For scientists, the ripple effects of the government shutdown are still spreading
Matt Helgeson knew it was time to pull the plug.For weeks, the UC Santa Barbara professor of chemical engineering had held out hope that politicians in Washington would find a way to end the government shutdown. If they did, his graduate students could still make their long-planned trip to Maryland... (Source: Los Angeles Times - Science)
Source: Los Angeles Times - Science - February 15, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Julia Rosen Source Type: news

HRSA: Meeting of the Council on Graduate Medical Education
The Health Resources and Service Administration (HRSA) announces an electronic meeting of the Council on Graduate Medical Education (COGME) on June 5-6, 2019. The meeting will include a discussion of rural health graduate medical education financing and workforce development, among other topics. See the notice for additional details, including a webinar link and call-in information. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - February 14, 2019 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

CUNY SPH awarded grant for environmental and occupational health scholarships
(CUNY Graduate School of Public Health and Health Policy) CUNY SPH was awarded grant from the New York Community Trust to provide 10 scholarships annually to aspiring women or minority graduate students who intend to pursue the Master of Science program in Environmental and Occupational Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mark Kelly Isn ’t the First Astronaut to Consider a Political Campaign. But Most Didn’t Have the Right Stuff
Most people go through their entire lives without checking any of the major fame boxes. In a nation of 325 million people, there are only so many NFL quarterbacks, Oscar winners and Nobel laureates. There are only so many astronauts and elected officials, too — so it’s especially rare when someone tries to succeed at both gigs. Mark Kelly, onetime NASA astronaut and husband of former Congresswoman Gabrielle Giffords, is going for just that twofer, with his Feb. 12 announcement that he will run for a U.S. Senate seat in Arizona during the 2020 cycle. Kelly, a Democrat, will be seeking to defeat incumbent GOP Sen...
Source: TIME: Science - February 13, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

This simple lifestyle change may be the most effective way to keep kids off anti-depressants
(Natural News) As more and more kids get hooked on electronic devices, depression is affecting a startling number of our nation’s young people. One out of every five teens will have experienced a major depressive episode before graduating from high school, while as many as 3 percent of children and 9 percent of adolescents are... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 13, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Imaging Sciences Department Develops Radiology Training Program for Future Zambian Doctors
The University of Rochester employs about 80 radiologists; the country of Zambia has one. A collaboration between Michael Potchen, M.D., professor in the Department of Imaging Sciences, URMC Imaging residents, and the Zambian Ministry of Health aims to address this disparity by training Zambian medical school graduates in radiology. This endeavor is unique in that, while Potchen is the attending physician overseeing the project, URMC Imaging residents are actually running the program. (Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases)
Source: University of Rochester Medical Center Press Releases - February 12, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Authors: University of Rochester Medical Center Source Type: news

National Cancer Institute selects M.D.-Ph.D. Cancer Biology Graduate Program student ’s work for 2018 research showcase
(Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute)
Source: Karmanos Cancer Institute - February 11, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Applicants to nursing degrees have risen across all four UK countries
But still 13,150 fewer in England since removal of bursary and well below peak of 2014 Related items fromOnMedica Nearly a quarter of student nurses quit before graduation Rethink study funds for nurses to bolster headcount, government urged Brexit could leave health and social care 51,000 nurses short More than £1bn investment needed to save nurse education Lack of nurses linked to increased risk of patient death (Source: OnMedica Latest News)
Source: OnMedica Latest News - February 11, 2019 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

Higher Education May Not Protect People From Dementia
BOSTON (CBS) – Graduating from college may not protect you from dementia. That’s according to a new study in the journal Neurology. Previous research suggested that spending more time in school might protect a person from dementia by creating a cognitive buffer against mental decline, but researchers at Rush University looked at almost 3,000 people and found that while having a higher level of education was associated with more advanced thinking and memory skills in general, it did not affect when a person developed dementia or how quickly it progressed. That said, they say formal education usually stops long b...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Syndicated Local Watch Listen Dementia Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Cells to Society: 130 Years of Innovation / Research News
This study explores experiences related to hearing loss and barriers to hearing health care among older Korean Americans.      Read more   Aging ...
Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 6, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

