Kenya: Miraa, Hot Tea, Mursik Blamed For Cancer Cases
[Nation] Taking hot tea while chewing miraa and frequent drinking of mursik (fermented milk) are the leading causes of cancer of the oesophagus or food pipe in Northern Kenya and Rift Valley respectively. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - November 16, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Keytruda hits the mark in another late-stage cancer trial
Merck ’s top-selling Keytruda has proven effective in yet another phase 3 trial, this time with esophageal cancer. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - November 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Merck drug Keytruda succeeds in late-stage esophageal cancer trial
Merck& Co's blockbuster drug Keytruda met the main goal of a late-stage trial testing the treatment in patients with cancers of the digestive tract, the U.S. drugmaker said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - November 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Patients with cancers of the gullet, stomach and bowel respond well to new anti-HER2 drug
(ECCO-the European CanCer Organisation) An antibody that binds simultaneously to two distinct regions of the HER2 receptor to block the growth of cancer cells has shown promising signs of anti-tumor activity in a number of cancers including those of the gullet (esophagus), stomach and bowel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 13, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cook Medical inks deal to distribute Taewoong Medical Niti-S esophageal stents
Cook Medical said today that it inked a collaborative deal with South Korean Taewoong Medical to distribute a selection of the company’s stents in the U.S. The deal includes Taewoong’s Niti-S Through The Scope esophageal stent, which is the flagship product of the company’s Niti-S self-expandable line of metal gastrointestinal stents, Cook said. The Niti-S TTS esophageal stent is intended for use in treating certain esophageal strictures caused by malignant tumors, Bloomington, Ind.-based Cook Medical said. The system is deployed through a 10.5 French delivery system which Cook said is unique to the ...
Source: Mass Device - November 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Distribution Stents Cook Medical taewoongmedical Source Type: news

Is Controversy Over NCRT Plus Surgery Warranted in Esophageal Squamous Cell Carcinoma?
A new study adds to evidence examining whether neoadjuvant chemoradiotherapy plus surgery improves survival vs surgery alone in locally advanced ESCC. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - October 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: John Schieszer Source Type: news

Expect Boston Scientific to Keep Rounding Out Its Portfolio with M & amp;A
 Boston Scientific has been on quite the shopping spree in 2018. The Marlborough, MA-based company has announced eight acquisitions since the beginning of the year, plus a hefty investment in Millipede, which is likely to lead to an acquisition within the next year or so. Naturally, the company's aggressive M&A strategy has attracted attention from industry analysts who are eager to see if this spree will continue in 2019. During the company's third-quarter earnings call on Thursday, CFO Daniel Brennan said Boston Scientific still has a "tremendous amount" of financial flexibility. Loo...
Source: MDDI - October 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Middle-aged people have MORE cancer-causing mutant cells than normal ones, shock study reveals
Researchers from the Wellcome Sanger Institute, UK, found that in the oesophagus alone, up to 80 per cent of cells contain mutations that have the potential to cause cancer even if they seem healthy. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Does gut microbiota hold the key to improved diagnosis and treatment of esophageal cancer?
(Spink Health) Researchers from Italy directed by Professor Cammarota have found a unique pattern of microbes living in the esophagus of people with esophageal cancer or Barrett's esophagus, which could potentially be used to identify at-risk individuals and pave the way for new types of treatment in the future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mutant cells colonize our tissues over our lifetime
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) By the time we reach middle age, more than half of the oesophagus in healthy people has been taken over by cells carrying mutations in cancer genes, scientists have uncovered. By studying normal oesophagus tissue, scientists at the Wellcome Sanger Institute, MRC Cancer Unit, University of Cambridge and their collaborators uncovered a hidden world of mutations and evolution in our tissues as we age. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Women may experience more side effects than men during gastric cancer chemotherapy
(The Royal Marsden NHS Foundation Trust) Women may experience certain chemotherapy side-effects including nausea, vomiting, diarrhoea, mouth ulceration and hair loss more frequently than men, according to a new analysis of oesophageal and stomach cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer-associated mutations are common in normal human esophagus
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) Unexpectedly, a new study finds that cancer-associated genetic mutations are surprisingly common in aged, healthy esophageal epithelium tissue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Noncolorectal Gastrointestinal Cancer | Medscape Noncolorectal Gastrointestinal Cancer | Medscape
Noncolorectal gastrointestinal cancers include pancreatic, hepatobiliary, gastric, small bowel, and esophageal cancer. (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Resource Center Source Type: news

