UTMB team proves potential for reducing pre-term birth by treating fetus as patient
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) The results of a study by researchers at the University of Texas Medical Branch may pave the way for a new medicine delivery system that could reduce the incidence of pre-term labor and premature birth by allowing physicians to treat the 'fetus as the patient'. The study has been published in Science Advances. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study defines small-cell lung cancer subtypes and distinct therapeutic vulnerabilities for each type
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have developed the first comprehensive framework to classify small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) into four unique subtypes, based on gene expression, and have identified potential therapeutic targets for each type in a study published today in Cancer Cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Modified pain management strategy reduces opioid exposure to trauma patients, study shows
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) A pain management regimen comprised mostly of over-the-counter medication reduced opioid exposure in trauma patients while achieving equal levels of pain control, according to a new study by physician-researchers at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New computational tool reliably differentiates between cancer and normal cells from single-cell RNA-sequencing data
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) MD Anderson researchers have developed a new computational tool to accurately differentiate between cancer cells and normal cells when analyzing large single-cell RNA-sequencing data. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Is your skin thirsty? Optoacoustic sensor measures water content in living tissue
(Skolkovo Institute of Science and Technology (Skoltech)) Researchers from Skoltech and the University of Texas Medical Branch (US) have shown how optoacoustics can be used for monitoring skin water content, a technique which is promising for medical applications such as tissue trauma management and in cosmetology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA receives $5 million Mellon grant for racial justice efforts
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The University of Texas at San Antonio has been awarded a $5 million grant from The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation to support the university's community partnerships in advancing racial justice. UTSA's project -- Democratizing Racial Justice -- will be a transformative, community-based People's Academies for Racial Justice. Selected community fellows and faculty fellows will collaborate on a public-facing project. Grant funding will further support community dialogues with key scholars working in fields related to social justice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

< i > New England Journal of Medicine < /i > publishes COVID-19 treatment trial results
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) In a multicenter study funded by the National Institutes of Health, a combination of two drugs, baricitinib and remdesivir, reduced time to recovery in hospitalized COVID-19 patients. The results from sites including UT Health San Antonio and University Health were published Dec. 11 in theNew England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 14, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

MD Anderson and UroGen Pharma announce strategic research collaboration to advance investigational treatment for high-grade bladder cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) MD Anderson and UroGen today announced a strategic three-year collaboration agreement to advance combination immunotherapy, delivered directly into the bladder, for the treatment of high-grade non-muscle invasive bladder cancer. The collaboration will work through MD Anderson's immunotherapy platform to design pre-clinical and clinical studies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 13, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

DOD funding helps expand study of investigational drug to prevent ARDS in COVID
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Researchers evaluating whether an investigational oral drug, vadadustat, can help prevent acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) in COVID-19 patients were awarded $5.1 million in funding from the U.S. Department of Defense (DOD) to expand the Phase II clinical trial at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTA faculty member to study underground gas leaks, work with first responders
(University of Texas at Arlington) A civil engineering associate professor at The University of Texas at Arlington has received a pair of grants focused on detecting and repairing natural gas leaks in underground pipelines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 13, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Pfizer Study Suggests Vaccine Works Against Virus Variant
By LAURAN NEERGAARD AP Medical Writer New research suggests that Pfizer’s COVID-19 vaccine can protect against a mutation found in two highly contagious variants of the coronavirus that erupted in Britain and South Africa. Those variants are causing global concern. They both share a common mutation called N501Y, a slight alteration on one spot of the spike protein that coats the virus. That change is believed to be the reason they can spread so easily. Most of the vaccines being rolled out around the world train the body to recognize that spike protein and fight it. Pfizer teamed with researchers from the Un...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 8, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

An in vitro study shows Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine elicits antibodies that neutralize SARS-CoV-2 with a mutation associated with rapid transmission
Pfizer Inc. (NYSE: PFE) and BioNTech SE (Nasdaq: BNTX) today announced results from an in vitro study conducted by Pfizer and the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB) that shows the antibodies from people who have received the Pfizer-BioNTech COVID-19 vaccine effectively neutralize SARS-CoV-2 with a key mutation that is also found in two highly transmissible strains. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - January 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Business Business and Industry Source Type: news

