Rinri Therapeutics Raises £10 million from Existing Investors and UK Future Fund to Advance its Novel Stem Cell Therapy to Restore Hearing Loss
SHEFFIELD, England, April 20, 2021 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Rinri Therapeutics, a biotechnology company developing a novel stem cell therapy to restore hearing, today announces that it has raised a total of £10 million from exist... Regenerative Medicine, Venture Capital Rinri Therapeutics, stem cell, sensorineural hearing loss (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - April 20, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data for Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) reinforce significant benefit on slowing disease progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 16 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab) analyses supporting its significant benefit on disease progression in early-stage relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) as well as demonstrating high persistence and strong adherence to twice-yearly (six-monthly) dosing. These data are being presented virtually at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting from 17–22 April 2021. OCREVUS is the number one prescribed MS medication in the U.S. for patients starting a new treatment, and more than 200,000 peop...
Source: Roche Media News - April 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data for Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) reinforce significant benefit on slowing disease progression in relapsing and primary progressive multiple sclerosis
Basel, 16 April 2021 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new OCREVUS ® (ocrelizumab) analyses supporting its significant benefit on disease progression in early-stage relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) and primary progressive MS (PPMS) as well as demonstrating high persistence and strong adherence to twice-yearly (six-monthly) dosing. These data are being presented virtually at the 73rd American Academy of Neurology (AAN) Annual Meeting from 17–22 April 2021. OCREVUS is the number one prescribed MS medication in the U.S. for patients starting a new treatment, and more than 200,000 peop...
Source: Roche Investor Update - April 16, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Human-Monkey Chimeras Shed Light on Development
Human stem cells injected into early monkey embryos proliferate and contribute to multiple cell lineages over 20 days of embryonic development. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 16, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Harnessing Stem Cells to Model Neurological Disorders
(Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Webinars Source Type: news

Scientists Create Embryos With Cells From Monkeys, Humans
THURSDAY, April 15, 2021 -- Researchers have successfully introduced human stem cells into monkey embryos in the lab, creating short-lived hybrid organisms that could prove an important step in growing human transplant organs from livestock or... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 15, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Human cells grown in monkey embryos reignite ethics debate
Scientists confirm they have produced ‘chimera’ embryos from long-tailed macaques and humansMonkey embryos containing human cells have been produced in a laboratory, a study has confirmed, spurring fresh debate into the ethics of such experiments.The embryos are known as chimeras, organisms whose cells come fromtwo or more “individuals”, and in this case, different species: a long-tailed macaque and a human.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Science correspondent Tags: Medical research Science Embryos Stem cells Biology Animals World news Source Type: news

Scientists Report Creating the First Embryo With Human and Non-Human Primate Cells
In a ground-breaking experiment, researchers have successfully created the first human-monkey chimera. The work, published in the journal Cell, describes the the first embryo containing both human and monkey cells that was cultured for 20 days. Led by Juan Carlos Izpisua Belmonte, the study represents the culmination of decades of work in understanding early embryo development in non-human species, which Belmonte hopes will now apply to humans. But it is bound to raise serious ethical questions about the implications of combining human cells with those from a different species (even if it is a closely related one), and the...
Source: TIME: Health - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Personalized Cancer Vaccine Shows Early Promise Across Tumor Types Personalized Cancer Vaccine Shows Early Promise Across Tumor Types
In a phase 1 trial, the vaccine, called PGV-001, was well tolerated. It was given to 13 patients with multiple myeloma who had a high risk of recurrence after surgery or autologous stem cell transplant.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope
Title: Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers HopeCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/14/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/15/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Diabetes General)
Source: MedicineNet Diabetes General - April 15, 2021 Category: Endocrinology Source Type: news

Diabetes Can Lead to Amputations, But Stem Cell Treatment Offers Hope
WEDNESDAY, April 14, 2021 -- One of the most dangerous complications of diabetes is a foot ulcer that won't heal, but now a preliminary study finds that a type of stem cell found in body fat may be a powerful remedy for these severe foot... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 14, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

