Dr. Stanley Dudrick, Who Saved Post-Surgical Patients, Dies at 84
Why were they dying after “successful” operations? He discovered the cause and came up with a remedy: intravenous nutrition — a technique that has saved millions of lives. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Sam Roberts Tags: Deaths (Obituaries) Diet and Nutrition Surgery and Surgeons Malnutrition University of Texas system Dudrick, Dr. Stanley J. Total Parenteral Nutrition Source Type: news

Computer scientists' new tool fools hackers into sharing keys for better cybersecurity
(University of Texas at Dallas) Instead of blocking hackers, a new cybersecurity defense approach developed by University of Texas at Dallas computer scientists actually welcomes them. The method, called DEEP-Dig (DEcEPtion DIGging), ushers intruders into a decoy site so the computer can learn from hackers' tactics. The information is then used to train the computer to recognize and stop future attacks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Combined therapy may improve clinical responses for endometrial, colorectal and gastric tumors
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Combined therapy may improve clinical responses for endometrial, colorectal and gastric tumors. Enzyme inhibitor with anti-PD1 checkpoint blockade boosted efficacy over either treatment alone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 27, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UTA researcher investigating policies to improve rural and urban sustainability
(University of Texas at Arlington) Caroline Krejci, industrial engineering assistant professor at The University of Texas at Arlington, is part of a research team creating simulations that could result in more sustainable cities. In collaboration with researchers from Iowa State University, Krejci is helping develop a framework to analyze food, energy and water systems in the greater Des Moines, Iowa, area. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA civil engineer eliminating guesswork in protecting coastal homes from floodwaters
(University of Texas at Arlington) Nur Yazdani, a professor of civil engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, is developing a web-based tool that will help stakeholders properly design home slab elevations to protect homes and possessions against flood waters in future storms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 26, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UTSA finds the best method to teach children augmented reality
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Researchers at The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) identified the best approach to help children operate augmented reality (AR). According to UTSA computer science experts, a major barrier into wider adoption of the technology for experiential learning is based on AR designs geared toward adults that rely on voice or gesture commands. By conducting in-classroom testing among elementary school students, UTSA researchers uncovered that AR programs are best delivered using controller commands, followed by programs that communicate with age-specific language. (Source: EurekAlert! ...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trial Involves Immunotherapy Before Surgery
Three of the country’s leading cancer centers have opened a collaborative clinical trial that potentially could change surgical treatment of mesothelioma. Researchers will measure the safety and efficacy of using two different immunotherapy drug regimens — Opdivo (nivolumab) and Yervoy (ipilimumab) — beginning 42 days before surgery. The hope is that at least one will make surgical resection more effective. Sidney Kimmel Cancer Center at Johns Hopkins University, MD Anderson Cancer Center at the University of Texas and Greenebaum Cancer Center at the University of Maryland are working together to enroll a...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 24, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Osteosarcoma profiling reveals why immunotherapy remains ineffective
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Comprehensive profiling of tumor samples taken from patients with osteosarcoma shows that multiple factors contribute to the traditionally poor responses observed from treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors, according to new research from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists receive CPRIT grants for lung, kidney cancer research
(University of Texas at Dallas) The Cancer Prevention and Research Institute of Texas (CPRIT) has awarded new grants totaling $1.8 million to two University of Texas at Dallas scientists for their research related to lung and kidney cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 21, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Artificial Intelligence Can Help Pick the Best Depression Treatments for You
Seeking out help for depression is hard enough. It doesn’t make things any easier that it can take weeks, months or longer of trying different treatments to find something that works. Doctors typically start patients on antidepressants, but they take at least four weeks to start working, and research has shown that only about 30% respond well to the first drug they’re prescribed. “Right now, treatment selection is purely based on trial and error,” says Dr. Madhukar Trivedi, a professor of psychiatry at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. But promising new research published in Febru...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Mandy Oaklander Tags: Uncategorized Artificial Intelligence medicine mental health onetime psychiatry Source Type: news

