UPMC Enterprises invests in oncology diagnostics firm
UPMC Enterprises is the lead investor of a $5 million funding round for Cernostics, a biotech firm specializing in oncology diagnostics and based in Pittsburgh. The amount of UPMC Enterprises' investment wasn't disclosed. But a news release from UPMC and Cernostics said the money would help it with the rollout of a diagnostic test for Barrett's Esophagus, a condition that can lead to cancer for high-risk patients. The diagnostic test, TissueCypher, will b e used in UPMC in what it calls "precision… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 31, 2016 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Your NEJM Group Today: Promoting Super-Utilizer Care, PET Overuse in Lung & Esophageal Cancer, Alaska Hospitalist Opportunity (FREE)
By the Editors NEJM Group offers so many valuable resources for practicing clinicians. Here's what we chose for you today:NEJM Catalyst: How did UF … (Source: Physician's First Watch current issue)
Source: Physician's First Watch current issue - August 30, 2016 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Fused genes found in esophageal cancer cells offer new clues on disease mechanisms
Scientists have characterized structurally abnormal genes in esophageal adenocarcinoma, the findings of which could pave way for developing new biomarkers in this fatal disease, they say. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 25, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Excess body fat now linked to 13 different types of cancer
"Experts have linked eight more cancers to being overweight or obese, nearly tripling the list from five to 13," the Daily Mail reports. This is the latest finding of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a group of cancer experts from around the world that look at risk factors for cancer.  What is the basis for these reports? The headlines are based on a report published in the peer-reviewed New England Journal of Medicine. The report is not exactly new research, but a review of previously published studies that looked at the link between weight and cancers. It is the result of...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 25, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Obesity Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Fused genes found in esophageal cancer cells offer new clues on disease mechanisms
(Case Western Reserve University) Now, researchers from Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine have characterized structurally abnormal genes in esophageal adenocarcinoma, the findings of which could pave way for developing new biomarkers in this fatal disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

World Health Organization Links 8 More Cancer Types to Excess Weight
By Stacy SimonThe International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), part of the World Health Organization, has added 8 types of cancer to those it had previously linked to being overweight or obese. The newly linked cancer types are: stomach, liver, gallbladder, pancreatic, ovarian, thyroid, multiple myeloma, and meningioma (a tumor of the lining over the brain and spinal cord).IARC also confirmed its previous conclusions, that excess weight is a risk factor for cancers of the esophagus, colon and rectum, breast (in postmenopausal women), kidney, and endometrium. IARC also said being overweight or obese may raise the ris...
Source: American Cancer Society :: News and Features - August 25, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Diet/Exercise/Weight Source Type: news

Well: Obesity Is Linked to at Least 13 Types of Cancer
Carrying excess weight is a risk factor for a range of cancers, including uterine and ovarian cancers and some cancers of the breast, pancreas, liver, esophagus and kidney. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: NICHOLAS BAKALAR Tags: Cancer Esophageal Cancer Graham Colditz International Agency for Research on Cancer New England Journal of Medicine Obesity Uterine Cancer Women and Girls Featured Live Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Early indicator of esophageal cancer risk found in Barrett's cells
Testing genetic diversity of Barrett's cells in food pipe could give early indication of which people with Barrett's have higher risk of esophageal cancer. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - August 23, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Esophageal cancers driven by'marginal gain' rather than speed
Scientists have shown that unexpectedly, esophageal cancer cells do not divide faster than their normal neighbors. But unlike normal cells, the tumor cells produce slightly more dividing daughter cells than non-dividing ones, forming a tumor. The study could lead to the development of new treatments for cancers that do not respond to current therapies which target fast-growing cells. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Gene scanning 'could improve screening for oesophageal cancer'
Conclusion This prospective cohort study aimed to see whether a test performed on patients with non-cancerous Barrett's oesophagus may be able to predict whether the condition progressed to oesophageal cancer.  Overall, they found genetic diversity in the oesophageal cell samples at the start of the study seemed to be linked to the risk of cancer progression. However, the research has limitations to consider: By design, this study is only able to draw links – it does not propose treatment or lifestyle steps to be taken to reduce risk. The sample of patients in this study is small, so we...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Genetics/stem cells Source Type: news

