Stem cells can repair Parkinson's-damaged circuits in mouse brains
(University of Wisconsin-Madison) University of Wisconsin-Madison researchers demonstrated a proof-of-concept stem cell treatment in a mouse model of Parkinson's disease. They found that neurons derived from stem cells can integrate well into the correct regions of the brain, connect with native neurons and restore motor functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Large-scale RNAi screening uncovers therapeutic targets in the parasite Schistosoma mansoni
Schistosome parasites kill 250,000 people every year. Treatment of schistosomiasis relies on the drug praziquantel. Unfortunately, a scarcity of molecular tools has hindered the discovery of new drug targets. Here, we describe a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen in adult Schistosoma mansoni that examined the function of 2216 genes. We identified 261 genes with phenotypes affecting neuromuscular function, tissue integrity, stem cell maintenance, and parasite survival. Leveraging these data, we prioritized compounds with activity against the parasites and uncovered a pair of protein kinases (TAO and STK25) that coop...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wang, J., Paz, C., Padalino, G., Coghlan, A., Lu, Z., Gradinaru, I., Collins, J. N. R., Berriman, M., Hoffmann, K. F., Collins, J. J. Tags: Anatomy, Morphology, Biomechanics, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

A single-cell RNA-seq atlas of Schistosoma mansoni identifies a key regulator of blood feeding
Schistosomiasis is a neglected tropical disease that infects 240 million people. With no vaccines and only one drug available, new therapeutic targets are needed. The causative agents, schistosomes, are intravascular flatworm parasites that feed on blood and lay eggs, resulting in pathology. The function of the parasite’s various tissues in successful parasitism are poorly understood, hindering identification of therapeutic targets. Using single-cell RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we characterize 43,642 cells from the adult schistosome and identify 68 distinct cell populations, including specialized stem cells that mainta...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 24, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Wendt, G., Zhao, L., Chen, R., Liu, C., ODonoghue, A. J., Caffrey, C. R., Reese, M. L., Collins, J. J. Tags: Development, Microbiology reports Source Type: news

Guts and brains: How microbes in a mother ’s intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother ’s intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development,UCLA biologists report Sept. 23 in the journal Nature.While the maternal gut microbiota has been associated with abnormalities in the brain function and behavior of offspring — often in response to factors like infection, a high-fat diet or stress during pregnancy — scientists had not known until now whether it influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods and in the absence of such environ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Cincinnati Children's scientists identify hormone that might help treat malabsorption
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists at Cincinnati Children's used human intestinal organoids grown from stem cells to discover how our bodies control the absorption of nutrients from the food we eat. They further found that one hormone might be able to reverse a congenital disorder in babies who cannot adequately absorb nutrients and need intravenous feeding to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New way to halt leukemia relapse shown promising in mice
(Hiroshima University) Drugs tackling chronic myelogenous leukemia have completely transformed prognoses of patients over the last couple of decades, with most cases going into remission. But drug resistance can occur, leading to relapses. Targeting the lipids involved in regulating part of a leukemia stem cell's life span offers a potential second route to defeat the disease--and solid tumorous cancers as well. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

'Cellular compass' guides stem cell division in plants
(Stanford University) Biologists observing the formation of leaves noticed the nuclei moved in bewildering ways. Further investigation uncovered proteins that act as compasses and motors, guiding the divisions of individual cells to create the overall pattern of the leaf. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Species-specific pace of development is associated with differences in protein stability
Although many molecular mechanisms controlling developmental processes are evolutionarily conserved, the speed at which the embryo develops can vary substantially between species. For example, the same genetic program, comprising sequential changes in transcriptional states, governs the differentiation of motor neurons in mouse and human, but the tempo at which it operates differs between species. Using in vitro directed differentiation of embryonic stem cells to motor neurons, we show that the program runs more than twice as fast in mouse as in human. This is not due to differences in signaling, nor the genomic sequence o...
Source: ScienceNOW - September 17, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Rayon, T., Stamataki, D., Perez-Carrasco, R., Garcia-Perez, L., Barrington, C., Melchionda, M., Exelby, K., Lazaro, J., Tybulewicz, V. L. J., Fisher, E. M. C., Briscoe, J. Tags: Development, Engineering, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Transplanted Stem Cells Produce Sperm in Sterilized Livestock
The technique is designed for breeding genetically superior farm animals, but may have additional conservation and medical applications. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 16, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