Pfizer vaccine appears effective against mutation in new coronavirus variants: Study
The not-yet peer reviewed study by Pfizer and scientists from the University of Texas Medical Branch indicated the vaccine was effective in neutralizing virus with the so-called N501Y mutation of the spike protein. (Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News)
Source: The Economic Times Healthcare and Biotech News - January 8, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Richmond (TX) Emergency Services Official, 40, Remembered for His Dedication
Brooke A. Lewis and J.R. Gonzales Houston Chronicle (MCT) Anthony Pryor started his job as emergency management coordinator for the city of Richmond in July 2019, just months before a global pandemic would strike the country and Fort Bend County. During the coronavirus pandemic, he jumped in head first to serve the community, said his wife Julie, a teacher. “He just wanted everybody to have the information they needed, as far as supplies, testing and how to prepare themselves and be safe,” said Julie Pryor. Anthony Pryor, a Richmond resident who’d spent...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 7, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Coronavirus News News Feed EMS Texas Source Type: news

Mediterranean diet may decrease risk of prostate cancer progression
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) In a study to examine a Mediterranean diet in relation to prostate cancer progression in men on active surveillance, researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that men with localized prostate cancer who reported a baseline dietary pattern that more closely follows the key principles of a Mediterranean-style diet fared better over the course of their disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA Artificial Intelligence Consortium receives over $1M in research funding
(University of Texas at San Antonio) These awards will fund Kudithipudi's ongoing research developing novel brain-inspired lifelong learning algorithms and systems. Her approaches attempt to close the performance gap between modern artificial intelligence (AI) systems and biological systems, allowing them to learn new tasks while simultaneously improving their energy efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

10 UTA students land coveted transportation fellowships
(University of Texas at Arlington) Ten students from The University of Texas at Arlington have received coveted Dwight David Eisenhower Transportation Fellowships from the U.S. Department of Transportation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

MD Anderson and Xencor enter strategic collaboration to develop novel T cell-engaging bispecific antibodies for potential treatment of patients with cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center and Xencor, Inc. today announced a strategic research collaboration and commercialization agreement to develop novel CD3 bispecific antibody therapeutics for the potential treatment of patients with cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 6, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Journal article reviews century of data showing COVID-19 likely to impact the brain
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) Decades of data paint a compelling case for why COVID-19 survivors, even those with few symptoms, could experience long-term effects on the brain and central nervous system. A global research program supported by the Alzheimer's Association includes researchers from the Glenn Biggs Institute for Alzheimer's and Neurodegenerative Diseases at The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 5, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Single-cell analysis of metastatic gastric cancer finds diverse tumor cell populations associated with patient outcomes
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center who profiled more than 45,000 individual cells from patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC), a specific form of metastatic gastric cancer, defined the extensive cellular heterogeneity and identified two distinct subtypes correlated with patient survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Immunology study finds protein critical to T cell metabolism and anti-tumor immune response
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have discovered that a protein called NF-kappa B-inducing kinase (NIK) is essential for the shift in metabolic activity that occurs with T cell activation, making it a critical factor in regulating the anti-tumor immune response. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texas Longhorns Name Steve Sarkisian Head Football Coach
The University of Texas at Austin has named Steve Sarkisian, currently offensive coordinator for the Alabama Crimson Tide, head coach of... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - January 2, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Science Saturday: Across time, place to find cures for inherited heart diseases
Five years ago, Jay Schneider, M.D., Ph.D., was running a lab at The University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. The lab focused on researching cures for the genetic muscular-wasting disorder, Duchenne muscular dystrophy. His wife, Alice Chang, M.D., had accepted an offer to work at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, two years before. The [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - January 2, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Women Have Lower Survival to Hospital Discharge After OHCA
MONDAY, Dec. 28, 2020 -- Women have significantly lower survival to hospital discharge among out-of-hospital cardiac arrest patients, according to a study published online Dec. 15 in Circulation. Purav Mody, M.D., from the University of Texas... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - December 28, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Targeting the deadly coils of Ebola
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Computer simulations of the Ebola virus structure are helping to crack its defenses. Ebola virus nucleocapsid stability conferred by RNA electrostatic interactions. XSEDE EMPOWER undergraduate program, allocations on TACC Stampede2 and PSC Bridges systems supported research. Research by Perilla Lab of the University of Delaware opens door for possible druggable sites targeting stability of Ebola virus nucleocapsid. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene pathway linked to schizophrenia identified through stem cell engineering
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Using human-induced pluripotent stem cells engineered from a single family's blood samples, a gene signaling pathway linked to a higher risk for developing schizophrenia was discovered by scientists at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). The research was published in a recent issue of Neuropsychopharmacology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

