Questionable “Alzheimer’s blood test” goes on sale prior to FDA approval
First blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer’s goes on sale (NBC News): A company has started selling the first blood test to help diagnose Alzheimer’s disease, a leap for the field that could make it much easier for people to learn whether they have dementia. It also raises concern about the accuracy and impact of such life-altering news. Independent experts are leery because key test results have not been published and the test has not been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration — it’s being sold under more general rules for commercial labs. The test is not intended for general screening...
Source: SharpBrains - December 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Alzheimer's blood test Alzheimer’s Disease amyloid amyloid buildup amyloid hypothesis blood-test dementia FDA Food and Drug Administration Source Type: blogs

The latest on Brain Health and Resilience, plus a few fun Brain Teasers
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring fascinating neuroscience findings and tips, combined with fun brain teasers. #1. To celebrate this quite-challenging Thanksgiving, here are five fun brain teasers that readers have enjoyed the most this year so far. It is always good to learn more about (and appreciate) that most precious resource we all (yes, all) have up there! Five fun brain teasers to thank evolution for our human brains and minds #2. Want more? Ready, Set, Go! A few brain teasers to flex those cognitive muscles #3. “[Breathing techniques] are allowing you to consciousl...
Source: SharpBrains - November 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain Teasers Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning Peak Performance Technology & Innovation anxiety BCI biomarker Breathing cognitive engagement cognitive-reserve disorders doctors EIT European Institute of Innova Source Type: blogs

Five fun brain teasers to thank evolution for our human brains and minds
To celebrate this quite-challenging Thanksgiving, here are five fun brain teasers and games that readers have enjoyed the most this year so far. It is always good to learn more about (and appreciate) that most precious resource we all (yes, all) have up there! #1. First of all, these days it’s always important to test your stress level #2. You say you know the colors? Try the Stroop Test #3. Check out this classic attention experiment #4. What do you know about mental self-rotation? #5. Last but not least, here are ten classic illusions to tease your mind.   Thank you in advance for trying them, enjoying them, a...
Source: SharpBrains - November 25, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Caroline Latham Tags: Brain Teasers brain games for adults brain teasers for adults brain teasers for teens brain-teaser brain-teaser-games cognitive cognitive-abilities cognitive-ability mind-teasers puzzle games for adults Source Type: blogs

Studies identify key ethical concerns raised by invasive and non-invasive neurotechnologies
Studies outline key ethical questions surrounding brain-computer interface tech (NCSU release): Brain-computer interface (BCI) technologies are no longer hypothetical, yet there are fundamental aspects of the technology that remain unaddressed by both ethicists and policy-makers. Two new papers address these issues by outlining the outstanding ethical issues, offering guidance for addressing those issues, and offering particular insight into the field of BCI tech for cognitive enhancement. “BCI devices can be non-invasive devices that users wear, or they can be invasive devices, which are surgically implanted,”...
Source: SharpBrains - November 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Peak Performance Technology & Innovation BCI brain-computer interface cognitive cognitive-enhancement ethics Neuroethics Neurotechnology non-invasive neurotechnologies non-invasive neurotechnology Source Type: blogs

Next: Analyzing typing speed, speech and sleep patterns to identify cognitive decline, dementia, Parkinson ’s, and more
AI May Help Identify Patients With Early-Stage Dementia (The Wall Street Journal): Researchers are studying whether artificial-intelligence tools that analyze things like typing speed, sleep patterns and speech can be used to help clinicians better identify patients with early-stage dementia. Huge quantities of data reflecting our ability to think and process information are now widely available, thanks to watches and phones that track movement and heart rate, as well as tablets, computers and virtual assistants such as Amazon Echo that can record the way we type, search the internet and pay bills… The goal of using...
Source: SharpBrains - November 19, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation artificial intelligence brain signatures cognitive decline digital medicine doctors early-stage dementia machine-learning neurocognitive neurodegenerative disorders sleep-patterns speech Source Type: blogs

New book shares science and techniques to breathe better and promote calmness not anxiety
Scrolling social media, amid frantic election-related posts and news of escalating COVID-19 cases, you may have come across a friend reminding everyone to just breathe. But can just-breathing really make a difference? In his new book Breath: The New Science of a Lost Art, journalist James Nestor argues that modern humans have become pretty bad at this most basic act of living. We breathe through our mouths and into our chests, and we do it way too fast. There’s even a phenomenon called “email apnea,” where multitasking office workers breathe irregularly and shallowly, or even hold their breath, for half a...
Source: SharpBrains - November 17, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning anxiety book Breathing breathing techniques email apnea James Nestor meditation mental health mindfulness parasympathetic pranayama yogic breathing Source Type: blogs

