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National cooperative group trial seeks to cut in half early mortality rates for rare leukemia
(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) A national cooperative group trial is making a handful of the country's experts in a rare leukemia available around the clock, with the goal of cutting by more than half the high mortality rates that occur in the difficult first few weeks of treatment.Induction mortality for treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia, or APL, can be as high as 30 percent, but for patients who survive those first few weeks, survival rates can soar beyond 90 percent, making it the most curable leukemia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leukemia Health
Leukemia (Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - November 17, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Seattle Children's opens first pediatric CAR T-Cell trial targeting CD22 and CD19 proteins
(Seattle Children's) Seattle Children's has opened the first chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cell immunotherapy trial in the US for children and young adults with relapsed or refractory CD19- and CD22-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) that will simultaneously attack two targets on cancer cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New target, better leukemia mouse model
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - November 16, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: twis Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

CHLA is awarded more than $1M from St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund cancer research
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three physician-researchers with the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have been awarded more than $1 million in grants from the St. Baldrick's Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research. The funding will be used to support research efforts spanning both neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia -- two of the most aggressive childhood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Monoclonal antibody prevents graft-vs-host disease in bone marrow transplantation model
(Bioscribe) New research provides preclinical proof-of-concept for the ability of PRO 140, a humanized anti-CCR5 monoclonal antibody under development by CytoDyn Inc., to effectively block the development of graft-versus-host disease, a potentially lethal complication of bone marrow stem cell transplantation. CytoDyn is currently enrolling patients in a Phase 2 clinical trial with PRO 140 for the prevention of GvHD in leukemia patients undergoing BMSC transplantation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CHLA is awarded more than $1 million from St. Baldrick's Foundation to fund cancer research
(Children's Hospital Los Angeles) Three physician-researchers with the Children's Center for Cancer and Blood Diseases at Children's Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) have been awarded more than $1 million in grants from the St. Baldrick's Foundation, the largest private funder of childhood cancer research. The funding will be used to support research efforts spanning both neuroblastoma and acute lymphoblastic leukemia -- two of the most aggressive childhood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 14, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Prolonged breastfeeding linked to halving of later eczema risk
But promotion programme not associated with asthma or lung function at the age of 16 Related items fromOnMedica Less than half of babies breastfed after two months How to encourage breastfeeding? Breastfeeding could cut children ’s leukaemia risk (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - November 14, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

MAFB enhances oncogenic Notch signaling in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia
Activating mutations in the gene encoding the cell-cell contact signaling protein Notch1 are common in human T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias (T-ALLs). However, expressing Notch1 mutant alleles in mice fails to efficiently induce the development of leukemia. We performed a gain-of-function screen to identify proteins that enhanced signaling by leukemia-associated Notch1 mutants. The transcription factors MAFB and ETS2 emerged as candidates that individually enhanced Notch1 signaling, and when coexpressed, they synergistically increased signaling to an extent similar to that induced by core components of the Notch trans...
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - November 14, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Pajcini, K. V., Xu, L., Shao, L., Petrovic, J., Palasiewicz, K., Ohtani, Y., Bailis, W., Lee, C., Wertheim, G. B., Mani, R., Musuthamy, N., Li, Y., Meijerink, J. P. P., Blacklow, S. C., Faryabi, R. B., Cherry, S., Pear, W. S. Tags: STKE Research Articles Source Type: news