First patient-derived organoid model for cervical cancer
(Hubrecht Institute) Researchers from the group of Hans Clevers developed the first patient-derived organoid model for cervical cancer. They also modelled the healthy human cervix using organoids. The researchers used the platform to study sexually transmitted infections for a herpes virus. The model can potentially also be used to study human papillomavirus (HPV), which is one of the main causes of cervical cancer. The results will be published in Cell Stem Cell on the 13th of April, 2021. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Aged bone marrow niche impedes function of rejuvenated hematopoietic stem cells
(AlphaMed Press) A new study released in STEM CELLS focuses on rejuvenating hematopoietic stem cells as a way to treat leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 13, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

< a href= " /news-events/nih-research-matters/how-stress-causes-hair-loss " > How stress causes hair loss < /a >
Researchers found that a stress hormone impairs stem cells necessary for hair growth in mice. The findings suggest potential ways to treat hair loss caused by chronic stress. (Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH))
Source: NIH Research Matters from the National Institutes of Health (NIH) - April 13, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

USC Stem Cell study reveals neural stem cells age rapidly
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) Researchers at Keck School of Medicine of USC conduct first-ever study of Abl1 gene's role in neural stem cell (NSC) biology and the implications for cognitive decline. After a drug blocked the activity of the gene Abl1, the NSCs began to divide more and proliferate in the hippocampus, the part of the brain responsible for learning and memory. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Thomas Carmichael elected to the Association of American Physicians
Dr. S. Thomas Carmichael has been elected to the Association of American Physicians, an honor society recognizing exemplary physician-scientists who contribute to clinical medicine through the pursuit of basic science. The newly elected members for 2021 were recognized at the association ’s annual meeting, which was held virtually April 8–10.Carmichael, UCLA ’s Frances Stark Professor of Neurology, is the chair of theneurology department in the David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA and co-director of theEli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA.In his research, ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 9, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Brain organoids uncover various mechanisms of virus-induced microcephaly
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Researchers at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - demonstrate that different viruses can lead to brain malformations through diverse mechanisms by using human brain organoid models. The results are published in the journal Cell Stem Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pillar of support: Breakthrough discovery could speed up bone implant recovery
(Monash University) A Monash University-led international research team has uncovered a new technique that can speed up recovery from bone replacements. Novel micropillars, 10 times smaller than the width of a human hair, can change the size, shape and nucleus of individual stem cells and 'trick' them to become bone. Further research will look to improve the process of locking bone replacements with reduced risk of infection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new international consortium to promote stem cell-based therapy for Huntington's disease
(University of Barcelona) The Stem Cells for Huntington's Disease (SC4HD) is a new international consortium created to promote advanced therapy medicinal product (ATMP) through cell transplantation studies on Huntington's Disease. The entity, made up of twenty-eight renowned researchers from ten countries, has been officially presented in a recent publication in the Journal of Huntington's Disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

USC Stem Cell study explores 'synthetic' embryonic development with $2.5 million NIH grant
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) USC Stem Cell scientist Leonardo Morsut, Ph.D., received a $2.56 million grant from the National Institute of General Medical Sciences at the National Institutes of Health (NIH) to design artificial genetic programs to perturb natural signaling networks and study how this inflects embryonic development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Light shed on the coordination of neural stem cell activation
(Institut Pasteur) Scientists at the Institut Pasteur, CNRS, and Tel Aviv University working in collaboration with the É cole Polytechnique and INRAE have successfully performed 3D visualization and spatial and temporal distribution analysis of neural stem cell activation in the adult brain of a zebrafish vertebrate model.Their findings demonstrate for the first time that activation events for these cells are coordinated in time and space. In particular, these results may help improve our understanding of regulation processes triggered during brain tumor formation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists identify new differences between the sexes in age-related changes to brain stem cells
(International Society for Stem Cell Research) Data suggest that ageing-related changes to stem cells and blood vessels in the brain are more pronounced in male animals. Possible causes for these differences by sex, such as hormonal or genetic influences and their impact on brain function and disease related to ageing, require further investigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 8, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