FDA grants clearance for NightWare app designed to reduce PTSD-related nightmares
FDA grants De Novo clearance to prescription Apple Watch app for nightmare disorder (MobiHealth News): The FDA granted Minneapolis-based NightWare a De Novo clearance on Friday for its Apple Watch and iPhone app designed to improve the sleep quality of those experiencing nightmare disorder and nightmares related to PTSD. The digital therapeutic – which received breakthrough designation from the agency last year – uses the Watch’s sensors to track the heart rate and movement of users as they sleep. After establishing a baseline profile for the patient within one or two nights’ sleep, the machine lear...
Source: SharpBrains - November 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation Apple Watch De Novo clearance digital therapeutic FDA heart-rate iPhone app machine-learning nightmares NightWare prescription PTSD sleep quality Source Type: blogs

Debate: How should doctors prescribe exercise to ensure compliance and engagement?
Table 2. Neurobiological benefits of exercise. How to Effectively Prescribe Exercise (Psychiatric Times): Exercise can be a useful tool in managing symptoms of anxiety and depression. Learn how you can integrate exercise prescriptions into your treatment plans. While most of us appreciate its importance, we also recognize that avoidance is exceedingly common. Too often patients hear the word exercise and develop an aversive reaction, as they anticipate that it involves intensive training reserved only for the athletically elite. So how can one simply and effectively counsel a patient on exercise to increase their chances o...
Source: SharpBrains - November 12, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health anxiety depression exercise neurobiological neuroplasticity Neuropsychology Physical-activity stress and coping. Source Type: blogs

Study: Work in adulthood seen to significantly delay memory decline after age 60, supporting the Cognitive Reserve theory
Conclusions: Women who worked for pay in early adulthood and midlife experienced slower rates of later-life memory decline, regardless of marital and parenthood status, suggesting participation in the paid labor force may protect against later-life memory decline. The Study in Context: Study: High Cognitive Reserve (CR) seen to significantly lower dementia risk even in the presence of high Alzheimer’s Disease (AD) neuropathology Build Your Cognitive Reserve: An Interview with Dr. Yaakov Stern Systematic review finds ten lifestyle factors that clearly impact the probability of developing Alzheimer’s disease (A...
Source: SharpBrains - November 10, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Brain/ Mental Health cognitive cognitive-domains cognitive-reserve cognitive-stimulation memory-decline memory-loss paid work social-engagement working Source Type: blogs

Using Reddit as a population-level “mental health tracker” during the COVID pandemic
Conclusions: By using a broad set of NLP techniques and analyzing a baseline of prepandemic posts, we uncovered patterns of how specific mental health problems manifest in language, identified at-risk users, and revealed the distribution of concerns across Reddit, which could help provide better resources to its millions of users. We then demonstrated that textual analysis is sensitive to uncover mental health complaints as they appear in real time, identifying vulnerable groups and alarming themes during COVID-19, and thus may have utility during the ongoing pandemic and other world-changing events such as elections and p...
Source: SharpBrains - November 9, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Technology & Innovation Uncategorized anxiety machine-learning mental health natural language processing pandemic Source Type: blogs

A few brain teasers to flex those cognitive muscles over the weekend
Look around you, wherever you are, and find three green things that may fit in your pockets, and three red objects that are clearly too big to fit. Done? OK, now you have six objects. Go ahead and say their names in alpha­bet­i­cal order. Done? Now name them in reverse alphabetical order. Done? Now count the total number of syllables in those six words. Not easy, right? All these mental operations engage your working memory — think of working memory as your temporary mental workspace where you can hold and integrate several units of information at once. Feel free to practice in different locations &hell...
Source: SharpBrains - November 6, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Caroline Latham Tags: Brain Teasers adults brain games for adults brain teasers for adults brain teasers for teens brain-teaser brain-teaser-games cognitive cognitive-abilities cognitive-ability mental muscles mind-teasers Source Type: blogs

Alphabet ’s X shares Amber EEG system to expand the quest for mental health biomarkers
Amber’s final EEG prototype: Headset, sensor strip and bioamp Alphabet’s X details Project Amber, a quest for a single biomarker for depression that fell short of its goal (TechCrunch): Alphabet’s X (the Google-owner’s so-called “Moonshot Factory”) published a new blog post today about Project Amber, a project it’s been working on over the past three years — the results of which it’s now making available open source for the rest of the mental health research community to learn from, and hopefully build upon. The X project sought to identify a specific biomarker for depr...
Source: SharpBrains - November 5, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation Alphabet biomarker depression digital phenotyping EEG electroencephalography machine-learning med-tech mental health research Moonshot Factory open-source predictive Project Amber Source Type: blogs

To call, or to text, that is the (mental well-being) question
Like most people, I’ve been doing a lot of texting with friends and family lately. COVID-19 (and the physical separation it necessitates) has made socializing in person very limited, which means I’ve had to work harder than ever to keep my relationships strong and healthy. But a new study suggests that if that’s my aim, texting may not be enough. To stay close at a time when we all need companionship and support, we’d be better off picking up the phone or setting up a video call—doing something where we can actually hear another person’s voice. In the study, participants imagined having ...
Source: SharpBrains - November 3, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Brain/ Mental Health call mental well being text well-being Source Type: blogs