New study shows esophageal cancers driven by 'marginal gain' rather than speed
(Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute) Wellcome Trust Sanger Institute scientists have shown that unexpectedly, esophageal cancer cells do not divide faster than their normal neighbors. But unlike normal cells, the tumor cells produce slightly more dividing daughter cells than non-dividing ones, forming a tumor. The study, published in Nature Cell Biology today, could lead to the development of new treatments for cancers that do not respond to current therapies which target fast-growing cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 22, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Queen Mary University study shows which heartburn patients are at risk of oesophageal cancer
Researchers of Queen Mary University of London have shown it is possible to work out which patients with Barrett's oesophagus are at high risk of cancer by looking at the genetic make-up of their cells. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 19, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

' Born to be bad' or'born to be benign:' Testing cells for esophageal cancer risk
Genetically analyzing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for esophageal cancer, according to research. Barrett's Esophagus is a common condition that affects millions of people, although many are undiagnosed. This condition involves normal cells in the esophagus (food pipe) being replaced by an unusual cell type called Barrett's Esophagus, and is thought to be a consequence of chronic reflux (heartburn). (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - August 19, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

'Born to be bad' or 'born to be benign' -- testing cells for esophageal cancer risk
(Queen Mary University of London) Genetically analyzing lesions in the food pipe could provide an early and accurate test for esophageal cancer, according to research led by Queen Mary University of London, Academic Medical Center in Amsterdam and Arizona State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 19, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Squamous Dysplasia in the Esophagus Tied to Risk of Additional Lesions Squamous Dysplasia in the Esophagus Tied to Risk of Additional Lesions
Patients with early-stage esophageal squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) and areas of dysplastic squamous epithelium are at increased risk of developing multiple SCCs, according to Japanese researchers.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - August 18, 2016 Category: Surgery Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Perspective on alcohol use and cancer risk
This study isn’t going to become part of my discussion about the pros and cons of alcohol consumption. For those who have the time, here’s why: First, it isn’t because some of the cancers attributed to alcohol use aren’t serious––they are. Anyone who has had a loved one with cancer of the esophagus (swallowing pipe) knows this to be true. The problem is in the context in which I counsel about the role of alcohol in my patient’s lives. For a few, alcohol is nothing but bad news, and this study doesn’t add to what we already know. For these individuals, the challenge is that I ...
Source: New Harvard Health Information - August 12, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Steven J. Atlas, MD, MPH Tags: Behavioral Health Cancer Prevention alcohol use Source Type: news

Can elastography help guide breast cancer treatment?
Shear-wave elastography measurements of tumor stiffness can predict early on...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Shear-wave elastography can predict esophageal varices ABUS: An effective option for dense breast screening Ultrasound fusion software clears up liver biopsies Elastography aids assessment of focal prostate lesions Shear-wave elastography aids monitoring of tendinopathy (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - August 5, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Alcohol, Obesity Could Up Esophageal Cancer Risk
A third of cases would vanish if people stayed trim and didn't drink, cancer experts say (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk
A third of cases would vanish if people stayed trim and didn't drink, cancer experts say (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - July 28, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Authors: webmaster at doctorslounge.com Tags: Oncology, Dependence, Nutrition, News, Source Type: news

Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk
A third of cases would vanish if people stayed trim and didn't drink, cancer experts say Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Alcohol, Esophageal Cancer, Obesity (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - July 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers discover gene variant associated with esophageal cancer
A rare genetic mutation is associated with susceptibility to familial Barrett esophagus and esophageal cancer, according to a new study that set out to identify novel disease susceptibility variants in FBE in affected individuals from a large multigenerational family. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 28, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk
THURSDAY, July 28, 2016 -- Drinking plus being overweight may be a bad combo when it comes to risks for the two most common types of esophageal cancer, a new report warns. The findings suggest that in the United States, a third of esophageal cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 28, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Source Type: news