Child cancer survivor fights for better treatment
Vicky Forster beat leukaemia as a child. Now she works as a scientist, trying to change the lives of children with the same disease. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - November 10, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Russian chemists discovered a surprising effect of a well-known leukemia drug
(RUDN University) Researchers from RUDN University and Institute of Biomedical Chemistry of the Russian Academy of Sciences have identified an alternative mechanism for the effective antitumor drug -- an enzyme called L-asparaginase. Some isoenzymes of L-asparaginase block the growth of telomeres (region of repetitive nucleotide sequences at each end of a chromosome) on DNA molecules, and this limits the number of divisions of a cancer cell. This effect is reported in the Biochemical and Biophysical Research Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the Berlin patient's unexpected cure
(Oregon Health& Science University) Researchers have a new way to understand the much-studied Berlin patient's unexpected cure from HIV and improve outcomes of stem cell transplants for patients with other blood-related diseases such as leukemia and sickle-cell disease. A team at Oregon Health& Science University has shown a species of monkey called Mauritian cynomolgus macaques can successfully receive stem cell transplants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA Expands Approval of Sprycel (dasatinib) to Include Treatment of Children with Philadelphia Chromosome-Positive Chronic Myeloid Leukemia in Chronic Phase
PRINCETON, N.J.--(BUSINESS WIRE) November 10, 2017 --Bristol-Myers Squibb Company (NYSE:BMY) today announced the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded the indication for Sprycel (dasatinib) tablets to include the treatment of children... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Approvals - November 10, 2017 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Misregulated protein breakdown promotes leukemias and brain cancer
(German Cancer Research Center (Deutsches Krebsforschungszentrum, DKFZ)) An enzyme that is responsible for the breakdown of specific amino acids in food plays a key role in the development of leukemias and brain cancer, scientists from the German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ) in Heidelberg have now reported in Nature. The researchers have hence discovered a surprising link between energy metabolism and the so-called epigenetic code. The authors think that blocking this enzyme is a promising possibility to combat cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stem cell and leukemia expert wins prestigious medal
(Academy of Medical Sciences (UK)) Dr. Cristina Lo Celso, a Reader in Stem Cell Biology at Imperial College London, has been announced as the winner of the Foulkes Foundation Medal 2017. The Foulkes Medal is awarded biennially to a rising star within biomedical research for contributing important and significant impacts to the field before, or in, their first independent position. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 7, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Duke Doctors Diagnose Rare Sweet ’s Syndrome
Treatment TermsDermatology Author Shawn Lake Overview Greg Cannon saw more than 15 doctors near his hometown of Valdese, GA and was hospitalized twice with puzzling symptoms before Duke Health dermatologists confirmed he had a rare condition called subcutaneous Sweet ’s syndrome. Their knowledge and expertise helped Cannon find relief from the painful symptoms and enjoy life once again. Hero Imagecannon_skin_001.jpg Preview Image Content Blocks Header Cycles of Fever and Pain ContentThe first sign something was wrong came on a hot autumn day in 2013. Cannon was at an Atlanta Braves game with his wife Linda,...
Source: dukehealth.org: Duke Health News - November 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: dg62 at duke.edu Source Type: news

Are You Sure That's What the Doctor Said About Your Leukemia?
Source: HealthDay Related MedlinePlus Pages: Acute Myeloid Leukemia, Talking With Your Doctor (Source: MedlinePlus Health News)
Source: MedlinePlus Health News - November 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Are You Sure That's What the Doctor Said About Your Leukemia?
Title: Are You Sure That's What the Doctor Said About Your Leukemia?Category: Health NewsCreated: 11/2/2017 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 11/3/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - November 3, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Are You Sure That's What the Doctor Said About Your Leukemia?
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - November 3, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Are You Sure That's What the Doctor Said About Your Leukemia?
THURSDAY, Nov. 2, 2017 -- The stress of a frightening leukemia diagnosis may impede clear doctor-patient communication, a new study suggests. Patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) tend to view their illness and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 2, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Doctors: When the Doctor ’ s Mother Has Cancer
I braced myself for what would come next: The beginning of every cancer story, when the seemingly innocent cough or dizziness takes a sinister turn. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: MIKKAEL A. SEKERES, M.D. Tags: Lung Cancer Tests (Medical) Brain Cancer Computerized Axial Tomography (CAT Scans) Leukemia Surgery and Surgeons Lymph Nodes and Lymphatic System Chemotherapy Radiation Source Type: news

How an interest in bipolar disorder drugs led to a better understanding of leukemia
(American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) A research project that began 20 years ago with an interest in how lithium treats mood disorders has yielded insights into the progression of blood cancers such as leukemia. The research, which centers on a protein called GSK-3, will be published in the Nov. 3 issue of the Journal of Biological Chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Breastfeeding for two months protects against SIDS
Study quantifies minimum time needed for benefit Related items fromOnMedica UK breastfeeding rates some of lowest in the world How to encourage breastfeeding? Breastfeeding could cut children ’s leukaemia risk Breastfeeding for longer linked to higher IQ claim (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - October 31, 2017 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Papers of note in Science Translational Medicine 9 (413)
This week’s articles describe new therapeutic targets for pulmonary arterial hypertension, acute myeloid leukemia, and Friedreich’s ataxia. (Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment)
Source: Signal Transduction Knowledge Environment - October 31, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Ferrarelli, L. K. Tags: STKE Editors ' Choice Source Type: news