QSER1 protects DNA methylation valleys from de novo methylation
DNA methylation is essential to mammalian development, and dysregulation can cause serious pathological conditions. Key enzymes responsible for deposition and removal of DNA methylation are known, but how they cooperate to regulate the methylation landscape remains a central question. Using a knockin DNA methylation reporter, we performed a genome-wide CRISPR-Cas9 screen in human embryonic stem cells to discover DNA methylation regulators. The top screen hit was an uncharacterized gene, QSER1, which proved to be a key guardian of bivalent promoters and poised enhancers of developmental genes, especially those residing in D...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Dixon, G., Pan, H., Yang, D., Rosen, B. P., Jashari, T., Verma, N., Pulecio, J., Caspi, I., Lee, K., Stransky, S., Glezer, A., Liu, C., Rivas, M., Kumar, R., Lan, Y., Torregroza, I., He, C., Sidoli, S., Evans, T., Elemento, O., Huangfu, D. Tags: Cell Biology, Development, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Imaging cell lineage with a synthetic digital recording system
During multicellular development, spatial position and lineage history play powerful roles in controlling cell fate decisions. Using a serine integrase–based recording system, we engineered cells to record lineage information in a format that can be read out in situ. The system, termed integrase-editable memory by engineered mutagenesis with optical in situ readout (intMEMOIR), allowed in situ reconstruction of lineage relationships in cultured mouse cells and flies. intMEMOIR uses an array of independent three-state genetic memory elements that can recombine stochastically and irreversibly, allowing up to 59,049 dis...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 8, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Chow, K.-H. K., Budde, M. W., Granados, A. A., Cabrera, M., Yoon, S., Cho, S., Huang, T.-h., Koulena, N., Frieda, K. L., Cai, L., Lois, C., Elowitz, M. B. Tags: Development, Molecular Biology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Spring 2021 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities & Related Notices NIH/HHS News Subscribe to NICDR News Science Advances   Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR & NIH Stand Against Structural Racism NIDCR Director Rena D’Souza, DDS, MS, PhD, said in a statement that there is no place for structural racism in biomedical research, echoing remarks from NIH Director Francis Collins, MD, PhD, in his announcement of a new NIH ...
Source: NIDCR Science News - April 7, 2021 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Reopen and regenerate: Exosome-coated stent heals vascular injury, repairs damaged tissue
(North Carolina State University) An exosome-coated stent with a " smart-release " trigger could prevent reopened blood vessels from narrowing and deliver regenerative stem cell-derived therapy to blood-starved, or ischemic, tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - April 2, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Oncology, Pediatrics, Pharmacy, Research, News, Source Type: news

Combo Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia
Combining stem cell transplants with cutting-edge immunotherapy prevents leukemia relapses in young people and improves their chances of survival, new research suggests. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - April 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia
FRIDAY, April 2, 2021 -- Combining stem cell transplants with cutting-edge immunotherapy prevents leukemia relapses in young people and improves their chances of survival, new research suggests. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia is the most common... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 2, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood Leukemia
Title: Adding in Stem Cell Therapy Helps Beat a Common Childhood LeukemiaCategory: Health NewsCreated: 4/2/2021 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 4/2/2021 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - April 2, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Targeting microRNAs could unmask hidden vulnerability in breast cancer stem cells
(Rockefeller University Press) Researchers in Italy have identified a pair of microRNA molecules that help maintain a population of cancerous stem cells that drive the growth of breast cancers and initiate tumor relapse after treatment. The study, which will be published April 2 in the Journal of Cell Biology (JCB), reveals that targeting these microRNAs makes cancer stem cells more susceptible to some chemotherapies and could potentially improve the prognosis of patients with aggressive forms of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 2, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

High Stress Hormone Levels Halt Mouse Fur Growth
Corticosterone interferes with signaling in the skin that normally activates hair follicle stem cells, possibly explaining the link between stress and hair loss. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Researchers devise more efficient, enduring CAR gene therapy to combat HIV
FINDINGSA UCLA research team has shown that using a truncated form of the CD4 molecule as part of a gene therapy to combat HIV yielded superiorand longer-lastingresults in mouse models than previous similar therapies using the CD4 molecule.This new approach to CAR T gene therapy — a type of immunotherapy that involves genetically engineering the body ’s own blood-forming stem cells to create HIV-fighting T cells— has the potential to not only destroy HIV-infected cells but to create “memory cells” that could provide lifelong protection from infection with the virus that causes AIDS.BACKGROUNDC...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - April 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