CSA Medical ices $23m funding round
CSA Medical said yesterday that it put a $23 million debt-and-equity round on ice for the cryospray technology it’s developing. Boston-based CSA said Horizon Technology Finance led the round with a $15 million loan facility; existing shareholders ponied up $8 million in equity financing, the company said. The round’s first tranche included a $6 million loan from Horizon and another $5 million in equity financing from backers including SV Health Investors, Ascension Ventures and Intersouth Partners, CSA said. Proceeds are earmarked for expanding the commercial footprint into gastrointestinal indic...
Source: Mass Device - October 9, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Featured Funding Roundup Wall Street Beat CSA Medical Inc. Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Scientists create human esophagus in stem cell first
For the first time, scientists have created a human esophagus entirely from stem cells. The organoids may help treat conditions such as esophageal cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GastroIntestinal / Gastroenterology Source Type: news

New oral hygiene care regimen reduces postoperative oral bacteria count and number of days with elevated fever in ICU patients with esophageal cancer.
J Oral Sci. 2018 Aug 30. doi: 10.2334/josnusd.17-0381. [Epub ahead of print]AbstractUsing a controlled pre/post study design, we investigated the effects of professional mechanical cleaning of the oral cavity with benzethonium chloride, interdental brushes, and hydrogen peroxide on the number of oral bacteria and postoperative complications among esophageal cancer patients in an intensive care unit. Before surgery, 44 patients with esophageal cancer were recruited at Okayama Hospital from January through August 2015. The control group (n = 23) received routine oral hygiene care in the intensive care unit. The intervention ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - September 20, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

CSA Medical touts QoL improvements in RejuvenAir chronic bronchitis study
CSA Medical today released early results from a feasibility study exploring the use of its RejuvenAir Metered Cryospray system in treating patients with chronic bronchitis, touting improvements in quality of life for patients treated with the system. Results from the trial were presented at the 2018 European Respiratory Society Congress in Paris, the Boston-based company said. “We are encouraged by these positive safety and feasibility results and we’re moving forward with plans to initiate a worldwide pivotal study of RejuvenAir in chronic bronchitis in 2019. We look forward to advancing this novel therap...
Source: Mass Device - September 19, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Respiratory CSA Medical Inc. Source Type: news

Reducing Risk of Esophageal Cancer in Barrett's Esophagus Reducing Risk of Esophageal Cancer in Barrett's Esophagus
Patients with Barrett's esophagus have a high risk of developing esophageal adenocarcinoma. Can PPIs and H2 receptor antagonists mitigate the risk?Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - September 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Gastroenterology Journal Article Source Type: news

9/11 Cancer Deaths Continue to Rise
John Feal believes more people will die from illnesses related to 9/11 than from the terrorist attack at the World Trade Center. He should know. He’s a first responder who witnesses it every day. And he is not alone in his belief. Feal, a longtime advocate for Sept. 11 survivors and those dying from diseases related to the terrorist attacks, will again host the annual naming ceremony at the 9/11 Responders Remembered Park in Smithtown, Long Island. Each year he reads the names of those who have died within the past year. And each year, the list is longer than the last. On the 17th anniversary of the terrorist attack...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 10, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Barrett's Tied to Better Survival in Esophageal Ca
(MedPage Today) -- Data suggests existence of two distinct types of esophageal adenocarcinoma (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - September 6, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Esophago-pericardial fistula and pneumopericardium from caustic ingestion and esophageal stent - Farkas ZC, Pal S, Jolly GP, Lim MMD, Malik A, Malekan R.
We report a case of an esophago-pericardial fistula presenting as pneumopericardium and purulent pericarditis in a patient with a history ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Treatment for severe heartburn prevents cancer
(Karolinska Institutet) Medical or surgical treatment of severe heartburn prevents cancer of the oesophagus, a study from Karolinska Institutet with almost one million Nordic patients reveals. The results are published in the scientific journal JAMA Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 23, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Chemicals in green vegetables show to prevent bowel cancer
Diets high in indole-3-carbinol protect stomach cells from chaotic division Related items fromOnMedica FOB associated with rise in all-cause mortality Colorectal cancer risk link to ‘inflammatory’ foods Taking aspirin with a PPI reduces risk of oesophageal cancer Cetuximab with chemo shrinks more secondaries Overweight teens more likely to have severe liver disease later (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - August 15, 2018 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Researchers Find New Mesothelioma Genes in Family Study
This study strengthens the suspicion that, next to germline BAP1 alterations, other genetic factors might predispose families to the development of MM,” the authors wrote. Mutations in only one gene called BAP1 have been shown to increase risk of mesothelioma. However, experts suspect other genes may play a role in the disease. This new study supports the idea that other genes can predispose a person — or even an entire family — to mesothelioma. Hints of Genetic Influence on Mesothelioma Risk Asbestos exposure is the No. 1 cause of mesothelioma. However, some families seem to have more cases of mesothe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

