Researchers Find New Mesothelioma Genes in Family Study
This study strengthens the suspicion that, next to germline BAP1 alterations, other genetic factors might predispose families to the development of MM,” the authors wrote. Mutations in only one gene called BAP1 have been shown to increase risk of mesothelioma. However, experts suspect other genes may play a role in the disease. This new study supports the idea that other genes can predispose a person — or even an entire family — to mesothelioma. Hints of Genetic Influence on Mesothelioma Risk Asbestos exposure is the No. 1 cause of mesothelioma. However, some families seem to have more cases of mesothe...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

HPV Linked to Esophageal Cancer Outcomes
(MedPage Today) -- Better disease-free and overall survival in patients with HPV-positive disease (Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology)
Source: MedPage Today Gastroenterology - August 3, 2018 Category: Gastroenterology Source Type: news

Could HPV Be Prognostic in Esophageal Cancer Too? Could HPV Be Prognostic in Esophageal Cancer Too?
HPV positivity is associated with significantly better outcomes in patients with Barrett's high-grade dysplasia or esophageal adenocarcinoma, suggesting less intensive therapy might be considered.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - August 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Predicting esophageal cancer
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - August 2, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Yang, M. Tags: twil Source Type: news

Drinking Too Much Alcohol (And Too Little) Is Linked to Dementia
To drink or not to drink when it comes to your health really depends on a few important factors, including how much you imbibe and what health issues you’re concerned about. Alcohol in moderation can lower the risk of heart disease for some people, as well as reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes and gallstones. But excessive drinking — more than about a drink a day for women and two drinks a day for men — is also linked to several types of cancer, including breast, colon, pharynx, larynx and esophageal. Too much alcohol can also take a toll on the liver. Some studies have also suggested that moderate drink...
Source: TIME: Health - August 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Alcohol Brain Dementia Source Type: news

Tanzania:How Tobacco Smoking Stalls Economic Development
[Daily News] MAIME Mushomi, a father of four resides at Lugine Village in Kiteto District, Manyara Region. Unfortunately however, he is currently undergoing treatment at Ocean Road Cancer Institute (ORCI) after being diagnosed with Esophagus Cancer. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 19, 2018 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Cool that cuppa! New study finds five-fold increase in risk of esophageal cancer for drinkers of super-hot beverages
(Natural News) Love a cup of hot tea? Researchers say it’s best to let it cool down before taking a sip. Drinking tea at high temperatures may increase a person’s risk for esophageal cancer, especially if it is coupled with alcohol consumption and cigarette smoking. The study, which was published in the journal Annals of Internal... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Detecting esophageal cancer cells
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers at the University of Texas at Arlington's College of Nursing and Health Innovation have developed a new nanoparticle-based platform for simultaneous imaging and treatment of esophageal cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High-Dose PPI Plus Aspirin Reduced Esophageal Cancer Risk
Combination therapy with a high-dose proton pump inhibitor and aspirin reduced the risk of progression to esophageal cancer in patients with Barrett esophagus. (Source: CancerNetwork)
Source: CancerNetwork - July 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: Bryant Furlow Source Type: news

Pembrolizumab Not Better Than PTX for Advanced Gastric Cancer
MONDAY, July 2, 2018 -- For patients with previously treated advanced gastric cancer or gastro-esophageal junction cancer, pembrolizumab does not result in a significant improvement in overall survival compared with paclitaxel, according to a study... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Consuming more than 5 alcoholic drinks per week increases your risk of oral cancer: Analysis
(Natural News) You may want to rethink about downing another bottle of beer. Scientists have confirmed that alcohol increases the risk of getting cancer. Research revealed that frequent alcohol drinkers are more prone to contract cancers of the oral cavity and pharynx, esophagus, larynx, breast, liver, colon or rectum, and stomach. Several studies were conducted aiming... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

11 Best Foods For Your Immune System
The following story is excerpted from TIME’s special edition, 100 Most Healing Foods, which is available in stores, at the Meredith Shop and at Amazon. Vitamin C has a reputation for being a feel-good nutrient, so it will come as no surprise that this list is full of foods with high levels of it. In the body, vitamin C behaves as an antioxidant, which means it protects cells from free-radical damage. Consuming it also helps the body better absorb iron, which is critical for normal immune-system function. Although foods high in vitamin C won’t stop your flu symptoms, eating them regularly may help prevent...
Source: TIME: Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

