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White House Nominates Retired Astronaut to Lead USGS
The Trump Administration has announced its intent to nominate Dr. James F. Reilly, a former NASA astronaut and exploration geologist, as the next Director of the United States Geological Survey. Reilly currently serves as a technical adviser and subject matter expert on space operations at the U.S. Air Force’s National Security Space Institute in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He worked at NASA for 13 years where he was first selected as an astronaut candidate in 1994. He flew three Space Shuttle missions, conducted 5 spacewalks, and logged over 856 hours in space, with his work primarily focused on assembling the Inte...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 23, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

UT Dallas scientists isolate cancer stem cells using novel method
(University of Texas at Dallas) Researchers at The University of Texas at Dallas have devised a new technique to isolate aggressive cells thought to form the root of many hard-to-treat metastasized cancers -- a significant step toward developing new drugs that might target these cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researcher to develop nanomaterials to treat antibiotic-resistant infections
(University of Texas at Arlington) A researcher at The University of Texas at Arlington has been awarded a prestigious National Science Foundation Faculty Early Career Development, or CAREER, grant to develop new synthetic antimicrobial nanomaterials to treat antibiotic-resistant infections in hospitals and military facilities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 21, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study offers more food for thought on kids' eating habits, emotions
(University of Texas at Dallas) A University of Texas at Dallas psychologist has examined the preconceptions about the effects of emotions on children's eating habits, creating the framework for future studies of how dietary patterns evolve in early childhood. Dr. Shayla C. Holub, associate professor in the School of Behavioral and Brain Sciences, demonstrated that children from 4 ½ to 9 years old chose chocolate candy over goldfish crackers more frequently in response to both happiness and sadness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Kinase inhibitor larotrectinib shows durable anti-tumor abilities in patients of all ages with 17 un
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Three simultaneous safety and efficacy studies of the drug larotrectinib reported an overall response rate of 75 percent for patients ages four months to 76 years with 17 different cancer diagnoses. All patients had tumors with tropomyosin receptor kinase (TRK) fusions, gene mutations that switch on TRK genes, allowing cancer growth. The studies indicate larotrectinib as a potentially powerful new treatment approach for the approximately 5,000 patients with these forms of cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

MD Anderson receives $22 million in CPRIT funding for research, prevention and recruitment
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center was awarded $22.3 million from the Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT), accounting for 30 percent of the $73.5 million in awards CPRIT announced today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lesbian couple was denied chance to be foster parents by taxpayer-funded charity. So they sued.
A lesbian married couple from Texas is suing the federal government after they say that a Catholic nonprofit that receives taxpayer funding denied them the opportunity to serve as foster parents for refugee children because of their sexual orientation. Fatma Marouf, 41, and Bryn Esplin, 33, both professors at the University of Texas A&M in […]Related:CDC warns about salmonella infections traced to kratomHere’s what you should know about the flu season this yearChildren’s deaths from flu rise sharply amid signs that season may be hitting plateau (Source: Washington Post: To Your Health)
Source: Washington Post: To Your Health - February 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Using mutant bacteria to study how changes in membrane proteins affect cell functions
(Biophysical Society) Phospholipids are water insoluble " building blocks " that define the membrane barrier surrounding cells and provide the structural scaffold and environment where membrane proteins reside. During the 62nd Biophysical Society Annual Meeting, held Feb. 17-21, William Dowhan from the University of Texas-Houston McGovern Medical School will present his group's work exploring how the membrane protein phospholipid environment determines its structure and function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How to Help Your Kids Spot and Report Signs of Mass Violence Before Tragedy Strikes
With 18 school shootings already recorded in 2018— including Wednesday’s deadly spree in Parkland, Florida — parents and schools alike are grappling with the grim task of talking to kids about mass violence. It’s a tall order. In addition to broaching topics such as gun safety and helping kids process emotional and psychological trauma, adults are tasked with preparing children to recognize and report warning signs of violence before horrific events occur. In the wake of the Florida shooting, for example, sources ranging from gun control organizations to President Donald Trump emphasized the need to...
Source: TIME: Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

UTA researcher studies influence of fat storage in the heart on cardiovascular disease
(University of Texas at Arlington) Michael Nelson, assistant professor of kinesiology at The University of Texas at Arlington, has received a new five-year, $3.3 million grant from the National Institutes of Health to study the link between fat storage in the heart and cardiovascular disease, as well as the influence of gender on the development of cardiac dysfunction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This Woman Woke Up With a British Accent. Here ’s What to Know About Foreign Accent Syndrome
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - February 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme / Health.com Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

