'Electronic nose' could smell breath to warn about higher risk of oesophagal cancer
Current diagnostic method for Barrett ’s oesophagus relies on invasive and costly endoscopyAn electronic device that “sniffs” breath may offer a new way to identify people with a condition that can lead to cancer of the oesophagus, researchers have revealed.Recent figures suggest there are about 9,000 new cases of oesophageal cancer, or cancer of the food pipe, every year in the UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Cancer research Health Medical research World news Science Society UK news Source Type: news

'Electronic nose' could smell breath to warn about higher risk of oesophageal cancer
Current diagnostic method for Barrett ’s oesophagus relies on invasive and costly endoscopyAn electronic device that “sniffs” breath may offer a new way to identify people with a condition that can lead to cancer of the oesophagus, researchers have revealed.Recent figures suggest there are about 9,000 new cases of oesophageal cancer, or cancer of the food pipe, every year in the UK.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 26, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Cancer research Health Medical research World news Science Society UK news Source Type: news

Portable ‘electronic nose’ picks up early warning signs of oesophageal cancer
May be promising diagnostic test for use in primary care, say researchers Related items fromOnMedica Taking aspirin with a PPI reduces risk of oesophageal cancer Electronic ‘pill’ may revolutionise gut diagnoses Drinking hot tea may increase risk of oesophageal cancer Survival better for colon cancer picked up on screening Bisphosphonates may double cancer risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 26, 2020 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

HPV Biomarkers Linked to Improved Survival With Esophageal Dysplasia, Adenocarcinoma HPV Biomarkers Linked to Improved Survival With Esophageal Dysplasia, Adenocarcinoma
Human papillomavirus (HPV) positivity and HPV biomarkers are associated with improved survival in adults with Barrett high-grade dysplasia (HGD) and esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC), according to a new study.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Bright idea in dentist's office leads to innovative smoking cessation project
Results from this study recently published online in Addiction found primary care physicians providing smokers with a free, two week starter kit of nicotine replacement therapy (NRT) increased quit attempts While sitting in the dentist's office, Hollings Cancer Center researcher Matthew Carpenter, Ph.D., of the Medical University of South Carolina, had a bright idea. As he received his goody bag with dental hygiene products, he wondered why not conduct a study and have primary care providers do the same thing for their patients who use tobacco. The bags would contain educational material, free lozenges and tobacco cessati...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - February 12, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Gene therapy prevents disorders with alcohol exposure in ALDH2 deficiency
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) A new study has shown that gene therapy to treat one of the most common hereditary disorders, aldehyde dehydrogenase type 2 (ALDH2) deficiency, may prevent increased risk for esophageal cancer and osteoporosis associated with chronic alcohol exposure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virginia woman who took Zantac every day says the medication led to her esophageal cancer
Deborah Haskins, of Ridgeway, Virginia, filed a lawsuit against the makers of Zantac, claiming the active ingredient produced a known human carcinogen and led to her esophageal cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

No Benefit With Boosted Radiation Dose in Esophageal Cancer No Benefit With Boosted Radiation Dose in Esophageal Cancer
Escalating the radiation dose does not improve outcomes in patients receiving definitive chemoradiation.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - January 25, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Into pharma's roaring twenties
“I drained the last of my cocktail, gazing up at the ceiling. It was one of those moments that curls the hairs on your neck. At once, the grand scale of this labyrinth of cathedrals became clear, the desert wind blowing through the clever hieroglyphics carved into every available surface. I turned my head back down to ground level just in time to see the man draw back his fist in anger, and then.And then.With a piercing shriek, he lunged straight at my jaw –”Do you ever wake from a dream, marvelling at the inventiveness and detail of your subconscious mind? That disorienting moment where you lie blinking ...
Source: EyeForPharma - January 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Paul Simms Source Type: news

Judge: Veteran Wrongly Denied Benefits For Cancer Due To Water At Camp Lejeune
WASHINGTON, D.C. - A federal judge in the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims on Dec. 12 vacated a portion of a Board of Veterans Affairs decision that denied a veteran benefits for esophageal cancer he contends he developed as a result of drinking contaminated water at the Marine Corps Base at Camp Lejeune. The judge ruled that the board provided an inadequate statement of the reason it denied benefits (Don R. Edwards v. Robert L. Wilkie, No. 19-74, U.S. App., Vet. Clms., 2019 U.S. App. Vet. Claims LEXIS 2185). (Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News)
Source: LexisNexis® Mealey's™ Emerging Toxic Torts Legal News - December 18, 2019 Category: Medical Law Source Type: news

