Is Oatmeal Healthy? Here ’s What the Experts Say
Oatmeal is a near-universally beloved breakfast. While it has historically been enjoyed across Europe, Russia and the U.S., oatmeal is rapidly gaining popularity in developing countries because of its affordability and its perceived health properties. But is oatmeal really good for you? To answer that question, it’s first important to differentiate among all the different types of oatmeal. There’s steel-cut and rolled, quick-cooking and instant. But all of these terms refer to different methods of preparing hulled oats for cooking. “You can’t eat an unprocessed oat straight from the field,” sa...
Source: TIME: Health - August 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime Source Type: news

UMN Medical School research shows it's possible to reverse damage caused by aging cells
(University of Minnesota Medical School) What's the secret to aging well? University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have answered it -- on a cellular level. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Deaths from resident-to-resident incidents in dementia offers insights to inform policy
(University of Minnesota) Analyzing the incidents between residents in dementia in long-term care homes may hold the key to reducing future fatalities among this vulnerable population, according to a new research from the University of Minnesota School of Nursing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: UMN researchers use green gold to rapidly detect and identify harmful bacteria
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the University of Minnesota (UMN) have developed a method to screen and identify harmful or antibiotic-resistant bacteria within one hour using a portable luminometer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 14, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: New 3D-printed device could help treat spinal cord injuries
(University of Minnesota) Engineers and medical researchers at the University of Minnesota have teamed up to create a groundbreaking 3D-printed device that could someday help patients with long-term spinal cord injuries regain some function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research Brief: UMN Medical School researchers study how cues drive our behavior
(University of Minnesota) Recent research published in Nature Neuroscience by University of Minnesota Medical School neuroscientist Benjamin Saunders, PhD, uses a Pavlovian model of conditioning to see if turning on a light -- a simple cue -- just before dopamine neurons were activated could motivate action. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pinpointing a molecule for sea lamprey control
(Michigan State University) A team of scientists has identified a single molecule that could be a key in controlling invasive sea lampreys. Researchers from Michigan State University, the University of Minnesota and Western Michigan University have homed in on a fatty molecule that directs the destructive eels' migration. The results, published in the current issue of PNAS, could lead to better ways to control sea lampreys. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tamarack ’s GlideWear helps kids with painful skin condition
Photo by Alison Bents Photography for Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc. A company that makes ultra-low-friction fabric for people with burn injuries, amputations and pressure sores has launched a clothing line for children with a painful skin condition. Known as “butterfly children,” these patients have epidermolysis bullosa (EB), a rare genetic disorder in which their bodies do not produce a protein that would enable the skin to adhere to itself. Their extremely fragile skin blisters and tears from minor friction or trauma, making it seem as fragile as the wings of a butterfly. When officials with low-f...
Source: Mass Device - July 31, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Blog Pediatrics Wound Care Tamarack Habilitation Technologies Inc. University of Minnesota Source Type: news

New research challenges common assumptions about people who use food shelves
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The first-ever statewide survey of Minnesota food-shelf users uncovered important information about a population whose voices are rarely represented in research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Scientific-backed gBeta accelerator picks 6 new startups
Minneapolis-based, Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) backed medtech accelerator Gener8tor announced six new entrants into its summer gBeta Medtech program last Wednesday, according to a MinneInno report. The gBeta accelerator, which is also supported by the Medical Alley Association, the University of Minnesota and the Mayo Clinic, will host the six companies in a free, seven-week long session. The program is designed to aid the startups in gaining insight on product development and customer traction and establishing metrics to seek selection into full-time accelerators or for finding seed investors, according to the repor...
Source: Mass Device - July 30, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development Boston Scientific Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

Counting the benefits from U of M's million-dollar mouse
A genetically engineered mouse has brought in $1 million in licensing fees to the University of Minnesota for its use in cancer research. The Minnesota Daily reports on the mouse and its unique advantages: Its plasma cells don't die and can be used as antibodies to help detect cancer cells. The U of M licensed the antibodies to Cell Signaling Technology of Danvers, Mass., which sells antibodies to researchers. The U collects 4 perc ent of revenue from Cell Signalling's sale of antibodies; the 15-year-old… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 30, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

Counting the benefits from U of M's million-dollar mouse
A genetically engineered mouse has brought in $1 million in licensing fees to the University of Minnesota for its use in cancer research. The Minnesota Daily reports on the mouse and its unique advantages: Its plasma cells don't die and can be used as antibodies to help detect cancer cells. The U of M licensed the antibodies to Cell Signaling Technology of Danvers, Mass., which sells antibodies to researchers. The U collects 4 perc ent of revenue from Cell Signalling's sale of antibodies; the 15-year-old… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 30, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