New sustainable production method could advance plastics and pharmaceuticals
(University of Texas at Austin) A team of chemical engineers at The University of Texas at Austin has developed a new, cost-effective method for synthetically producing a biorenewable platform chemical called triacetic acid lactone (TAL) that can be used to produce innovative new drugs and sustainable plastics at an industrial scale. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 12, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Smart bomb virus shows promise as brain tumor immunotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A common cold virus engineered to attack the most common and deadly of brain tumors allowed 20 percent of patients with recurrent glioblastoma to live for three years or longer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report on a phase I clinical trial in the Journal of Clinical Oncology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Obesity associated with longer survival for men with metastatic melanoma
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Obese patients with metastatic melanoma who are treated with targeted or immune therapies live significantly longer than those with a normal body mass index (BMI), investigators report in a study published in Lancet Oncology of 1,918 patients in six independent clinical cohorts.This effect, referred to as the 'Obesity Paradox,' principally manifested itself in men, said Jennifer McQuade, M.D., lead author and instructor of Melanoma Medical Oncology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New drug for women with 'Angelina Jolie' cancer
Lead researcher Jennifer Litton, Associate Professor at The University of Texas MD said: ‘This is game-changing because patients would always rather take a daily pill than go to hospital for chemo.' (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Researchers discover efficient and sustainable way to filter salt and metal ions from water
(Monash University) With two billion people worldwide lacking access to clean and safe drinking water, joint research by Monash University, CSIRO and the University of Texas at Austin published today in Sciences Advances may offer a breakthrough new solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New lithium collection method could boost global supply
(University of Texas at Austin) With continual technological advancements in mobile devices and electric cars, the global demand for lithium has quickly outpaced the rate at which it can be mined or recycled, but a University of Texas at Austin professor and his research team may have a solution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research explores workers' response to abusive supervision
(University of Texas at Dallas) A recent Naveen Jindal School of Management study examined the damaging impact abusive supervision has in the workplace including the ways employees respond with retaliatory behavior, which lowers productivity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTHealth leads ACSM paper on safety recommendations for energy drinks
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Helpful guidance and warnings regarding the potential dangers that energy drinks present to at-risk populations, primarily children, were published in a paper led by a cardiologist at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) for the American College of Sports Medicine (ACSM). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public policy, transportation PhD student receives national award
(University of Texas at Arlington) Somayeh Moazzeni, a UTA doctoral student in public policy and transportation, has been recognized by the U.S. Department of Transportation as the 2017 outstanding student of the year for C-TEDD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

White House Nominates Retired Astronaut to Lead USGS
The Trump Administration has announced its intent to nominate Dr. James F. Reilly, a former NASA astronaut and exploration geologist, as the next Director of the United States Geological Survey. Reilly currently serves as a technical adviser and subject matter expert on space operations at the U.S. Air Force’s National Security Space Institute in Colorado Springs, Colorado. He worked at NASA for 13 years where he was first selected as an astronaut candidate in 1994. He flew three Space Shuttle missions, conducted 5 spacewalks, and logged over 856 hours in space, with his work primarily focused on assembling the Inte...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 5, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Army researchers develop new algorithms to train robots
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Researchers at the US Army Research Laboratory and the University of Texas at Austin have developed new techniques for robots or computer programs to learn how to perform tasks by interacting with a human instructor. The findings of the study will be presented and published at the Association for the Advancement of Artificial Intelligence Conference in New Orleans, Louisiana, Feb. 2-7. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA moves bioengineered REHEAL glove toward commercialization
(University of Texas at Arlington) The University of Texas at Arlington has received a new $227,000 grant funded through the federal government's Medical Technology Enterprise Consortium to develop the manufacturing process for the REHEAL glove, a bioengineered healing glove that delivers medicine to injured hands to speed up healing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson study evaluates need for biopsies during follow-up care in women with early breast cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) In an analysis of more than 120,000 women diagnosed with and treated for early-stage breast cancer, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center determined the rate of additional breast biopsies needed for these patients during their follow-up care. The findings, reported in JAMA Surgery, are the first comprehensive nationwide population-based study regarding the need for breast biopsies performed during follow up after treatment for invasive breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Bikram yoga not so hot after all: New study finds yoga benefits are the same at room temperature as they are for the hot Bikram version
(Natural News) Yoga is an ancient practice that continuous to prove its mettle today; and while there are different types of yoga, it does not need to be hot in order to provide beneficial effects. A study carried out by researchers from Texas State University and the University of Texas at Austin in the U.S. revealed that... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Site of 1st chlamydia exposure makes big difference
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) Exposing the gut to chlamydia protects against subsequent infection in the genital tract and other tissues, researchers from UT Health San Antonio discovered. Chlamydia is the nation's most common sexually transmitted disease and causes infertility, ectopic pregnancy and pelvic inflammatory disease if left untreated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study Confirms Flu Increases Risk of Heart Attack in Elderly
NEW YORK (AP) — As if the flu wasn't bad enough already: Researchers have confirmed that flu sharply increases the risk of heart attack for older people. Doctors have long known that flu can trigger heart problems. It's one of the reasons flu shots are recommended for nearly everyone. A new Canadian study found that risk was six times higher in the first week after flu is diagnosed, compared to the year before and after the bug hits. Unlike previous studies, the researchers used lab tests to make sure people suspected of having the flu really did. "It's a much more rigorous study that allows us to make a much mo...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Study Confirms Flu Increases Risk of Heart Attack in Elderly
NEW YORK (AP) — As if the flu wasn't bad enough already: Researchers have confirmed that flu sharply increases the risk of heart attack for older people. Doctors have long known that flu can trigger heart problems. It's one of the reasons flu shots are recommended for nearly everyone. A new Canadian study found that risk was six times higher in the first week after flu is diagnosed, compared to the year before and after the bug hits. Unlike previous studies, the researchers used lab tests to make sure people suspected of having the flu really did. "It's a much more rigorous study that allows us to make a much mo...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 25, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Mike Stobbe, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Can Shut Out the Shock of Mass Shootings
It took only 23 days for the U.S. to witness its 11th school shooting of the year, during which a Marshall County High School student killed two of his classmates and wounded more than a dozen others. The Jan. 23 assault, in Benton, Kentucky, was the second school shooting of the week. It was only a Tuesday. Despite (or perhaps because of) the recent frequency of such horrors, the story was somewhat lost in a news cycle dominated by Oscar nominations, the end of the government shutdown, and the impending sentencing of Larry Nassar. While the town of Benton was undoubtedly rocked by the incident, the rest of the country&rsq...
Source: TIME: Health - January 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime psychology/mental health Source Type: news