From complexity to clarity in cell and gene therapy
One of the most exciting frontiers in medicine, cell and gene therapies are already offering breakthrough treatments and potential cures in severe genetic diseases and cancer. The innovations continue to advance rapidly, with press releases announcing major breakthroughs on a seemingly monthly basis.  It ’s undoubtedly a good news story but these advances bring with them the challenge of explaining all the exciting, but complex possibilities to patients and caregivers.  The groups that have historically been expected to help keep doctors up to speed cannot be expected to do so in this dynamic environm...
Source: EyeForPharma - September 16, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Andrew Stone Source Type: news

Watchdogs clamp down on bogus stem cell clinics
Unscrupulous operators are using Covid-19 fears to target vulnerable patients (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - September 15, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Seaweed capsule packed with stem cells could repair damage after heart attack, scientists find
Roughly the thickness of a grain of rice, the seaweed capsule is injected into the heart through an incision in the side of the chest. The capsules were developed by scientists in Houston, Texas. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New data further reinforce Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) as a highly effective treatment for people with multiple sclerosis
Basel, 11 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new data that show OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) is a highly effective treatment option for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who experienced a suboptimal response to their prior disease modifying therapy (DMT). Subgroup analys is from the two-year open-label Phase IIIb CASTING study also demonstrates that patients benefit across a wide range of disease related and demographic subgroups, regardless of prior treatment background. Findings will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

New data further reinforce Roche ’s OCREVUS (ocrelizumab) as a highly effective treatment for people with multiple sclerosis
Basel, 11 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced new data that show OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) is a highly effective treatment option for people with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who experienced a suboptimal response to their prior disease modifying therapy (DMT). Subgroup analys is from the two-year open-label Phase IIIb CASTING study also demonstrates that patients benefit across a wide range of disease related and demographic subgroups, regardless of prior treatment background. Findings will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee...
Source: Roche Media News - September 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Feeding off fusion or the immortalization of tumor cells
(IMBA- Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences) Despite all recent progress, cancer remains one of the deadliest human diseases. In a new publication that appeared in the journal Cell, researchers from J ü rgen Knoblich's lab at IMBA - Institute of Molecular Biotechnology of the Austrian Academy of Sciences - found a very surprising and unexpected connection between the formation of tumors and mitochondria, the power house of the cells, that allows neural stem cells that normally build our brain to become deadly tumor cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stem cell function may explain higher colon cancer rate in males
(International Society for Stem Cell Research) In research recently published in Stem Cell Reports, Jingxin Li (ljingxin@sdu.edu.cn), Dawei Chen (dawei.chen@uliege.be) and colleagues found that androgen levels can regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation, a new potential link between androgen levels and colon cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 10, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Adult Stem Cell Research Shows Promise
FDA scientists are working on an unprecedented project. They are studying adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which are cells that can turn into a variety of cell types and tissues including those that form fat, cartilage and bone. MSC-based products have the potential to be used for cellular repair, restoration, replacement and regeneration if approved by FDA. (Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates)
Source: FDA Consumer Health Information Updates - September 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: FDA Source Type: news