USC Stem Cell study identifies molecular 'switch' that turns precursors into kidney cells
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) Kidney development is a balancing act between the self-renewal of stem and progenitor cells to maintain and expand their numbers, and the differentiation of these cells into more specialized cell types. In a new study from the Department of Stem Cell Biology and Regenerative Medicine at the Keck School of Medicine of USC, a team of scientists demonstrates the importance of a molecule calledβ-catenin in striking this balance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stem cell transplants prevent relapses of most common childhood cancer
(University of Virginia Health System) Children and young adults who receive CAR T-cell therapy for the most common childhood cancer - acute lymphoblastic leukemia - suffer remarkably fewer relapses and are far more likely to survive when the treatment is paired with a subsequent stem cell transplant, a new study finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 1, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Incorporation of a nucleoside analog maps genome repair sites in postmitotic human neurons
Neurons are the longest-lived cells in our bodies and lack DNA replication, which makes them reliant on a limited repertoire of DNA repair mechanisms to maintain genome fidelity. These repair mechanisms decline with age, but we have limited knowledge of how genome instability emerges and what strategies neurons and other long-lived cells may have evolved to protect their genomes over the human life span. A targeted sequencing approach in human embryonic stem cell–induced neurons shows that, in neurons, DNA repair is enriched at well-defined hotspots that protect essential genes. These hotspots are enriched with histo...
Source: ScienceNOW - April 1, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Reid, D. A., Reed, P. J., Schlachetzki, J. C. M., Nitulescu, I. I., Chou, G., Tsui, E. C., Jones, J. R., Chandran, S., Lu, A. T., McClain, C. A., Ooi, J. H., Wang, T.-W., Lana, A. J., Linker, S. B., Ricciardulli, A. S., Lau, S., Schafer, S. T., Horvath, S Tags: Genetics, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Crnic Institute discovery may explain high risk of leukemia in children with Down syndrome
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Children with Down syndrome are 20-times more likely to develop acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL) and 150-times more likely to develop acute myeloid leukemia (AML) compared to their typical peers. According to a new study by researchers at the Linda Crnic Institute for Down Syndrome, the reason could be that children with Down syndrome are more likely to present with clonal hematopoiesis (CH), a process in which a blood stem cell acquires a genetic mutation that promotes replication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 31, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UC group launches clinical trial using CRISPR to correct sickle cell disease gene defect
Scientists at UCLA, UC San Francisco and UC Berkeley have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patients ’ own blood-forming stem cells.The trial will combine CRISPR technology developed at the Innovative Genomics Institute — a UC Berkeley–UCSF initiative founded by Berkeley’s Nobel Prize–winning scientist Jennifer Doudna — with UCLA’s expertise in genetic analysis and cell manufacturing, and the decades-long expertise at U...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - March 30, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

New Cultrex UltiMatrix BME for Use in Generating Advanced 2D and 3D Cell Culture Models
Include increased total protein content, optimized extracellular matrix protein composition and high levels of entactin Offered with Improved tensile strength while reducing the dependency on supplemental growth factors Supports the increased use of organoids and pluripotent stem cells for drug discovery research and personalized medicineThis story is related to the following:Health, Medical,& Dental Supplies and EquipmentSearch for suppliers of:Hydrogel (Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies)
Source: Industrial Newsroom - Health, Medical and Dental Supplies - March 30, 2021 Category: Medical Devices Source Type: news

UC consortium launches first clinical trial using CRISPR to correct sickle cell gene
(University of California - San Francisco) Scientists at UC San Francisco, UC Berkeley and UCLA have received U.S. Food and Drug Administration approval to jointly launch an early phase, first-in-human clinical trial of a CRISPR gene correction therapy in patients with sickle cell disease using the patient's own blood-forming stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 30, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modeling the Human Lung with Organoids
A new specialized cell culture media system generates induced pluripotent stem cell-derived lung organoids that more closely resemble the diversity of cell types found in the human lung. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - March 29, 2021 Category: Science Tags: Research Products Blog Source Type: news