Here ’s Why You Can Shut Out the Shock of Mass Shootings
It took only 23 days for the U.S. to witness its 11th school shooting of the year, during which a Marshall County High School student killed two of his classmates and wounded more than a dozen others. The Jan. 23 assault, in Benton, Kentucky, was the second school shooting of the week. It was only a Tuesday. Despite (or perhaps because of) the recent frequency of such horrors, the story was somewhat lost in a news cycle dominated by Oscar nominations, the end of the government shutdown, and the impending sentencing of Larry Nassar. While the town of Benton was undoubtedly rocked by the incident, the rest of the country&rsq...
Source: TIME: Science - January 24, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime psychology/mental health Source Type: news

Nintedanib Moves Closer to Mesothelioma Standard of Care
The Medicines and Healthcare products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) in the United Kingdom granted early access designation to nintedanib for the treatment of pleural mesothelioma, a major step forward for patients diagnosed with the asbestos-related cancer. Nintedanib, marketed under the brand names Ofev and Vargatef, is a small-molecule enzyme inhibitor. In clinical trials, the drug has shown the ability to prevent mesothelioma cell growth and slow tumor spread (metastasis). “This is potentially quite significant,” Dr. Dean Fennell, chair of thoracic medical oncology at the University of Leicester and University Ho...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - January 24, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Tags: Dean Fennell FDA LUME-Meso clinical trial md anderson cancer center MHRA nintedanib Ofev pleural mesothelioma Promising Innovative Medicine rama balaraman UCSF Helen Diller Family Comprehensive Cancer Center University of Pittsburgh Source Type: news

Blast, bubble and brain injury
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Researchers from the University of Texas at Arlington used supercomputers at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to simulate how bubbles caused by explosions may damage neurons in the brain. Using similar methods, the team reported in the Journal of the American Ceramic Society how nanoparticles affect the fragility of ceramic materials used in space shuttles. They found that the conventional wisdom that nanoparticles improve material strength is not necessarily guaranteed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researcher receives $441,000 NIH grant to develop technology for cardiovascular health
(University of Texas at Arlington) A UTA researcher will use a National Institutes of Health grant to build new imaging technology that will study blood vessel function in patients with heart failure that could lead to quicker diagnosis and life-saving treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discrepancies between satellite and global model estimates of land water storage
(University of Texas at Austin) Research led by The University of Texas at Austin has found that calculations of water storage in many river basins from commonly used global computer models differ markedly from independent storage estimates from GRACE satellites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically from one zip code to the next
(The University of Texas System) Infant mortality rates in Texas vary dramatically even across neighboring zip codes, according to a new analysis and mapping tool from researchers at The University of Texas System and UT Health Northeast. The analysis and searchable map, which are the first of their kind in Texas, use data from Texas Vital Statistics Linked Birth and Death Records from 2011-2014. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researcher to examine cured-in-place pipe technology
(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington expert in pipe technology is investigating whether steam sealing of repaired pipes release a noxious fume and how dangerous that is to people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vitamin deficiency we are all born with
I’ve admired Linus Pauling for years. In 1976, the Nobel Prize-winning chemist gave mega doses of vitamin C to 100 “untreatable” cancer patients. He then compared these so-called terminal patients to patients with the same kind of cancer who didn’t get vitamin C. The patients who received the traditional cancer treatment lived for an average of six months. Pauling’s patients lived — on average — for six years. You’d think that the medical community would have heralded Pauling’s research as a huge breakthrough in cancer treatment. But they didn’t. And they still ...
Source: Al Sears, MD Natural Remedies - January 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: Cathy Card Tags: Health Natural Cures Nutrition anti-cancer leukemia vitamin vitamin C Source Type: news