Save the Date: Promoting Brain Health for Life, December 15 –16th, online
We need a different, two-pronged approach to address the Brain Health for Life challenge: instead of trying to treat diseases, we need to focus on promoting brain health, educate and empower the public to adopt lifelong healthy lifestyles in order to minimize the risk of developing psychiatric and neurological diseases. In parallel, we need to gain a deeper understanding of brain resilience and its mechanisms, to be able to design interventions to promote it and delay the onset of clinical manifestations of disease and the consequent disability. Here, we aim to promote a global ecosystem that engages multipl...
Source: SharpBrains - November 2, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Institut Guttmann Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation brain health brain resilience brain-reserve EIT European Institute of Innovation & Technology Source Type: blogs

On neurons, lifelong learning, meditation, humility, “empty brain calories” and more
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring 12 fascinating neuroscience findings and open questions–and the beautiful image above. #1. “With this image I want to illustrate the large advances made in imaging methods over the past century, allowing modern neuroscientists to look at neurons in ways that Cajal could have only dreamed of.” – Silvia Rodriguez-Rozada, Center for Molecular Neurobiology, Hamburg. Award-winning image shows neuroimaging progress in a century #2. One more reason why lifelong learning matters: Study: High Cognitive Reserve (CR) seen to significantly...
Source: SharpBrains - October 30, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: SharpBrains Monthly eNewsletter awe behavior-therapy brain-enhancement cognitive-bias FDA humility Lifelong-learning medication meditation Memory-Training mental health mindfulness Neurons neuroscience supplements virtual-r Source Type: blogs

On perception, cognitive bias and cultivating humility ahead of next week ’s vote
Many Americans worry about the political divide tearing our country apart. A large percentage are unwilling to engage with people who have opposing political views, and that’s creating more animosity. This is especially worrying considering how many crises we’re facing that require cooperation, trust, and solutions a diverse citizenry can get behind. How can we find a way across our divide and come together for common cause? At Greater Good, we’ve been studying and writing about various ways to bridge divides, putting together tools to help people connect. But there may be one key character trait that&rsq...
Source: SharpBrains - October 27, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Brain/ Mental Health brain-teaser cognitive biases fundamental attribution error humility perception Source Type: blogs

On cutting “empty brain calories” by reading a book instead of social media
Stop doomscrolling on social media and read a book (Fortune): 2020 is the year I decided to cut back on empty brain calories. That’s right, I swore off the mindless junk from social media. Because we are all likely to conduct more and more doomscrolling as the election nears and 2020 continues its infamy, I urge you to stop ingesting digital junk, and start reading a book. To say that this has been a stressful year is a gross understatement. Much has been written about how ill-prepared we were to confront the pandemic and cope with the change and stress it has brought to our lives. Many of us are settling into our ei...
Source: SharpBrains - October 26, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning Books default network fiction functional MRI reading simulation social-media theory-of-mind Source Type: blogs

What will the ‘Peloton for mental health’ look like five years from now? And, who will develop it?
MindLabs raises £1.4M for its new platform, a ‘Peloton for mental health’ (TechCrunch): Ideally, mental wellness should be considered part of a healthy daily routine, like exercise. But even exercise is difficult to turn into a regular habit. Peloton addressed physical fitness by combining smart stationary bikes with live classes and community features to create an engaging experience. Now a new startup, MindLabs, is taking a similar approach to mental wellness… Its platform will launch next year, first with a mobile app that combines live videos from mental health professionals who lead meditation...
Source: SharpBrains - October 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation EEG EEG headband gym Halo mental-wellness MindLabs mobile app neuroplasticity Peloton Peloton for mental health stress-levels Source Type: blogs

The FDA clears AppliedVR headset to help treat fibromyalgia and chronic pain
Conclusions: High engagement and satisfaction combined with low levels of adverse effects support the feasibility and acceptability of at-home skills-based VR for chronic pain. A significant reduction in pain outcomes over the course of the 21-day treatment both within the VR group and compared with an audio-only version suggests that VR has the potential to provide enhanced treatment and greater improvement across a range of pain outcomes. These findings provide a foundation for future research on VR behavioral interventions for chronic pain. News in Context: FDA clears MindMaze GO neurorehabilitation platform, easing a...
Source: SharpBrains - October 22, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Technology & Innovation AppliedVR back pain Breakthrough Device Designation chronic pain EaseVRx FDA fibromyalgia virtual-reality Source Type: blogs