Kareem Abdul-Jabbar joins UCLA Health and the Los Angeles Lakers in leukemia and lymphoma fundraiser
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar is teaming up with UCLA Health and the Los Angeles Lakers at the 2017 Leukemia and Lymphoma Society ’s Los Angeles Light the Night Walk. The annual event, which raises research funds to find cures for blood cancers, will be held on Nov. 4, starting at 4:30 p.m. at L.A. Live in downtown Los Angeles.The Los Angeles Lakers legend and UCLA Bruin basketball player will serve as the celebrity ambassador for the UCLA Health/Lakers group. As a survivor of leukemia himself, Abdul-Jabbar will lead the walk, which brings together patients, families, friends and co-workers to celebrate, honor or remember thos...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - October 26, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Insights from a rare genetic disease may help treat multiple myeloma
(American Chemical Society) A new class of drugs for blood cancers such as leukemia and multiple myeloma is showing promise. But it is hobbled by a problem that also plagues other cancer drugs: targeted cells can develop resistance. Now scientists, reporting in ACS Central Science, have found that insights into a rare genetic disease known as NGLY1 deficiency could help scientists understand how that resistance works -- and potentially how drugs can outsmart it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researchers engineer complex immunotherapy that may target relapsing leukemia
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 25, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fred Hutch researchers engineer complex TCR immunotherapy that may target relapsing leukemia
(Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center) Researchers at Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center and the University of Washington have developed a novel way to genetically engineer T cells that may be effective for treating and preventing leukemia relapse. The findings provide the basis for launching a first-in-human clinical trial of this new immunotherapy, which relies on engineered T-cell receptors, or TCRs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blocking key pathways is a way to defeat cancer stem cells
(RIKEN) Scientists from the RIKEN Center for Integrative Medical Sciences in Japan and international collaborators have found that in humanized mice, a cocktail of drugs blocking certain key pathways is effective in eliminating acute myeloid leukemia (AML), a disease which is estimated to kill more than 250,000 people a year around the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 25, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Leukemia Patients Who Survive Severe GVHD Often Fare Worse
Those who develop severe acute graft - versus - host after stem cell transplant have higher mortality (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Internal Medicine, Critical Care, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

People with leukemia and their oncologists have vastly different perceptions of prognosis
(American Society of Clinical Oncology) A study of 100 people with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) receiving chemotherapy found that patient and physician perceptions of treatment risk and the likelihood of a cure varied widely. Overall, patients tended to overestimate both the risk of dying due to treatment and the likelihood of a cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Thumbs Up to Latest CAR T-Cell Approval
(MedPage Today) -- New era for lymphoma, leukemia, possibly other cancers (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - October 19, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

FDA Approves 2nd Gene Therapy For Leukemia
Yescarta fights a type of lymphoma; move is heralded as helping open 'new era' in medical care (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Approves Gene Therapy Tested In Boston To Treat Adults With Lymphoma
TRENTON, N.J. (CBS/AP) — U.S. regulators on Wednesday approved a second gene therapy for a blood cancer, a one-time, custom-made treatment for aggressive lymphoma in adults. The Food and Drug Administration allowed sales of the treatment from Kite Pharma. It uses the same technology, called CAR-T, as the first gene therapy approved in the U.S. in August, a treatment for childhood leukemia from Novartis Pharmaceuticals. That Novartis treatment was tested in Boston. In those tests, Dana Farber and Brigham and Women’s Hospital cancer researchers found that 80 percent of lymphoma patients who underwent the treatmen...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - October 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News blood cancer Brigham and Women's Hospital Dana Farber FDA Gene Therapy Novartis Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Three of the most deadly cancers get critical funding for research
Immunotherapy for leukemia patients has been nothing short of a miracle. Now scientists hope to use that science and other forms of gene therapy to tackle three of the deadliest forms of cancer: glioblastoma (brain cancer), sarcoma (bone cancer) and ovarian cancer. Three scientists have received $1.3 million in critical funding from the Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy (ACGT), the nation's only nonprofit dedicated exclusively to cell and gene therapies for cancer. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - October 18, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Development Research and Development Source Type: news

Medical News Today: Leukemia: Cancer cells killed off with diabetes drug
Researchers find that boosting fat cells in the bone marrow using a diabetes drug not only kills off leukemic cells, but it also regenerates healthy ones. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lymphoma / Leukemia / Myeloma Source Type: news

Flu vaccine failed to protect young leukemia patients during cancer treatment
(St. Jude Children's Research Hospital) St. Jude Children's Research Hospital investigators said the results reinforce the importance of hand washing and other measures to help protect vulnerable patients from influenza infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bolstering fat cells offers potential new leukemia treatment
(McMaster University) Killing cancer cells indirectly by powering up fat cells in the bone marrow could help acute myeloid leukemia patients, says a study from McMaster University published in Nature Cell Biology. Researchers with the McMaster Stem Cell and Cancer Research Institute found that boosting adipocytes, or fat cells, located in the bone morrow suppressed cancerous leukemia cells but -- in a surprise to the research team -- also induced the regeneration of healthy blood cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 16, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

