Hot tea linked to increased risk of esophageal cancer
People who like hot tea may want to wait until it gets cooler before taking that first sip. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking Very Hot Tea Almost Doubles Risk Of Cancer, New Study Says
This study, published Wednesday in the International Journal of Cancer, was the first to pinpoint a specific temperature, according to the authors. Esophageal cancer is the eighth most common cancer in the world and is often fatal, killing approximately 400,000 people every year, according to the International Agency for Research on Cancer. It is usually caused by repeated injury to the esophagus due to smoke, alcohol, acid reflux and — maybe — hot liquids. The esophagus is a long tube through which swallowed food and liquids travel to reach the stomach. The American Cancer Society estimates that 13,750 new cas...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News tea Source Type: news

Drinking very hot tea almost doubles risk of cancer, new study says
Many people start their day with a cup of tea. But those who drink it piping hot could be increasing their risk of esophageal cancer, according to a new study. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking hot tea or coffee could more than DOUBLE the risk of developing cancer of the oesophagus
The study looked at the drinking habits of 50,045 people who lived in north-eastern Iran. People in the UK and US typically drink beverages below 60°C. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Drinking hot tea linked with elevated risk of esophageal cancer
(Wiley) Previous studies have revealed a link between hot tea drinking and risk of esophageal cancer, but until now, no study has examined this association using prospectively and objectively measured tea drinking temperature. A new International Journal of Cancer study achieved this by following 50,045 individuals aged 40 to 75 years for a median of 10 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news