Study Shows Even Light Drinking Can Increase Cancer Risk
BOSTON (CBS) — According to a new study published in the journal Cancer, even light to moderate alcohol intake has been linked to a higher risk of cancer. Researchers at the University of Tokyo and the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health looked at data on over 60,000 cancer patients in Japan. They found drinking as little as one drink a day for 10 years or two drinks a year for five years, was associated would increase overall cancer risk by five percent, such as cancers of the colon, stomach, breast, prostate, and esophagus. Cancer risk was lowest with no alcohol consumption. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, W...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Dr. Mallika Marshall Drinking Source Type: news

Kenya: Experts Call for Study on Rise in Stomach Cancer in Nyeri Men
[Nation] Rising cases of oesophagus and stomach cancer among men in Nyeri has raised concerns among health experts as they push for a government-funded research in the county. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - December 6, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Tick box questionnaire could significantly improve esophageal cancer survival rates
(University College London) A simple health questionnaire could be a highly effective tool to pre-screen people for early signs of esophageal cancer, enabling much earlier diagnosis and treatment, finds a UCL-led study published in Lancet Digital Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DaSilva Building Mesothelioma Specialty Program in Orlando
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Marcelo DaSilva came to Orlando, Florida, with a lofty goal. He wants to make Central Florida a destination for patients diagnosed with malignant pleural mesothelioma. DaSilva also has the tools to make that goal a reality, building a mesothelioma specialty program at AdventHealth Orlando. “We want to make this a nationally — and internationally — recognized program,” DaSilva told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com. “People who come to Orlando will not only see Disney World, but they will see excellence in health care. We can do that here.” DaSilva was named chi...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - December 3, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

A new machine learning approach detects esophageal cancer better than current methods
(Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center) Dartmouth scientists have proposed a new machine learning model for identification of esophageal cancer that could open new avenues for applying deep learning to digital pathology. The novel method automatically learns clinically important regions on whole-slide images for classification. The approach outperformed the current state-of-the-art model that requires detailed, manual annotations by a pathologist for its training. Such systems could assist pathologists in reading slides more accurately and efficiently while eliminating laborious, high-cost data annotation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Untangling the Financial Costs of Esophageal Cancer
Researchers look at cost estimates stratified by stage, histology, and level of treatment. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - November 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Naveed Saleh, MD, MS Source Type: news

Certain gut bacteria may be involved in causing colorectal cancer
People with an unclassified type of Bacteroidales bacteria in their guts may be at greater risk of developing colorectal cancer Related items fromOnMedica Invest in workforce to roll out bowel cancer screening, urges former health secretary Bowel cancer screening tests exceed target set in Scotland Taking aspirin with a PPI reduces risk of oesophageal cancer FOB associated with rise in all-cause mortality Screening for colorectal cancer should start at 45 years (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 4, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Application of Whole-Genome Sequencing in Older Esophageal Carcinoma...
In this free webinar, participants will hear about the challenges in traditional whole-genome sequencing, WuXi NextCODE’s process for generating high-quality WGS data using FFPE samples and details of...(PRWeb October 28, 2019)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/application_of_whole_genome_sequencing_in_older_esophageal_carcinoma_ffpe_tissues_reveals_novel_insights_upcoming_webinar_hosted_by_xtalks/prweb16677732.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 28, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Years of hiccups and heartburn could lead to cancer by exposing cells to stomach acid, doctors warn
Peter Denson, 66, a retired coach engineer from Kent, suffered 20 years of seemingly harmless hiccups, burping and heartburn. He was shocked to be diagnosed with oesophageal cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psoriasis Tied to Increased Cancer Risk
Among people with psoriasis, the risk of skin, esophageal, liver and pancreatic cancer was particularly high. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Nicholas Bakalar Tags: Pancreatic Cancer Psoriasis Liver Skin Source Type: news