Researchers discover gene variant associated with esophageal cancer
( University Hospitals Case Medical Center ) Researchers at University Hospitals Case Medical Center have discovered that a rare genetic mutation is associated with susceptibility to familial Barrett esophagus and esophageal cancer, according to a new study published in the July issue of JAMA Oncology. Amitabh Chak, M.D., of University Hospitals Case Medical Center's Seidman Cancer Center and Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine, and colleagues set out to identify novel disease susceptibility variants in FBE in affected individuals from a large multigenerational family. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 28, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Alcohol, Obesity Could Raise Esophageal Cancer Risk
A third of cases would vanish if people stayed trim and didn't drink, cancer experts say (Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - July 28, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Supercharge career skills at the AMA Research Symposium
Each fall physicians in training have a chance to spotlight their research projects before leaders of the medical community. Find out how the AMA Research Symposium can boost your visibility, build your CV and expand your network. Last year ’s symposium winners also offer tips for competitors. Symposium participants compete for cash prizes and benefit from the chance to present their findings before experts in their fields. The symposium takes place Nov. 11-12 during the 2016 AMA Interim Meeting at Walt Disney World Swan and Dolphin Resort in Orlando. Build credibility, polish your CV Discussing your research ...
Source: AMA Wire - July 27, 2016 Category: Journals (General) Authors: Troy Parks Source Type: news

Extranodal extension of lymph node metastasis is a marker of poor prognosis in oesophageal cancer: a systematic review with meta-analysis
This review concludes that on the basis of the results, in oesophageal cancer, extranodal extension should be considered from the gross sampling to the pathology report, and in future oncological staging system. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - July 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Study Suggests
A new study suggests that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The study, published Thursday in the scientific journal Addiction, consists of a major review of 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, the study concludes. “From a public health perspective, a...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Alcohol Is Even Deadlier Than You Think, Scientist Reminds Us
An opinion piece published in the scientific journal Addiction in July gathers evidence to argue that alcohol is a direct cause of cancer in several areas of the body. The article reviews 10 years’ worth of studies from several organizations, including the World Cancer Research Fund, the American Institute for Cancer Research and the International Agency for Research on Cancer. And its conclusions are dire.  Nearly 6 percent of cancer deaths worldwide can be linked to alcohol, including in people who drink light to moderate amounts of alcohol, according to author Jennie Connor, a profess...
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - July 24, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Alcohol 'a direct cause of seven types of cancer'
Conclusion This narrative review aimed to summarise data from published biological and epidemiological research to discuss the strength of evidence that alcohol causes cancer. The author gives their main finding as a link between alcohol consumption and cancer at seven sites, and also that the highest risks seem to be associated with heavier drinking. However, they state there's no "safe" drinking threshold and that low to moderate consumption still contributes to a significant number of cancer cases. The biggest limitation of this review is that it doesn't appear to be systematic. The author provided no method...
Source: NHS News Feed - July 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

New review concludes that evidence for alcohol causing cancer is strong
A new review of epidemiological evidence supports a causal association between alcohol consumption and cancers at seven sites in the body: oropharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum and female breast. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 22, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New review concludes that evidence for alcohol causing cancer is strong
( Society for the Study of Addiction ) A new review of epidemiological evidence supports a causal association between alcohol consumption and cancers at seven sites in the body: oropharynx, larynx, esophagus, liver, colon, rectum and female breast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 21, 2016 Category: Global & Universal Source Type: news

SpectraScience taps Advanced Medical German Co as Middle East distributor
SpectraScience said today it inked a distribution deal with Kuwait’s Advanced Medical German Co. Through the deal, AMG will operate as SpectraScience’s exclusive distributor for the Middle East region, the San Diego, Calif.-based company said today. “We are pleased to be working with the premier distribution company for gastroenterology in the Middle East. We believe that with our innovative products and the sales, marketing, and distribution acumen of AMG in the Middle East we are poised to bring a new level of diagnostic capability to clinicians in colorectal cancer screening,” SpectraScience...
Source: Mass Device - July 19, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Distribution SpectraScience Inc. Source Type: news