MD Anderson announces strategic collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to research and develop targeted therapies for neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) MD Anderson announces a strategic research collaboration with Denali Therapeutics to develop new targeted therapies for Alzheimer's and other neurodegenerative diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Outreach effective for opioid use disorder long-term treatment
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) Proactive outreach, including knocking on the doors of individuals who recently overdosed on opioids, can be an effective way to engage more people who have opioid use disorder with long-term care, according to researchers at UTHealth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Texas scientists say their discovery could lead to a coronavirus vaccine
University of Texas at Austin scientists recreated the protein 'spike' on the virus's surface to fully map it. The molecule they made can also work as a vaccine against it, and development is underway. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Breakthrough in coronavirus research results in new map to support vaccine design
Researchers from The University of Texas at Austin and the National Institutes of Health have made a critical breakthrough toward developing a vaccine for the 2019 novel coronavirus by creating the first 3D atomic scale map of the part of the virus that attaches to and infects human cells. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - February 19, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Breakthrough in coronavirus research results in new map to support vaccine design
(University of Texas at Austin) Researchers have made a critical breakthrough toward developing a vaccine for the 2019 novel coronavirus by creating the first 3D atomic scale map of the part of the virus that attaches to and infects human cells. Mapping this part, called the spike protein, is an essential step so researchers around the world can develop vaccines and antiviral drugs to combat the virus. The paper is publishing Wednesday, Feb. 19 in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 19, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gene Therapy for Mesothelioma Has ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Gene Therapy Trial Shows ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Intratumoral heterogeneity may be responsible for chemotherapy resistance in patients with small cell lung cancer
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center found that chemotherapy results in increased heterogeneity within small cell lung cancer, leading to the evolution of multiple resistance mechanisms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 17, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Optimism after a stroke could ward off life-changing disability by slashing brain inflammation
In a study of 49 stroke survivors researchers at The University of Texas examined the relationship between optimism and recovery for three months after a stroke. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 12, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UTSA examines reporters' portrayal of US border under Trump
(University of Texas at San Antonio) The southern US border has been portrayed as a bogeyman not only by the Trump administration but also surprisingly by major US news media. This is the latest finding according to an analysis of news reporting conducted at The University of Texas at San Antonio. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Absent p53, oral cancers recruit and reprogram nerves to fuel tumor growth
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Loss of an important tumor-suppressing gene allows head and neck cancer to spin off signals to nearby nerves, changing their function and recruiting them to the tumor, where they fuel growth and cancer progress. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 12, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Gene associated with autism also controls growth of the embryonic brain
A UCLA-led study reveals a new role for a gene that ’s associated with autism spectrum disorder, intellectual disability and language impairment.The gene, Foxp1, has previously been studied for its function in the neurons of the developing brain. But the new study reveals that it ’s also important in a group of brain stem cells — the precursors to mature neurons.“This discovery really broadens the scope of where we think Foxp1 is important,” said Bennett Novitch, a member of the Eli and Edythe Broad Center of Regenerative Medicine and Stem Cell Research at UCLA and the senior author ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - February 12, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Prater is first UTA professor to be appointed Jefferson Science Fellow
(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington professor is the University's first to be appointed a Jefferson Science Fellow by the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UTA's Maddalena named fellow of Royal Aeronautical Society
(University of Texas at Arlington) The Royal Aeronautical Society (RAeS) has elected Luca Maddalena, a professor of mechanical and aerospace engineering at The University of Texas at Arlington, as a fellow in the world's oldest professional body dedicated to the aerospace community. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

SwRI, UTSA to team on $18M vaccine development project
Southwest Research Institute will share in an $18 million contract from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a vaccine that can be used to protect humans from tularemia, a potential biothreat also known as rabbit fever. SwRI will share the contract with the University of Texas at San Antonio and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, which is based in New Mexico. SwRI's pharmaceutical testing laboratories will formulate UTSA’s modified bacterium for human clinical trials using intradermal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 10, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

SwRI, UTSA to team on $18M vaccine development project
Southwest Research Institute will share in an $18 million contract from the U.S. Department of Defense to develop a vaccine that can be used to protect humans from tularemia, a potential biothreat also known as rabbit fever. SwRI will share the contract with the University of Texas at San Antonio and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute, which is based in New Mexico. SwRI's pharmaceutical testing laboratories will formulate UTSA’s modified bacterium for human clinical trials using intradermal… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 10, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: W. Scott Bailey Source Type: news