Study: Over-the-counter “brain enhancement” supplements in the US found both to a) contain multiple unapproved drugs and b) lack some ingredients listed on the label
Conclusions: Over-the-counter cognitive enhancement supplements may contain multiple unapproved drugs. The health effects of consuming untested combinations of unapproved drugs at unpredictable dosages without clinician oversight in supplements is unknown. The Study in Context: Study: Some “brain-boosting” supplements sold in the US contain not-approved drugs at supratherapeutic doses, exposing users to unknown side effects AARP: A majority of Americans believe dietary supplements improve brain health, despite the lack of evidence The FDA cracks down on dozens of supplements claiming to prevent or cure Alzhei...
Source: SharpBrains - October 20, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Alzheimers Alzheimers-disease boost cognitive function brain health supplements brain-supplements cognitive-abilities cognitive-enhancement cognitive-function cognitive-health dietary supplements FDA lifestyle Source Type: blogs

Study: A combined teaching + app gratitude program helps adolescents address anxiety and improve mental health
This study remedied some of the shortcomings of previous studies in the field by designing an entirely new gratitude program specifically for high school students, that was taught by teachers, and incorporated technology, giving teens lots of freedom in how to express themselves. Many previous gratitude programs were not tailored to adolescents in these ways, and thus may not have felt particularly motivating or meaningful to young people. Additionally, though research has shown that actually expressing gratitude to others (beyond simply feeling it oneself) can be extra impactful, few youth gratitude programs have included...
Source: SharpBrains - October 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning academic learning educators GiveThx Gratitude gratitude program improve mental health and wellness pandemic Positive-Psychology resilience social-emotional-learning students well-being Source Type: blogs

Debate: Can mindfulness and meditation be harmful?
Yes (in perhaps 8% of individuals). Can mindfulness and meditation be harmful? (Science Focus): Meditation has escaped both the religious cells of monks and nuns and the labs of scientists. An increasing number of people are using meditation apps to deal with mental health problems, such as depression and anxiety. Although there is no clear estimate of how many people are practising meditation, last year one single app had close to 40 million downloads. But now my new study, which reviews over 40 years of the science of meditation and mindfulness-based therapies, suggests that these practices can also lead to negative effe...
Source: SharpBrains - October 14, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Brain/ Mental Health Education & Lifelong Learning anxiety depression harm harmful meditation meditation apps mental health problems mindfulness negative side effects Stress Source Type: blogs

How feeling awe in nature can spur mental well-being and personal growth
You might enjoy skiing or hiking. But do you feel at home in the mountains? Do you feel connected to the wilderness? According to a new study, that sense of being “home” in nature could be linked to your life satisfaction and personal growth, at least for young people. Another new study of older people finds that a connection to nature seems to make them happier and more willing to help others. In the first study, a team of researchers in Norway followed a group of college students who were training to lead wilderness expeditions in one of two settings: either in a forest in the middle of a storm or across a hi...
Source: SharpBrains - October 12, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Peak Performance awe Brain Teasers brain-teaser mental health mental well being nature personal growth well-being wilderness Source Type: blogs

What should come first to treat ADHD in children, behavior therapy or stimulant medication?
In this study, however, this was never done. As a result, we don’t learn whether beginning with combined medication and behavioral treatment may be superior to starting with either in isolation. Third, parents did not choose which treatment their child started with, or how treatment was augmented if their child’s response was not sufficient. Instead, random assignment was used to determine what treatment(s) children received. While this randomization is an essential part of a controlled study, in community settings, parents decide what initial and subsequent treatment their child receives. Thus, finding that pa...
Source: SharpBrains - October 7, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness AD/HD-treatments behavior behavior-therapy classroom behavior medication-treatment stimulant medication Source Type: blogs

Study: High Cognitive Reserve (CR) seen to significantly lower dementia risk even in the presence of high Alzheimer ’s Disease (AD) neuropathology
Conclusions and relevance: High lifespan CR is associated with a reduction in dementia risk, even in the presence of high brain pathologies. Our findings highlight the importance of lifespan CR accumulation in dementia prevention. The Study in Context: Build Your Cognitive Reserve: An Interview with Dr. Yaakov Stern Systematic review finds ten lifestyle factors that clearly impact the probability of developing Alzheimer’s disease (AD) How learning changes your brain Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging The post Study: High Cognitive Reserve (CR) seen to significantly lower dementia ri...
Source: SharpBrains - October 5, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Alzheimer-disease brain pathology Cognitive-impairment cognitive-reserve cognitive-stimulation dementia JAMA neurodegeneration neurology neuropathology occupa Source Type: blogs

Evolution of Cajal ’s drawings: Award-winning image shows neuroimaging progress in a century
About the Image: “With this image I want to illustrate the large advances made in imaging methods over the past century, allowing modern neuroscientists to look at neurons in ways that Cajal could have only dreamed of. The composition was created by mirroring an image of two pyramidal cells of a mouse hippocampus. Using the technique of single-cell electroporation, the DNAs encoding a fluorescent protein and an opsin fused to a different fluorescent protein were introduced in these neurons. The left image shows opsin fluorescence intensity as inverted gray values to create a Cajal’s drawing-like appearance. In ...
Source: SharpBrains - October 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Technology hippocampus image Imaging neuroimaging Neurons neuroplasticity Ramon-y-Cajal Source Type: blogs

