Log in to search using one of your social media accounts:

 

UTSA receives $350,000 grant for prostate cancer research
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Jing Yong Ye, professor of biomedical engineering at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA), has received a two-year, $354,617 grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Cancer Institute to support the development of his noninvasive method of detecting prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public-private partnerships key to sustainable telemedicine
Researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington have developed a way to make telemedicine more affordable and sustainable in remote parts of India. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTA study finds public-private partnerships key to making telemedicine sustainable
(University of Texas at Arlington) RadhaKanta Mahapatra, a professor in the Department of Information Systems and Operations Management in the UTA College of Business, conducted the study, A Collaborative Approach to Creating ICT-based Sustainable Development, which was published as part of the Americas Conference on Information Systems' proceedings earlier this year. ICT is Information and Communication Technology. Former Odisha Chief Secretary Sahadeva Sahoo co-authored the study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows diet and exercise improve treatment outcomes for obese pediatric cancer patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Diet and exercise may improve treatment outcomes in pediatric cancer patients, according to a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Children's Cancer Hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA puts stake in the ground in battle against brain disease
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Making a bold commitment to develop groundbreaking approaches for treating brain diseases and injuries, The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) has assembled a world-class research enterprise, comprised of 40 of the nation's leading brain health researchers, dedicated to conquering the greatest mysteries of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why poison frogs don't poison themselves
(University of Texas at Austin) Poison frogs harbor some of the most potent neurotoxins we know, yet scientists have long wondered -- how do these frogs keep from poisoning themselves? With a new paper published in the journal Science, scientists are a step closer to resolving that head-scratcher. And the answer has potential consequences for the fight against pain and addiction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yoga Improves Sleep In People Being Treated For Cancer
People receiving chemotherapy are often plagued by insomnia at night and excessive drowsiness during the day. But a new study in the journal Cancer suggests that yoga can help. Breast cancer patients in the study who practiced at home at least twice a week reported better sleep quality over time, compared to those who practiced less often or not at all. The new research is “another piece of evidence, along with now dozens of studies, showing that incorporating a mind-body practice within conventional cancer care can help decrease side effects for patients,” says lead author Lorenzo Cohen, director of the integr...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized Alternative Medicine Breast Cancer breast cancer treatment breathing exercises chemotherapy Exercise/Fitness fatigue insomnia Meditation sleep tibetan yoga TIME Health Breast Cancer Source Type: news

Tibetan yoga can help breast cancer patients finds study
A new study from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has found that breast cancer patients undergoing chemo who practice Tibetan yoga sleep better. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Despite legal abortion in Great Britain, women cite access barriers, new research finds
(University of Texas at Austin) Some women are seeking abortion services outside the formal healthcare system in Great Britain, where abortion is legally available, citing reasons such as access barriers, privacy concerns and controlling circumstances, according to new research from Abigail Aiken, an assistant professor at the LBJ School of Public Affairs at The University of Texas at Austin. Aiken examined the demographics and circumstances of women requesting early medication abortion through an online telemedicine initiative over a 4-month period. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tibetan yoga practice may improve sleep quality for breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Participating in twice-weekly practice of Tibetan yoga may reduce sleep disturbances and improve sleep quality in breast cancer patients receiving chemotherapy, according to a study from researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTA computer scientist earns grant to combine methods to better analyze brain image data
(University of Texas at Arlington) Junzhou Huang, an associate professor in the Computer Science and Engineering Department at The University of Texas at Arlington, will use a $210,000 National Science Foundation grant to explore how to combine the two methods to more accurately predict the outcome of future data. Chao Chen at the City University of New York is co-principal investigator on the project. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oxidative stress produces damage linked with increased risk of preterm birth
This study is currently available in The American Journal of Pathology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New president officially named for M.D. Anderson Cancer Center
It ’s official. Dr. Peter Pisters will be the next president of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Center Center. The UT System Board of Regents appointed him to the role during a special meeting Sept. 18. He was named the sole finalist for the position on Aug. 25, but Texas law requires universi ty governing boards to name finalists for a president position at least 21 days before making the appointment official. Pisters will take over the role “later this year,” according to a Sept. 18… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 19, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