HPV Linked to Esophageal Cancer Outcomes
(MedPage Today) -- Better disease-free and overall survival in patients with HPV-positive disease (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - August 3, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Could HPV Be Prognostic in Esophageal Cancer Too? Could HPV Be Prognostic in Esophageal Cancer Too?
HPV positivity is associated with significantly better outcomes in patients with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma, suggesting less intensive therapy might be considered.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Predicting esophageal cancer
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Yang, M. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Drinking Too Much Alcohol (And Too Little) Is Linked to Dementia
To drink or not to drink when it comes to your health really depends on a few important factors, including how much you imbibe and what health issues you’re concerned about. Alcohol in moderation can lower the risk of heart disease for some people, as well as reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and gallstones. But excessive drinking — more than about a drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men — is also linked to several types of cancer, including breast, colon, pharynx, larynx and esophageal. Too much alcohol can also take a toll on the liver. Some studies have also suggested that moderate drink...
Source: TIME: Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alcohol Brain Dementia Source Type: news

Tanzania:How Tobacco Smoking Stalls Economic Development
[Daily News] MAIME Mushomi, a father of four resides at Lugine Village in Kiteto District, Manyara Region. Unfortunately however, he is currently undergoing treatment at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) after being diagnosed with Esophagus Cancer. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 19, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cool that cuppa! New study finds five-fold increase in risk of esophageal cancer for drinkers of super-hot beverages
(Natural News) Love a cup of hot tea? Researchers say it’s best to let it cool down before taking a sip. Drinking tea at high temperatures may increase a person’s risk for esophageal cancer, especially if it is coupled with alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. The study, which was published in the journal Annals of Internal... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Detecting esophageal cancer cells
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-Dose PPI Plus Aspirin Reduced Esophageal Cancer Risk
Combination therapy with a high-dose proton pump inhibitor and aspirin reduced the risk of progression to esophageal cancer in patients with Barrett esophagus. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Pembrolizumab Not Better Than PTX for Advanced Gastric Cancer
MONDAY, July 2, 2018 -- For patients with previously treated advanced gastric cancer or gastro-esophageal junction cancer, pembrolizumab does not result in a significant improvement in overall survival compared with paclitaxel, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Consuming more than 5 alcoholic drinks per week increases your risk of oral cancer: Analysis
(Natural News) You may want to rethink about downing another bottle of beer. Scientists have confirmed that alcohol increases the risk of getting cancer. Research revealed that frequent alcohol drinkers are more prone to contract cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, larynx, breast, liver, colon or rectum, and stomach. Several studies were conducted aiming... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