USDA grant to blend data with agriculture for improved production
(University of Texas at Arlington) A University of Texas at Arlington math professor will use a US Department of Agriculture grant to prepare graduate and undergraduate students for data-based careers in agriculture-related fields. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Weighing in on the AI Renaissance in Medtech
Roughly eight years ago, IBM’s Watson super computer bested several master Jeopardy contestants. The event is quite arguably a focal point in the Artificial Intelligence Renaissance that’s having such a profound impact on healthcare today. The event also prompted Anthony Chang, M.D. to return to school and get a better understanding of artificial intelligence. The Watson event was an incredible moment for Chang and was the catalyst for a personal transformation. “I had always been interested in AI,” said Chang, who is now Chief Intelligence & Innov...
Source: MDDI - February 6, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Perinatal depression knowledge, attitudes, and beliefs among graduate social work students - Goyal D, Han M.
The purpose of this study was to identify the proportion of Master of Social Work (MSW) students who received perinatal depression (PD) training as part of their coursework. Additionally, we sought to identify differences in PD knowledge, attitudes, belief... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Suicide and Self-Harm Source Type: news

Anticancer mechanism revealed in yeast experiments
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Scientists uncover how important enzymes in both fission yeast and human cancer cells interact to boost cell proliferation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 5, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Participate in 2019 Congressional Visits Day
Join the American Institute of Biological Sciences on March 26-27 for our annual Congressional Visits Day in Washington, DC. Meet with your members of Congress to help them understand the important role the federal government plays in supporting the biological sciences. Advocate for federal investments in biological sciences research supported by the National Science Foundation and other federal agencies. Participants will complete a communications and advocacy training program provided by AIBS that prepares them to be effective advocates for their science. AIBS also provides participants with background information and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Senate Weighs Crucial Teaching Health Center Legislation
Following testimony from the AAFP, the Senate introduced legislation to renew Teaching Health Center Graduate Medical Education program funding for five years. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - February 4, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Coming next month: Johns Hopkins Training to Better Impact the Lives of Parents and Their Young Children
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Source: Johns Hopkins University and Health Systems Archive - February 4, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Northwestern 2019-2020 Research Fellowship
The Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine Department of Orthopaedic Surgery announces a one-year research fellowship position in basic science and translational research. We invite highly motivated medical students or recent graduates to apply for this opportunity. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - February 3, 2019 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Spatial variation in teens' crash rate reduction following the implementation of a graduated driver licensing program in Michigan - Goldstick JE, Carter PM, Almani F, Brines SJ, Shope JT.
Motor vehicle crashes are a leading cause of injury, and teen drivers contribute disproportionately to that burden. Graduated Driver Licensing (GDL) programs are effective at reducing teen crash risk, but teen crash rates remain high. Between-state variati... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

The influence of physical fitness on reasons for academy separation in law enforcement recruits - Lockie RG, Balfany K, Bloodgood AM, Moreno MR, Cesario KA, Dulla JM, Dawes JJ, Orr RM.
This study analyzed the effects physical fitness may have on reasons for academy separation in law enforcement recruits. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 401 recruits; 330 recruits graduated (GRAD), and 71 recruits separated at various times durin... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Economics of Injury and Safety, PTSD, Injury Outcomes Source Type: news

Adaptive models capture complexity of the brain and behavior
(Okinawa Institute of Science and Technology (OIST) Graduate University) Scientists reveal rich details of dynamical systems by breaking them down into simpler components which change over time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UCLA-led team uncovers critical new clues about what goes awry in brains of people with autism
This study gives a new critical clue in understanding what has gone awry in the brains of autism patients.”More than 24 million people worldwide are estimated to have autism. In developed countries, about 1.5 percent of children have been diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder as of 2017. The disorder affects communication and behavior, and is marked by problems in social communication and social interaction, and repetitive behaviors.“We need to understand how a panoply of genetic and environmental factors converges to cause autism,” Geschwind said. “RNA editing is an important piece of the autism ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 30, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Researchers link overexpression of MDMX protein to metastasis of 3X negative breast cancer
(Advanced Science Research Center, GC/CUNY) In a newly published paper in the journal Breast Cancer Research, scientists at The Graduate Center of The City University of New York and Hunter College are the first to report that MDMX promotes metastasis of triple-negative breast cancer -- one of the most aggressive forms of the disease, and one that is more prevalent in young women and women of color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 30, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