Discovery of the genes responsible for esophageal cancer common among Japanese
A Japanese research group has now discovered the genetic mutations responsible for esophageal cancer frequently found among Japanese. They base their discovery on a genomic analysis of 144 Japanese esophageal cancer patients, the largest of its scale so far. The study findings are expected to contribute to the development of new medical treatments with fewer side effects and tailored drug therapies. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 15, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

Best Exercise To Prevent Cancer
This study focused on the connection between a high-intensity exercise program and cancer. In this case, shrinking tumors. Published a few months ago, this report found high-intensity exercise reduced tumors in mice by 50%.2 Researchers believe it’s because of the adrenaline surge that a high-intensity exercise produces. The adrenaline pushes cancer-busting natural killer (NK) cells toward tumors. NK cells are part of your innate immune system. They are a kind of white blood cell that seeks out and kills other infected cells (including tumor cells) while sparing healthy cells. They also found that a ch...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - July 11, 2016 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Al Sears Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

Shear-wave elastography can predict esophageal varices
Shear-wave elastography can noninvasively predict the presence of esophageal...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Quantitative ultrasound CAD analyzes multiple conditions Shear-wave elastography aids monitoring of tendinopathy Ultrasound elastography can spot risk of preterm labor Shear-wave elastography shows promise for breast cancer (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 7, 2016 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New detection method paves the way for 100 percent detection of esophageal cancer
Recognizing early stages of esophageal cancer is difficult because it can easily be missed. Medical researchers have now been working to develop a method to enable a computer to scan esophagus images for signs of esophageal cancer. With exceptional results: the computer recognizes early cancer with almost as much accuracy as top specialists, of which there is only a handful. (Source: ScienceDaily Headlines)
Source: ScienceDaily Headlines - July 5, 2016 Category: Science Source Type: news

New detection method paves the way for 100 percent detection of esophageal cancer
(Eindhoven University of Technology) Recognizing early stages of esophageal cancer is difficult because it can easily be missed. Eindhoven University of Technology has therefore been working with the Catharina Hospital in Eindhoven to develop a method to enable a computer to scan esophagus images for signs of esophageal cancer. With exceptional results: the computer recognizes early cancer with almost as much accuracy as top specialists, of which there is only a handful. The results are in the July issue of Endoscopy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 5, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA approves Concordia’s Photofrin 630 laser
Concordia International (NSDQ:CXRX) said it won pre-market approval from the FDA for its Photofrin 630 laser, which is designed to activate an anti-cancer drug in patients with throat and lung cancers. Oakville, Ontario-based Concordia said the device is designed to activate the drug Photofrin (porfimer sodium) in patients with esophageal cancer, Barrett’s Esophagus and non-small cell lung cancer. The Photofrin 630 laser was re-engineered to include new controls and peripheral systems, the company said. “We anticipate that these improvements could support greater adoption of PDT with Photofrin wi...
Source: Mass Device - June 30, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Concordia International Source Type: news

Biostage files for orphan drug designation for Cellspan artificial esophagus
Organ regeneration specialist Biostage (NSDQ:BSTG) said it asked the FDA for orphan drug status for its Cellspan artificial esophagus. If the request is granted, Holliston, Mass.-based Biostage, formerly know as Harvard Apparatus Regenerative Technology, would win 7 years of market exclusivity after FDA approval, plus tax credits and an exemption from the federal safety watchdog’s drug registration fees. “This submission is the 1st step in our effort to secure orphan status for our Cellspan esophageal implant, which we believe has the potential to be a valuable option in the treatment of esophage...
Source: Mass Device - June 29, 2016 Category: Medical Equipment Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regenerative Medicine Regulatory/Compliance Biostage Inc Source Type: news

Drinking alcohol DOES increase your chance of cancer
Indulging in less than two drinks a day - a number considered to be acceptable - increases the risk of breast, bowel, liver, mouth and oesophagus cancers, say experts at the University of Otago. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 28, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Light alcohol consumption tied to increased risk of breast cancer in women
(NaturalNews) In 1987, a working group of the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) – an agency of the World Health Organization (WHO) – listed cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, larynx, esophagus and liver as "causally related to the consumption of alcoholic... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 27, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

