UMN medical school researchers study abnormal blood glucose levels of discharged patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers decided to delve into an area where little data currently exists. They wanted to know what happens after these patients with abnormal blood glucose measurements are discharged? Are uncontrolled blood glucose levels associated with worse outcomes after patients are discharged from the hospital? Surprisingly, despite a large body of literature around management of blood glucose in the hospital -- there are few studies that attempt to answer this question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers give new insight to muscular dystrophy patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research by University of Minnesota scientists has revealed the three dimensional structure of the DUX4 protein, which is responsible for the disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Unlike the majority of genetic diseases, FSHD is not caused by a protein that is missing or not functioning properly. Rather it is caused when a functioning, normal, protein shows up in a place where it doesn't belong (in muscles). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why feeling empathy could lead former drug users to relapse
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Empathy, the awareness of another's feelings and emotions, is a key feature in normal social interactions. But new research from the University of Minnesota suggests that empathy can have detrimental effects on an individual -- and can push former drug users to relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pushing 3D Printing Forward
Researchers and students have demonstrated that inks can be used instead of thermoplastic filaments to 3D print functional biomedical devices. Michael McAlpine, Benjamin Mayhugh Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, described such advances in the ESC Minneapolis keynote, “3D Printing Functional Materials & Devices.” A lot of the inks McAlpine’s group uses are nanometer-scale particle inks printed at a line-width scale of 10 microns and above for printing devices at the macro level. They have developed software as well as a hig...
Source: MDDI - December 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis 3-D Printing Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Geriatric Trauma Fellowship Opening: 2020-2021
The University of Minnesota/Regions Hospital offers an exceptional opportunity for a multi-disciplinary Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma fellowship, under fellowship director, Dr. Julie Switzer.  We have this position available for the 2020-2021 academic year and beyond.  This fellowship is a twelve month unique training experience in the operative and clinical management of geriatric orthopaedic trauma patients. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - December 3, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Adult Reconstruction Trauma Fellowship: 2020-2021
Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota is seeking a qualified candidate to fill one Combined Adult Reconstruction/Orthopaedic Trauma position for 2020-2021 academic year, beginning on August 1, 2020. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - December 3, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Policy, legal approaches key to health equity in precision medicine
(University of Minnesota) Genomics has a diversity problem. Despite the dazzling promise of genetically-tailored treatments and therapies, fundamental questions remain about whether precision medicine will advance health equity or make disparities worse. On Nov. 29, 2018, a national conference and webcast at Meharry Medical College in Nashville will be the first to focus on the role law and policy must play to ensure precision medicine increases health equity and access. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers work to improve dermatologic care for sexual and gender minority patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota researchers recently published an opinion piece in JAMA Dermatology focused on standardizing collection of sexual orientation and gender identity in dermatology clinical settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers stop 'sneaky' cancer cells in their tracks
(University of Minnesota) A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers discover important connection between cells in the liver
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have made a discovery which could lead to a new way of thinking about how disease pathogenesis in the liver is regulated, which is important for understanding the condition nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is incredibly common and growing. It is apparent that about 30 percent of Americans and are at risk to advance to more severe conditions such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, cardiovascular disease, or even liver cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New strategy discovered toward possible prevention of cancers tied to mono
(University of Minnesota) Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis --more commonly known as mono or the 'kissing disease' -- that infects millions of people around the globe each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex addiction more common than previously thought: 1 in 10 men and 1 in 12 women are hooked
A University of Minnesota study found that 10 percent of men and six percent of women struggle to control intrusive sexual urges - rates far higher than psychiatrists previously estimated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMN researchers study the impact of insurance coverage on transferred patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers seek to identify the relationship between insurance coverage and the mortality rate of patients transferred between hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are E-Cigarettes Safe? Here ’s What the Science Says
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Research Brief: Opioid-Affected Births to Rural Residents Are Increasing in Both Rural and Urban Hospitals
This study looked at where rural mothers with opioid use disorder gave birth and examined the characteristics of opioid-affected births to rural mothers based on whether they occurred in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, or urban teaching hospitals. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 29, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Opioid-affected births to rural residents increase in rural and urban hospitals
(University of Minnesota) Pregnant women with opioid addiction may have particular challenges in receiving the care they need when they live in rural areas. Both maternal opioid use disorder and neonatal abstinence syndrome, also known as infant withdrawal, are increasing faster in rural areas than in urban areas. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M Physicians pulls new CEO from the U's medical school
University of Minnesota Physicians has named Dr. Badrinath Konety, leader of the urology department at the U's medical school, as its next CEO. Konety also will hold the title of vice dean of clinical affairs at the medical school and will serve on the newly created M Health Fairview’s executive leadership team. Konety starts as CEO Dec. 1, succeeding Dr. Macaran Baird. Konety’s appointment follows approval of a deal between the Uni versity of Minnesota and Minneapolis-based Fairview Health… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - October 23, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Research brief: Predicting how native plants return to abandoned farm fields
(University of Minnesota) Tracking how seeds move--or disperse--can be difficult because of a seed's small size. However, in a study published in Ecology, researchers at the University of Minnesota's College of Biological Sciences found a solution for tracking seed movement by using electrical engineering and mathematical models. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 23, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