Given cognitive strengths and needs are diverse, what brain training may work best for each person and under which conditions?
Does ‘Brain Training’ Actually Work? (Scientific American): If there were an app on your phone that could improve your memory, would you try it? Who wouldn’t want a better memory? After all, our recollections are fragile and can be impaired by diseases, injuries, mental health conditions and, most acutely for all of us, aging. … our team is currently leveraging the power of citizen science. Similar to a large-scale study in the United Kingdom (Brain Test Britain, promoted by Cambridge University and the BBC), we are seeking to recruit thousands of participants to help us uncover the potential merit...
Source: SharpBrains - September 29, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology aging Brain Game Center brain training Brain-exercises Brain-games cognitive decline cognitive needs cognitive strengths cognitive-benefits cogniti Source Type: blogs

Update: A life of cognitive and physical exercise helps you stay sharp in your 70s and beyond
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring 13 fascinating brain research findings, useful resources–and a brain teaser to test your attention skills. #1. Good news of the month: Elders today are in significantly better shape–physically and cognitively–than three decades ago #2. A distinction WITH a difference: Actual, sustained practice–not mere knowledge–is needed to harness neuroplasticity and improve cognition over time #3. “Be mindful that with the rapid changes we are experiencing, our brains are going through accelerated learning. Our brains get tired ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 25, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Technology adhd anticholinergic drugs Behavioral Health Boehringer Ingelheim brain teaser for adults brain training brain-teaser brains Click Therapeutics cog Source Type: blogs

Study: Elders today are in significantly better shape –physically and cognitively–than three decades ago
Conclusions: The results of this study provide strong evidence that cognitive performance is better in more recent cohorts of older people compared to their counterparts measured 28 years earlier. (Editor’s Note: The cognitive performance measures used underlie traits such as memory, attention, processing speed and problem solving.) The Study in Context: Brain scans show lower accumulation of tau and amyloid pathology among cognitive “super-agers” Reminder: A brain-friendly lifestyle is the best approach to delay cognitive decline and dementia Cognitive training, diet, exercise, and vascular management ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 23, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness cognitive decline cognitive performance tests cognitive-abilities cognitive-performance Cognitive-tests elders lower cognitive abilities older Source Type: blogs

Click Therapeutics and Boehringer Ingelheim partner to develop and market a digital therapeutic to treat schizophrenia
Boehringer Ingelheim, Click Therapeutics ink $500M+ digital therapeutics development, commercialization deal (MobiHealthNews): International pharma Boehringer Ingelheim and prescription digital therapeutics company Click Therapeutics have inked a $500 million-plus deal to jointly develop and commercialize a digital treatment for patients with schizophrenia. The treatment, referred to as CT-155, will be a mobile app built on Click’s proprietary tech platform, the companies said … With this big ticket deal, Boehringer Ingelheim becomes the latest major pharma company to bet big on what many in the industry ...
Source: SharpBrains - September 21, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology Boehringer Ingelheim Click Therapeutics CT-155 digital therapeutic digital treatment disorders neuropsychiatric neuropsychiatric disorders pharma prescription-based schizophreni Source Type: blogs

Study: Self-driving cars will increase motion sickness …unless we retrain our brains to improve visuospatial skills
Is brain training the cure for car sickness? (The Sunday Times): RESEARCHERS from the University of Warwick think they’ve found the cure for motion sickness, a condition to which a third of people are highly susceptible and from which anyone can suffer. The implications could be significant should fully driverless vehicles become a reality, with passengers predicted to be more susceptible to nausea while working, reading or watching screens during travel. According to the Warwick Manufacturing Group (WMG), who undertook the study, “visuospatial training exercises” can train the brain to reduce motion sick...
Source: SharpBrains - September 18, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Peak Performance Technology brain training brain-training-exercises cognitive-abilities ergonomics motion sickness self-driving cars self-driving vehicles simulator train the brain virtual Source Type: blogs

Marshmallow Test with a twist: 3- and 4 ‑year-olds kids display more self-control when their reputation is at stake
Children Will Wait to Impress Others—Another Twist on the Classic Marshmallow Test (Association for Psychological Science): If you asked people to name a famous psychology study, the “marshmallow test” would probably come out near the top of the list. In this task, young children are told they can immediately get a small reward (one marshmallow) or wait to get a bigger reward (two marshmallows)… A new study published in the journal Psychological Science expands on this earlier research … The researchers told the children that they could earn a small reward immediately or wait for a bigg...
Source: SharpBrains - September 16, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning delay of gratification delayed gratification marshmallow marshmallow test psychological Psychological Science rational reputation self-control social cognition Source Type: blogs