Aspirin Plus PPI Prevents Esophageal Cancer Aspirin Plus PPI Prevents Esophageal Cancer
Barrett's esophagus doesn't commonly progress to cancer, but there is a risk; chemoprevention with aspirin plus proton pump inhibitor (PPI) works, but also carries a risk.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Aspirin, acid reducer combo can slow advance of esophogeal cancer
Researchers have found in a phase 3 clinical trial that a combination of aspirin and an acid reducer can slow the spread of esophageal cancer. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

PET directs esophageal cancer treatment for better outcomes
By using PET scans to assess the efficacy of chemotherapy for esophageal cancer...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: PET scans for lung and esophageal cancer may be overused Imaging biomarkers show promise for cancer treatment response Pill camera views Barrett's esophagus PET/CT correctly alters esophageal cancer treatment ASCO: PET, PET/CT show broad utility in gastrointestinal cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How aspirin can cut risk of tumour in the gullet
ASPIRIN could help prevent cancer of the oesophagus for those with a high risk of the disease, according to new research released yesterday. Patients with a condition called Barrett ’s oesophagus are more likely to go on to develop the cancer, which kills nearly 8,000 a year in the UK. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - June 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Taking aspirin with acid reducers can slow advance of esophogeal cancer
New study looked at patients with Barrett ’s esophagus, usually caused by stomach acid, which is considered a precancerous conditionTaking aspirin with acid reducers can help patients with chronic acid reflux slow the advance of cancer of the esophagus, the tube from the throat to the stomach, a new study has found.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Glenza in Chicago Tags: Cancer Aspirin Science Health Society Source Type: news

Aspirin and PPI ‘prevents oesophageal cancer in high risk patients’
Taking an anti-acid reflux medication together with a low dose of aspirin can prevent oesophageal cancer in people with a high risk of the disease, according to a UK trial. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - June 4, 2018 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Indigestion pills taken with aspirin could cut risk of gullet cancer
The trial, led by Professor Janus Jankowski at the University of Central Lancashire, split 2,563 people with Barrett's oesophagus into four groups. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

ASCO18: Trial shows how PET scans help tailor therapy for esophageal cancer
(University of Colorado Anschutz Medical Campus) Survival results for the CALGB 80303 Trial presented at ASCO18 show that PET scan may determine which esophageal cancer patients should continue first chemotherapy and who should switch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Cancer Group Recommends Ditching Bacon and Booze to Stay Cancer-Free
The World Cancer Research Fund (WCRF) has bad news for lovers of bacon and booze: Eliminating processed meats and alcohol from your diet may help reduce your risk of developing cancer. The third report from the WCRF’s Continuous Update Project, an ongoing effort to inform consumers about lifestyle habits that may be related to cancer, provides numerous recommendations for people looking to minimize their risk of getting cancer. But two, in particular, are likely to cause a stir for many Americans. First, the WCRF recommends significantly or totally cutting back on processed meats including bacon, salami, hot dogs and...
Source: TIME: Health - May 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer healthytime onetime Source Type: news

PavMed subsidiary Lucid Dx inks licensing deal with Case Western Univ.
Pavmed (NSDQ:PAVM) subsidiary Lucid Diagnostics said today it finalized a licensing agreement with Case Western Reserve University to commercialize its EsoCheck non-invasive cell sampling device and DNA biomarker test. The New York-based company said that the EsoCheck device has been shown to effectively and accurately detect Barrett’s Esophagus, which is a precursor to the most common and lethal forms of esophageal cancer caused by Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease. The EsoCheck test is composed of a pill-sized capsule with a small inflatable balloon attached to a thin catheter. The patient swallows the capsule, ...
Source: Mass Device - May 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Diagnostics Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Pavmed Source Type: news