Grail Stays at Forefront of Liquid Biopsy Conversation with New Results
Newly-released data is putting Grail back in the forefront of the liquid biopsy conversation. The Menlo Park, CA-based company announced data validating the performance of its investigational multi-cancer early detection blood test for the first time in an independent cohort of participants. The validation data is coming from both the Circulating Cell-Free Genome Atlas (CCGA) study. Data show Grail’s liquid biopsy test was shown to detect more than 20 cancer types across all stages with a single, very low false-positive rate. Grail will present the results at an American Society of Clinical Oncology Break...
Source: MDDI - October 11, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Guideline Inclusion Could Open More Doors for WATS3D
CDx Diagnostics has some extra firepower behind the WATS3D diagnostic platform. The Suffern, NY-based company said the diagnostic has been included in the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy’s Standards of Practice Committee’s guideline for the screening and surveillance of Barrett’s esophagus. Since esophageal dysplasia is both highly focal and typically invisible, the effectiveness of upper endoscopy is widely recognized to be limited by the high rate of false-negative sampling error associated with standard 4-quadrant random biopsy. WATS3D, or Wide Area T...
Source: MDDI - October 4, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Worse Survival If Severe Lymphopenia Follows Chemoradiation Worse Survival If Severe Lymphopenia Follows Chemoradiation
Severe lymphopenia following chemoradiotherapy compromises outcomes for patients with esophageal cancer, again underscoring the importance of the immune system in cancer control.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - September 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Cancer survival improves, but at varying rates
Cancer survival rates for esophagus, stomach, colon, rectum, pancreas, lung,...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI predicts lung cancer survival from CT scan data Lancet: Cancer survival rates improve but vary widely Cancer deaths continue to fall, but CT lung screening lags ACS: U.S. cancer death rates continue to fall NEJM: Treatment, not screening, cuts breast cancer deaths (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - September 12, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

H. pylori eradication linked to reduced risk of gastric cancer
Gastric cancer incidence and death half as likely over 22 years after short-term H. pylori treatment Related items fromOnMedica Antivirals cut liver cancer risk after hepatitis C Statins might not cut colorectal cancer risk after all Antibiotics, H2RAs and PPIs linked to child obesity Long-term use of PPIs linked to doubling in stomach cancer risk Taking aspirin with a PPI reduces risk of oesophageal cancer (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - September 12, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Real-World Data Favor Doublets in Esophageal/Gastric Cancer Real-World Data Favor Doublets in Esophageal/Gastric Cancer
Real-world data favor use of doublet chemotherapy for metastatic esophageal and gastric cancer over triplet regimens and especially over monotherapy.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - September 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Trends in Treatment of T1N0 Esophageal Cancer Trends in Treatment of T1N0 Esophageal Cancer
A new study examines the nationwide treatment trends and outcomes of esophageal cancer.Annals of Surgery (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - September 2, 2019 Category: Radiology Tags: General Surgery Journal Article Source Type: news

Famous People Who Died from Head and Neck Cancer
List of notable people who died from head and neck cancers that include; throat, esophageal, laryngeal, oral, and thyroid cancers (Source: Disabled World)
Source: Disabled World - August 13, 2019 Category: Disability Tags: Famous Disabled Source Type: news

Promising Blood Test Could Help to Predict Breast Cancer Recurrence
Doctors have gotten much better at detecting and treating breast cancer early. Drug and chemotherapy regimens to control tumors have gotten so effective, in fact, that in some cases, surgery is no longer necessary. In up to 30% of cases of early-stage breast cancer treated before surgery, doctors can’t find evidence of cancer cells in postoperative biopsies. The problem, however, is that there is currently no reliable way to tell which cancers have been pushed into remission and which ones have not. That’s where an easy identifier, like a blood test, could transform the way early stage breast cancer is treated....
Source: TIME: Health - August 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized blood tests Breast Cancer Source Type: news

FDA approves pembrolizumab for advanced esophageal squamous cell cancer
Oncology News burst (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - August 1, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

FDA Approves Keytruda (pembrolizumab) for Recurrent Locally Advanced or Metastatic Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Esophagus
KENILWORTH, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE) July 31, 2019 --Merck (NYSE: MRK), known as MSD outside the United States and Canada, today announced that the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved Keytruda, Merck’s anti-PD-1 therapy, as... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - July 31, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

