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Surveillance intensity not associated with earlier detection of recurrence or improved survival in c
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A national retrospective study led by researchers at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found no association between intensity of post-treatment surveillance and detection of recurrence or overall survival (OS) in patients with stage I, II or III colorectal cancer (CRC). Published in the Journal of the American Medical Association, the study is the largest of surveillance intensity in CRC ever conducted. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 22, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTA bioengineer earns AHA grant to study biomechanical influences on cardiac development
(University of Texas at Arlington) Juhyun Lee, an assistant professor in the Bioengineering Department, has been awarded a prestigious Career Development Award by the American Heart Association for the research. The three-year, $251,000 grant relates to another grant that he received in March to develop a new microscope that can capture 3-D motion, then add time to construct a 4-D beating heart using optical imaging techniques with fluorescent nanoparticles in a zebrafish. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 22, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New data changes the way scientists explain how cancer tumors develop
This study is currently available in Nature Genetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Simpler scan still effective in deciding stroke treatment
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) A study led by a neurologist from McGovern Medical School at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) showed that a computed tomography (CT scan) could be sufficient for determining thrombectomy treatment in stroke. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Grant to help sustainable urban development for the city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia
(University of Texas at Arlington) Now, the city of Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, has signed a five-year, $4 million agreement with UTA's Sahadat Hossain to solve the one major issue for their country -- growing demand for sustainable urban development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Reading histone modifications, an oncoprotein is modified in return
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) Turning genes on and off is an intricate process involving communication between many different types of proteins that interact with DNA. These communications can go awry, resulting in conditions like cancer. Researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have uncovered an unusual form of cross-talk between proteins that affect gene expression, suggesting new ways of inhibiting metastasis in cancer. The findings are published in the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supercomputing the emergence of material behavior
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Chemists at the University of California, San Diego designed the first artificial protein assembly (C98RhuA) whose conformational dynamics can be chemically and mechanically toggled. The Maverick GPU-based supercomputer at the Texas Advanced Computing Center simulated the system through an allocation on NSF-funded XSEDE, the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment. The research, published in April 2018 in Nature Chemistry, could help create new materials for renewable energy, medicine, water purification, and more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 17, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stroke prevention drug combo shows promise, study says
(University of Texas at Austin) If you've had a minor stroke or a transient ischemic stroke (TIA), taking the clot-preventing drug clopidogrel along with aspirin may lower your risk of having a major stroke within the next 90 days, according to new research published in The New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTHealth researcher reveals results of study on emergency breathing tubes
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) In a landmark study, researchers found that patients treated with paramedic oxygen delivery using a newer, more flexible laryngeal breathing tube may have a greater survival rate after sudden cardiac arrest than the traditional intubation breathing tube. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inspired by nature, new "slippery rough surface" material harvests water out of air
(Natural News) There are many places in the world suffering from water shortages. As such, scientists are constantly looking for ways to alleviate this, trying to come up with possible solutions that can be implemented in the real world today. Now a group of researchers from Penn State and the University of Texas at Dallas (UT... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTA researcher patents 'roach motel' for cancer
(University of Texas at Arlington) The University of Texas at Arlington has successfully patented in Europe an implantable medical device that attracts and kills circulating cancer cells that was invented by a faculty member. This cancer trap can be used for early diagnosis and treatment of metastasized cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New approach to cancer research aims to accelerate studies and reduce cost
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A new model for improving how clinical trials are developed and conducted by bringing together academic cancer experts and pharmaceutical companies is being tested by research experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Math Can Potentially Reduce Unnecessary Breast Biopsies
The perceived risk of missing a breast cancer diagnosis with imaging studies often leads to unnecessary breast biopsies, according to a new report published in the American Journal of Roentgenology. The authors showed how statistical methods can be used to downgrade the risk classification of breast masses to reduce the need for unnecessary biopsies. Clinicians from San Antonio, TX-based Seno Medical and medical center collaborators from the University of Texas (MD Anderson and U of Texas Health Sciences Center) co-authored the report. The authors studied a statistical calculation known as the negative ...
Source: MDDI - May 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Imaging Source Type: news