Roche expands its multiple sclerosis portfolio with investigational BTK inhibitor fenebrutinib and initiates novel clinical trials for OCREVUS (ocrelizumab)
Basel, 9 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the initiation of an innovative Phase III clinical trial programme for its investigational medicine fenebrutinib in multiple sclerosis (MS), along with a higher-dose Phase III clinical trial programme for OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) and a distinct O CREVUS trial specifically to support African-American and Hispanic- and Latinx-American patients with MS. Overviews of clinical trials and scientific rationale will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTR...
Source: Roche Media News - September 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche expands its multiple sclerosis portfolio with investigational BTK inhibitor fenebrutinib and initiates novel clinical trials for OCREVUS (ocrelizumab)
Basel, 9 September 2020 – Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced the initiation of an innovative Phase III clinical trial programme for its investigational medicine fenebrutinib in multiple sclerosis (MS), along with a higher-dose Phase III clinical trial programme for OCREVUS® (ocrelizumab) and a distinct O CREVUS trial specifically to support African-American and Hispanic- and Latinx-American patients with MS. Overviews of clinical trials and scientific rationale will be presented at MSVirtual2020, the 8th Joint Meeting of the Americas Committee for Treatment and Research in Multiple Sclerosis (ACTR...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 9, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Albert Einstein College of Medicine receives $16 million NIH grant to study cellular process linked to Alzheimer's disease
(Albert Einstein College of Medicine) Researchers at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, led by Ana Maria Cuervo, M.D., Ph.D., co-director of the Institute for Aging Research, have received a five-year, $16 million grant from the NIH to determine how autophagy, a cellular recycling process, is related to the development of Alzheimer's disease and related dementias. The multidisciplinary team working to untangle this puzzle includes experts in the biology of aging, neurodegeneration, metabolism, immunology, stem cells, drug development, and advanced imaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA clearance for BK virus quantitative test on cobas 6800/8800 Systems to support better care for transplant patients
Basel, 8 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510k clearance for the cobas ® BKV Test on the cobas® 6800 and 8800 Systems. The test was previously granted FDA Breakthrough Device designation demonstrating the improved treatment or diagnosis of life-threatening diseases or conditions for transplant patients. The test provides standardised, high-quality results that can he lp healthcare professionals better assess the risk of complications caused by the BK virus in transplant patients and identify effective treatment options. BK virus (BKV) is a m...
Source: Roche Media News - September 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Roche receives FDA clearance for BK virus quantitative test on cobas 6800/8800 Systems to support better care for transplant patients
Basel, 8 September 2020 - Roche (SIX: RO, ROG; OTCQX: RHHBY) today announced U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) 510k clearance for the cobas ® BKV Test on the cobas® 6800 and 8800 Systems. The test was previously granted FDA Breakthrough Device designation demonstrating the improved treatment or diagnosis of life-threatening diseases or conditions for transplant patients. The test provides standardised, high-quality results that can he lp healthcare professionals better assess the risk of complications caused by the BK virus in transplant patients and identify effective treatment options. BK virus (BKV) is a m...
Source: Roche Investor Update - September 8, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Coaxing single stem cells into specialized cells
(University of Illinois at Chicago) Researchers at the University of Illinois Chicago have developed a unique method for precisely controlling the deposition of hydrogel, which is made of water-soluble polymers commonly used to support cells in experiments or for therapeutic purposes. The researchers noticed that their technique - which allows for the encapsulation of a single cell within a minute hydrogel droplet - can be used to coax bone marrow stem cells into specialized cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene therapy research for HIV awarded $14.6 million NIH grant
(Keck School of Medicine of USC) An HIV research program led by scientists at USC and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center has received a five-year, $14.6 million grant from the National Institutes of Health. The team is advancing a gene therapy approach to control the virus without the need for daily medicines. The NIH award will support preclinical studies that combine gene editing against HIV with technologies for safer and more effective hematopoietic stem cell transplants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 2, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Fetal Tissue Ethics Board Recommends Rejecting Majority of Research Proposals
The National Institutes of Health (NIH) Human Fetal Tissue Research Ethics Advisory Board, which was appointed by Health and Human Services (HHS) Secretary Alex Azar in February 2020, has recommended that the Secretary withhold funding for most of the applications submitted to NIH to conduct medical research using human fetal tissue. The Trump Administration first announced that it will restrict federal funding for medical research that uses human fetal tissue in June 2019. The new policy prohibits all intramural research, or research conducted within NIH, involving the use of human fetal tissue from elective abortions. ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 1, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Scientists discover key regulator of neuron function and survival
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Scientists studying neuronal energy metabolism found evidence the loss of an important energy regulator called AMPK in neural stem cells or glial cells called astrocytes causes neuronal death in laboratory rodents. Publishing their findings in Cell Reports, researchers also discovered AMPK loss in neural stem cells or neurons causes spontaneous brain seizures in the animals. The study provides evidence that a medication used to treat diabetes may help control epileptic seizures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why are patients STILL at risk from stem cell jabs?
JOHN NAISH: Princess Michael of Kent appeared in a promotional video for a clinic in the Bahamas that offers stem cell therapy for problem joints such as her painful shoulder. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are teeth superior to implants? A mapping review
ConclusionsBased on this mapping review, teeth are superior to implants in their ability to resist biologic challenges, but implants are superior to teeth in managing higher compressive loads without prompting bone resorption.  (Source: Dental Technology Blog)
Source: Dental Technology Blog - August 31, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

