Fairview, University of Minnesota sign letter of intent for revamped pact
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have approved a non-binding letter of intent that would govern their long-time — and historically rocky — relationship for years to come, the organizations said Monday. The deal calls for Fairview to make an annual contribution of $35 million to the University of Minnesota medical school. That amount would increase to $50 million annually by 2021. In addition, Minneapolis -based Fairview would make payments based on figures that vary from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - June 18, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Fairview, University of Minnesota sign letter of intent for revamped pact
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have approved a non-binding letter of intent that would govern their long-time — and historically rocky — relationship for years to come, the organizations said Monday. The deal calls for Fairview to make an annual contribution of $35 million to the University of Minnesota medical school. That amount would increase to $50 million annually by 2021. In addition, Minneapolis -based Fairview would make payments based on figures that vary from… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 18, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

'Helicopter' parenting could give children social and emotional problems
Researchers at the University of Minnesota studied more than 400 children for eight years and found those with more demanding parents were more likely to have emotional problems. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota regents to consider Fairview pact Monday
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have only two weeks left to address a key agreement governing their relationship. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

University of Minnesota regents to consider Fairview pact Monday
Fairview Health Services and the University of Minnesota have only two weeks left to address a key agreement governing their relationship. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 15, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Medtech companies need to expand their philosophy: Here ’s why
[Image from unsplash.com]Medtech companies should expand their notion of who their customers are and dig deeper to discern what those customers want, according to health provider- and insurer-connected experts at the recent DeviceTalks Minnesota in St. Paul. Artificial intelligence and the proliferation of healthcare data have made it possible for medtech to consider not just individual patients as their ultimate customers, but entire populations, the DeviceTalks panelists said. The industry would also do well to seek collaborations with not only the established experts in particular areas of medicine, but younger, hungrie...
Source: Mass Device - June 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Nancy Crotti Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development Blue Health Intelligence Mayo Clinic University of Minnesota University of St. Thomas Source Type: news

Teen pregnancy and birth rates at an all time low in Minn., UMN Medical School report shows
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline for 15-19-year-olds in Minnesota, with rates decreasing the most among youth from communities of color. The 2018 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD - PRC) attributes the decline to a combination of delayed sexual activity and an increase in use of highly effective contraceptive methods among teens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A deeper understanding of AFib could lower risk
(University of Minnesota Medical School) More than 2.5 million Americans are living with Atrial Fibrillation (AFib). AFib is an irregular heartbeat that can lead to blood clots, stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could Mesothelioma Chemotherapy Ever Be Obsolete?
Oncologist Dr. Arek Dudek at Regions Hospital Cancer Care Center in St. Paul, Minnesota, believes his clinical trial involving a novel immunotherapy combination could change the way doctors treat pleural mesothelioma. Dudek is opening the only Phase II trial evaluating the combination of nivalumab (Opdivo) and ramucirumab (Cyramza) for previously treated mesothelioma patients. “This strategy – if successful, like we think it will be – could make treatment with chemotherapy obsolete,” Dudek told Asbestos.com. “People can be really excited about this one.” He based his optimism on the pote...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - June 1, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Walter Pacheco Source Type: news

Research brief: New approach boosts effort to scale up biodiversity monitoring
(University of Minnesota) The value of ecological biodiversity for maintaining ecosystem stability and function is well established, but a recent study points to a novel way to fine-tune our ability to measure it at larger scales. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 1, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMN Now Accepting Applications for Data Management Training Session
  Data Management for Librarians CE Course Monday, August 6, 2018 Health science librarians from states represented by the Greater Midwest Region (GMR) are invited to participate in a data management for health sciences librarians CE course, hosted by the University of Minnesota Health Sciences Libraries in Minneapolis, MN. The overall objective of this session is to introduce librarians to research data management and allow them to develop practical strategies for incorporating data into their existing roles. Course Components This 4-hour workshop will introduce participants to key elements of research data managemen...
Source: The Cornflower - May 30, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Data Science Funding Source Type: news

