“I am excited”: Making Stress Work for You, Instead of Against You

Image: The Yerkes-Dodson Law (YDL) — How much stress is good for you? In 1908, Robert Mearns Yerkes and John Dillingham Dodson designed an experiment that would begin to tackle the question, “How much stress is good for you?” The researchers tracked mice to see how stress would affect their ability to learn. Simple—yet painful, because how do you stress out mice? You shock them. The researchers set up two corridors to choose from—one painted white and the other black—and if a mouse went down the black corridor, ZAP! Yerkes and Dodson observed that given too mild a shock, the mice just shrugged it off and kept on keepin’ on—no biggie if they made the same mistake again. Too big a jolt, and the stress left them too frazzled too figure out what had just happened and how to make that not happen again. Those who learned most quickly—indeed, those mice that might need half as much time to learn which corridor to take—did it Goldilocks style: the size of their shock was juuuuust right. You may not be a mouse, but research shows that you learn like one. Not that we are suggesting self-electrocution (to do so would be highly unethical—fascinating, but highly unethical). But a just-right dose of stress can lead to your peak performance. Ed Ehlinger of the University of Minnesota studied almost 10,000 students and found that those who couldn’t manage their stress (32 percent of them) had a 0.5 drop in their GPA com...
Source: SharpBrains - Category: Neuroscience Authors: Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Peak Performance Professional Development ability ability to learn alertness anxiety mind physiology Stress work Yerkes-Dodson Law Source Type: blogs

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The objective of this longitudinal study was to examine the gender differences in college students' depression, anxiety, and stress over the four academic years, and to explore possible anxiety-related factors among first year students. ...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news
INTRODUCTION: Dysregulation of emotion (DE) is commonly seen in individuals suffering from compulsive sexual behavior (CSB), as well as represents a crucial element of its common comorbidities like mood, anxiety, and substance use disorders. AIM: T...
Source: SafetyLit - Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Risk Factor Prevalence, Injury Occurrence Source Type: news
Conclusion: A vestibular rehabilitation program started early after confirmed vestibular neuritis diagnosis in addition to standard care reduces the perception of dizziness and improves functions of daily life more effectively than standard care alone.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: VESTIBULAR DISORDERS Source Type: research
Objective: The Dizziness Handicap Inventory (DHI) is the most commonly used quality of life measure for vestibular disorders. However, there is wide variability in scores, and little is known about which variables contribute to dizziness-related quality of life. Our goal was to investigate the key demographic and symptom-related factors to that account for DHI variance. Study Design: Cross-sectional survey. Setting: Tertiary referral center. Patients: Adult patients presenting to a dizziness clinic. Main Outcome Measure: DHI variance explained by multiple linear regression. Results: Seventy subjects were i...
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: VESTIBULAR DISORDERS Source Type: research
Conclusions: Our data support the hypothesis that increased anxiety may play a role in visuo-vestibular interactions; moreover, they are not inconsistent with the hypothesis that OKS might provoke a “threatening effect,” leading to gaze bias during examination.
Source: Otology and Neurotology - Category: ENT & OMF Tags: VESTIBULAR DISORDERS Source Type: research
Condition:   Social Anxiety Interventions:   Behavioral: Psychoeducation;   Behavioral: Motivation Sponsor:   University of Colorado, Boulder Completed
Source: ClinicalTrials.gov - Category: Research Source Type: clinical trials
Depression is thought to affect one-in-seven adults in the US during their lives. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Anxiety Depression subscribers-only Source Type: blogs
A proven way to lose weight without diet or exercise. → Support PsyBlog for just $4 per month. Enables access to articles marked (M) and removes ads. → Explore PsyBlog's ebooks, all written by Dr Jeremy Dean: Accept Yourself: How to feel a profound sense of warmth and self-compassion The Anxiety Plan: 42 Strategies For Worry, Phobias, OCD and Panic Spark: 17 Steps That Will Boost Your Motivation For Anything Activate: How To Find Joy Again By Changing What You Do
Source: PsyBlog | Psychology Blog - Category: Psychiatry & Psychology Authors: Tags: Weight Loss Source Type: blogs
CONCLUSIONS: SMC is a multi-caused symptom. They are associated with lower memory performance, but also with variables related to health, social aspects and lifestyle. When faced with a patient with SMC, which may be due to cognitive impairment because of Alzheimer's disease, these associations should be taken into account to assess this risk and know when follow-up is most needed. PMID: 31820817 [PubMed - in process]
Source: Revista de Neurologia - Category: Neurology Authors: Tags: Rev Neurol Source Type: research
This study on pediatric patients with primary enuresis included 30 patients with monosymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (MonoNE), 30 patients with polysymptomatic nocturnal enuresis (PolyNE), and 30 healthy controls, making a total of 90 subjects with an age range of 8-18. In all subjects, the levels of serum and urinary Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) were measured, in addition to urinary creatinine levels and calculated as BDNF/Cr ng/mg creatinine (BDNF/ Cr). RESULTS: The serum BDNF results of the PolyNE group (0.949±0.587) were significantly lower than those of the control group (1.158±0.587) (p=0...
Source: Archivos Espanoles de Urologia - Category: Urology & Nephrology Tags: Arch Esp Urol Source Type: research
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