The Scientist Speaks Podcast - Episode 8
Experimental Cures for Fragile Patients: Prenatal Stem Cell and Gene Therapies (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - August 26, 2020 Category: Science Tags: Sponsored Videos Source Type: news

Yale researchers reach advance stem cell therapy for hormone disorder
Yale investigators have developed a multistep process that models the biological instructions to create parathyroid gland cells from pluripotent stem cells. (Source: Yale Science and Health News)
Source: Yale Science and Health News - August 25, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Heart repair factor boosted by RNA-targeting compound
(Scripps Research Institute) Damaged hearts require stem cell activation to heal, but heart attack silences a key signaling molecule. A compound discovered in Disney lab reactivates its production, in cell-based studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Cartilage Is Grown in the Arthritic Joints of Mice
Researchers discovered a way to awaken dormant stem cells and transform them into cartilage. If the technique works in humans, it may help ease debilitating joint pain. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 22, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Gina Kolata Tags: Knees Bones Research Mice Stem Cells Arthritis Osteoarthritis Surgery and Surgeons Nature Medicine (Journal) your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

A new molecular guardian of intestinal stem cells
(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Researchers from Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU) investigated how intestinal stem cells are controlled at the molecular level to remain stem cells or to develop into one of various intestinal cells. By studying mice lacking the protein IRF2, the researchers found a blunted regenerative response and an increased development of immature Paneth cells upon intestinal inflammation and infection. These findings help clarify the molecular biology of intestinal stem cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How UCLA scientists are using stem cells to take on COVID-19
As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, UCLA researchers are rising to the occasion by channeling their specialized expertise to seek new and creative ways to reduce the spread of the virus and save lives. Using years ’ — or even decades’ — worth of knowledge they’ve acquired studying other diseases and biological processes, many of them have shifted their focus to the novel coronavirus, and they’re collaborating across disciplines as they work toward new diagnostic tests, treatments and vaccines.At UCLA, more than 230 research projects, including several being led by members of theEli and Ed...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 20, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells decreased T helper 17 immune response in skin draining lymph node of atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by aspergillus fumigatus
Conference abstracts (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - August 20, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: MeganB Source Type: news

UCalgary research delivers new insights into how skin can regenerate after severe burns
(University of Calgary) New research led by Dr. Jeff Biernaskie, PhD, has made an exciting leap forward in understanding how skin heals, which could lead to drug treatments to vastly improve wound healing. The study, published in the scientific journal Cell Stem Cell, was co-led by Dr. Sepideh Abbasi, PhD, Sarthak Sinha, MD/PhD candidate and Dr. Elodie Labit, PhD, postdoctoral fellow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Heart attack damage reduced by shielded stem cells
(Rice University) Bioengineers and surgeons from Rice University and Baylor College of Medicine have shown in rodents that a four-week shielded stem cell treatment can reduce damage caused by a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