Study: Actual, sustained practice –not mere knowledge–is needed to harness neuroplasticity and improve cognition over time
CONCLUSION: Results support the hypothesis that improvements in lifestyle risk factors for dementia can lead to improvements in cognition over a short time frame with a population experiencing cognitive decline. Outcomes from this trial support the conduct of a larger and longer trial with this participant group. The Study in Context: Can you grow your hippocampus? Yes. Here’s how, and why it matters How learning changes your brain To harness neuroplasticity, start with enthusiasm Solving the Brain Fitness Puzzle Is the Key to Self-Empowered Aging What are cognitive abilities and how to boost them? The Ten Habits o...
Source: SharpBrains - September 14, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness brain training cognition cognitive decline cognitive-abilities dementia prevention dietitian exercise improve-cognition lifestyle lifestyle risk reduction mil Source Type: blogs

Anticholinergic drugs found to significantly increase risk of cognitive decline, especially among those with Alzheimer ’s Disease biomarkers or genetic predisposition
Conclusions: aCH increased risk of incident MCI and cognitive decline, and effects were significantly enhanced among individuals with genetic risk factors and CSF-based AD pathophysiological markers. Findings underscore the adverse impact of aCH medications on cognition and the need for deprescribing trials, particularly among individuals with elevated risk for AD. The Study in Context: First, do no harm? Common anticholinergic meds seen to increase dementia risk Study: 46.7 million Americans have Alzheimer’s Disease brain pathology today, so it’s urgent to prevent or at least delay progression to clinical di...
Source: SharpBrains - September 11, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Disease anticholinergic anticholinergic medications biomarkers cognition cognitive decline cognitively dementia lower cognitive abilities lower cognitive ability MCI mild-cog Source Type: blogs

Helping shape the future of lifelong learning via SEK Education Group
This week, as many students around the globe finally go back to school to meet their peers and teachers in person for the first time since March, it is an honor to announce that our very own Álvaro Fernández Ibáñez has joined the International Advisory Board of SEK Education Group, which runs 9 bilingual IB schools, and a major university, in Spain, France, Ireland and Qatar. He (and us) look forward to seeing over 9,000 students from 70 different nationalities plus their many teachers and administrators, further develop their unique brains and minds in years ahead! About SEK Education Group: Wi...
Source: SharpBrains - September 9, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Education & Lifelong Learning bilingual brains Lifelong-learning minds schooling schools SEK Education Group students teachers Source Type: blogs

Study finds surprising correlation between states ’ elevation and ADHD prevalence
This study adds to other work on how natural factors may play a role in the development of ADHD. For instance, several years ago I reviewed a study in which a link between ADHD and exposure to sunlight was found, and exposure to natural outdoor environments has also reported to reduce ADHD symptoms. Results such as these are surprising and interesting, and highlight the complexity of factors that may be involved in the development and expression of ADHD symptoms. Several aspects of the current work are important to keep in mind. First, the results highlight a potential linkage between altitude and ADHD at the population le...
Source: SharpBrains - September 8, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. David Rabiner Tags: Attention and ADD/ADHD Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness ADHD diagnostic altitude cognitive-abilities dopamine dopamine activity hypobaric lower cognitive abilities stimulant medications Source Type: blogs

How COVID-related stress can disrupt your brain circuits and nine tips to prevent it
COVID-19 has touched each of us somehow. Many now recognize that caring for our mental health is as essential as addressing the virus if we are to emerge stronger, more connected and more resilient. The Ancient Greeks said “know thyself” to live soundly, but it is only now that we have the technology to start understanding how our individual experiences arise from the complexity of our brains. Gaining understanding of our brain responses offers a window into how mental health symptoms arise, and allows us to mitigate the negative effects of the pandemic on mental health. At the Stanford Center for Precision Men...
Source: SharpBrains - September 3, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: World Economic Forum Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness accelerated accelerated learning Anhedonia anxiety disorder biotypes brain circuits Brain-Plasticity chronic-stress clinical depression Cognitive Fog cognitiv Source Type: blogs

To harness our best selves, “Temper your empathy, train your compassion, and avoid the news”
In the novel Lord of the Flies, a group of young boys are shipwrecked on an island and eventually turn savagely against each other. The book is a cautionary tale about humanity’s underlying cruelty and the need for civilization to tame our darker impulses—a message that resonates with many people today. But that’s not what happened to a real-life group of shipwrecked kids in 1965. Unlike the fictional Lord of the Flies characters, they developed a game plan for survival that was cooperative, fun, and peaceful, resulting in lifelong friendships. In other words, the boys didn’t turn into devils when l...
Source: SharpBrains - September 1, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness brain-damaging stress coronavirus humankind Lord of the Flies mental health mental hygiene mindfulness Rutger Bregman Source Type: blogs

