Novel educational program puts a human face on biomedical research
(Medical University of South Carolina) The goal of translational research is to speed research breakthroughs into clinical practice. Too often, however, clinicians and biomedical researchers work in silos, with little opportunity for collaboration. With the support of the South Carolina Clinical& Translational Research Institute, an educational initiative at the Medical University of South Carolina is trying to change that by enabling biomedical graduate students to shadow a clinical team as they treat patients with the diseases they are researching. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Theater improvisation techniques show promising results for science classroom engagement
(University of Maryland Baltimore County) A researcher at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed a unique method to improve class participation in a graduate-level thermodynamics course by incorporating theater improvisation activities in the classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Guts and brains: How microbes in a mother ’s intestines affect fetal neurodevelopment
During pregnancy in mice, the billions of bacteria and other microbes that live in a mother ’s intestines regulate key metabolites, small molecules that are important for healthy fetal brain development,UCLA biologists report Sept. 23 in the journal Nature.While the maternal gut microbiota has been associated with abnormalities in the brain function and behavior of offspring — often in response to factors like infection, a high-fat diet or stress during pregnancy — scientists had not known until now whether it influenced brain development during critical prenatal periods and in the absence of such environ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 23, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

HRSA: Meeting of the Council on Graduate Medical Education
The Health Resources and Services Administration's Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) will hold a virtual meeting on December 8-9, 2020. Login information and meeting materials will be available on theCOGME website. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - September 23, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

URI grad student finds PFAS in seabirds from Narragansett Bay, Massachusetts Bay, Cape Fear
(University of Rhode Island) A recent study by a University of Rhode Island graduate student researching PFAS exposure found high levels of the compounds in seabirds from offshore Massachusetts and coastal Rhode Island and North Carolina adding to the accumulating pile of evidence related to human and animal exposure to these chemical compounds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research helps people, lunar rovers, get there on time
(University of Illinois Grainger College of Engineering) Illinois graduate student Pranay Thangeda relies on the bus system in Champaign-Urbana to get to class. He wanted to understand why, despite arriving at the bus stop on time, he was sometimes late. He developed a tool that considers transportation variables weighed against how great a margin of error bus riders are willing to accept, which can also apply to getting a lunar rover to its destination, and with a high degree of reliability. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘How Am I Going To Make It?’ Months of Eviction Uncertainty Are Taking a Toll on Millions of Families
Nine months into the COVID-19 pandemic, Marlenis Zambrano is out of money. A 48-year-old single mother in Virginia, she tried her best to get by after being furloughed from her Defense Department daycare job in March by selling homemade face masks and empanadas to help support her two dependent children, both in college. She twice applied for housing relief from Arlington County, but was denied because, at the time, she had $5,000 in savings intended for her daughter’s tuition. With that money long gone, Zambrano is living off her credit card, racking up $5,000 in charges to pay for her Arlington, Virginia apartment....
Source: TIME: Health - September 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 UnitedWeRise20Disaster Source Type: news

Return to work pathways following injury in road traffic crashes: a retrospective cohort study - Gray SE, Collie A.
OBJECTIVES: To determine: 1) different return to work (RTW) pathways among road traffic crash (RTC) survivors; 2) RTW differences between RTC and workers' compensation schemes, and; 3) factors associated with relapse and attempting graduated RTW. METHO... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Ethiopia: Hospital, Staff Shouldering Burden of Fighting Covid-19
[Ethiopian Herald] Yom Fisseha, a graduating medical student at St Paul's Hospital's Millennium Medical College was recently infected by corona virus while giving treatment for mothers giving birth. Due to various symptoms of the virus, many people are affected during the past six months particularly in the Millennium College and nation in general. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - September 19, 2020 Category: African Health Source Type: news