National Academy of Sciences awards Kovalenko medal to immunotherapy pioneer Allison
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Cancer immunotherapy innovator Jim Allison, Ph.D., chair of Immunology at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, will receive the 2018 Jessie Stevenson Kovalenko Medal for outstanding research in medical sciences, the National Academy of Sciences announced today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Presurgical targeted therapy delays relapse of high-risk stage 3 melanoma
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A pair of targeted therapies given before and after surgery for melanoma produced at least a six-fold increase in time to progression compared to standard-of-care surgery for patients with stage 3 disease, researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Lancet Oncology. Patients who had no sign of disease at surgery after combination treatment did not progress to metastasis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Uncovering decades of questionable investments
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Researchers used the Wrangler supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center to uncover the root cause of the 'beta anomaly' -- a discrepancy between the expected return on high-risk assets and their actual return. The team found that investors who are attracted to the lottery-like characteristics of these stocks push their prices higher than theory would predict, thereby lowering their future returns. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers devise decoy molecule to block pain where it starts
(University of Texas at Dallas) For anyone who has accidentally injured themselves, Dr. Zachary Campbell not only sympathizes, he's developing new ways to blunt pain. Campbell, who researches pain on the molecular level at the University of Texas at Dallas, recently published a study in the journal Nature Communications that describes a new method of reducing pain-associated behaviors with RNA-based medicine, creating a new class of decoy molecules that prevent the onset of pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 16, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Technology blurs lines: Study finds use of mobile devices contributes to a blending of work and personal time, negatively impacting both
(Natural News) Put your phones down— it looks like even adults can benefit from a “timeout” from their gadgets. According to the results of a recent study, employees who use their mobile devices to continue working at home often face conflicts in their work life. Wayne Crawford, assistant professor of management in University of Texas at... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Innovative Pathologists and Clinical Laboratory Scientists Use Diagnostic Management Teams to Support Physicians with More Accurate, Faster Diagnoses
At institutions such as University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, and Vanderbilt University Medical Center, pathologists are using diagnostic management teams to improve patient outcomes while lowering the medical costs Diagnostic Management Teams are a hot concept within the medical laboratory profession. In fact, a new annual DMT conference in Galveston, Texas, is the fastest-growing […] (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - January 11, 2018 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Hiring & Human Resources Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations Aaron Wyble MD anatomic pathologist Aristides Koutrouvelis MD Source Type: news

UT Dallas study: Recent spikes in homicide rates don't tell whole story
(University of Texas at Dallas) Recent spikes in homicide rates across the nation have been attributed to causes ranging from civil unrest to the opioid epidemic, but new UT Dallas research published in the journal Homicide Studies found a much simpler explanation: The increases follow predictable fluctuations in rates over the past 55 years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Some Lung Cancer Patients Don't Get Best Treatment
This less-than-optimal care is reducing survival rates, according to researchers from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - January 10, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Multiparametric MRI can help avoid renal mass biopsies
Researchers at the University of Texas Southwestern have discovered that radiologists...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: BMJ: Multiparametric MRI has role in prostate screening (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - January 10, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Promise of new antibiotics lies with shackling tiny toxic tetherballs to bacteria
(University of Texas at Austin) Biologists at The University of Texas at Austin have developed a method for rapidly screening hundreds of thousands of potential drugs for fighting infections, an innovation that holds promise for combating the growing scourge of antibiotic-resistant bacteria. The method involves engineering bacteria to produce and test molecules that are potentially toxic to themselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 9, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Bio-based compound offers a greener carbon fiber alternative
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) From cars and bicycles to airplanes and space shuttles, manufacturers around the world are trying to make these vehicles lighter, which helps lower fuel use and lessen the environmental footprint. But with the industry relying on petroleum products to make carbon fiber today, could we instead use renewable sources? (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 9, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

It's never too late to start exercising, study finds
Researchers from the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center found being active at least four times a week significantly improves middle-aged people's heart muscle flexibility. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTA civil engineering researcher to lead pipeline-coating project spanning six states
(University of Texas at Arlington) Six state transportation departments and a national cooperative have awarded a University of Texas at Arlington pipeline researcher a $400,000 grant to develop design methodologies for lining their storm-water pipes with a sprayed polymer or cement-like material coating that can extend the design life of those pipes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news