University students to be severely punished for using "wrong" gender pronouns... the speech Nazis of the Left are on a rampage
(Natural News) Identifying people by their natural biological gender is on its way out at the University of Minnesota, where school officials are reportedly developing new policies that would make it a punishable offense for students and faculty members alike to use the wrong gender “pronouns” on campus. Entitled, “Equity and Access: Gender Identity, Gender... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - July 26, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sunless tanning may not be the answer to preventing skin cancer
(University of Minnesota Medical School) In the study 'Characteristics and Skin Cancer Risk Behaviors of Adult Sunless Tanners in the United States,' published in JAMA Dermatology, Mansh and fellow University of Minnesota Medical School researchers sought to assess the demographic characteristics and skin cancer risk behaviors of adult sunless tanners in the United States. They wanted to find out if adults who used sunless tanning products were able to reduce risky behaviors such as indoor and outdoor tanning. They found little evidence they did. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 25, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Miromatrix lands $15.7M for organ-growing tech
Miromatrix Medical Inc., a biotech company whose long-term goal is to grow human organs using a patient ’s own cells, has closed on a $15.7 million round of funding. Participating investors include a multibillion-dollar health care company that Miromatrix CEO Jeff Ross declined to name.  Eden Prairie-based Miromatrix plans to put the capital partly toward further development and testing of its te chnology, which was first developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota. The company strips… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Miromatrix lands $15.7M for organ-growing tech
Miromatrix Medical Inc., a biotech company whose long-term goal is to grow human organs using a patient ’s own cells, has closed on a $15.7 million round of funding. Participating investors include a multibillion-dollar health care company that Miromatrix CEO Jeff Ross declined to name.  Eden Prairie-based Miromatrix plans to put the capital partly toward further development and testing of its te chnology, which was first developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota. The company strips… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Incarceration of parents impacts health of their children into adulthood
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A new study published in Pediatrics found that young adults who had a parent incarcerated during their childhood are more likely to skip needed healthcare, smoke cigarettes, engage in risky sexual behaviors, and abuse alcohol, prescription and illicit drugs. These findings have a potentially broad impact, as more than five million US children have had a parent in jail or prison. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Increased communication between hospitals improves patient care and survival rates
(University of Minnesota Medical School) More than a million patients are transferred between hospitals each year in the U.S. This process is challenging both for hospitals and patients and breakdowns in communication are common. A recent University of Minnesota Medical School study focuses on the patients transferring from one hospital to another and highlights the importance of efficient communication between hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sticking with the wrong choice
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research from the University of Minnesota published in the journal Science discovered that mice, rats, and humans all commit the sunk cost fallacy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mice Don ’ t Know When to Let It Go, Either
Animals, like humans, are reluctant to give up on pursuits they ’ ve invested in, psychologists report. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ERICA GOODE Tags: Psychology and Psychologists Decisions and Verdicts Animal Behavior University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Research brief: Human rights in a changing sociopolitical climate
(University of Minnesota) In a new study to understand the current sociopolitical climate, particularly as it relates to Syrians, researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted a comprehensive needs and readiness assessment of the United States Refugee Resettlement Program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers develop algorithm to improve care delivery to seriously ill patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The level of communication between patient and physician can make a monumental difference, specifically in the case of seriously ill hospitalized patients. Researchers at the University of Minnesota have found a way to better identify these patients with the hopes of better facilitating 'end-of-life' or specialized conversations and care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Data Management for Librarians CE workshop
The University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries is hosting a 4-hour Data Management for Librarians CE workshop in Minneapolis, MN on August 6th. Registration for the workshop is free, and there are a select number of travel stipends available for up to $1,000.  The Workshop will introduce participants to key elements of research data management in the health sciences, including best practices for documentation, metadata, backup, storage, and preservation. Participants in the CE course may also partake in an online data management skills community of practice, which will meet quarterly to take a deeper dive into ...
Source: MCR News - July 3, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: ssawyer Tags: #CC/Academic List #Health Interest List Source Type: news