CMS: Medicare Program: Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Final Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2021 Rates; Quality Reporting and Medicare and Medicaid Promoting Interoperability Programs Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals
Notice of final rule from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to revise the FY 2021 Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for capital and operating costs of acute care hospitals, make changes to Medicare graduate medical education (GME) for teaching hospitals and payments to Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). Also provides the market basket updated that applies to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis, updates payment policies and rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatient hospital servi...
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - September 18, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Mapping the decision-making pathways in the brain
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have identified a new area of the brain that could be involved in cost-benefit decision-making. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Latest: Univ of Michigan graduate students end strike
Graduate students who teach at the University of Michigan returned to classes Thursday after voting to end a nine-day strike (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Leveraging Research for Solution-driven Policymaking in the Era of COVID-19
By Sudip Ranjan Basu, Monica Das, Alexandra Boakes Tracy and Achim WennmannBANGKOK, Thailand, Sep 16 2020 (IPS) The United Nations has tasked the Canadian Institutes of Health Research Institute of Population and Public Health (CIHR-IPPH) to lead the research roadmap to identify priorities that will support an equitable global socio-economic recovery from COVID-19 within the broader framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). As the world grapples with the impacts of COVID-19, identifying the research agenda and partnering with academic institutions and think tanks have become more essential than ever before. S...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Sudip Ranjan Basu - Monica Das - Alexandra Boakes Tracy - Ac Tags: Asia-Pacific Development & Aid Economy & Trade Global Headlines Health Human Rights Humanitarian Emergencies Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

Parliament nod to Bill for giving 'national importance' tag to Gujarat Ayurveda institutes
Lok Sabha has already approved the bill in the last session, in which three Jamnagar, Gujarat-based institutes -- Institute of Post Graduate Teaching and Research in Ayurveda, Gulabkunwerba Ayurveda Mahavidyalaya and Institute of Ayurveda Pharmaceutical Sciences --would be conglomerated. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - September 16, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New study finds two amino acids are the Marie Kondo of molecular liquid phase separation
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) a team of biologists at the Advanced Science Research Center at The Graduate Center, CUNY (CUNY ASRC) have identified unique roles for the amino acids arginine and lysine in contributing to molecule liquid phase properties and their regulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Prepare Your Resume, Hone Your Interview Skills
Registration is open for the Employment Acquisition Skills Boot Camp for Scientists, an online professional development program from the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs in the United States do an excellent job of preparing students for careers in academia. As early career professionals and a growing number of reports note, however, many STEM graduates (including those with advanced degrees) are interested in employment in sectors beyond the professoriate. Scientists continue to report that they feel ill-prepared and ill-equipped ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 15, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Call for Award Applicants: Johnson & Johnson Seeks Female Researchers Working in Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design
NEW BRUNSWICK, N.J. (September 14, 2020) – Johnson & Johnson today announced that it is accepting applications for its 2021 Women in STEM2D (WiSTEM2D) Scholars Award, aimed at supporting assistant or associate academic professors in the disciplines of Science, Technology, Engineering, Math, Manufacturing and Design. For three years, each recipient will receive mentorship from leaders at Johnson & Johnson and a total $150,000 ($50,000 each year). The deadline for applications is Oct. 15, 2020 at 9 a.m. HST, and guidelines and additional details are available here: https://www.jnj.com/wistem2d-university-schola...
Source: Johnson and Johnson - September 14, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Our Company Source Type: news

Newly tapped Ohio health director declines post within hours of her selection
Dr. Joan Duwve has decided not to be Ohio's next health director, hours after Gov. Mike DeWine announced she'd been selected for the position. Duwve, an Ohio State University graduate who just a few months ago was named to a similar position in South Carolina, withdrew for "personal reasons," according to statement from the governor's office late Thursday. She had been slated to succeed Dr. Amy Acton, who led the state health department during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, and received… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 11, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Eleanor Kennedy Source Type: news

