
(University of Maryland) With the number of people who suffer from organ failures and the growing need for available organs for transplant, finding a new way to provide organs and therapeutic options to transplant patients is a critical need. In a new paper, University of Maryland researchers show for the first time that newly established stem cells from pigs could provide a solution, laying the groundwork for growing transplantable human organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Eight Proteins Turn Mouse Stem Cells into Egglike Cells
The identification of the transcription factors that elicit oocyte growth will aid reproductive biology research and might help women with fertility issues, scientists say. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - December 16, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

2020 reflections: Bruins respond to the challenges of COVID-19
When people look back, COVID-19 will be what defines 2020 — and that applies to UCLA, just like everywhere else. From forcing us to shift to remote learning, move all but the most essential jobs off campus and ultimately close the campus to the public, the pandemic remade life in ways we couldn’t have imagined.But as difficult as the challenges were, Bruins everywhere responded withthe resilience, creativity and ingenuity that embody our values.Scientists, doctors and scholars continued to pursue the research that helped the public better understand the virus.Health care workers put themselves on the line day a...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 16, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The bull's eye: New modified stem cells can deliver drugs specifically to tumor cells
(Tokyo University of Science) Targeting drugs to cancer tissues is a major challenge in cancer treatment. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are known for their ability to find and target tumor cells in the body, but using MSCs for drug delivery has been tricky, because upon loading with drugs, MSCs lose their viability and migratory ability. Now, researchers from Tokyo University of Science have successfully modified MSCs to deliver large quantities of anti-cancer drugs in a targeted manner to developing cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA approves Roche ’s OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) shorter 2-hour infusion for relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 14 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a shorter two-hour infusion time for OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab), dosed twice-yearly for those living with relapsing or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) who have not experienced any prior serious infusion reactions (IRs). The approval was based on data from the randomised, double-blind ENSEMBLE PLUS study.“More than 170,000 people with MS have been treated with OCREVUS - the only approved B-cell therapy with a twice-yearly dosing schedule - and it is the most prescribed...
Source: Roche Media News - December 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

FDA approves Roche ’s OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) shorter 2-hour infusion for relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 14 December 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved a shorter two-hour infusion time for OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab), dosed twice-yearly for those living with relapsing or primary progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) who have not experienced any prior serious infusion reactions (IRs). The approval was based on data from the randomised, double-blind ENSEMBLE PLUS study.“More than 170,000 people with MS have been treated with OCREVUS - the only approved B-cell therapy with a twice-yearly dosing schedule - and it is the most prescribed...
Source: Roche Investor Update - December 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Research dispels fears human stem cells contain cancer-causing mutations
(University of Exeter) Pioneering new research has made a pivotal breakthrough that dispel concerns that human stem cells could contain cancer-causing mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news