An AI oncologist to help cancer patients worldwide
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Before performing radiation therapy, oncologists review medical images to identify tumors and surrounding tissue, a process known as contouring. Researchers from MD Anderson Cancer Center developed a new method for automating the contouring of high-risk clinical target volumes using artificial intelligence and supercomputers. They found the predicted contours could be implemented clinically, with only minor or no changes. Results appear in the June 2018 issue of the International Journal of Radiation Oncology*Biology*Physics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTSA researcher identifies barriers impacting PrEP use among Latino gay and bisexual men
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study led by a UTSA researcher examines the social perceptions of Pre-Exposure Prophylaxis (PrEP), a medication to prevent HIV, among gay and bisexual men in Texas. Over a six-month period, UTSA assistant professor Phillip Schnarrs worked with education, health care and nonprofit partners to survey more than 100 gay and bisexual men from the White, Latino and African-American communities about their perceptions of PrEP. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

OHSU selects new president to succeed Dr. Joe Robertson
The Oregon Health& Science University Board of Directors on Tuesday selected Dr. Danny Jacobs of the University of Texas to replace Dr. Joe Robertson as its top leader. Jacobs, 63, is currently executive vice president, provost and dean of the School of Medicine at the University of Texas Medical Branch. He holds professorships in the Institute for Translational Sciences and the departments of Surgery and Preventive Medicine and Community Health. Among his resear ch interests are the metabolic effects… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Elizabeth Hayes Source Type: news

Preclinical M.D. Anderson study suggests ARID1a may be useful biomarker for immunotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Functional loss of ARID1a, a frequently mutated tumor suppressor gene, causes deficiencies in normal DNA repair and may sensitize tumors to immune checkpoint blockade therapies, according to researchers from The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical study suggests that mutations in ARID1a could be beneficial in predicting immunotherapy success. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - May 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New breakthrough paving the way for universal Ebola therapeutic
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A new collaborative study has identified and studied Ebola antibodies that could be used to design universal therapeutics that are effective against many different Ebola species. The findings were recently published in Nature Microbiology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 7, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The couple's guide to slimming down without breaking up
According to the 'weight loss ripple effect,' couples help each other loose weight, and a University of Texas, Austin expert, explains how to drop the pounds and keep your partner, (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - May 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

J & J ’ s Acclarent launches TruDi ENT nav system
Johnson & Johnson‘s (NYSE:JNJ) Acclarent said late last month it launched the TruDi real-time, three-dimensional navigation system designed for ENT procedures. Acclarent said that the first commercial procedures were performed with the device on April 16, after having previously won FDA 510(k) clearance. The TruDi system is an electromagnetic image-guided navigation system designed for endoscopic sinus surgery procedures, and is intended for use during intranasal and paranasal image-guided navigation procedures for eligible patients who require sinus surgery. The newly launched system enables the use of the ...
Source: Mass Device - May 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Otolaryngology Ear, Nose & Throat Acclarent Inc. johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

New trial tests DNA of women at risk for cancers
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is conducting a trial of home genetic testing kits that screen at-risk women for markers of breast and ovarian cancer.   Researchers in the Making Genetic Testing Available (MAGENTA) program hope that improving access with home testing - eliminating the need to travel to healthcare providers - will encourage more women to participate in earlier or more frequent screenings and will save lives.   Participants who qualify for the study provide… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 3, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

New trial tests DNA of women at risk for cancers
The University of Texas M.D. Anderson Cancer Center is conducting a trial of home genetic testing kits that screen at-risk women for markers of breast and ovarian cancer.   Researchers in the Making Genetic Testing Available (MAGENTA) program hope that improving access with home testing - eliminating the need to travel to healthcare providers - will encourage more women to participate in earlier or more frequent screenings and will save lives.   Participants who qualify for the study provide… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 3, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anne Stych Source Type: news