One HPV Vaccine Dose May Be As Effective As Multiple, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) — It is currently recommended that boys and girls under age 15 get two doses of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine but a new study published in the journal Cancer finds that just one dose may be as effective. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection and certain strains of the virus are associated with cervical cancer in women. Researchers at the University of Texas looked at more than 130,000 females and found that one dose of the HPV vaccine was as effective as multiple doses for preventing cervical changes that often lead to cervical cancer. The hope is that if only one dose is require...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall HPV vaccine Source Type: news

Could a plant virus help create a new MRI contrast agent?
What's old is new for University of Texas at Dallas (UTD) researchers who are...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: No signs of residual gadolinium after MR arthrography Might manganese make gadolinium obsolete for MRI scans? Patients at risk for NSF might be safe with certain GBCAs Be mindful of respiratory, motion issues with GBCAs Study shines more light on GBCA-related adverse reactions (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 10, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

San Antonio researchers win $18 million contract to develop tularemia vaccine
(University of Texas at San Antonio) Southwest Research Institute (SwRI ® ), The University of Texas at San Antonio (UTSA) and Lovelace Respiratory Research Institute have received an $18 million contract from the U.S. Department of Defense's Defense Threat Reduction Agency to collaboratively develop a protective vaccine against Francisella tularensis, the bacterium that causes tularemia. The researchers' goal is to develop a vaccine formulation that protects humans for up to one year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Gulf coast mollusks rode out past periods of climate change
(University of Texas at Austin) About 55 million years ago, a rapidly warming climate decimated marine communities around the world. But according to new research, it was a different story for snails, clams and other mollusks living in the shallow waters along what is now the Gulf Coast of the United States. They were able to survive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Circulating Tumor Cells Predict Relapse in Stage III Melanoma
FRIDAY, Feb. 7, 2020 -- For stage III melanoma patients, circulating tumor cells (CTCs) predict relapse, according to a study published online Feb. 3 in Clinical Cancer Research. Anthony Lucci, M.D., from the University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - February 7, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

After Cancer Took His Mother, James Allison Taught Our Immune Systems How to Fight It
There once was a boy in Alice, Texas, who saw things a little differently from everybody else. Influenced by his father, a “country” doctor, he was drawn to science instead of football and conducted biology experiments in his parents’ garage. When he was 10, someone gave him a harmonica, but he never took a lesson or learned to read music, so he wandered the woods mimicking what he’d heard on the radio. A year after that, his mother died following a long struggle with lymphoma. What he still remembers decades later are her last, bedridden days when he spent hours holding her hand, and the burns sing...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

UTA study examines potential sources of groundwater contamination in private wells
(University of Texas at Arlington) A study led by environmental researchers at The University of Texas at Arlington suggests a disconnect between the perception of groundwater contamination and the extent to which that contamination is attributable to oil and natural gas extraction. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