Answering a medical mystery: Why are vaccines less effective in the developing world?
(University of Minnesota Medical School) It's a question that has challenged scientists and physicians for years: why do vaccines work better in some parts of the world than in others? A new study, led in part by University of Minnesota Medical School researcher Tim Schacker, M.D., contributes to knowledge about why vaccines given in the developing world often are less effective than in the developed world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 25, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A Conversation with Carrie Henning Smith
Discussion includes an overview of the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center and its work, including research into barriers faced by rural residents in accessing nursing home care and related population health concerns, among other things. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - May 22, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to the Ni Mi Way
The GMR office is thrilled to announce the funding of the Ni Mi Way project at the University of Minnesota Medical School-Duluth via our Health Information Outreach award. Project: Description:  Ni Mi Way means “I am well” in the Ojibwe language.  It serves as both an inspiration and potential outcome of the project proposed by the partnership of UMMS-Duluth’s Anna Wirta-Kosobuski and Bois Forte Band of Chippewa.  The projects strives to empower Bois Forte band members to become well-informed health consumers in control of their own well being, and who in turn, will work to build a com...
Source: The Cornflower - May 21, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: Funding News from the Region Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to Ixodes Outreach Project
  We at the GMR office are pleased to announce that the University of Minnesota-Duluth has been granted a Health Information Outreach award to support their research into Lyme disease. Project Description – The Ixodes Outreach Project is a concerted effort to tackle the emerging epidemic of Lyme disease in the upper Midwest.  Dr. Ben Clarke and his team at the University of Minnesota-Duluth will be promoting awareness of Lyme and other tick-borne diseases through educational outreach activities, a citizen-science program, and an undergraduate research experience.   The primary component of this re...
Source: The Cornflower - May 18, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Sam Watson Tags: Funding News from the Region Source Type: news

MN childcare programs focused on nutrition and physical activities, study finds
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Existing state and local programs focused on good nutrition and physical activities for children have led to measurable improvement in practices by the state's child care programs between 2010 and 2016, says a new University of Minnesota Medical School study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

International Charr Symposium lures scientists to Lake Superior
(University of Minnesota) Lake Superior and its cold-water fishes will be prominent in the first-ever Charr Symposium held in the United States. Charr are a cold-water group of fishes that includes lake trout, brook trout, bull trout, dolly varden and arctic charr and are the northernmost freshwater fishes on Earth. The symposium will be June 18-21, 2018, in Duluth, Minnesota, on the shore of Lake Superior. Registration is required and the deadline is May 31. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fairview to make $112M investment in University of Minnesota Medical Center campus
The Minneapolis-based health system begin expansion of the ER and operating rooms at its east bank hospital in the coming weeks. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - May 10, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Fairview to make $112M investment in University of Minnesota Medical Center campus
The Minneapolis-based health system begin expansion of the ER and operating rooms at its east bank hospital in the coming weeks. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 10, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Speakers you need to see at DeviceTalks Minnesota
A Google executive whose own heart problems spurred her to seek medtech innovation, a leader at Abbott who wants to drive healthcare value, the head of an upstart company seeking to transform diabetes care — those are but some of the speakers you will encounter at DeviceTalks Minnesota this June. Read on to find out more about some of the top speakers we’ve lined up for the show. And register soon to attend. Next>> Attend DeviceTalks Minnesota, June 4–5 in St. Paul>> The post Speakers you need to see at DeviceTalks Minnesota appeared first on MassDevice. (Source: Mass Device)
Source: Mass Device - May 8, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News DeviceTalks Q&A mHealth (Mobile Health) Abbott Bigfoot Biomedical Boston Scientific devicetalksminnesota evergreenmedicaltechnologies google Mayo Clinic mcalpineresearchgroup University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Can chimpanzee vocalizations reveal the origins of human language?
(Acoustical Society of America) Fossil primates provide important clues about human evolution, but the sounds they made and the soft tissue involved in making those sounds weren't preserved. So chimpanzees can provide important points of comparison for inferring the sorts of sounds our early ancestors may have made. During the 175th ASA Meeting, Michael Wilson, an associate professor at the University of Minnesota, will present his group's work searching for similarities between the vocal communications of chimpanzees and humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