Anti-alcoholism drug shows promise in animal models
(University of Texas at Austin) Scientists at The University of Texas at Austin have successfully tested in animals a drug that, they say, may one day help block the withdrawal symptoms and cravings that incessantly coax people with alcoholism to drink. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bioprinting of new tissues
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington have developed a highly elastic biodegradable hydrogel for bio-printing of materials that mimic natural human soft tissues. Bio-printing uses live cells within the scaffolding of the new tissues and could potentially transform cell printing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA researchers investigate link between ovarian hormones and blood cholesterol levels
(University of Texas at Arlington) Researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington are investigating the link between ovarian hormones and the blood cholesterol balance in the body, itself a key determinant of cardiovascular health or disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pioneering paper shows infection control and prevention in clinics is in everyone's hands
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) When it comes to the examination room at your health care clinic, you might think that avoiding catching the flu or other more deadly viruses is out of your hands, so to speak. But infectious disease experts at the University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston, who just published a practical guide for infectious disease control in clinics, reveal how we can all help make a difference in infection control. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 2, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Dr. Donald Seldin, Who Put a Medical School on the Map, Dies at 97
A kidney specialist born in Brooklyn, he gambled that an old Army barracks in Dallas could grow into a national leader in biomedicine. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: SAM ROBERTS Tags: Seldin, Dr. Donald W. Deaths (Obituaries) Medical Schools Medicine and Health University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center Nobel Prizes Dallas (Tex) Source Type: news

UTA graduate student/veteran studies molecular genetic basis of 'loser' effect
(University of Texas at Arlington) UTA biology doctoral student Marquerite Herzog has been awarded a prestigious NSF Graduate Research Fellowship to study the molecular genetic basis of changes in behavior seen when an individual loses an aggressive conflict. These traits, which often include a period of time of isolation or submissiveness, are often referred to as the 'loser' effect. Herzog's interest in this issue grew from her experiences as a military veteran who worked extensively with military personnel with combat-induced Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder or PTSD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients are living with dementia for less time, study finds
Breakthroughs in the prevention and care of stroke, which can trigger the devastating condition, may partly explain the trend spotted by a team at the University of Texas, San Antonio. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Now even FEMINISTS are deriding transgender ideology as "incoherent political intimidation"
(Natural News) A radical feminist soy-boy who teaches in the communications department at The University of Texas at Austin recently took aim at a new book that promotes the mental illness known as transgenderism, declaring its text to be entirely “incoherent” and centered around “political intimidation” rather than logical thought and argument. Robert Jensen, a... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 27, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Size matters when fighting cancer, groundbreaking UTHealth study finds
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Doctors could be a step closer to finding the most effective way to treat cancer with a double whammy of a virus combined with boosting the natural immune system, according to a pioneering study by researchers at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) and The Ohio State University. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