2019-2020 Research Specialist Position at Missouri Orthopaedic Institute
The Missouri Orthopaedic Institute is pleased to offer a Research Specialist position for a recent medical school graduate or current 4thyear medical student with an interest in orthopaedic research who is seeking to enhance their residency application. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - January 30, 2019 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Tim Langford Reappointed to A-State Board
Gov. Asa Hutchinson on Monday appointed Dr. Tim Langford of Little Rock, a 1983 graduate of Arkansas State University, to a second five-year term on the ASU Board of Trustees. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - January 30, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Cochrane's 30 under 30: Petter Brattstr öm
Cochrane is made up of13,000 members and over50,000 supporters who come from more than130 countries, worldwide. Our volunteers and contributors are researchers, health professionals, patients, carers, people passionate about improving health outcomes for everyone, everywhere.Cochrane is an incredible community of people who all play their part in improving health and healthcare globally. We believe that by putting trusted evidence at the heart of health decisions we can achieve a world of improved health for all.Many of our contributors are young people working with Cochrane as researchers, citizen scientists, medical stud...
Source: Cochrane News and Events - January 29, 2019 Category: Information Technology Authors: Lydia Parsonson Source Type: news

The GRE fails to identify students that will graduate and hurts diversity, new study finds
(Rochester Institute of Technology) A team of researchers led by RIT Professor Casey Miller discovered that traditional admissions metrics for physics Ph.D. programs such as the Graduate Record Examination (GRE) do not predict completion and hurt the growth of diversity in physics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Female graduates who wear 'sexy clothes' seen as less capable than counterparts
(University of Surrey) Females who dress 'sexily' at their graduation are perceived as being less competent and are believed to have performed worse in their degree than their peers who dress more professionally, new research from the University of Surrey reports. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Graduation ceremonies for first cohort of new nursing role
Graduation ceremonies have been held around the country for members of the new nursing associate role, ahead of them officially joining the NHS workforce on 28 January. (Source: Nursing Times)
Source: Nursing Times - January 26, 2019 Category: Nursing Source Type: news

Naturally improve glucose metabolism with coastal hog fennel
(Natural News) A recent study from the Osaka University Graduate School of Medicine has found that chomeiso (Peucedanum japonicum), a plant from the parsley family found in southern Japan, can help in regulating glucose levels, especially for people at risk of developing metabolic syndrome and other chronic diseases. The research, which was published in the Japanese Journal of Complementary and Alternative Medicine,... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Oregon Works: Adventist's David Russell on assessing future workforce needs
Adventist Health is a faith-based, integrated health system with hospitals, skilled nursing facilities and urgent care locations throughout the West. Headquartered in Roseville, Calif., Adventist Health employs 35,000 workers and posted $4.1 billion in revenue in 2017. What are your biggest workforce challenges? First, finding people who have the needed background and experience. Yes, there are a lot of people graduating from programs. But take RNs, for example. After they get a degree they have… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 24, 2019 Category: American Health Source Type: news

AAFP Seeks Flexibility in Medicare GME Funding Cap
The AAFP asked CMS to allow more flexibility in the cap on Medicare support for graduate medical education to help offset the shortage of family physicians. (Source: AAFP News)
Source: AAFP News - January 24, 2019 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Life Science Graduates Face Daunting Labor Market
In my position as CEO of a firm employing over 80,000 engineers, I can testify that most were excellent engineers. But the factor that most distinguished those who advanced in the organization was the ability to think broadly and read and write clearly.(Norman Augustine, former chairman and CEO of Lockheed Martin) Biology graduate students have a dizzying array of options after completing their degree, including settling on an initial career path. Although many young biologists hope to make these decisions on the basis of personal preference, changing labor market conditions are likely to influence the decision. The empl...
Source: Washington Watch - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: Julie Palakovich Carr Source Type: news