7 ways you can doom your medical device startup
[Image from Unsplash]Randy Nelson has worked with medical device startups for more than a dozen years through his Evergreen Medical Technologies (St. Paul, Minn.), as well as the University of Minnesota’s Carlson School of Management. A product development veteran of St. Jude Medical and Boston Scientific, Nelson has pretty much seen it all when it comes to the ways a medical device startup can doom itself to failure. Here are his top seven. Next>> (And find out more from Nelson at DeviceTalks Minnesota, June 4–5 in St. Paul.) The post 7 ways you can doom your medical device startup appeared first on Mass...
Source: Mass Device - May 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development evergreenmedicaltechnologies startups Source Type: news

Research brief: Freshwater ecosystems filter pollutants before they reach oceans
(University of Minnesota) By adding excess nutrients to crops, some are very likely to end up in rivers, lakes and streams. But not all of the carbon, nitrogen and phosphorus that enter waterways end up downstream. Freshwater ecosystems filter some of the excess pollutants out of the water before it reaches the ocean, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Funding Awarded to UMN for Research Data Management Education
The GMR is excited to announce that the Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Minnesota have been awarded a Research Data Management (RDM) Award to support research data management services! The project will expand RDM education not only within their institution but across the GMR as well! Project Description This project has two goals: Enable health science librarians at institutions throughout the GMR to build research data management knowledge and skills and develop actionable next steps to provide data services at their libraries Enable health science faculty and graduate/professional students at the Universi...
Source: The Cornflower - April 26, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Derek Johnson Tags: Data Science Funding News from the Region Data Management Source Type: news

How 3D printed cells on the skin could enable wound healing
Researchers at the University of Minnesota are 3D printing electronics and cells directly on the skin that could create new methods for wound healing and enable biological agent detection. The Minnesota researchers used a customized, low-cost 3D printer to print electronics on a human hand. They’ve also successfully printed biological cells on a sin wound of a mouse. The researchers suggest that the new technique could create new medical treatments for wound healing and graft treatments. “We are excited about the potential of this new 3D-printing technology using a portable, lightweight printer costing les...
Source: Mass Device - April 25, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Research & Development Wound Care 3D printing MedTech University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Researchers 3-D print electronics and cells directly on skin
(University of Minnesota) In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota used a customized, low-cost 3-D printer to print electronics on a real hand for the first time. The technology could be used by soldiers on the battlefield to print temporary sensors on their bodies to detect chemical or biological agents or solar cells to charge essential electronics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Boston Sci Sees Strong Data From Parkinson & #039;s Treatment Study
This study meets a new level of rigor in evaluating the effectiveness of a DBS system," Jerrold Vitek, MD, Phd, McKnight professor and chair, Department of Neurology, University of Minnesota Medical School and coordinating principal investigator for the INTREPID study, said in a release. "The double-blind design gives us confidence that the improvements in patients on time with good symptom control, as evaluated by the diary data, are an objective measure of the outcomes and suggests patients will benefit from the Vercise System." Boston Scientific received FDA approval for Vercise late last year. The device...
Source: MDDI - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Omar Ford Tags: Implants Source Type: news

Boston Scientific touts 1-year data on Vercise DBS in Parkinson ’ s
This study meets a new level of rigor in evaluating the effectiveness of a DBS system,” coordinating principal investigator Dr. Jerrold Vitek, of the University of Minnesota Medical School, said in prepared remarks. “The double-blind design gives us confidence that the improvements in patients on time with good symptom control, as evaluated by the diary data, are an objective measure of the outcomes and suggests patients will benefit from the Vercise System.” Vercise won CE Mark approval in the European Union to treat essential tremor in 2014. FDA approval to treat Parkinson’s followed las...
Source: Mass Device - April 24, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Clinical Trials Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation Boston Scientific Parkinson's disease Source Type: news