RIP Medtronic co-founder Earl Bakken
Earl Bakken, who along with a brother-in-law founded what grew to become the world’s largest medical device company, Medtronic (NYSE:MDT), died Oct. 21 at age 94. Bakken and Palmer Hermundslie founded the Minneapolis-area company in 1949, working in an unheated boxcar behind the Hermundslie home. His first innovation was a battery-powered pacemaker designed using transistors that was drastically smaller than contemporary devices that used vacuum tubes. From there, Bakken oversaw the growth of Medtronic for 40 years until his retirement in 1989. “Today we are saddened by the passing of Earl Bakken, but...
Source: Mass Device - October 22, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Medtronic Personnel Moves Source Type: news

Medtech issues again take center stage in Minn. Congressional races
The medical device industry is yet again positioned to play a major role in Minnesota congressional races. Incumbent Rep. Erik Paulsen (R-Minn.), who has been a longtime supporter of the medtech industry and led numerous attempts to repeal the medical device tax, is facing a tough re-election campaign. Paulsen is facing off against 48-year-old liquor heir Dean Philips (D), and is considered unlikely to keep his seat, which would be the first time since 1961 that Minnesota’s 3rd District was represented by a Democrat. In his last race, against former state Sen. Terri Bonoff (D), Paulsen won with a nearly 14-point lead...
Source: Mass Device - October 18, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Featured Source Type: news

3 ways HHS can help medtech innovators
The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) is doing everything from sharing more data to cultivating entrepreneurial talent and engaging in partnerships in order to support medical device innovators, the department’s CTO Ed Simcox told than 100 industry insiders in the Twin Cities today. A major goal at HHS is to build an innovation-focused culture, what Simcox described as an internal means to an end. “And the end is to improve health outcomes and reduce costs,” said Simcox, who spoke a “Healthcare Startup Day Minnesota” event that the University of Minnesota and Medical Alle...
Source: Mass Device - October 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Medicare Regulatory/Compliance Dept. of Health & Human Services (HHS) Medical Alley Medical Alley Assn. Minnesota Reimbursement University of Minnesota Source Type: news

HHS ’ s healthcare startups tour is coming to Minnesota next week
[Image courtesy of Google Maps] [Image courtesy of Google Maps] The University of Minnesota and the Medical Alley Association will host the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services (HHS) for a “Healthcare Startup Day Minnesota” event on Oct. 15. The event, which will be held at the University of Minnesota’s McNamara Alumni Center, will be HHS representatives’ sixth stop on a two-year tour to interact with healthcare entrepreneurs around the country. The goal is to seek ways that the department might better support startups. Get the full story on our sister site Medical Design & Outsourci...
Source: Mass Device - October 11, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News News Well Dept. of Health & Human Services (HHS) University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Recent National Academies report puts research participants' rights at risk, say law scholars
(University of Minnesota) In a Policy Forum article appearing in the Oct. 12, 2018 issue of Science, leading bioethics and legal scholars sound the alarm about a recent report from National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine. The Academies' report on 'Returning Individual Research Results to Participants' makes recommendations on how to share research results and data with people who agree to participate in research studies and calls for problematic changes to federal law. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Adult Reconstruction/Trauma Fellowship 2019-2020
Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota is seeking a qualified candidate to fill one Combined Adult Reconstruction/Orthopaedic Trauma position for 2019-2020 academic year, beginning on August 1, 2019. Qualified candidates are current PGY5 orthopaedic residents in an accredited US orthopaedic residency program and available to obtain a Minnesota medical license.     (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - October 9, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Fellowship News Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Geriatric Trauma Fellowship Opening: 2019-2020
The University of Minnesota/Regions Hospital offers an exceptional opportunity for a multi-disciplinary Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma fellowship, under fellowship director, Dr. Julie Switzer.  We have this position available for the 2019-2020 academic year and beyond.  This fellowship is a twelve month unique training experience in the operative and clinical management of geriatric orthopaedic trauma patients.  (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - October 9, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Fellowship News Source Type: news