Will Lawmakers Reform Immigration Rules for STEM Graduates?
Ranjini Prithviraj is at the start of a promising career in neuroscience. She is a postdoctoral fellow at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), serves as an editor on the NIH Fellows Editorial Board, and mentors students interested in careers in science. Despite her strong résumé and her PhD in cell and molecular biology from a well-regarded American university, Prithviraj's ability to continue to work in the United States is uncertain, because she was born in India and raised in Dubai. "I would like to stay in the US long term, but I'm not sure as of now," said Prithviraj. "The reason I'm ...
Source: Washington Watch - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: Julie Palakovich Carr Source Type: news

How Kindling Catches Flame: U-MD Transforming Undergrad Biology Education
At lunchtime, during a busy fall-semester day at the University of Maryland, College Park (UMD), a conference room is soon filled with research and teaching faculty, laboratory instructors, postdoctoral scholars, graduate students, and education specialists. The diverse group gathers in the Biosciences Research Building on a regular basis to focus on one thing: improving students' conceptual understanding of host–pathogen interactions. Find out more here.       (Source: Eye on Education)
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

The USDA Invests in Biology Education
The US Department of Agriculture (USDA) might not come to mind when biology educators are searching for funding to support innovative projects, but the agency turns out to be a welcome partner in the field. In early 2013, the USDA joined other federal agencies and private funders in supporting the second Vision and Change in Biology Education conference. As Muquarrab Qureshi, assistant director of the USDA's Institute of Youth, Family, and Community, explained in an opening presentation, the USDA is concerned about the disparity between the high level of interest in science among younger students and the low number of coll...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Networking to Boost the Skills of Graduate Teaching Assistants
When Elisabeth Schussler arrived at the University of Tennessee, Knoxville, (UT) she used her knowledge of evidence-based teaching practices to revise the undergraduate biology laboratory curriculum. Unfortunately, she had little control over how the curriculum was delivered. Many graduate teaching assistants (GTAs) at UT have never taught before their appointment and are neither required nor have the time to attend professional development programs. "Ineffective teaching can derail good curriculum," says Schussler, who is an assistant professor and the director of biology teaching and learning. "If you don'...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Discovering the Biology Education Research Community
When Sarah Eddy began work on her doctoral thesis, she assumed that her main contribution would relate to her field of study—behavioral ecology and the sexual selection of salamanders—but one of her more significant discoveries had nothing to do with amphibians and everything to do with what was going on in the classroom. As a graduate teaching assistant at Oregon State University, she realized how important it was to her to see students truly improve their learning. "It was in trying to figure out how to help students achieve more that I discovered education research literature," she explained. Many ...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Collaborations Grow through the Introductory Biology Project
When Elena Bray-Speth, assistant professor of biology at Saint Louis University, presented her case study on the evolution of fur color in mice, little did she know that someone in the audience had developed a case on the very same topic. That person was Jim Smith, principal investigator (PI) of Evo-Ed (http://lbc.msu.edu/evo-ed), a National Science Foundation (NSF)-funded project that currently houses four evolutionbased case studies. "Elena and I met just after her session and I showed her our cases," said Smith, who is a professor in the Lyman Briggs College and the Department of Entomology at Michigan State U...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Community Colleges Giving Students a Framework for STEM Careers
Over the coming decade, our country will need one million more science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM) professionals than was originally projected. That is the conclusion of a February 2012 report, Engage to Excel: Producing One Million Additional College Graduates with Degrees in Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (www.whitehouse.gov/sites/default/files/microsites/ostp/pcast-engage-to-excel-final_2-25-12.pdf), presented to President Obama by the President's Council of Advisors on Science and Technology (PCAST). The report stresses the importance of exciting early on students who are potent...
Source: Eye on Education - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: BioScience Source Type: news

Training Graduate Students to have Broader Impacts
Learn how the biology department at University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign developed a course to teach science communication and outreach to their graduate students in “Amplify the Signal: Graduate Training in Broader Impacts of Scientific Research”, available via Advance Access with a subscription to BioScience.     Related StoriesAttend A ConferenceUnderstanding Teaching PracticesDeveloping an Interdisciplinary Program  (Source: Education Reports)
Source: Education Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: April/May Source Type: news