How accurate is breath test for diagnosis esophagogastric cancer?
(JAMA Network) A breath analysis test to diagnose esophagogastric (esophagus or stomach) cancer showed good diagnostic accuracy in a study of 335 patients, including 172 patients already diagnosed with that cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Case Western Reserve, Lucid Diagnostics sign agreement on Barrett's Esophagus detector
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) Case Western Reserve University and Lucid Diagnostics, a subsidiary of publicly traded New York-based medical device company, PAVmed Inc. (Nasdaq: PAVM), have signed an exclusive license agreement to commercialize a technology that quickly and accurately detects Barrett's Esophagus. University Hospitals physicians will implement the technology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Amplification of key cellular organizer may initiate cancer, study suggests
(Rockefeller University Press) Cells begin to accumulate centrosomes -- organelles that play a vital role during cell division -- before they transform into cancer cells, according to a new study of patients with Barrett's esophagus condition, which is associated with esophageal cancer. The research, which will be published May 8 in the Journal of Cell Biology, suggests that similar cases of centrosome amplification may contribute to the initiation and progression of a variety of human cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 8, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Nodal Response to Pre - Op Tx Tied to Survival in Esophageal Cancer
Survival benefit of nodal response maintained among patients with nodal, but not primary response (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - May 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Radiology, Surgery, Journal, Source Type: news

Nodal Response to Pre-Op Tx Tied to Survival in Esophageal Cancer
WEDNESDAY, May 2, 2018 -- For patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer, the status of lymph nodes following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy determines survival, according to a study presented at the annual... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

For patients with esophageal cancer, status of lymph nodes after preoperative therapy determines survival
(American Association for Thoracic Surgery) The status of lymph nodes rather than the status of the primary tumor following preoperative neoadjuvant chemotherapy or chemoradiation therapy is the most important factor that determines whether patients with locally advanced esophageal cancer will survive. The study presented at the AATS 98th Annual Meeting indicates that while preoperative chemotherapy and radiation therapy improve survival of patients with esophageal cancer, patients with malignant lymph nodes following therapy were less likely to survive than patients with no cancer in the lymph nodes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Health Tip: Heavy Alcohol Use Increases Cancer Risk
-- Heavy drinking increases your risk of developing cancers of the mouth, throat, voice box, esophagus, liver, colon and breast, the American Cancer Society says. The society says alcohol abuse may: Damage body tissues. Help toxic chemicals, such... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Heavy Drinking May Change the Bacteria In Your Mouth and Raise Gum Disease Risk
There’s still quite a bit scientists don’t know about the microbiome: the vast collection of microorganisms living within your body. What is becoming increasingly clear, however, is that your lifestyle habits, from the foods you eat to the medications you take, may influence these bacterial colonies. Even drinking seems to have an effect. A new study, published Tuesday in the journal Microbiome, finds that drinking alcohol may alter some of the approximately 700 types of bacteria in your mouth — and probably not for the better. The study finds that alcohol may give rise to strains of oral bacteria that ar...
Source: TIME: Health - April 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Correcting tiny differences in patient's position for radiotherapy could increase survival chances
(European Society for Radiotherapy and Oncology (ESTRO)) Very small differences in the way a patient lies during radiotherapy treatment for lung or esophageal cancer can have an impact on how likely they are to survive, according to research presented at the ESTRO 37 conference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A study links soil metals with cancer mortality
(FECYT - Spanish Foundation for Science and Technology) Spanish epidemiologists and geologists have found associations between esophageal cancer and soils where lead is abundant, lung cancer and terrains with increased copper content, brain tumor with areas rich in arsenic, and bladder cancer with high cadmium levels. These statistical links do not indicate that there is a cause-effect relationship between soil type and cancer, but they suggest that the influence of metals from the earth's surface on the geographical distribution of tumors should be analyzed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Living With Cancer: Understanding esophageal cancer
Esophageal cancer? April?is Esophageal Cancer Awareness Month, which makes it a good time to learn more about esophageal cancer, the sixth most common cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Signs and symptoms of esophageal cancer include difficulty swallowing, unexplained weight loss, coughing and hoarseness. Risk factors for esophageal cancer include smoking, drinking alcohol, being obese, and [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - April 20, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Boston Sci Continues M & amp;A Hot Streak with nVision Buy
Boston Scientific isn’t slowing down with its M&A activity. This time the Marlborough, MA-based company is acquiring nVision Medical, a private company focused on women's health. The transaction consists of an upfront cash payment of $150 million, and up to an additional $125 million in potential clinical and commercial milestones over four years.  nVision’s device collects cells from the fallopian tubes, offering a potential platform for earlier diagnosis of ovarian cancer. “nVision Medical developed the first and only device cleared by the FDA to collect cells from the fallopian tubes,” K...
Source: MDDI - April 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Source Type: news