Uprooting cancer: Hydrogel rapidly reverts cancer cells back to cancer stem cells
(Hokkaido University) A hydrogel, a type of soft matter, developed at Hokkaido University successfully reverted cancer cells back to cancer stem cells within 24 hours, in six different human cancer types. This could lead to the development of anti-cancer stem cell drugs and personalized medicines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 29, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Small Business, Big Mission: Biotech company brings it all together
With early funding from California's Oakland-based stem cell research funding agency for its academic founders, the Stanford University spinout is tapping the CRISPR gene-editing technology out of UC Berkeley to push an experimental gene therapy for sickle cell disease into an early-stage clinical trial and pursue fixes for rare genetic diseases. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 26, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ron Leuty Source Type: news

Robust cell junctions are critical for maintaining stem cell function
(National Centre for Biological Sciences) In the recent paper published in the Developmental Cell, Dr. Srikala Raghavan and her research group at the Centre for Inflammation and Tissue Homeostasis (CITH) theme, DBT-inStem identified the role for robust cell adhesion between stem cells in maintaining their quiescent properties. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Risk Factors Predict Graft Failure in Pediatric Acute Leukemia Patients Risk Factors Predict Graft Failure in Pediatric Acute Leukemia Patients
Researchers have developed a predictive score for the risk of graft failure in patients with acute leukemia who undergo allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation with ex vivo T-cell depletion.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 25, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug may help women who have repeated miscarriages – study
Type of stem cell deficiency is common among women who lose pregnancies, and sitagliptin may helpA common diabetes drug may be able to help women who have repeated miscarriages, researchers have found, after they identified that a certain type of stem cell deficiency is common among women who lose pregnancies.A study for the Tommy ’s National Miscarriage Research Centre in London discovered that the diabetes drugsitagliptin can boost recruitment of these cells to the lining of the uterus, called the endometrium, in women who have experienced repeated miscarriages.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Tags: Miscarriage Medical research Stem cells Biology Science Society Source Type: news

New biomarkers of malignant melanoma identified
(University of Granada) A team of researchers has studied the molecular profile of small " messenger " vesicles called exosomes, produced by cancer stem cells (CSCs), which play a key role in the process of carcinogenesis and metastasis in the blood of patients with malignant melanoma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 25, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The CNIO describe how embryonic stem cells keep optimal conditions for use in regenerative medicine
(Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Oncol ó gicas (CNIO)) * Researchers from the Proteomics Core Unit at CNIO have described molecular mechanisms, unknown to date, involved in the maintenance of the na ï ve state of the embryonic stem cells* The na ï ve state is optimal for the quest for treatments for heart disease or neurodegenerative disorders, but it is also the most unstable and difficult to maintain* The results of the study, published in 'Nature Communications', might prove useful to study some types of cancer (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 25, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Liver type 1 innate lymphoid cells develop locally via an interferon-{gamma}-dependent loop
The pathways that lead to the development of tissue-resident lymphocytes, including liver type 1 innate lymphoid cells (ILC1s), remain unclear. We show here that the adult mouse liver contains Lin–Sca-1+Mac-1+ hematopoietic stem cells derived from the fetal liver. This population includes Lin–CD122+CD49a+ progenitors that can generate liver ILC1s but not conventional natural killer cells. Interferon- (IFN-) production by the liver ILC1s themselves promotes the development of these cells in situ, through effects on their IFN-R+ liver progenitors. Thus, an IFN-–dependent loop drives liver ILC1 development i...
Source: ScienceNOW - March 25, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Bai, L., Vienne, M., Tang, L., Kerdiles, Y., Etiennot, M., Escaliere, B., Galluso, J., Wei, H., Sun, R., Vivier, E., Peng, H., Tian, Z. Tags: Immunology, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Scientists discover why humans have such big brains
Molecular switch makes human organ three times larger than great apes ’, study findsIt is one of the defining attributes of being human: when compared with our closest primate relatives, we have incredibly large brains.Now scientists have shed light on the reasons for the difference, by collecting cells from humans, chimps and gorillas and turning them into lumps of brain in the laboratory.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - March 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Ian Sample Science editor Tags: Science Neuroscience Stem cells UK news Source Type: news