HabitAware, Carrot Health, Nordic Waffles take top Minnesota Cup prizes
HabitAware, a Minneapolis-based maker of an "awareness tracker" bracelet designed to help wearers break bad habits, won the grand prize at this year's Minnesota Cup. The Star Tribune reports on the winners of the annual startup competition, which were announced Monday night at the University of Minnesota. HabitAware took the top $50,000 grand prize for its bracelet, which adapts wearable technology to treat a condition called trichotillomania, which involves obsessively pulling one's own hair.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 9, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

Vulnerability to Pandemic Flu Could Be Greater Today Than a Century Ago
This article is a conversion with Dr Osterholm, director of the Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, who discusses the global impact of another 1918-like flu pandemic. (Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH))
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - October 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Online diabetes prevention programs are as effective as in-person sessions for weight loss, study finds
This study is one of the first to assess weight outcomes in an online diabetes prevention program in comparison to in-person delivery of such a program.BACKGROUNDSome 84 million, or one in three, U.S. adults have prediabetes, a condition in which one ’s blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal, though not high enough to be type 2 diabetes. Without any intervention, up to 30 percent of adults with prediabetes can develop type 2 diabetes within five years, and up to 70 percent can develop it over their lifetime. Yet type 2 diabetes risk can be lowered by as much as 58 percent with lifestyle interventions ...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 24, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

UMN researchers discover influenza virus doesn't replicate equally in all cells
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The seasonal flu is caused by different subtypes of Influenza A virus and typically leads to the death of half a million people each year. In order to better understand this virus and how it spreads, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers took a closer look at the cells inside the lungs. What they discovered is not only is the immune system response tuned to the amount of virus replication, it's also tuned to the viral spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers predict invasion risk of starry stonewort in upper Midwest
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the Minnesota Aquatic Invasive Species Research Center recently published a new paper predicting the risk of starry stonewort invasion in Minnesota and Wisconsin. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 18, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMN heads up new project to foster more collaboration among researchers
(University of Minnesota) The University of Minnesota's Humphrey School of Public Affairs and Institute on the Environment, along with Duke University, are leading a new, multi-university project that will explore how to make interdisciplinary research more common and more effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research Brief: Immediately limiting nicotine in all cigarettes could reduce smoking
(University of Minnesota) A new study conducted by the University of Minnesota and eight additional institutions recently published in the JAMA addresses whether a gradual reduction or a targeted immediate reduction in nicotine in cigarettes is the best approach. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Researchers discover how caged molecules 'rattle and sing'
(University of Minnesota) A team of energy researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Massachusetts Amherst has discovered that molecular motion can be predicted with high accuracy when confining molecules in small nanocages. Their theoretical method is suitable for screening millions of possible nanomaterials and could improve production of fuels and chemicals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 10, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Saint Mary's University of Minnesota extends partnership with Wiley education services
(Wiley) Saint Mary's University of Minnesota, a private, non-profit Lasallian Catholic educational institution, and Wiley Education Services, a division of Wiley that provides tailored services and technology solutions to higher education institutions, are pleased to announce a 10-year extension of their existing partnership. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