The Medical Device Behind the Discovery of a New Human Structure
What on Earth is this thing? That is the question David Carr-Locke, MD, and his colleagues asked when they discovered a microanatomical network of interconnected spaces, filled with fluid and lined by collagen with a unique arrangement, that appears to be present throughout the body. Whether or not this network is actually a newly discovered human organ is debatable. What is clear, however, is that this discovery is very widespread throughout the body and contains a lot of fluid, said Carr-Locke, clinical director of the Center for Advanced Digestive Care at Weill Cornell Medical College and New York Presbyterian...
Source: MDDI - April 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Opens with Optimism in South Florida
Dr. Chukwuemeka Ikpeazu at the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center has brought hope — where once there was none — to patients in South Florida with unresectable pleural mesothelioma. Ikpeazu is the principal investigator in the multicenter phase II clinical trial involving the much-anticipated immunotherapy drug durvalumab. Pharmaceutical giant AstraZeneca manufactures the drug under the brand name Imfinzi. “I am optimistic, very, very optimistic that this drug will be effective for these patients,” Ikpeazu told Asbestos.com. “All the data, all the earlier studies, are encouraging.” He...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 4, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

California Coffee Shops Will Warn Customers About This Possibly Cancer-Causing Chemical. Here ’s What to Know About It
A judge ruled on Thursday that coffee sellers in California should post warnings about a potentially cancer-causing chemical found in the beverage. The chemical, acrylamide, is produced during the coffee bean roasting process, as well as when sugars and amino acids found in other foods are cooked at high temperatures. It’s one of 65 chemicals included in a California law that requires businesses to warn consumers if they may be exposed to substances associated with cancer, birth defects or other reproductive issues. While the decision — which at this point is just a preliminary ruling, and may still be challeng...
Source: TIME: Health - March 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cancer onetime Source Type: news

Pembrolizumab Promising in Previously Treated Gastric Cancer Pembrolizumab Promising in Previously Treated Gastric Cancer
In patients with advanced gastric or gastro-esophageal cancer progressing after second-line treatment, monotherapy with pembrolizumab offers a “ promising new treatment option, ” according to research from Merck, which sells the drug as Keytruda.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

The connection between diet, obesity, and cancer: Nutrition experts explore the evidence
(Elsevier) About one third of cancer cases are estimated to be linked to dietary and other modifiable risk factors, especially for obesity-related cancers such as breast, colorectal, ovarian, endometrial, kidney, gallbladder, esophageal, and pancreatic cancers. In this special theme issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, food and nutrition practitioners and other health professionals take an in-depth look at the relationship between nutrition, obesity, and cancer prevention, treatment, and survival and identify research gaps for future prevention research efforts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New family of promising, selective silver-based anti-cancer drugs discovered
(University of Johannesburg) A new family of potential silver-based anti-cancer drugs has been discovered by researchers in South Africa. The most promising complex among these has been successfully tested in rats and in several human cancer cell lines in laboratory studies. The complex is as effective against human esophageal cancer cells, as a widely-used chemotherapy drug, but at a ten times lower dose, and much lower toxicity against non-malignant cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDx & #039;s WATS3D Highly Effective in Real World Setting
CDx Diagnostics said results from a recent multicenter prospective trial show the use of its WATS3D test increases the detection of both Barrett’s esophagus and esophageal dysplasia by more than 80%. The results were published in the latest issue of United European Gastroenterology Journal and featured in the American Society for Gastrointestinal Endoscopy (ASGE’s) Scope Tech Talk Video Series. The trial was conducted at 25 community-based gastrointestinal (GI) centers across the U.S. In the study, 4,203 patients were tested for esophageal disease. The findings show that with the inclusion of WATS3D overal...
Source: MDDI - March 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Business Design News Source Type: news