Victimization of transgender youths linked to suicidal thoughts, substance abuse
(University of Texas at Austin) In two peer-reviewed papers, researchers at The University of Texas at Austin have found that transgender adolescents are twice as likely to have suicidal thoughts as the general population, and they are up to four times as likely to engage in substance use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers compose guidelines for handling CAR T cell side effects
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Immune-cell based therapies opening a new frontier for cancer treatment carry unique, potentially lethal side effects that provide a new challenge for oncologists, one addressed by a team led by clinicians at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center with proposed guidelines for systematically dealing with the toxicities of these drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTHealth discovers how to train damaging inflammatory cells to promote repair after stroke
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Researchers at McGovern Medical School at UTHealth have discovered a way to turn neutrophils from toxic to helpful after a hemorrhagic stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nearly $16 million grant opens door at UT-Austin to disrupt medical device, electronics manufacturing
Aided by a $15.6 million federal grant, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin will explore the creation and manipulation of new types of materials that could improve the development of medical devices and electronic components. The grant, announced Monday, will be distributed over six years by the National Science Federation’s Division of Materials Research to researchers at UT’s Cockrell School of Engineering and the College of Natural Sciences. The funds will help launch UT-Austin’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Staff report Source Type: news

Nearly $16 million grant opens door at UT-Austin to disrupt medical device, electronics manufacturing
Aided by a $15.6 million federal grant, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin will explore the creation and manipulation of new types of materials that could improve the development of medical devices and electronic components. The grant, announced Monday, will be distributed over six years by the National Science Foundation's Division of Materials Research to researchers at UT’s Cockrell School of Engineering and the College of Natural Sciences. The funds will help launch UT-Austin’s… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 18, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Staff report Source Type: news

Biology Labs Hit by Harveys Eye Face Long Road to Recovery
At the University of Texas's Marine Science Institute, the hurricane caused more than $100 million in damage, killed hundreds of study animals, and displaced numerous researchers, but its work... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - September 15, 2017 Category: Science Tags: Daily News,The Scientist Source Type: news

Couples weather bickering with a little help from their friends
(University of Texas at Austin) New research finds that having good friends and family members to turn to alleviates the stress of everyday conflict between marital partners. According to a new study led by The University of Texas at Austin's Lisa Neff, social networks may help provide protection against health problems brought about by ordinary tension between spouses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson and Daiichi Sankyo enter research collaboration to accelerate development of acute myeloid leukemia therapies
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Daiichi Sankyo Company, Limited today announced a multi-year collaboration focused on accelerating the development of novel therapies for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Device used to close small hole in heart may protect against recurrent stroke
A device used to close a small hole in the heart may benefit certain stroke patients by providing an extra layer of protection for those facing years of ongoing stroke risk, according to the results of a large clinical trial led by UCLA researchers.“It is a major new treatment option for some people,” said Dr. Jeffrey Saver, director of theUCLA Comprehensive Stroke Center and lead author of the study. However, he added, “Using the device is going to have to be a considered clinical decision between the doctor and the patient about who’s the right person to get it.”Thefindings appear in the Sep...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 14, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The One Word You Need to Stop Overusing
This article originally appeared on RealSimple.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 12, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan / Real Simple Tags: Uncategorized advice Apology career how to apologize how to break up with someone how to say sorry i'm sorry Life advice Mental Health/Psychology professional advice work advice Source Type: news

Washington U. professor wins $790,000 prize for cancer research
Washington University professor Robert Schreiber is one of two U.S. researchers who are receiving a $790,000 prize for their work developing immunological cancer treatments. Schreiber and James Allison of the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center were named co-recipients of the Balzan Prize, which recognizes the "most meritorious initiatives in the cause of humanity, peace and fraternity among peoples throughout the world." This year's winners were announced M onday in Milan. Jules Hoffmann,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - September 12, 2017 Category: Health Management Authors: Angela Mueller Source Type: news