#MayoClinicRadio podcast: 10/14/17
Listen: Mayo Clinic Radio 10/14/17 On the Mayo Clinic Radio podcast, Dr. Mohamad Bydon, a neurosurgeon at Mayo Clinic, discusses minimally invasive spine surgery. Also on the podcast, Dr. Allison Rosenthal, an oncologist at Mayo Clinic, shares how her leukemia diagnosis changed not only her life, but also her career path. And?Dr. M. Rizwan Sohail, [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - October 16, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)
Title: Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL)Category: Diseases and ConditionsCreated: 10/28/2009 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 10/11/2017 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - October 11, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

I ’ ve Been Seeing a Therapist for Years, So Why Am I Not Getting Better?
The answer: We need to address what’s happening inside the office as well as stigma. During the creation of the documentary Going Sane I interviewed Cindy Bulik. She is perhaps the most important researcher on anorexia today. She lives between UNC where she is a distinguished Professor of Eating Disorders and Sweden where she is a professor at the Karolinska Institute. Her current research is exploring genetic influences on anorexia and by the end of our interview she asked if my entire family would be willing to give a sample of blood for the study. She is not the single-minded professor oblivious to social customs...
Source: Psych Central - October 10, 2017 Category: Psychiatry Authors: Josh Sabey Tags: Disabilities Disorders Editorials Essays Medications Motivation and Inspiration Policy and Advocacy Psychology Psychotherapy Suicide Treatment Child Development child therapy Clinical Outcome evidence-based practices evidence Source Type: news

BU researcher receives grant to better understand lymphoblastic leukemia
(Boston University School of Medicine) Hui Feng, M.D., Ph.D., assistant professor of pharmacology and medicine at Boston University School of Medicine (BUSM), is the recipient of a four-year, $792,000 grant from the American Cancer Society to study why T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is so aggressive and resistant to treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 10, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How to encourage breastfeeding?
Dr Julie Bishop, director of health improvement at Public Health Wales, discusses how healthcare professionals can help new parents considering breastfeeding Related items fromOnMedica Breastfeeding twice as likely after home birth Less than half of babies breastfed after two months UK breastfeeding rates some of lowest in the world Breastfeeding could cut children ’s leukaemia risk (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - October 10, 2017 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Novel Treatment Causes Cancer to Self-Destruct Without Affecting Healthy Cells
October 9, 2017—BRONX, NY—Scientists atAlbert Einstein College of Medicine have discovered the first compound that directly makescancer cells commit suicide while sparing healthy cells. The new treatment approach, described in today’s issue of Cancer Cell, was directed against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells but may also have potential for attacking other types of cancers. (Source: Einstein News)
Source: Einstein News - October 9, 2017 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Medical News Today: New compound kills cancer without harming healthy cells
A proof-of-concept study shows how a new compound selectively triggers cell suicide in acute myeloid leukemia cells without harming healthy cells. (Source: Health News from Medical News Today)
Source: Health News from Medical News Today - October 9, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Cancer / Oncology Source Type: news

Stealing from the body: How cancer recharges its batteries
(University of East Anglia) New research published today uncovers how the blood cancer 'steals' parts of surrounding healthy bone marrow cells to thrive, in work that could help form new approaches to cancer treatment in the future. Researchers at the University of East Anglia (UEA), funded by the Rosetrees Trust and The Big C Charity, found that healthy bone marrow stromal cells were made to transfer their power-generating mitochondria to neighbouring cancer cells, effectively 'recharging' the acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and supporting the leukaemia to grow. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new CRISPR-engineered cancer model to test therapeutics
(Broad Institute of MIT and Harvard) Using multiplex CRISPR-Cas9 editing of human hematopoietic, or blood-forming, stem cells followed by transplantation in mice, researchers designed customized mouse models for the progression of leukemia. In a number of different experiments, the animal models successfully reflected human responses to a therapeutic agent commonly used to treat blood cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 5, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rates and Trends of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Rates and Trends of Pediatric Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia
This report examines the latest demographic and geographic trends in ALL incidence among children and adolescents in the U.S.Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Protein identified that drives initiation and growth of aggressive form of leukemia
(Massachusetts General Hospital) A team led by Massachusetts General Hospital investigators has identified a new cancer-causing pathway behind most cases of an aggressive type of leukemia, findings that could lead to new targeted treatment approaches. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news