Neuralink: Thumbs up or down so far?
Elon Musk’s Neuralink is neuroscience theater (MIT Technology Review): Rock-climb without fear. Play a symphony in your head. See radar with superhuman vision. Discover the nature of consciousness. Cure blindness, paralysis, deafness, and mental illness. Those are just a few of the applications that Elon Musk and employees at his four-year-old neuroscience company Neuralink believe electronic brain-computer interfaces will one day bring about. None of these advances are close at hand, and some are unlikely to ever come about. But in a “product update” streamed over YouTube on Friday, Musk, also the founde...
Source: SharpBrains - August 31, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Technology Brain-Computer Interfaces electrochemical Elon Musk FitBit Neuralink skull Source Type: blogs

Update: The placebo effect works even when people know they are taking a placebo
Welcome to a new edition of SharpBrains’ e‑newsletter, featuring 14 research findings, resources and tips for brain health … and starting with this fascinating study: #1. Wow. The placebo effect works even when people know they are taking a placebo #2. Beating Alzheimer’s Disease will require a combined physical/ mental approach: From the ten factors found to increase AD risk in the most comprehensive evidence review to date, Five are “neck up:” Lower education level, Lower cognitive activity, Head trauma, Repeated episodes of depression, High-levels of long-term stress. Five are &ldquo...
Source: SharpBrains - August 27, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Health & Wellness Alzheimer’s Disease Apple attentional focus Barbara Arrowsmith-Young brain brain health Brain Teasers brain-teaser meditation mental healthcare neural signa Source Type: blogs

Debate: How and when will the telemedicine surge reach mental healthcare?
Covid-19 Pandemic Drives Patients—and Deal Makers—to Telemedicine (The Wall Street Journal): The coronavirus pandemic has put the once-niche category of telemedicine in the spotlight and is now driving a flurry of deal activity involving virtual health-care providers … Patients have embraced virtual care as a way to stay in touch with doctors for urgent care or chronic care management without risking exposure to the coronavirus by visiting medical offices. Telemedicine visits are typically conducted between a doctor and patient using videoconferencing or a phone call and are used to address minor ai...
Source: SharpBrains - August 25, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Alvaro Fernandez Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology CBT cognitive-behavioral-therapy COVID-19 mental health mental healthcare Talkspace telemedicine Source Type: blogs

Coming soon: Virtual World Tour at the frontier of applied neuroplasticity, education and learning difficulties
Heads-up about Barbara Arrowsmith-Young’s upcoming Virtual World Tour to discuss her experience, her book and her schools at the frontier of applied neuroplasticity, education and helping kids with learning difficulties. Presentations are noted in EDT time (Toronto, Canada). Please use this time zone converter to see the time in your region. Learn more and Register HERE. September 14th 2020, 6.00 AM EDT and 8.00 PM EDT October 20th 2020, 7.00 AM EDT and 8.00 PM EDT November 12th 2020, 7.00 AM EDT and 8.00 PM EDT Talk description: Learn about Barbara’s journey of discovery, the lines of research she combined ...
Source: SharpBrains - August 24, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning Arrowsmith Program Barbara Arrowsmith-Young brain change learning disabilities neuroplasticity Virtual World Tour Source Type: blogs

Simple, quick brain teaser to test the limits of multitasking
How often do you discuss office gossip via chat while participating in a Zoom meeting? Or read a document while talking on the phone with a client? Or think about problems at work while helping your child with her homework? We are constantly exposed to lots of information flows and To Dos and often required to perform multiple tasks at once. It is not easy to stay focused and be truly productive. All the situations above involve doing more than one thing at a time, often compromising performance on important matters. Attention is a scarce resource. Think about your attentional focus as the beam of a light. If the light is...
Source: SharpBrains - August 21, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Pascale Michelon Tags: Brain Teasers Cognitive Neuroscience Education & Lifelong Learning attention attentional focus cognitive-abilities cognitive-stimulation multitasking Source Type: blogs

Study: Meditation practice, both formal and informal, helps develop equanimity over time
This study suggests that even for those new to the practice of mindfulness, they can experience short-term increases in emotional stability with a body scan. Cultivating this state could possibly help us cope with the current chaos we are living through, at least a little bit better. The connection between meditation and equanimity may be a solace for those looking to find peace with the unknown. If you are able to go about your life with a more even-minded state of mind, you’ll be in better shape to take care of yourself and others. – Sophie McMullen is a recent graduate of UC Berkeley, where she majored in ps...
Source: SharpBrains - August 20, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Greater Good Science Center Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Peak Performance Professional Development anger anxiety body scan meditation boredom breathing meditation coronavirus equanimity mental habits mind mindfulness-meditation pandemic stat Source Type: blogs