Study of circular DNA comes full circle with use of old technique
(University of Texas at Dallas) A 50-year-old lab technique is helping researchers better understand circular DNA, a lesser-known and poorly understood cousin of the linear version commonly associated with life's genetic blueprint. With the aid of a process called density gradient centrifugation, a research team recently published a study that for the first time characterizes all of the circular DNA in the worm   C. elegans, as well as in three human cell types.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stop prostate cancer dead in its tracks by eating apples and grapes, reveals new research
(Natural News) Eating apples and grapes may help stave off prostate cancer onset, the most common cancer among American men. As reported by Nature.com, a study published on Precision Oncology revealed that a combination of nutritional compounds can inhibit cancer cell growth. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the University of Texas at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTA researchers discover connection between low oxygen levels and a human gene
(University of Texas at Arlington) University of Texas at Arlington researchers have established a link between hypoxia, a condition that reduces the flow of oxygen to tissues, and HOTAIR, a noncoding RNA or molecule that has been implicated in several types of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study finds length of stay critical factor in readmission rates at hospitals
(University of Texas at Dallas) Using data from congestive heart failure patient records in North Texas from January 2006 to December 2009, UT Dallas researchers studied the relationship between length of stay and readmission risk, the role of health information technology in reducing the deviation of length of stay, and the cost trade-offs between early discharge and readmission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Big data may amplify existing police surveillance practices, study shows
(University of Texas at Austin) With access to more personal data than ever before, police have the power to solve crimes more quickly, but in practice, the influx of information tends to amplify existing practices, according to sociology research at the University of Texas at Austin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UT Austin study raises question: Why are fossilized hairs so rare?
(University of Texas at Austin) New research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that when it comes to preserving body parts, fossilized hair is rare--five times rarer than feathers--despite being an important tool for understanding ancient species. This finding has researchers trying to determine if the lack of hair in the fossil record has to do with physical traits that might make it more difficult for hair to fossilize, or an issue with scientists' collection techniques that could lead to them missing important finds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New pen-like device can detect cancer in just 10 seconds
A new device called a MasSpec Pen can tell doctors whether or not tissue in patients they are operating on is cancerous. The 'pen' was developed by researchers at the University of Texas Austin. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Zika virus may be useful in treating brain tumours
Conclusion This is an interesting piece of research that shows how knowledge in one field of medicine can sometimes be applied to another field with surprising results. But it's important to be realistic about the stage of research. This is very much a "proof of concept" study, and tests on cells, tissues and mice don't necessarily translate into a safe and effective treatment for humans. The study has several limitations, but the fact the treatment so far hasn't been tested on humans is the most important. For one thing, Zika virus doesn't naturally infect mice, so researchers had to use a specially engineered v...
Source: NHS News Feed - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer Source Type: news

MD Anderson Retains Top Spot for Cancer Care
U.S. News & World Report ranked the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston the No. 1 cancer care hospital in America for the third consecutive year. MD Anderson has been a leader in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma, a contributing factor in maintaining its top billing on the rankings. Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, were No. 2 and No. 3, respectively, in the 2017-18 Best Hospitals for Cancer  listing. U.S. News & World Report — a global authority in hospital care — has published the rankings annually for 28 years, helping patients make tough health c...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Barnes-Jewis Hospital best mesothelioma cancer centers Cardiology Cleveland Clinic Gastroenterology H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute heart surgery Johns Hopkins Massachusetts General Hospital Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic- Source Type: news

Scientists: New device accurately identifies cancer in seconds
(University of Texas at Austin) A team of scientists and engineers has invented a powerful tool that rapidly and accurately identifies cancerous tissue during surgery, delivering results in about 10 seconds. The MasSpec Pen is an innovative handheld instrument that gives surgeons precise diagnostic information about what tissue to cut or preserve, helping improve treatment and reduce the chances of cancer recurrence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 6, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers develop Lassa fever treatment effective eight days after infection
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A collaborative team of scientists, led by a group at The University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston, have successfully protected nonhuman primates against one of the most deadly viruses in the world, Lassa fever, eight days after they became infected. The findings are now available in Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 5, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UT Health San Antonio researchers developing drug for recurring ER-positive breast cancer
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) Researchers at UT Health San Antonio and two partner institutions are developing a new, first-in-class agent that has stopped the growth of estrogen receptor-positive (ER-positive) breast cancer in its tracks. The new agent is a molecule called ERX-11 that has blocked the growth of recurring breast cancer tumors. Ratna Vadlamudi, Ph.D., from UT Health San Antonio, is principal investigator of a study describing the new findings, published Aug. 8 in the journal eLIFE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Periodic table of ecological niches could aid in predicting effects of climate change
(University of Texas at Austin) A group of ecologists has started creating a periodic table of ecological niches similar to chemistry's periodic table. It will be a critical resource for scientists seeking to understand how a warming climate may be spurring changes in species around the globe. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 30, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Flooding Disrupts Care at Houston Trauma Center, Hospitals
One of the nation's busiest trauma centers began clearing space Monday for the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey even as the storm continued its days-long onslaught of rain. Ben Taub Hospital personnel transferred a handful of patients to other facilities and took much needed deliveries of food and fresh linens after spending the weekend short-staffed and with dwindling supplies, said Bryan McLeod, a spokesman for the Houston hospital's parent company, Harris Health System. The goal was not a full evacuation but to move about 60 of the 350 patients from the 440-bed facility in time to take on new patients once the storm final...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - August 29, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione and Emily Schmall, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Operations Source Type: news