One step closer to creating the world's first bionic EYE: Scientists 3D print a prototype 'eyeball'
In a world first, University of Minnesota researchers have 3D printed an artificial 'eyeball' that mimics the function of the retina in order to restore sight. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research brief: Researchers 3D print prototype for 'bionic eye'
(University of Minnesota) A team of researchers at the University of Minnesota have, for the first time, fully 3D printed an array of light receptors on a hemispherical surface. This discovery marks a significant step toward creating a 'bionic eye' that could someday help blind people see or sighted people see better. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Education RE: Herd Immunity Can Up Readiness to Be Vaccinated
FRIDAY, Aug. 24, 2018 -- Educating adults about herd immunity can increase the proportion willing to be vaccinated for influenza, according to a study recently published in Vaccine. Jacqueline Logan, M.P.H., from the University of Minnesota in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 24, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Key brain processes are exactly the same regardless of sex
Scientists from the University of Minnesota and the University of Cincinnati found that the formation of 'executive functions' is dependent on many factors, but sex is not one of them (stock). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

E-cigarettes raise the risk of mouth cancer by damaging DNA
Trendy vapes that millions of Americans use instead of smoking cigarettes may still raise oral cancer risks by altering DNA in the mouth, a small new University of Minnesota study suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Is Oatmeal Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Oatmeal is a near-universally beloved breakfast. While it has historically been enjoyed across Europe, Russia and the U.S., oatmeal is rapidly gaining popularity in developing countries because of its affordability and its perceived health properties. But is oatmeal really good for you? To answer that question, it’s first important to differentiate among all the different types of oatmeal. There’s steel-cut and rolled, quick-cooking and instant. But all of these terms refer to different methods of preparing hulled oats for cooking. “You can’t eat an unprocessed oat straight from the field,” sa...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

UMN Medical School research shows it's possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells
(University of Minnesota Medical School) What's the secret to aging well? University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have answered it -- on a cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deaths from resident-to-resident incidents in dementia offers insights to inform policy
(University of Minnesota) Analyzing the incidents between residents in dementia in long-term care homes may hold the key to reducing future fatalities among this vulnerable population, according to a new research from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: UMN researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the University of Minnesota (UMN) have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries
(University of Minnesota) Engineers and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research Brief: UMN Medical School researchers study how cues drive our behavior
(University of Minnesota) Recent research published in Nature Neuroscience by University of Minnesota Medical School neuroscientist Benjamin Saunders, PhD, uses a Pavlovian model of conditioning to see if turning on a light -- a simple cue -- just before dopamine neurons were activated could motivate action. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control
(Michigan State University) A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota and Western Michigan University have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration. The results, published in the current issue of PNAS, could lead to better ways to control sea lampreys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tamarack ’s GlideWear helps kids with painful skin condition
Photo by Alison Bents Photography for Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc. A company that makes ultra-low-friction fabric for people with burn injuries, amputations and pressure sores has launched a clothing line for children with a painful skin condition. Known as “butterfly children,” these patients have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic disorder in which their bodies do not produce a protein that would enable the skin to adhere to itself. Their extremely fragile skin blisters and tears from minor friction or trauma, making it seem as fragile as the wings of a butterfly. When officials with low-f...
Source: Mass Device - July 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Pediatrics Wound Care Tamarack Habilitation Technologies Inc. University of Minnesota Source Type: news

New research challenges common assumptions about people who use food shelves
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The first-ever statewide survey of Minnesota food-shelf users uncovered important information about a population whose voices are rarely represented in research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Scientific-backed gBeta accelerator picks 6 new startups
Minneapolis-based, Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) backed medtech accelerator Gener8tor announced six new entrants into its summer gBeta Medtech program last Wednesday, according to a MinneInno report. The gBeta accelerator, which is also supported by the Medical Alley Association, the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic, will host the six companies in a free, seven-week long session. The program is designed to aid the startups in gaining insight on product development and customer traction and establishing metrics to seek selection into full-time accelerators or for finding seed investors, according to the repor...
Source: Mass Device - July 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development Boston Scientific Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Counting the benefits from U of M's million-dollar mouse
A genetically engineered mouse has brought in $1 million in licensing fees to the University of Minnesota for its use in cancer research. The Minnesota Daily reports on the mouse and its unique advantages: Its plasma cells don't die and can be used as antibodies to help detect cancer cells. The U of M licensed the antibodies to Cell Signaling Technology of Danvers, Mass., which sells antibodies to researchers. The U collects 4 perc ent of revenue from Cell Signalling's sale of antibodies; the 15-year-old… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news