COIVD-19: A barometer for social justice in New York City
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) In an editorial for the American Journal of Public Health, faculty from the CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy (CUNY SPH) led by Dean Ayman El-Mohandes highlight the long-standing public health-related inequities among people of color in the United States--which have only been exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic--and call upon New York City lawmakers to put forth policies to achieve a more equitable distribution of basic necessities such as employment, food, health care, housing, and education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Newly tapped Ohio health director declines post within hours of her selection
Dr. Joan Duwve has decided not to be Ohio's next health director, hours after Gov. Mike DeWine announced she'd been selected for the position. Duwve, an Ohio State University graduate who just a few months ago was named to a similar position in South Carolina, withdrew for "personal reasons," according to statement from the governor's office late Thursday. She had been slated to succeed Dr. Amy Acton, who led the state health department during the early days of the coronavirus pandemic, and received… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Eleanor Kennedy Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Factors linked to college aspirations, enrollment, and success
(Wiley) A recent study has identified certain factors associated with a greater likelihood that a high school student will decide to attend college, enroll in college the fall semester immediately following high school graduation, and then return to that same college a year later as a retained college student. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A window into adolescence
(University of Delaware) Why do some adolescents take more risks than others? Research from University of Delaware Biomedical Engineer Curtis Johnson and graduate student Grace McIlvain suggests that two centers in the brain, one which makes adolescents want to take risks and the other which prevents them from acting on these impulses, physically mature at different rates and that adolescents with large differences in the rate of development between these two brain regions are more likely to be risk-takers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists develop low-cost chip to detect presence and quantity of COVID-19 antibodies
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Robust and widespread antibody testing has emerged as a key strategy in the fight against SARS-CoV-2, the virus responsible for the COVID-19 pandemic. However current testing methods are too inaccurate or too expensive to be feasible on a global scale. But now, scientists at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) have developed a rapid, reliable and low-cost antibody test. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

CEOs with uncommon names tend to implement unconventional strategies
(Rice University) If you're looking for an unconventional approach to doing business, select a CEO with an uncommon name, according to new research co-authored by an expert at Rice University's Jones Graduate School of Business. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Model shows that the speed neurons fire impacts their ability to synchronize
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Research conducted by the Computational Neuroscience Unit at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University (OIST) has shown for the first time that a computer model can replicate and explain a unique property displayed by a crucial brain cell. Their findings, published today in eLife, shed light on how groups of neurons can self-organize by synchronizing when they fire fast. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Identifying fall prevention content in graduate healthcare curricula - Frie BL, Brueggemann AD, Dutton LL, Pearson VI.
ISSUE: An interprofessional team-based approach to fall prevention is advocated to address the public health issue of fall-related injuries. The purpose of this study was to analyze fall-related curricular content across graduate physician assistant, nursi... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Young Adults Source Type: news

A space to speak: therapeutic theater to address gender-based violence - Arias G, Dennis C, Loo S, Lazier AL, Moye KD, Moye K, O'Connor C, Rich A, Weinberg M, Butler JD.
This article examines the experience of eight graduate students in the drama therapy program at Lesley University when creating and performing a theater piece centered around gender-based violence. The performance piece, A Space to Speak, used the performe... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - September 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

2021 WFU Orthopaedics Physician Scientist Program
The Department of Orthopaedic Surgery at Wake Forest University offers a 2-year Orthopaedic Physician Scientist Training Program. The program is a two year postdoctoral experience of mentored and protected basic science research time prior to clinical residency. The goal of the program is to provide applicants with a foundation in basic science research and the necessary knowledge and skills to pursue a career in academic Orthopaedic Surgery. In addition, Physician Scientists have the opportunity to seek further education by pursuing a Doctor of Philosophy degree in the Wake Forest Graduate School of Arts and Sciences. (So...
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - September 4, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Residency News Source Type: news

Team Effort: Restarting Safely
Both first- and second-year Geisel medical students completed their required 14-day quarantines and screening PCR testing per Dartmouth policy. As of this week, we are happy to report that there are no positive tests among our medical or graduate students. Thanks to everyone for their continued commitment to the safety of our community. (Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School)
Source: News at Dartmouth Medical School - September 3, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Authors: NonPerson Geisel Web Service Acct Tags: Announcements Education COVID-19 re-opening Source Type: news