Air Force announces research platform to harness closed-loop neurotechnology and accelerate learning “on the fly”
U.S. Air Force illustration/Richard Eldridge Air Force Neurotechnology Partnership Aims to Accelerate Learning (Military Spot): The Individualized Neural Learning System, or iNeuraLS, is a new augmented learning platform that will enable rapid learning by closed-loop modulation of cognitive states during skill acquisition. Essentially, the AFRL team seeks to develop a capability that will give Airmen the ability to rapidly acquire knowledge and skills on the fly through direct brain interfaces with the help of neurotechnologies… “We’re going to have unprecedented access to the brain using a novel brain-...
Source: SharpBrains - August 18, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Peak Performance Technology Air-Force Airmen augmented learning brain interfaces brain stimulation brain-machine interface cognitive states electroencephalography Individualized Neural Learning System iNeuraL Source Type: blogs

Debate: Will brain-computer interfaces replace smartphones and other “mediating” devices?
The Fifth Industrial Revolution: where mind meets machine (The National): The Fifth Industrial Revolution will make that connection closer and seamless, and will feel unmediated. The smart device onto which we tap and into which we speak will disappear. Brain-computer interfaces will replace them…Can we connect our brains – and our minds – to machines? The short answer is yes, and we have done so for some time. The longer answer is more complicated, but more interesting. Until a few years ago, machines were connected to the brain and the nervous system principally for medical purposes – for exampl...
Source: SharpBrains - August 17, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology -google Amazon brain-computer interface Brain-Computer Interfaces Ctrl-labs Facebook Fifth Industrial Revolution Fourth Industrial Revolution Kernel Neuralink Source Type: blogs

On Stress, Yoga Meditation, and The Evolution Revolution
In the Tale of Two Cities, Charles Dickens wrote: “It was the best of times, it was the worst of times. It was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness…. It was the season of light, it was the season of darkness. It was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair” Yes, the period of which Dickens wrote is a lot like the present day. We are living through extraordinary times in a complicated world. In my 74 ½ years, I’ve never seen anything like it — from the virus to political strife to protests, stress is rampant. Stress may impact negatively virtually every system of o...
Source: SharpBrains - August 14, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: Dr. Dharma Singh Khalsa at Alzheimer's Research & Prevention Foundation Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness anxiety chronic-stress depression immune system insomnia Kirtan-Kriya lower cognitive ability mbsr meditation mental health Mindfulness-Based-Stress-Reduction telomere Transcendental Med Source Type: blogs

Study: The placebo effect works even when people know they are taking a placebo
Placebos Prove Powerful, Even When People Know They’re Taking One, New Study Suggests (MSU release): How much of a treatment is mind over matter? It is well documented that people often feel better after taking a treatment without active ingredients simply because they believe it’s real — known as the placebo effect. A team of researchers from Michigan State University, University of Michigan and Dartmouth College is the first to demonstrate that placebos reduce brain markers of emotional distress even when people know they are taking one. “Just think: What if someone took a side-effect free sugar p...
Source: SharpBrains - August 13, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness active ingredient clinical disorders neural neural measure neuroplasticity non-deceptive non-deceptive placebos Placebo-Effect psychobiological sugar-pill Source Type: blogs

Neuromodulation device Relivion gets FDA clearance to help patients with major depression who don ’t benefit from antidepressant medications
Neurolief wins FDA breakthrough nod for wearable neuromod for depression (Mass Device): Neurolief announced today that it received FDA breakthrough device designation for its Relivion DP system for treating major depression. Relivion is a wearable, non-invasive, multi-channel brain neuromodulation device designed as an adjunctive treatment to pharmaceutical management of major depressive disorder (MDD) in adults who haven’t experienced satisfactory improvement from antidepressant medications, according to a news release. Netanya, Israel-based Neurolief’s Relivion DP is a headset-like device placed on the head t...
Source: SharpBrains - August 12, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology antidepressant medications breakthrough device depression FDA Major Depressive Disorder Neurolief neuromod neuromodulation Psychotherapy Relivion DP treating major depression Source Type: blogs

UCLA launches major mental health study collecting & analyzing data from Apple wearables to better understand depression and anxiety
Apple and UCLA kick off a three-year depression study (CNBC): UCLA on Tuesday said it is launching a three-year study to better understand how factors such as sleep, physical activity, heart rate and daily routines impact symptoms of depression and anxiety. UCLA is working with Apple to design the study, which will use data collected by the iPhone, Apple Watch and Beddit sleep-tracker … involves 150 participants recruited from among UCLA Health patients. From there, the next phases of the research will expand out to 3,000 participants from both the hospital and the student body. Study participants will download an a...
Source: SharpBrains - August 11, 2020 Category: Neuroscience Authors: SharpBrains Tags: Cognitive Neuroscience Health & Wellness Technology anxiety Apple Apple Watch Beddit depression Depression Grand Challenge digital exhaust heart-rate iPhone mental health Mindstrong Health Physical-activity sleep sleep-trac Source Type: blogs