CD19 CAR NK-cell therapy achieves 73% response rate in patients with leukemia and lymphoma
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) According to results from a Phase I/IIa trial at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, treatment with cord blood-derived chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) natural killer (NK)-cell therapy targeting CD19 resulted in clinical responses in a majority of patients with relapsed or refractory non-Hodgkin's lymphoma (NHL) and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), with no major toxicities observed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Retinoid X receptor boosts brain recovery after stroke in preclinical trial
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) A regulator of gene expression, retinoid X receptor (RXR), can boost scavenging cells in their mission to clear the brain of dead cells and debris after a stroke, thus limiting inflammation and improving recovery, according to preclinical research led by Jarek Aronowski, M.D., Ph.D., of The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers brighten path for creating new type of MRI contrast agent
(University of Texas at Dallas) University of Texas at Dallas researchers are breathing new life into an old MRI contrast agent by attaching it to a plant virus and wrapping it in a protective chemical cage. The novel strategy is aimed at developing a completely organic and biodegradable compound that would eliminate the need to use heavy metals such as gadolinium in contrast agents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study provides new understanding of mitochondria genome with potential for new avenues of treatment for multiple cancers
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A study led by The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center furthered understanding about mitochondria, the cell components known as the 'powerhouse of the cell.' Knowing more about the genome is crucial given that mitochondria play important roles in tumorigenesis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers say early spread of coronavirus extends far beyond China's quarantine zone
(University of Texas at Austin) Infectious disease researchers at The University of Texas at Austin and other institutions in Hong Kong, mainland China and France have concluded there is a high probability that the deadly Wuhan coronavirus spread beyond Wuhan and other quarantined cities before Chinese officials were able to put a quarantine in place. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 4, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Short Takes
The National Science Foundation's (NSF) Biological Sciences Directorate (BIO) is soliciting applications for two permanent and two temporary Program Directors in the Division of Integrative Organismal Systems. For the Animal Behavior Program in the Behavioral Systems Cluster, NSF is seeking temporary and permanent Program Directors with a broad background in integrative organismal biology focused on behavior across levels of organization and contexts. For the Integrative Ecological Physiology (IEP) Program of the Physiological and Structural Systems Cluster, NSF is seeking temporary and permanent Program Directors whose ba...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Research sheds light on the evolutionary puzzle of coupling
(University of Texas at San Antonio) A UTSA researcher has discovered that, whether in a pair or in groups, success in primate social systems may also provide insight into organization of human social life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UT scientists' fossil-finding board game is a success in classrooms
(University of Texas at Austin) Drawing inspiration straight from the source material, two researchers from The University of Texas at Austin have designed their own game of chance and skill -- a board game that puts students in the role of time-travelling paleontologists -- to teach key concepts about how fossils form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 3, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study demonstrates liquid biopsy as effective predictor of stage III melanoma relapse and treatment
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) A study at The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center showed that circulating tumor cells (CTCs), a form of liquid biopsy, was independently associated with melanoma relapse, suggesting CTC assessment may be useful in identifying patients at risk for relapse who could benefit from more aggressive therapy following primary treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 3, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Infant and toddler teachers receive specialized training on helping young minds
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The Children's Learning Institute at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) has received a $3 million grant to teach the latest child development strategies to more than 850 infant and toddler specialists and teachers working in at-risk communities in the Lone Star State. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lung cancer screening decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines improves informed decision-making
(University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center) Researchers from The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center have shown that a decision aid delivered through tobacco quitlines effectively reaches a screening-eligible population and results in informed decisions about lung cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 31, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Long Will the Coronavirus Outbreak Last? Experts Are Scrambling to Find Out
As a novel coronavirus known as 2019-nCoV continues to spread throughout China and to countries across the world, the big question is: How long will the outbreak last—and how bad will it get? While some doctors have made predictions and outbreaks of similar coronaviruses like severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) and Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) provide clues, the short, if unsatisfying, answer is that no one is exactly sure. “There is no scientist nor sage on the planet that will tell you when the peak of this epidemic will occur,” said Dr. Michael Ryan, executive director of the World Heal...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV Infectious Disease Source Type: news

Study finds vaping prevention program significantly reduces use in middle school students
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) In response to the youth vaping crisis, experts at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth) developed CATCH My Breath, a program to prevent electronic cigarette use among fifth - 12th grade students. Research published in Public Health Reports reveals the program significantly reduces the likelihood of e-cigarette use among students who complete the curriculum. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study challenges assumptions about social interaction difficulties in autism
(University of Texas at Dallas) Results from researchers at UT Dallas suggest that successful social interactions for autistic adults revolve around partner compatibility and not just the skill set of either person. 'If autistic people were inherently poor at social interaction, you'd expect an interaction between two autistic people to be even more of a struggle than between an autistic and non-autistic person,' Dr. Noah Sasson said. 'But that's not what we found.' (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Protein pores packed in polymers make super-efficient filtration membranes
(University of Texas at Austin) A multidisciplinary team of engineers and scientists has developed a new class of filtration membranes for a variety of applications, from water purification to small-molecule separations to contaminant-removal processes, that are faster to produce and higher performing than current technology. This could reduce energy consumption, operational costs and production time in industrial separations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The great e-scooter hack
(University of Texas at San Antonio) New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Children to bear the burden of negative health effects from climate change
(University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston) The grim effects that climate change will have on pediatric health outcomes was the focus of a 'Viewpoint' article published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation by Susan E. Pacheco, MD, an expert at The University of Texas Health Science Center at Houston (UTHealth). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news