Bioelectronic Medicine: Targeting Inflammatory Disease with Electricity

We presented positive initial results in Crohn’s disease at the 2016 United European Gastroenterology meeting: six of the eight patients had seen a substantial reduction in their disease activity index scores, and three were in remission from the disease. As SetPoint looks ahead, several chronic disease areas are emerging as key bioelectronic medicine therapy targets, and our company is exploring a number of these. One of our preclinical programs explores bioelectronic medicine’s potential role as a treatment for MS.   New Target: Multiple Sclerosis In late 2017, SetPoint presented positive data from a study exploring the therapeutic effects of a bioelectronic medicine approach for MS at the European Committee and Americas Committee for Research and Treatment in Multiple Sclerosis (ECTRIMS-ACTRIMS). Data showed that SetPoint’s therapy reduced demyelination and, more importantly, accelerated remyelination, which is a significant challenge in treating MS with currently available drugs/biologics. The study also demonstrated this approach reduced leakage of the blood-spinal cord barrier, which can prevent immune cell infiltration and further reduce disease progression. Current approved treatments for MS target the overactive immune response but do not repair damage to the myelin sheath – a critical aspect. These results show promise for a possible bioelectronic treatment for MS and lay the groundwork for further studies.   Bioelectronic Medici...
Source: Mass Device - Category: Medical Devices Authors: Tags: Bioelectronic Medicine Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation SetPoint Medical Sponsored Content Source Type: news

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For most of us, springtime marks the return of life to a dreary landscape, bringing birdsong, trees in bud, and daffodils in bloom. But if you work for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the coming of spring means the return of nasty diseases spread by ticks and mosquitoes. The killjoys at CDC celebrated the end of winter with a bummer of a paper showing that infections spread by ticks doubled in the United States from 2004 to 2016. (Tick populations have exploded in recent decades, perhaps due to climate change and loss of biodiversity.) Lyme disease The most common infection spread by ticks in the US i...
Source: Harvard Health Blog - Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tags: Health Infectious diseases Source Type: blogs
ARTHRITIS pain affects about 10 million people in the UK, and symptoms include joint pain and inflammation. Cutting back on this food ingredient in your diet could lower your risk of arthritis signs.
Source: Daily Express - Health - Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news
We read with great interest the article of Kessler et  al.1 in a recent issue of the journal. The authors performed a retrospective cohort study on 213 participants who underwent surgical repair for symptomatic full-thickness rotator cuff tears and concluded that obesity was not associated with postoperative complications. The authors should be congra tulated for performing a well-designed study in an important topic (e.g., obesity) in patients undergoing surgery.2,3 The current emphasis on optimizing patients before surgery to enhance recovery across many surgical procedures makes the topic timely in perioperative medicine.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Thank you for the opportunity to respond to Bhatia  et al.'s letter to the editor regarding our study “Bilateral Hip Arthroscopy: Direct Comparison of Primary Acetabular Labral Repair and Primary Labral Reconstruction.” Their response is expected as the results of our study represent a significant challenge to their current treatment philosoph y. Labral reconstruction is a technically challenging procedure and is not meant for all surgeons. It is disappointing that their response is not fully objective and appears to be influenced by their treatment bias.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
With regard to the recent article by White et  al. entitled “Bilateral Hip Arthroscopy: Direct Comparison of Primary Acetabular Labral Repair and Primary Acetabular Labral Reconstruction,”1 we commend the authors for publishing a difficult study and initiating an international discussion on the appropriate management of the labrum in prima ry hip arthroscopy. The management of the labrum has profound implications on both functional outcome and chondral integrity following hip arthroscopy.2-4 Although the authors present compelling data, we believe there are significant limitations that should be emphasized...
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Letter to the Editor Source Type: research
Active patients with massive irreparable rotator cuff tears and no glenohumeral arthritis have long posed a dilemma for shoulder surgeons. Such high-demand patients do not do well with partial cuff repair, as their results tend to deteriorate over time. They are also not good candidates for reverse total shoulder arthroplasty due to high rates of complications and high revision rates. The early good results of superior capsular reconstruction for these challenging patients are very encouraging, and they highlight the potential for superior capsular reconstruction to be a reliable joint-preserving option with low morbidity.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Hip arthroscopy has demonstrated a drastic rise in utilization in the past decade for the treatment of femoroacetabular impingement, labral tears, and early arthritic changes. During that time, there has also been a rise in the use of administrative claims databases that have allowed for the analysis of trends in surgical procedures. Multiple large administrative database analyses have been used to characterize the changing trends in hip arthroscopy, and the demand for these procedures has grown significantly at our own institution as well as nationally.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
Meniscal allograft transplantation (MAT) is an established treatment for a symptomatic, meniscus-deficient knee. It is well known that MAT is effective in patients with good cartilage even in the early era of this procedure. The role of MAT in arthritic knees is getting more and more clear with increasing evidence over the last decade. Now we are able to expand our surgical indication to arthritic patients and provide them with individualized explanation for outcome and survival.
Source: Arthroscopy - Journal of Arthroscopic and Related Surgery - Category: Surgery Authors: Tags: Editorial Commentary Source Type: research
A new Yale study looks at how arterial plaque forms at a molecular level, and may help produce targeted treatments for heart disease and stroke prevention.
Source: Yale Science and Health News - Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news
Source: Journal of Stroke and Cerebrovascular Diseases - Category: Neurology Source Type: research
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