Cernostics Raises $2.5 Million in Series A1 Financing, Led by Illumina Ventures
TissueCypher® Barrett's Esophagus Assay is First Precision Medicine Platform for Prevention of Esophageal Cancer PITTSBURGH, March 21, 2018 -- (Healthcare Sales & Marketing Network) -- Cernostics, a privately-held company focused on delivering next... Diagnostics, Oncology, Venture Capital Cernostics, TissueCypher, Barrett's Esophagus, esophageal cancer (Source: HSMN NewsFeed)
Source: HSMN NewsFeed - March 21, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Cedars-Sinai Investigator Awarded grant to study esophageal cancer
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) Dechen Lin, PhD, a research scientist in the Division of Hematology and Oncology in the Cedars-Sinai Department of Medicine, has been awarded $175,000 from the Price Family Foundation and the DeGregorio Family Foundation for Gastric and Esophageal Cancer Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Should You Drink Matcha Tea?
While green tea has long been a recommended part of a healthy diet, another brighter shade is becoming increasingly popular: matcha. Here’s what you should know about the beverage. What is matcha tea? Matcha is a type of green tea made by taking young tea leaves and grinding them into a bright green powder. The powder is then whisked with hot water. This is different from regular green tea, where the leaves are infused in water, then removed. Drinking brewed green tea “is a bit like boiling spinach, throwing away the spinach and just drinking the water,” says Louise Cheadle, co-author of The Book of Match...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Matcha tea Source Type: news

Long-term PPI Use and Increased Esophageal CA Risk Long-term PPI Use and Increased Esophageal CA Risk
A single cohort study shows an increased risk for esophageal cancer in patients taking long-term proton-pump inhibitor (PPI) therapy, but experts are skeptical about the finding.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - March 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Detection and localization of surgically resectable cancers with a multi-analyte blood test
Earlier detection is key to reducing cancer deaths. Here, we describe a blood test that can detect eight common cancer types through assessment of the levels of circulating proteins and mutations in cell-free DNA. We applied this test, called CancerSEEK, to 1005 patients with nonmetastatic, clinically detected cancers of the ovary, liver, stomach, pancreas, esophagus, colorectum, lung, or breast. CancerSEEK tests were positive in a median of 70% of the eight cancer types. The sensitivities ranged from 69 to 98% for the detection of five cancer types (ovary, liver, stomach, pancreas, and esophagus) for which there are no sc...
Source: ScienceNOW - February 22, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Cohen, J. D., Li, L., Wang, Y., Thoburn, C., Afsari, B., Danilova, L., Douville, C., Javed, A. A., Wong, F., Mattox, A., Hruban, R. H., Wolfgang, C. L., Goggins, M. G., Dal Molin, M., Wang, T.-L., Roden, R., Klein, A. P., Ptak, J., Dobbyn, L., Schaefer, J Tags: Medicine, Diseases reports Source Type: news

Doctors In China Lead Race To Treat Cancer By Editing Genes
More than a third of patients with cancer of the esophagus responded to experimental treatment in China with the gene-editing technique CRISPR. Several CRISPR studies are underway there.(Image credit: Yuhan Xu/NPR) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Rob Stein Source Type: news

Can Alcohol Help You Live Longer? Here ’s What the Research Really Says
New research, which was presented at the American Association for the Advancement of Science’s annual conference, has found that moderate drinking is linked to a longer life. Drinking about two glasses of wine or beer a day was linked to an 18% drop in a person’s risk of early death—an even stronger effect than the life-preserving practice of exercise, according to the researchers. The results came from the 90+ Study, a research project out of the University of California Irvine’s Institute for Memory Impairments and Neurological Disorders that examines the habits of people who live to at least 90. ...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Cancer Research boost: £45 million invested into most hard-to-treat types of the disease
CANCER Research UK is investing £45 million into finding a cure for some of the most hard-to-treat types of the disease. The money - one of the largest investments in clinical research to date - will be ploughed into human trials into pancreatic, oesophageal and lung cancer and brain tumours. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hot Tea Linked to Esophageal Cancer Risk
Title: Hot Tea Linked to Esophageal Cancer RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/7/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/7/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news