First Approval for Immunotherapy for Esophageal Cancer First Approval for Immunotherapy for Esophageal Cancer
Esophageal cancer has now joined the list of tumor types that can be treated with a checkpoint inhibitor — in this case, with pembrolizumab (Keytruda).FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Hematology-Oncology Headlines - July 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

Trump Signs 9/11 Victims Fund Extension
President Donald Trump on Monday signed legislation that will extend the September 11th Victim Compensation Fund until 2092. During the signing ceremony at the White House, Trump was surrounding by first responders, survivors and family members of several who died in the 2001 terrorist attack on the United States. The U.S. House of Representatives and the U.S Senate voted overwhelmingly last week to approve the legislation that will provide a lifetime of assistance for victims and their families. The extension will allow the fund, first established in 2001, to pay for past and future medical claims of those effected by the...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 29, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Senate Passes 9/11 Victim Compensation Fund Extension
The U.S. Senate followed the House of Representatives on Tuesday and passed legislation that will extend the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund until 2092. The legislation will fund all current and future medical claims of those effected by the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington, and United Flight 93, which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The extension of funding will benefit victims who may develop mesothelioma linked to the more than 400 tons of asbestos that covered the 16-acre disaster zone after the twin towers fell. According to World Trade Center R...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 23, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

9/11 Victims Fund Passes Senate
The Senate gallery erupted in applause from politicians and first responders on Tuesday after a 97-2 vote to extend the September 11 Victim Compensation Fund until 2092. The reauthorization will fund all current and future medical claims of those effected by the 9/11 terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center in New York City, the Pentagon in Washington, and United Flight 93, which crashed in Shanksville, Pennsylvania. The extension will allow victims and their families to file claims through 2090, but they will be paid out through 2092. The extension of funding will benefit victims who may develop mesothelioma linked to ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - July 23, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Kenya: Cases of Throat Cancer Increase in Bomet
[Nation] Bomet has broken the cancer pattern in the country by recording oesophagus as the leading form of the killer disease in both male and female adults. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 16, 2019 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Researchers identify cancer killing capability of lesser-known immune cells
(Trinity College Dublin) Researchers at Trinity College Dublin have identified, for the first time in oesophageal cancer, the cancer killing capability of a lesser-known type of immune cell, presenting a new potential therapeutic target. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Ongoing safety review of oral osteoporosis drugs (bisphosphonates) and potential increased risk of esophageal cancer
[07-21-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is continuing to review data from published studies to evaluate whether use of oral bisphosphonate drugs is associated with an increased risk of cancer of the esophagus (esophageal cancer). (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - June 28, 2019 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

CDx Diagnostics Founder and CSO Shares Company ’s Journey
CDx Diagnostics is on a mission to provide clinicians with tests and tools to preempt cancer through enhanced detection of precancerous cellular changes. The Suffern, NY-based company accomplishes this goal with WATS3, a diagnostic platform that synthesizes computer imaging, artificial intelligence, molecular biology and three-dimensional cytopathology to detect precancerous change earlier and more reliably than prior methods. MD+DI caught up with the company’s founder and CSO to discuss the evolution of the company and where it goes from here. MD+DI: Let’s talk a little bit about CDx D...
Source: MDDI - June 21, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Promising esophageal reconstruction based on engineered constructs
(Mary Ann Liebert, Inc./Genetic Engineering News) The loss of complete segments of the esophagus often results from treatments for esophageal cancer or congenital abnormalities, and current methods to re-establish continuity are inadequate. Now, working with a rat model, researchers have developed a promising reconstruction method based on the use of 3D-printed esophageal grafts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Meet Thrive: The New Kid on the Liquid Biopsy Block
There’s a new player in the liquid biopsy field. Thrive Earlier Detection Corp., announced late last month that it has launched and has raised $110 million in its Series A round. The financing is pretty sizeable. To put this in perspective, Cambridge, MA-based Thrive’s round is $10 million more than Grail’s series A round, which was raised in 2016. Liquid Biopsy companies are known for having above-average financings (In 2017, Redwood City, CA-based, Guardant Health pulled in $360 million in funding at one point ). Part of the reason for the huge funding rou...
Source: MDDI - June 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