UMN kidney transplant team receives national award for difficult transplant match
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The National Kidney Registry has awarded its 2018 'Excellence in Teamwork' Award to the University of Minnesota Medical Center for demonstrating excellence in teamwork for a complex kidney swap. The hospital is one of ten member centers to receive this award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 29, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CAR-T immunotherapies may have a new player
(University of California - San Diego) Emerging CAR-T immunotherapies leverage modified versions of patient's T-cells to target and kill cancer cells. In a new study, published June 28 online in Cell Stem Cell, researchers at University of California San Diego School of Medicine and University of Minnesota report that similarly modified natural killer (NK) cells derived from human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) also displayed heightened activity against a mouse model of ovarian cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

FDA clears Shape Memory Medical ’ s Impede embolization plug
Shape Memory Medical said today it won FDA 510(k) clearance for its Impede embolization plug designed to obstruct or reduce the rate of blood flow in the peripheral vasculature. The newly cleared device, which won CE Mark approval last August, is available in three sizes and is intended to treat vessels up to 10 mm in diameter. The Impede device features shape memory polymer technology developed at Texas A&M University and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, the Santa Clara, Calif.-based company said. “The Impede embolization plug is an exciting development in embolization technology, expanding the o...
Source: Mass Device - June 26, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: 510(k) Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Regulatory/Compliance Vascular Shape Memory Therapeutics Source Type: news

Short Takes
The Society for the Study of Evolution, American Society of Naturalists, and the Society of Systematic Biologists have sent a statement to the Environmental Protection Agency expressing "significant concerns regarding the proposed EPA rule" on the use of scientific data in decision-making. The three organizations, who collectively represent more than 4,600 scientists, warned that the proposed limitations and restrictions on the kind of data that can be used to guide decision-making would "bias the data used by EPA...". President Trump has nominated Mary Neumayr to lead the White House Council on Enviro...
Source: Public Policy Reports - June 25, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Glaukos wins FDA PMA for iStent inject glaucoma device
Glaukos (NYSE:GKOS) said today it won FDA premarket approval for its iStent inject trabecular micro-bypass system. With the clearance, the iStent inject is now indicated for use in the reduction of intraocular pressure in adults with mild to moderate primary open-angle glaucoma who are undergoing concomitant cataract surgery. San Clemente, Calif.-based Glaukos said the iStent inject is designed to treat mild-to-moderate open-angle glaucoma in patients undergoing cataract surgery. It uses a pair of heparin-coated titanium stents in a pre-loaded auto-injection system that allows them to be injected into multiple trabecu...
Source: Mass Device - June 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Optical/Ophthalmic Pre-Market Approval (PMA) Regulatory/Compliance Glaukos Source Type: news

Teenagers and the agony of body image
A study from the University of Minnesota School of Public Health found that almost all of their survey participants had at some time been concerned with their eating habits or their body (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Young adults that go gluten-free are more likely to purge and smoke
A new study from the University of Minnesota say that young adults ho regularly eat gluten-free foods are more likely to purge, smoke and have bad body images, hurting their overall health. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fairview, University of Minnesota sign letter of intent for revamped pact
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have approved a non-binding letter of intent that would govern their long-time — and historically rocky — relationship for years to come, the organizations said Monday. The deal calls for Fairview to make an annual contribution of $35 million to the University of Minnesota medical school. That amount would increase to $50 million annually by 2021. In addition, Minneapolis -based Fairview would make payments based on figures that vary from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 18, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Fairview, University of Minnesota sign letter of intent for revamped pact
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have approved a non-binding letter of intent that would govern their long-time — and historically rocky — relationship for years to come, the organizations said Monday. The deal calls for Fairview to make an annual contribution of $35 million to the University of Minnesota medical school. That amount would increase to $50 million annually by 2021. In addition, Minneapolis -based Fairview would make payments based on figures that vary from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 18, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

'Helicopter' parenting could give children social and emotional problems
Researchers at the University of Minnesota studied more than 400 children for eight years and found those with more demanding parents were more likely to have emotional problems. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota regents to consider Fairview pact Monday
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have only two weeks left to address a key agreement governing their relationship. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

University of Minnesota regents to consider Fairview pact Monday
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have only two weeks left to address a key agreement governing their relationship. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Medtech companies need to expand their philosophy: Here ’s why
[Image from unsplash.com]Medtech companies should expand their notion of who their customers are and dig deeper to discern what those customers want, according to health provider- and insurer-connected experts at the recent DeviceTalks Minnesota in St. Paul. Artificial intelligence and the proliferation of healthcare data have made it possible for medtech to consider not just individual patients as their ultimate customers, but entire populations, the DeviceTalks panelists said. The industry would also do well to seek collaborations with not only the established experts in particular areas of medicine, but younger, hungrie...
Source: Mass Device - June 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development Blue Health Intelligence Mayo Clinic University of Minnesota University of St. Thomas Source Type: news