11 Best Foods For Your Immune System
The following story is excerpted from TIME’s special edition, 100 Most Healing Foods, which is available in stores, at the Meredith Shop and at Amazon. Vitamin C has a reputation for being a feel-good nutrient, so it will come as no surprise that this list is full of foods with high levels of it. In the body, vitamin C behaves as an antioxidant, which means it protects cells from free-radical damage. Consuming it also helps the body better absorb iron, which is critical for normal immune-system function. Although foods high in vitamin C won’t stop your flu symptoms, eating them regularly may help prevent...
Source: TIME: Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Aspirin Plus PPI Prevents Esophageal Cancer Aspirin Plus PPI Prevents Esophageal Cancer
Barrett's esophagus doesn't commonly progress to cancer, but there is a risk; chemoprevention with aspirin plus proton pump inhibitor (PPI) works, but also carries a risk.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Aspirin, acid reducer combo can slow advance of esophogeal cancer
Researchers have found in a phase 3 clinical trial that a combination of aspirin and an acid reducer can slow the spread of esophageal cancer. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET directs esophageal cancer treatment for better outcomes
By using PET scans to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy for esophageal cancer...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET scans for lung and esophageal cancer may be overused Imaging biomarkers show promise for cancer treatment response Pill camera views Barrett's esophagus PET/CT correctly alters esophageal cancer treatment ASCO: PET, PET/CT show broad utility in gastrointestinal cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How aspirin can cut risk of tumour in the gullet
ASPIRIN could help prevent cancer of the oesophagus for those with a high risk of the disease, according to new research released yesterday. Patients with a condition called Barrett ’s oesophagus are more likely to go on to develop the cancer, which kills nearly 8,000 a year in the UK. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taking aspirin with acid reducers can slow advance of esophogeal cancer
New study looked at patients with Barrett ’s esophagus, usually caused by stomach acid, which is considered a precancerous conditionTaking aspirin with acid reducers can help patients with chronic acid reflux slow the advance of cancer of the esophagus, the tube from the throat to the stomach, a new study has found.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in Chicago Tags: Cancer Aspirin Science Health Society Source Type: news

Aspirin and PPI ‘prevents oesophageal cancer in high risk patients’
Taking an anti-acid reflux medication together with a low dose of aspirin can prevent oesophageal cancer in people with a high risk of the disease, according to a UK trial. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - June 4, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Indigestion pills taken with aspirin could cut risk of gullet cancer
The trial, led by Professor Janus Jankowski at the University of Central Lancashire, split 2,563 people with Barrett's oesophagus into four groups. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ASCO18: Trial shows how PET scans help tailor therapy for esophageal cancer
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Survival results for the CALGB 80303 Trial presented at ASCO18 show that PET scan may determine which esophageal cancer patients should continue first chemotherapy and who should switch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer Group Recommends Ditching Bacon and Booze to Stay Cancer-Free
The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has bad news for lovers of bacon and booze: Eliminating processed meats and alcohol from your diet may help reduce your risk of developing cancer. The third report from the WCRF’s Continuous Update Project, an ongoing effort to inform consumers about lifestyle habits that may be related to cancer, provides numerous recommendations for people looking to minimize their risk of getting cancer. But two, in particular, are likely to cause a stir for many Americans. First, the WCRF recommends significantly or totally cutting back on processed meats including bacon, salami, hot dogs and...
Source: TIME: Health - May 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

PavMed subsidiary Lucid Dx inks licensing deal with Case Western Univ.
Pavmed (NSDQ:PAVM) subsidiary Lucid Diagnostics said today it finalized a licensing agreement with Case Western Reserve University to commercialize its EsoCheck non-invasive cell sampling device and DNA biomarker test. The New York-based company said that the EsoCheck device has been shown to effectively and accurately detect Barrett’s Esophagus, which is a precursor to the most common and lethal forms of esophageal cancer caused by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. The EsoCheck test is composed of a pill-sized capsule with a small inflatable balloon attached to a thin catheter. The patient swallows the capsule, ...
Source: Mass Device - May 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Pavmed Source Type: news

How accurate is breath test for diagnosis esophagogastric cancer?
(JAMA Network) A breath analysis test to diagnose esophagogastric (esophagus or stomach) cancer showed good diagnostic accuracy in a study of 335 patients, including 172 patients already diagnosed with that cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve, Lucid Diagnostics sign agreement on Barrett's Esophagus detector
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) Case Western Reserve University and Lucid Diagnostics, a subsidiary of publicly traded New York-based medical device company, PAVmed Inc. (Nasdaq: PAVM), have signed an exclusive license agreement to commercialize a technology that quickly and accurately detects Barrett's Esophagus. University Hospitals physicians will implement the technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Amplification of key cellular organizer may initiate cancer, study suggests
(Rockefeller University Press) Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes -- organelles that play a vital role during cell division -- before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett's esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nodal Response to Pre - Op Tx Tied to Survival in Esophageal Cancer
Survival benefit of nodal response maintained among patients with nodal, but not primary response (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Radiology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Nodal Response to Pre-Op Tx Tied to Survival in Esophageal Cancer
WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 -- For patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer, the status of lymph nodes following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy determines survival, according to a study presented at the annual... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news