Promising Blood Test Could Help to Predict Breast Cancer Recurrence

Doctors have gotten much better at detecting and treating breast cancer early. Drug and chemotherapy regimens to control tumors have gotten so effective, in fact, that in some cases, surgery is no longer necessary. In up to 30% of cases of early-stage breast cancer treated before surgery, doctors can’t find evidence of cancer cells in postoperative biopsies. The problem, however, is that there is currently no reliable way to tell which cancers have been pushed into remission and which ones have not. That’s where an easy identifier, like a blood test, could transform the way early stage breast cancer is treated. In a paper published in Science Translational Medicine, researchers led by a team at the Translational Genomics Institute (TGen), an Arizona-based nonprofit, report encouraging results on just such a liquid biopsy. Its test, called Targeted Digital Sequencing (or TARDIS), was up to 100 times more sensitive than other similar liquid-biopsy tests in picking up DNA shed by breast cancer cells into the blood. Currently available ways of tracking breast cancer cells in the blood are most useful in people with advanced cancer. In those conditions, cancer cells litter the blood with fragments of their DNA as they circulate throughout the body to seed new tumors in other tissues like the bone, liver and brain. But in early-stage breast cancer, these cells are, by definition, scarcer. To address the problem, the research team, which included scientists at Arizona S...
Source: TIME: Health - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Uncategorized blood tests Breast Cancer Source Type: news

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AbstractIncidence and outcome of microbiologically documented bacterial/viral infections and invasive fungal disease (IFD) in children and adults after hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) were compared in 650 children and 3200 adults in multicenter cross-sectional nationwide study. Infections were diagnosed in 60.8% children and 35.0% adults, including respectively 69.1% and 63.5% allo-HCT, and 33.1% and 20.8% auto-HCT patients. The incidence of bacterial infections was higher in children (36.0% vs 27.6%;p 
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Source: Annals of Hematology - Category: Hematology Source Type: research
Normally, each month when new issues of journals are opened or scanned online, there can be an element of excitement together with an element of trepidation. The latter can stem from complicated tables concerning obscure genes that govern inflammatory pathways that interact with bacteria, tedious immunologic data, and metabolic novelties that boggle the mind. However, in this issue of Gastrointestinal Endoscopy, Overwater et  al1 have provided us with a breath of fresh air.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
Gastric cancer remains one of the most common causes of cancer deaths worldwide. The best current option for reducing gastric cancer deaths is Helicobacter pylori eradication combined with risk assessment and surveillance programs for those deemed to be at high risk for gastric cancer so as to identify lesions at a stage amenable to curative therapy. In this issue, Nam et  al1 report a retrospective study of Helicobacter pylori eradication on gastric cancer incidence among 10,328 Korean adults undergoing health checkups including an H pylori test-and-treat program.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
We read with great interest the comment by Dr Li and colleagues1 referring to our study on endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) for early colorectal cancer.2 We would like to thank the editors for the opportunity to reply.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Gastric cancer remains one of the most common cancers worldwide and is the third leading cause of cancer-related mortality, trailing only lung and colon cancer.1 Given its historically low survival rates, early detection and resection is the most effective strategy to improve prognosis. Endoscopic submucosal dissection (ESD), a technique developed in Japan, enables en bloc resection of early gastric cancer (EGC) and can be curative for selected lesions, depending on the histologic features, size, and tumor depth.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Original article Source Type: research
We read with interest the article by Kuellmer et  al1 evaluating endoscopic full-thickness resection (EFTR) for early colorectal cancer. The authors found that EFTR for early colorectal cancer was feasible and safe. Because their findings are important to current practice, several questions deserve attention.
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
We have read with great interest the study by Januszewicz et  al1 describing the concept of endoscopist biopsy rate (EBR) as a potential quality indicator for routine diagnostic outpatient EGD. The authors found a significant variability in EBR among 26 endoscopists and an association between higher EBR, a higher detection of gastric precancerous conditions, and a lower risk of missed gastric cancers.1
Source: Gastrointestinal Endoscopy - Category: Gastroenterology Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
AbstractPurposeTo report outcomes of salvage re-irradiation (re-RT) in recurrent/progressive medulloblastoma (MB).MethodsMedical records of patients treated with curative-intent re-RT as multi-modality management for recurrent/progressive MB between 2008 and 2018 were analyzed retrospectively.ResultsA total of 28 patients (median age 18  years at index diagnosis) were included. Molecular subgrouping was done using real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) based on the differential expression of select set of 12 protein coding genes and 9 microRNAs. Fifteen of 17 (88%) patients with sonic hedge...
Source: Journal of Neuro-Oncology - Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: research
Discussion Suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 is an essential molecule for maintaining immune homeostasis and subverting inflammation. Disorders arising from excess inflammation or SOCS1 deficiency can be potentially treated with SOCS1 mimetics (Ahmed et al., 2015). While SOCS1 has promising potential in many disorders, it should be noted that new targets and actions of SOCS1 are still being discovered and not all the effects of this protein are beneficial in autoimmune diseases and cancer. For instance, SOCS1 degrades IRS1 and IRS2, required for insulin signaling, via the SOCS Box domain, thus, limiting its potential in ...
Source: Frontiers in Pharmacology - Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: research
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