RNA editing study shows potential for more effective precision cancer treatment
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) If there is one thing all cancers have in common, it is they have nothing in common. A multi-center study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center has shed light on why proteins, the seedlings that serve as the incubator for many cancers, can vary from cancer to cancer and even patient to patient, a discovery that adds to a growing base of knowledge important for developing more effective precision therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTA researcher participates in Nature paper on early human survival
(University of Texas at Arlington) UTA researcher Naomi Cleghorn has participated in a Nature paper that describes how humans thrived in South Africa through the Toba volcanic eruption about 74,000 years ago, which created a decades-long volcanic winter. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New UTSA study shows wearable technology also contributes to distracted driving
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A new study by Murtuza Jadliwala, assistant professor of computer science at The University of Texas at San Antonio, examines wearable technology and whether it affects drivers' concentration. Jadliwala and his collaborators discovered that while a driver texting with a wearable device can marginally reduce their level of distraction, it ultimately makes texting while driving just as dangerous as with an ordinary cell phone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Watch your step: How vision leads locomotion
(University of Texas at Austin) Using new technologies to track how vision guides foot placement, researchers at the University of Texas at Austin come one step closer in determining what is going on in the brain while we walk, paving the way for better treatment for mobility impairments -- strokes, aging and Parkinson's -- and technology development -- prosthetics and robots. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dementia trend shows later onset with fewer years of the disease
(University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio) People may be deteriorating into dementia later in life and living with it for a shorter period of time, a new study suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Size, structure help poziotinib pose threat to deadly exon 20 lung cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A drug that failed to effectively strike larger targets in lung cancer hits a bulls-eye on the smaller target presented by a previously untreatable form of the disease, researchers at the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center report in Nature Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTHealth receives funding to study stem cell therapy for traumatic injury
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has received funding through a public/private partnership for the first-ever clinical trial investigating a stem cell therapy for early treatment and prevention of complications after severe traumatic injury. The proposed Phase 2 trial is underwritten with $2 million from the Medical Technology Consortium (MTEC) and $1.5 million from Memorial Hermann Foundation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study may explain why some triple-negative breast cancers are resistant to chemotherapy
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) is an aggressive form of the disease accounting for 12 to 18 percent of breast cancers. It is a scary diagnosis, and even though chemotherapy can be effective as standard-of-care, many patients become resistant to treatment. A team at The University of Texas MD Anderson led a study which may explain how resistance evolves over time, and potentially which patients could benefit from chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTSA researcher and team launch diabetes support program
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) are taking diabetes education to church. Through the Building a Healthy Temple (BHT) program, they're working with Hispanics who have type 2 diabetes to help them manage the disease and develop a healthier lifestyle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA expands efforts to develop water recycling technologies
(University of Texas at Arlington) The Collaborative Laboratories for Environmental Analysis and Remediation at the University of Texas at Arlington has expanded its partnership with oil field equipment supplier Challenger Water Solutions to develop water recycling technologies that will transform waste from unconventional oil and gas development into reusable water. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Combination therapy strengthens T cells in melanoma pre-clinical study
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A pre-clinical study of two drugs designed to boost T cell performance, has revealed the agents, when give in combination, may enhance the immune system's ability to kill melanoma tumors deficient in the tumor suppressor gene PTEN. The study was led by investigators at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Opioid-related hospitalizations rising in Medicare patients without opioid prescriptions
(University of Texas Medical Branch at Galveston) A 2014 federal change that limited the dispensing of hydrocodone products may be indirectly contributing to the illegal use of some of those drugs, a study by University of Texas Medical Branch researchers has found. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boosting T cell 'memory' may result in longer-lasting and effective responses for patients
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Just like people, some T cells have excellent memories. These subtypes known as memory T cells may explain why some immunotherapies are more effective than others and potentially lead to researchers designing more effective studies using combination checkpoint blockade treatments, according to experts at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Precancerous colon polyps in patients with Lynch syndrome exhibit immune activation
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Colon polyps from patients with Lynch syndrome, a hereditary condition that raises colorectal cancer risk, display immune system activation well before cancer development, according to research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. The preclinical research challenges traditional models of cancer immune activation and suggests immunotherapy may be useful for colorectal cancer prevention in certain high-risk groups. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 16, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First-in-human clinical trial of new targeted therapy drug reports promising responses for multiple
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A phase I, first-in-human study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center reveals for the first time, an investigational drug that is effective and safe for patients with cancers caused by an alteration in the receptor tyrosine kinase known as RET. The drug appears to be promising as a potential therapy for RET-driven cancers, such as medullary and papillary thyroid, non-small cell lung, colorectal and bile duct cancers, which have been historically difficult to treat. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New liquid biopsy-based cancer model reveals data on deadly lung cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) accounts for 14 percent of all lung cancers and is often rapidly resistant to chemotherapy resulting in poor clinical outcomes. Treatment has changed little for decades, but a study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center offers a potential explanation for why the disease becomes chemoresistant, and a possible avenue to explore new diagnostic approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two sweet cocktails may actually help you STAY hydrated, study finds
Drinking sugary cocktails will make you want water, helping to prevent dehydration and hangovers, but after two hours of boozing, the effect fades away, a University of Texas study has found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study suggests ways to close CEO pay gap
(University of Texas at Dallas) Recent research from UT Dallas' Naveen Jindal School of Management examines how cultural perceptions affect the compensation of female CEOs in China, where women CEOs earn significantly less than their male counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to catch a fish genome with big data
(University of Texas at Austin, Texas Advanced Computing Center) Researchers assembled and annotated genome of the Seriola dorsalis fish species, aka California Yellowtail. Z-W sex determination identified in Seriola dorsalis. XSEDE Extended Collaborative Support Services, Blacklight, and Stampede resources utilized in fish genome discovery. This research on California Yellowtail could potentially help in its sustainable aquaculture harvest. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 11, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news