When Screening for Esophageal and Gastrointestinal Cancer, Rice University’s Low-Cost Microendoscope Could Reduce Need to Send Biopsies to Pathologists
This low-cost solution opens new doors for low-resource regions and, in many cases, allows operators to rule out malignancy without the need for a pathologist to review biopsies Rapid development of endoscopic technologies is bringing medical professionals closer to point-of-care pathology than ever before. The goal is to allow physicians to identify diseased or cancerous […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 24, 2016 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Digital Pathology Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Baylor College of Medicine Baylor Global Initiatives Source Type: news

When Screening for Esophageal and Gastrointestinal Cancer, Rice University ’s Low-Cost Microendoscope Could Reduce Need to Send Biopsies to Pathologists
This low-cost solution opens new doors for low-resource regions and, in many cases, allows operators to rule out malignancy without the need for a pathologist to review biopsies Rapid development of endoscopic technologies is bringing medical professionals closer to point-of-care pathology than ever before. The goal is to allow physicians to identify diseased or cancerous […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - June 24, 2016 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: jude Tags: Digital Pathology Instruments & Equipment Laboratory Instruments & Laboratory Equipment Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Baylor College of Medicine Baylor Global Initiatives Source Type: news

Hot beverages over 149 degrees Fahrenheit may cause esophageal cancer, say researchers
(NaturalNews) Hot beverages over 149 degrees Fahrenheit may cause cancer of the esophagus, say researchers. The World Health Organization's International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) has found some interesting connections to cancer, reporting that very hot drinks "probably... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 22, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Your Coffee Betraying You?
Coffee has been having a pretty good run lately. The World Health Organization recently downgraded a warning that previously suggested everyone's favorite morning beverage may contribute to cancer risk. Experts now say there's actually no evidence that coffee causes cancer, though they do warn that drinking any very hot beverage might be linked to cancer of the esophagus.  What's more, late last year, a major report funded by the National Institutes of Health found that regular consumption of coffee was associated with lower risk of total mortality as well as mortality caused by cardiovascular disease.&...
Source: Healthy Living - The Huffington Post - June 21, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Novel, Targeted Drug Yields Promising Results In Stomach And Esophageal Cancer
If these data pan out, this first-in-class antibody might be likened to Herceptin, or Rituxan. It may be the real deal, a precise treatment that works on malignant cells that have tested positive for the relevant molecule. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - June 20, 2016 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Elaine Schattner Source Type: news

Very Hot Beverages May Cause Esophageal Cancer
Title: Very Hot Beverages May Cause Esophageal CancerCategory: Doctor's & Expert's views on SymptomsCreated: 6/17/2016 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 6/17/2016 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - June 17, 2016 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Coffee's cancer risk downgraded (as long as you don't drink it hot)
"Very hot drinks may cause cancer, but coffee does not, says WHO," The Guardian reports. A review by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) concluded that only beverages consumed at higher than 65C posed a possible cancer risk. The working group's report re-evaluated the cancer-causing properties of drinking coffee, maté (a South American drink), and very hot beverages. Coffee was classified as a possible cause of cancer in 1991, but the group has cleared the previous classification and suggested any suspected link was because of the hot temperature of the drink. The researchers concl...
Source: NHS News Feed - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Food/diet QA articles Source Type: news

Drinking Very Hot Coffee Probably Causes Cancer, Experts Say
LYON, France (CBS) – Does that first sip of coffee burn your tongue? It could also put you at risk for cancer. That’s what experts at the World Health Organization are saying in a new report out this week. Scientists found that while there’s no evidence that the ingredients in coffee can lead to cancer, they did conclude that “drinking very hot beverages probably causes cancer” in the esophagus. Scalding hot drinks can cause damage to tissue, triggering uncontrolled growth of abnormal cells. Coffee served at over 150 degrees is considered too hot, but many popular cafes serve their drinks at 1...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - June 16, 2016 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: nealjriley Tags: Health News Trending Cancer Coffee Source Type: news