RNA sequence analysis reveals macroscopic somatic clonal expansion across normal tissues
This study provides a broad view of macroscopic clonal expansion in human tissues, thus serving as a foundation for associating clonal expansion with environmental factors, aging, and risk of disease. (Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - June 6, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Yizhak, K., Aguet, F., Kim, J., Hess, J. M., Kübler, K., Grimsby, J., Frazer, R., Zhang, H., Haradhvala, N. J., Rosebrock, D., Livitz, D., Li, X., Arich-Landkof, E., Shoresh, N., Stewart, C., Segre, A. V., Branton, P. A., Polak, P., Ardlie, K. G., Tags: Genetics, Medicine, Diseases, Online Only r-articles Source Type: news

Cancer operation filmed to raise awareness of cancer funding
Janet Jenkins is one of 20 patients who have taken part in a research project into oesophageal cancer. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - June 2, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Grail Presents Early Favorable CCGA Data at ASCO
Grail has been firing on all cylinders ever since it was spun-out from Illumina three years ago. From massive clinical trials to outrageous financing amounts, the liquid biopsy specialist has not let up on meeting milestones. The latest milestone from the Menlo Park, CA-based company is fairly positive data from the Circulating Cell-free Genome Atlas (CCGA) study. The massive study is a prospective, observational, longitudinal trial that has completed enrollment of about 15,000 people with and without cancer across 142 sites in the U.S. and Canada. Grail presented the results during the 2019 American Society of Clinical On...
Source: MDDI - May 31, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: IVD Source Type: news

Female patients more likely to survive but experience worse side effects from cancer treatment
Researchers looked at difference in outcomes after chemotherapy for early cancer of the oesophagus and stomach Related items fromOnMedica Physical problems after breast cancer limit survival Women suffer more chemo side effects than men Exercise and psychological treatments cut cancer fatigue Thousands of women with breast cancer may be spared chemotherapy Cancer mortality cut by a third in young people (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - May 29, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Female patients more likely to survive but experience worse side effects from cancer treatment
(The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust) An analysis of over 3,000 patients with cancer of the esophagus and stomach suggests female patients are more likely to survive longer than male patients, but experience more nausea, vomiting and diarrhea during therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 28, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Potential new therapy takes aim at a lethal esophageal cancer's glutamine addiction
(Medical University of South Carolina) Medical University of South Carolina investigators have exploited a metabolic quirk of certain cancers known as glutamine addiction to identify a potential new therapy for esophageal cancer. After characterizing the pathway involved in cancer progression, they tested a new combination treatment in both cells and animal models, with promising results. The next step is to secure funding to bring the new combination regimen to clinical trial. Their findings are reported in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer Research UK: Less chemotherapy better for older patients with some advanced cancers
(Cancer Research UK) Less chemotherapy is as effective at controlling disease for elderly or frail patients with advanced cancer of the stomach or oesophagus (food pipe), and leads to fewer side effects such as diarrhoea and lethargy. These are the results of a Cancer Research UK funded study, presented prior to the ASCO conference today (Wednesday). (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Radiotherapy Can Double Two-Year Survival for Mesothelioma
A novel radiotherapy regimen can double the chances of surviving two or more years with pleural mesothelioma, according to Dr. Marco Trovo at University Hospital of Udine in Italy. Trovo is the lead author of a study involving 108 patients treated for malignant mesothelioma between 2014 and 2018 at the National Cancer Institute in Aviano, Italy. He presented the findings this week at the annual European Society for Therapeutic Radiology and Oncology convention in Milan. “Radiotherapy has evolved dramatically in the last few years, so we wanted to see if it could now be used to prevent cancer from spreading to nearby ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 14, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

EPA Ignored Advice from Staff Experts When Issuing New Asbestos Rule
More than a dozen senior officials and experts at the Environmental Protection Agency urged the EPA to ban asbestos outright, a new report shows. Two internal memos obtained by the Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization and shared with the New York Times reveal the EPA’s own scientists and lawyers advised the agency to issue a complete ban of asbestos instead of the recent regulations that only restricted its domestic use. In the memos, dated Aug. 10, 2018, EPA staff members wrote that the agency “should seek to ban all new uses of asbestos because the extreme harm from this chemical substance outweighs any ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - May 8, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news