First patient enrolled in stem cell therapy trial for traumatic injury
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The first patient has enrolled in a Phase II clinical trial evaluating a stem cell therapy for the potential early treatment of traumatic injuries and their subsequent complications at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover brain pattern that could improve mental health disorder diagnosis
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) A pattern in how the brain breaks down tryptophan, a common amino acid consumed through food, was discovered by researchers at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Scientists to study whether aging is impacted by changes in gut microbiome
(Texas Biomedical Research Institute) Texas Biomedical Research Institute Associate Professor Corinna Ross, PhD, is a principal investigator on a $3.38 million National Institutes of Health multi-investigator grant to study " microbiome-mediated therapies for aging and healthspan " in marmosets, which are small monkeys native to South America and are becoming increasingly more important in aging and infectious disease research. Dr. Ross is partnering with University of Texas at Austin College of Pharmacy Assistant Professor Kelly Reveles, PharmD, PhD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

NASA-UT Hypersonics Project aims to transform sensing for high-speed vehicles
(University of Texas at Austin) NASA and the Air Force Office of Scientific Research are backing a team of four universities, led by The University of Texas at Austin, in a project to re-define sensing and analysis of hypersonic vehicles, which can travel at least five times the speed of sound and potentially revolutionize space and air travel. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers assess regenerative patch for spina bifida defect
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Researchers are investigating whether a human umbilical cord patch placed on the spina bifida defect could improve healing after minimally invasive fetoscopic surgery in a clinical trial at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Using water fleas, UTA researchers investigate adaptive evolution
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers from The University of Texas at Arlington resurrected the preserved eggs of a shrimp-like crustacean to examine long-standing questions about adaptive evolution, reporting the results in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research shows disparities in how communities respond to cardiac arrest
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Black neighborhoods had a significantly lower rate of bystander automated external defibrillator (AED) use relative to non-Hispanic/Latino white communities, according to researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2021 SPIE-Franz Hillenkamp Postdoctoral Fellowship awarded to Nitesh Katta
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics, has announced Nitesh Katta, who received his PhD in 2019 from the University of Texas at Austin, as the winner of the 2021 SPIE-Franz Hillenkamp Postdoctoral Fellowship in Problem-Driven Biomedical Optics and Analytics. The annual award of $75,000 supports interdisciplinary problem-driven research and provides opportunities for translating new technologies into clinical practice for improving human health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTSA Institute for Economic Development to host Texas Retail Academy
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The UTSA Institute for Economic Development has partnered with Retail Strategies LLC to offer Retail Academy to six communities across Texas. The IED will act as an accountability partner for the communities. Retail Academy is designed to educate city leaders on retail and business recruitment, real estate, and small business support. Retail Academy is made possible to cities that are awarded a grant through USDA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Natural reward theory could provide new foundation for biology
(Pensoft Publishers) Major trends of evolution, including the increase of complexity, command over resources, and innovativeness, have remained difficult to reconcile with Darwin's theory of evolution by natural selection. A new paper by Owen Gilbert (University of Texas), and published in the open-access, peer-reviewed journal Rethinking Ecology, suggests that there is an alternative non-random force of evolution: natural reward, which acts synergistically with natural selection and leads to the increased innovativeness, or advancement, of life with time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Every week coronavirus lockdowns drag on increases odds Americans will binge drink by nearly 20% 
A new study, from the University of Texas Health Science Center School of Public Health, found the odds of heavy alcohol consumption among binge drinkers rose by 20% with every week of lockdowns. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chemotherapy and blinatumomab improves survival for patients with B-cell acute lympho
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that first-line treatment with a regimen of chemotherapy combined with the monoclonal antibody blinatumomab resulted in increased survival and achieved a high rate of measurable residual disease (MRD) negativity for patients who were newly diagnosed with a high-risk form of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) known as Philadelphia chromosome-negative B-cell ALL (Ph-negative B-ALL). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 7, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news