Public Inspection: CMS: Medicare Program: Hospital Inpatient Prospective Payment Systems for Acute Care Hospitals and the Long Term Care Hospital Prospective Payment System and Final Policy Changes and Fiscal Year 2021 Rates; Quality Reporting and Medicare and Medicaid Promoting Interoperability Programs Requirements for Eligible Hospitals and Critical Access Hospitals
Pre-publication notice of final rule from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to revise the FY 2021 Medicare hospital inpatient prospective payment systems (IPPS) for capital and operating costs of acute care hospitals, make changes to Medicare graduate medical education (GME) for teaching hospitals and payments to Critical Access Hospitals (CAHs). Also provides the market basket updated that applies to the rate-of-increase limits for certain hospitals excluded from the IPPS that are paid on a reasonable cost basis, updates payment policies and rates for the Medicare prospective payment system (PPS) for inpatien...
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - September 3, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Fighting the health effects of climate change is the mission for new UCLA center
In response to the escalating health emergency that is already inflicting substantial damage on people in Southern California and around the world, the UCLA Fielding School of Public Health has created theUCLA Center for Healthy Climate Solutions.“Los Angeles is a city that tackles our toughest challenges by tapping into the innovation and creativity in our own backyard, and this UCLA center will help us build a safer, cleaner and more equitable city and world,” said Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti. Garcetti is chair of theC40 Cities, a global organization of almost 100 cities committed to action against climat...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 2, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

OhanaHealth launches nonclinical job placement platform, OhanaConnect
OhanaHealth, a health tech job placement company, today announced its new platform OhanaConnect to connect candidates with companies. The service works specifically to match students and recent graduates with internships and full-time jobs in the health tech industry. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - September 1, 2020 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Technology Meets Creativity on Women ’s Empowerment Platform
Artist Ayushi Chauhan’s painting on the Fuzia website. Credit: https://www.fuzia.com/By Fairuz AhmedNEW YORK, Sep 1 2020 (IPS) Eight years ago, and at the age of 11, Fuzia co-founder Riya Sinha decided to start the online platform for girls and women. Her story and Fuzia’s DNA are intrinsically wrapped around each other – and highlight how even in the age of feminism where women’s voices tend to be drowned out, a platform for them can become a global success. Sinha in an exclusive interview with Inter Press Service explains that Fuzia, with 4-million majority-female followership, was started after ...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Fairuz Ahmed Tags: Arts Development & Aid Education Gender Global Headlines Health Humanitarian Emergencies Labour TerraViva United Nations Fuzia 2020 Source Type: news

NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities NIH/HHS News Funding Notices Science Advances Subscribe to NICDR News Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR Announces Availability of COVID-19 Research Funding On May 5, NIDCR issued two Notices of Special Interest highlighting the urgent need for research on coronavirus disease 2019. This research may be conducted either via the National Dental PBRN infrastructu...
Source: NIDCR Science News - September 1, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Prepare Your Resume, Hone Your Interview Skills
Registration is open for the Employment Acquisition Skills Boot Camp for Scientists, an online professional development program from the American Institute of Biological Sciences (AIBS). Science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) graduate programs in the United States do an excellent job of preparing students for careers in academia. As early career professionals and a growing number of reports note, however, many STEM graduates (including those with advanced degrees) are interested in employment in sectors beyond the professoriate. Scientists continue to report that they feel ill-prepared and ill-equipped ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - September 1, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Academic journal asking for evidence of racism in policing not interested in contradictory evidence
(Natural News) The co-director of Northeastern University’s Violence and Justice Research Laboratory, Carlos Cuevas, sent an email to faculty and graduate students in the school’s criminal justice department in July asking them to submit any research they have proving there is systemic racism in policing. In addition, he requested studies showing the use of excessive... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AIIMS for Karnataka under Centre's active consideration: Union Health Minister
Noting that in the last six years the country has seen active development in terms of medical colleges, increase in the number of MBBS and post graduation seats, Vardhan said in the phase three expansion of medical colleges that began last year, permission has been given for creating 75 more medical colleges, with centre's help. (Source: The Economic Times)
Source: The Economic Times - August 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A surprising protein player in diabetes
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Conducted by researchers at the Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology Graduate University and Riken Center of Integrative Medical Sciences, a study looking at pancreatic beta cells has found a link between a commonly found protein, a subset of switched-off genes and the development of diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Duke-NUS to join the TriNetX Network
(Duke-NUS Medical School) Duke-NUS, the only graduate-entry medical school in Singapore, has joined the TriNetX global research network to increase clinical trial adoption and to facilitate better collaboration with other global healthcare organizations (HCOs). This latest member for TriNetX in Asia will provide the network with access to de-identified data from more than a million patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19 exposes how Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders face stark health care disparities
We see the headlines regularly: COVID-19 has revealed long-standing systemic social and health inequities facing members of racial and ethnic minority groups. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports that Black people and Latinos are almost  three times as likely to become infected and up to twice as likely to die from COVID-19 when compared with whites.But what about other minority groups, such as the Native Hawaiians and Pacific Islanders, who even amid calls for more equitable attention and treatment often get overlooked? The needs of the Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander populations have hist...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 26, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