Flooding Disrupts Care at Houston Trauma Center, Hospitals
One of the nation's busiest trauma centers began clearing space Monday for the aftermath of Hurricane Harvey even as the storm continued its days-long onslaught of rain. Ben Taub Hospital personnel transferred a handful of patients to other facilities and took much needed deliveries of food and fresh linens after spending the weekend short-staffed and with dwindling supplies, said Bryan McLeod, a spokesman for the Houston hospital's parent company, Harris Health System. The goal was not a full evacuation but to move about 60 of the 350 patients from the 440-bed facility in time to take on new patients once the storm final...
Source: JEMS Operations - August 29, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione and Emily Schmall, Associated Press Tags: Major Incidents News Operations Source Type: news

Mouthwash could raise heart disease risk, expert claims
Dr Nathan Bryan, based at the University of Texas, Austin, said daily rinsing and gargling, which is meant to eliminate bad breath, also rids the body of nitric oxide, which helps control blood pressure. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Avocado PITS found to be a "goldmine" of nutrition, with powerful nutrients that prevent disease
(Natural News) A recent study showed that the husk of an avocado seed is the healthiest part of the fruit as it contains a vast number of key nutrients that show potential in alleviating cancer, heart disease, and other diseases. As part of the study, a team of researchers at the University of Texas Rio Grande... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Algae fortifies coral reefs in past and present
(University of Texas at Austin) The Great Barrier Reef, and most other large reefs around the world, owe their bulk in large part to a type of red algae that grows on corals and strengthens them. New research led by Anna Weiss, a Ph.D. candidate at The University of Texas at Austin Jackson School of Geosciences, has found that ancient coral reefs were also bolstered by their bond with red algae, a finding that could help scientists better understand how reefs will respond to climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UT regents announce pick for M.D. Anderson Cancer Center president
Dr. Peter Pisters has been selected as the sole finalist to become the next president of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the UT System board of regents announced Aug. 25. Texas law requires university governing boards to name finalists for a president position at least 21 days before making the appointment official, according to UT's press release. Dr. Marshall Hicks will continue serving as M.D. Anderson’s interim president until Pisters’ appointment is finali zed. Hicks… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

UT regents announce pick for M.D. Anderson Cancer Center president
Dr. Peter Pisters has been selected as the sole finalist to become the next president of the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center, the UT System board of regents announced Aug. 25. Texas law requires university governing boards to name finalists for a president position at least 21 days before making the appointment official, according to UT's press release. Dr. Marshall Hicks will continue serving as M.D. Anderson’s interim president until Pisters’ appointment is finali zed. Hicks… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

UT regents could name M.D. Anderson president finalists soon
Finalists for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center ’s president position could be named this week. The UT System board of regents will hold a special meeting Aug. 25 that includes an executive session for M.D. Anderson president candidate interviews, according to a press release. One or more finalists might then be named in open session that afte rnoon, per the release. Dr. Marshall Hicks has been serving as president ad interim since Dr. Ronald DePinho stepped down earlier this… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - August 24, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

UT regents could name M.D. Anderson president finalists soon
Finalists for the University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center ’s president position could be named this week. The UT System board of regents will hold a special meeting Aug. 25 that includes an executive session for M.D. Anderson president candidate interviews, according to a press release. One or more finalists might then be named in open session that afte rnoon, per the release. Dr. Marshall Hicks has been serving as president ad interim since Dr. Ronald DePinho stepped down earlier this… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 24, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Olivia Pulsinelli Source Type: news

UTA researchers are refining their automated fact-checking system
(University of Texas at Arlington) A team of UTA researchers and their collaborators at Duke University, led by Chengkai Li, computer science and engineering associate professor, recently earned a three-year, $500,000 National Science Foundation grant to expand ClaimBuster, a tool they developed to verify facts reported in the media, to include new forms of media and publications and to automate the process as much as possible. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who regularly groom their pubic hair at risk of injuries
Conclusion Pubic hair removal is now common practice, and this study suggests it is not without risk. It seems sensible to find out more about how it can be done safely, with minimal risk of injury. However, while the study provides useful information about peoples' experiences of pubic hair removal and injury (at least in the US), it doesn't tell us which is the safest method. Although waxing was linked to fewer repeated injuries among women, previous studies suggest it can be harmful if done incorrectly, leading to severe injury or infection. Similarly, although frequent removal of all pubic hair is linked to higher...
Source: NHS News Feed - August 17, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Cannabis PROTECTS you from a stroke, study claims
The researchers at the University of Texas at Dallas found blood flow in the putamen - an area of the brain associated with reward, learning and habits - was greater in users than nonusers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTSA professor receives $1.5 million grant to study male infertility
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Brian Hermann, assistant professor of biology at The University of Texas at San Antonio, has received a $1.5 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study male infertility with cutting-edge technology. Hermann, whose laboratory focuses on stem cell research to preserve male fertility, is examining the cells that make fertility possible in a way that has never been done before. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news