Teen pregnancy and birth rates at an all time low in Minn., UMN Medical School report shows
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline for 15-19-year-olds in Minnesota, with rates decreasing the most among youth from communities of color. The 2018 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD - PRC) attributes the decline to a combination of delayed sexual activity and an increase in use of highly effective contraceptive methods among teens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A deeper understanding of AFib could lower risk
(University of Minnesota Medical School) More than 2.5 million Americans are living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). AFib is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could Mesothelioma Chemotherapy Ever Be Obsolete?
Oncologist Dr. Arek Dudek at Regions Hospital Cancer Care Center in St. Paul, Minnesota, believes his clinical trial involving a novel immunotherapy combination could change the way doctors treat pleural mesothelioma. Dudek is opening the only Phase II trial evaluating the combination of nivalumab (Opdivo) and ramucirumab (Cyramza) for previously treated mesothelioma patients. “This strategy – if successful, like we think it will be – could make treatment with chemotherapy obsolete,” Dudek told Asbestos.com. “People can be really excited about this one.” He based his optimism on the pote...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 1, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

Research brief: New approach boosts effort to scale up biodiversity monitoring
(University of Minnesota) The value of ecological biodiversity for maintaining ecosystem stability and function is well established, but a recent study points to a novel way to fine-tune our ability to measure it at larger scales. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMN Now Accepting Applications for Data Management Training Session
  Data Management for Librarians CE Course Monday, August 6, 2018 Health science librarians from states represented by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) are invited to participate in a data management for health sciences librarians CE course, hosted by the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries in Minneapolis, MN. The overall objective of this session is to introduce librarians to research data management and allow them to develop practical strategies for incorporating data into their existing roles. Course Components This 4-hour workshop will introduce participants to key elements of research data managemen...
Source: The Cornflower - May 30, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Data Science Funding Source Type: news

Answering a medical mystery: Why are vaccines less effective in the developing world?
(University of Minnesota Medical School) It's a question that has challenged scientists and physicians for years: why do vaccines work better in some parts of the world than in others? A new study, led in part by University of Minnesota Medical School researcher Tim Schacker, M.D., contributes to knowledge about why vaccines given in the developing world often are less effective than in the developed world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Conversation with Carrie Henning Smith
Discussion includes an overview of the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center and its work, including research into barriers faced by rural residents in accessing nursing home care and related population health concerns, among other things. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - May 22, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to the Ni Mi Way
The GMR office is thrilled to announce the funding of the Ni Mi Way project at the University of Minnesota Medical School-Duluth via our Health Information Outreach award. Project: Description:  Ni Mi Way means “I am well” in the Ojibwe language.  It serves as both an inspiration and potential outcome of the project proposed by the partnership of UMMS-Duluth’s Anna Wirta-Kosobuski and Bois Forte Band of Chippewa.  The projects strives to empower Bois Forte band members to become well-informed health consumers in control of their own well being, and who in turn, will work to build a com...
Source: The Cornflower - May 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: Funding News from the Region Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to Ixodes Outreach Project
  We at the GMR office are pleased to announce that the University of Minnesota-Duluth has been granted a Health Information Outreach award to support their research into Lyme disease. Project Description – The Ixodes Outreach Project is a concerted effort to tackle the emerging epidemic of Lyme disease in the upper Midwest.  Dr. Ben Clarke and his team at the University of Minnesota-Duluth will be promoting awareness of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases through educational outreach activities, a citizen-science program, and an undergraduate research experience.   The primary component of this re...
Source: The Cornflower - May 18, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: Funding News from the Region Source Type: news

MN childcare programs focused on nutrition and physical activities, study finds
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Existing state and local programs focused on good nutrition and physical activities for children have led to measurable improvement in practices by the state's child care programs between 2010 and 2016, says a new University of Minnesota Medical School study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International Charr Symposium lures scientists to Lake Superior
(University of Minnesota) Lake Superior and its cold-water fishes will be prominent in the first-ever Charr Symposium held in the United States. Charr are a cold-water group of fishes that includes lake trout, brook trout, bull trout, dolly varden and arctic charr and are the northernmost freshwater fishes on Earth. The symposium will be June 18-21, 2018, in Duluth, Minnesota, on the shore of Lake Superior. Registration is required and the deadline is May 31. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news