LJI team gets first-ever look at a rare but vital stem cell in humans
(La Jolla Institute for Immunology) Scientists at La Jolla Institute for Immunology (LJI) have tracked down the rare stem cells that generate neutrophils in human bone marrow. This research, published August 18, 2020, in Immunity, gives researchers a potential path for intervening in diseases where neutrophil development goes awry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Degradation of 5hmC-marked stalled replication forks by APE1 causes genomic instability
Synthetic lethality between poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) inhibition and BRCA deficiency is exploited to treat breast and ovarian tumors. However, resistance to PARP inhibitors (PARPis) is common. To identify potential resistance mechanisms, we performed a genome-wide RNAi screen in BRCA2-deficient mouse embryonic stem cells and validation in KB2P1.21 mouse mammary tumor cells. We found that resistance to multiple PARPi emerged with reduced expression of TET2 (ten-eleven translocation), which promotes DNA demethylation by oxidizing 5-methylcytosine (5mC) to 5-hydroxymethycytosine (5hmC) and other products. TET2 knockd...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - August 18, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Kharat, S. S., Ding, X., Swaminathan, D., Suresh, A., Singh, M., Sengodan, S. K., Burkett, S., Marks, H., Pamala, C., He, Y., Fox, S. D., Buehler, E. C., Muegge, K., Martin, S. E., Sharan, S. K. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Potential drug target revealed to help more children survive a lethal heart defect
(Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center) Study in Cell Stem Cell led by experts at Cincinnati Children's reveals a potentially druggable target to treat hypoplastic left heart syndrome (HLHS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DNA damage triggers reprogramming into stem cells
(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) A joint research team from the National Institute for Basic Biology (NIBB) in Japan, Huazhong Agricultural University in China, and the Czech Academy of Sciences in the Czech Republic has discovered that DNA damage causes cell? to reprogram themselves into stem cells and regenerate new plant bodies in the moss Physcomitrella patens. The researchers describe this phenomenon as a unique environmental adaptation of plants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Gene targeting helps overcome the resistance of brain cancer to therapy
(McGill University) New insight into a gene that controls energy production in cancer stem cells could help in the search for a more effective treatment for glioblastoma. A McGill-led study published in Nature Communication reveals that suppressing the OSMR gene can improve the effectiveness of radiation therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Random Gene Expression is Critical for Stem Cell Function
August 14, 2020—(BRONX, NY)—Chance plays a big part in life—including in how the human body functions. Randomness appears to be inherent in many biological systems and plays an important role even in processes considered tightly controlled or highly coordinated, such as turning genes on and off. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - August 14, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Mitochondrial dynamics in postmitotic cells regulate neurogenesis
We examined and manipulated mitochondrial dynamics during mouse and human cortical neurogenesis. We reveal that shortly after cortical stem cells have divided, daughter cells destined to self-renew undergo mitochondrial fusion, whereas those that retain high levels of mitochondria fission become neurons. Increased mitochondria fission promotes neuronal fate, whereas induction of mitochondria fusion after mitosis redirects daughter cells toward self-renewal. This occurs during a restricted time window that is doubled in human cells, in line with their increased self-renewal capacity. Our data reveal a postmitotic period of ...
Source: ScienceNOW - August 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Iwata, R., Casimir, P., Vanderhaeghen, P. Tags: Cell Biology, Neuroscience reports Source Type: news

Effect of human umbilical cord derived mesenchymal stem cells on atopic dermatitis-like skin lesions induced by Aspergillus fumigatus
Conference abstracts (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - August 5, 2020 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: MeganB Source Type: news

Heart regeneration using stem cells: Why irregular heartbeats occur after transplantation
(Shinshu University) Increased predominance of the matured ventricular subtype in embryonic stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes in vivo elucidated why arrhythmia occurs post-transplant of hESC-CMs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Culling cancer before it stems: A novel, rapid carcinogen detection method
(Okayama University) Testing chemical compounds for their ability to cause cancer is one way in which scientists can identify hazardous chemicals and thereby protect public health. But, standard testing methods are usually complex and time-consuming. In a new paper published in Scientific Reports, scientists have described a novel testing method based on stem cells that may allow scientists to quickly assess large numbers of compounds for their carcinogenicity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UArizona Health Sciences researcher seeks safer, more effective leukemia treatment
(University of Arizona Health Sciences) A potentially safer, more effective chemotherapy treatment for patients with blood-related cancers, such as leukemia, who need a particular bone marrow transplant procedure is under study at the University of Arizona Health Sciences. The procedure is known as a haploidentical (half-matched) bone marrow transplantation, or " haplo-BMT, " providng an alternate source of stem cells for patients needing a bone marrow transplant but unable to find a perfect or near-perfect donor match for human leukocyte antigens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation [NG164], NICE (updated 29th July 2020)
The purpose of this guideline is to maximise the safety of patients who need haemopoietic stem cell transplantation and make the best use of NHS resources, while protecting staff from infection. On 29 July 2020, we amended recommendations on advice and testing for COVID-19 for patients and donors, and removed recommendations on deferring treatment for some patients to reflect changes in the risk of infection and the capacity in services. See 2 External 0 0 0 update information false https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ng164/chapter/Update-information true false%> for details. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news