New from AIBS
Learn about the USDA’s commitment to improving undergraduate life science education and read about available funding opportunities in The USDA Invests in Biology Education, published in the January issue of BioScience. Read two recent education articles published in BioScience. One provides insights into How Students Think about Experimental Design: Novel Conceptions Revealed by in-Class Activities, by Sarah E. Brownell et al, and the other shares strategies for Improving Higher-Order Thinking and Knowledge Retention in Environmental Science Teaching, by Marion Dresner et al. Find out how the current labor market i...
Source: Education Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: January/February Source Type: news

Networking Opportunities
The Partnership for Undergraduate Life Science Education (PULSE) has over 1200 members! Do you want to network with other PULSErs in your region committed to changing the practices of undergraduate life sciences education? If so, check out the PULSE Community Overview to find people near you. The Biology Teaching Assistant Project (BioTAP) is a new network for individuals who support and provide professional development for graduate teaching assistants. Visit the site to learn about the network and join the BioTAP listerv to share resources and ideas to develop GTA teaching skills to transform introductory courses and tra...
Source: Education Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: January/February Source Type: news

From AIBS
Are you leading transformations to the undergraduate biology program at your institution? If so, tell AIBS about your role, experiences with leadership development, and further needs by taking the Faculty Leadership Development Survey before November 5th. Do you work with graduate student teaching assistants? Read the latest “Eye on Education” column in BioScience to learn about a new network focused on improving graduate teaching assistants’ professional development and how you can become a part of the network.       (Source: Education Reports)
Source: Education Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: September/October Source Type: news

Get Involved
Want to join a community of educators working to support and recognize change within academic departments in undergraduate life sciences education? Join the PULSE community to exchange ideas, provide feedback, and share resources. Do you teach about global change? Take the “Global Change” survey to help UCMP and NSCE get a better sense of how educators view global change, the importance of teaching it, and the resources available for doing so. Do you teach genetics? The American Society for Human Genetics is seeking proposals to investigate research questions related to genetics education in grades 7-20. Exp...
Source: Education Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: March/April Source Type: news

Inside the Specialized ‘Recovery’ High Schools Designed Just for Teens With Addiction
SEATTLE — It’s the last class period of the day. The students lean back on couches and take turns describing the most important day of their lives: the day they became sober. For Marques Martinez, that date was Nov. 15, 2016. Until then, he had used OxyContin, Xanax and nearly every other drug he could get his hands on, he said. He had been suspended from school for selling drugs. “I knew what I was doing was bad,” he said. “But I didn’t think there was another way.” Two years ago, Martinez’s parents sent him to an in-patient treatment center and then enrolled him in this unu...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Anna Gorman / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized Addiction Source Type: news

Participate in the 2019 Congressional Visits Day
Join the American Institute of Biological Sciences on March 25-27 for our annual Congressional Visits Day in Washington, DC. Meet with your members of Congress to help them understand the important role the federal government plays in supporting the biological sciences. Advocate for federal investments in biological sciences research supported by the National Science Foundation and other federal agencies. Participants will complete a communications and advocacy training program provided by AIBS that prepares them to be effective advocates for their science. AIBS also provides participants with background information and ...
Source: Public Policy Reports - January 23, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

The man who could be KILLED by the cold: 23-year-old suffers rare allergy
Max Fisher, a graduate from Nottingham who identifies as a man, suffers from cold urticaria, causing red itchy hives all over his body. Wearing a mask outside has led to abuse from strangers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The woman who could be KILLED by the cold: 23-year-old suffers rare allergy
Max Fisher, a graduate from Nottingham, suffers from cold urticaria, causing red itchy hives all over her body. She must wear a mask outside, which has led to abuse from strangers. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Cincinnati design team creates a naloxone dispenser
(University of Cincinnati) Claudia B. Rebola, graduate studies coordinator in UC's College of Design, Architecture, Art, and Planning, designed a device to make naloxone more accessible to those in need. Her intent is to bring a model she helped create first in Providence, R.I., to spaces in Cincinnati by spring.Rebola has worked with graduate students to create AntiOD, a naloxone-dispensing smart device installed in semi-public places with step-by-step instructions for bystanders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news