University creates student avatars for virtual graduation ceremony
At universities around the world, graduation ceremonies provide an opportunity to mark an educational achievement with family and friends, but the coronavirus pandemic has robbed students of the chance to do so in the traditional way. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - August 25, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Memory protein
(University of California - Santa Barbara) When UC Santa Barbara materials scientist Omar Saleh and graduate student Ian Morgan sought to understand the mechanical behaviors of disordered proteins in the lab, they expected that after being stretched, one particular model protein would snap back instantaneously, like a rubber band. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 25, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study: Student debt may hurt chances at full-time employment
(University of Texas at Arlington) A recently published study led by The University of Texas at Arlington says that student debt may hurt students' chances of securing full-time employment due to added pressure in their job search. Ariane Froidevaux, assistant professor of management in the College of Business, is first author of 'Is Student Loan Debt Good or Bad for Full-Time Employment Upon Graduation From College?' in the Journal of Applied Psychology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More Women Entering Primary Care
FRIDAY, Aug. 21, 2020 -- Gender significantly influences choice of specialty, with female osteopathic graduates 75 percent more likely to enter primary care (PC) than men, according to a study recently published in the Journal of the American... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 21, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Supporting young people into training, learning, and work during Covid-19, BPS
This document is aimed at professionals who support young people at key points of transition into work, training and further learning. It will be of special interest to teachers, educational psychologists, social workers, careers advisors, mentors, third sector workers as well as graduate recruiters. Drawing on a robust psychological evidence-base the document offers advice about steps to take in the context of Covid-19, recognising some of the challenges faced by young people and suggesting approaches to support a way forward. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - August 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What kind of animal transports the seeds of the world's smallest fruit-bearing plants?
(Kobe University) Plants in theBalanophora genus have very small fruits and very little is known about their seed dispersal strategy. Associate Professor Suetsugu Kenji (Kobe University Graduate School of Science) illuminates a previously unrecognized seed dispersal mutualism betweenBalanophora yakushimensis and birds, which are attracted by and obtain nutrients from its fleshy bracts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 21, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Aspiring UK medical students in limbo because of exam fiasco
Thousands of graduating high school students in Britain are scrambling for university spots following the government’s disastrous decision to award final grades using an algorithm (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - August 20, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Vaccine developed for human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B)
(Kobe University) A research group led by Professor MORI Yasuko (of the Division of Clinical Virology, Center for Infectious Diseases, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that the HHV-6B glycoprotein complex gH/gL/gQ1/gQ2 is an effective vaccine candidate for human herpesvirus 6B (HHV-6B). There are still no methods to treat nor prevent HHV-6B infection, and this study represents the first attempt in the world at developing a vaccine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news