How Minnesota got a Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium
FDA funds a handful of pediatric device innovation groups around the United States. But Dr. Gwenyth Fischer, director of The Pediatric Device Innovation Consortium at the University of Minnesota, thinks there’s something that sets the seven-year-old group apart. The Minnesota group, Fischer said, is focused not only on funding but on getting doctors and other academics with innovative ideas linked with the host of product development, regulatory, reimbursement and other experts around Minneapolis-St. Paul who can help get the concepts commercialized — versus the inventors “spinning their wheels.&rdqu...
Source: Mass Device - April 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Pediatrics Research & Development devicetalksminnesota pediatricdeviceinnovationconsortium University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Grassland plants react unexpectedly to high levels of carbon dioxide
(University of Minnesota) Plants are responding in unexpected ways to increased carbon dioxide in the air, according to a 20-year study conducted by researchers at the University of Minnesota. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 20, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Media Advisory: Physician/researcher to give April 23 lecture on reexamining how chronic pain is managed in primary care
What: Erin E. Krebs, M.D., M.P.H., an internist and health services researcher at the Minneapolis Veterans Affairs (VA) Center for Chronic Disease Outcomes Research, and an associate professor of medicine at the University of Minnesota, will present “Reframing the Primary Care Management of Chronic Pain.” (Source: NCCAM Featured Content)
Source: NCCAM Featured Content - April 17, 2018 Category: Complementary Medicine Authors: NCCIH Source Type: news

So you want to be an outreach librarian? Spotlight on Katherine Chew
Who knew there was such a thing as “outreach on a stick”? If you’re in Minnesota, like this month’s GMR Partner Outreach Librarian, Katherine Chew, you might know. From ice cream, taffy apples, and every deep fried food you can think of (olives!), the Minnesota State Fair takes the on-a-stick notion to new heights.   Name: Katherine Chew Title: Research/Outreach Services, University of Minnesota Bio-Medical Library, Minneapolis, MN How long have you been in the role of an outreach librarian? Officially November of 2014, practically (i.e. first outreach activity/event) April 2015. How did you g...
Source: The Cornflower - April 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Jacqueline Leskovec Tags: Blog Outreach Partner Outreach Libraries Source Type: news

FDA ’s Role in the New Era of Medtech Collaboration
As we've recently noted, the shift toward a value-based care system has inspired a new era of collaboration in the medical device industry, including the emergence of risk-sharing contracts. While these agreements primarily involve manufacturers, providers, and payers, is it too much of a stretch to think FDA might, at some point, play a role in that trend? The question seemed to catch Paul Howard a bit off guard Tuesday at the University of Minnesota's Design of Medical Devices Conference. Howard, senior advisor to FDA Commissioner Scott Gottlieb, delivered the luncheon keynote at the conference o...
Source: MDDI - April 12, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Research brief: Vaccines to treat opioid abuse and prevent fatal overdoses
(University of Minnesota) A team of scientists from the University of Minnesota Medical School and Minneapolis Medical Research Foundation at Hennepin Healthcare is developing vaccines against heroin and prescription opioids, such as oxycodone and fentanyl. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota receives $42.6 million to expand its impact on scientific health research
(University of Minnesota) The University of Minnesota's Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI) received more than $42 million in renewed National Institutes of Health (NIH) funding through the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences' Clinical and Translational Science Award (CTSA) program. The five-year CTSA award is one of the University's largest federal research grants and enables clinical and translational researchers across the UMN System and state to accelerate their discoveries to help Minnesotans live healthier, longer lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

This patented 3D printing method could boost medical device innovation
Mechanical engineering professor Michael McAlpine shows off an LED that was 3D printed in curved glass. [Photo by Frank Wojciechowski/Princeton University]Michael McAlpine, a 3D printing pioneer at the University of Minnesota, suspects that a method he helped invent to print semiconductors could help boost innovation in the medical device field and elsewhere. The U.S. Patent Office in February issued a patent for “3D printed active electronic materials and devices.” The patent covers work that McAlpine, a University of Minnesota mechanical engineering professor, and Yong Lin Kong, a University of Utah...
Source: Mass Device - April 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Research & Development 3D printing mcalpineresearchgroup princetonuniversity University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Scientists Just Observed the Most Distant Star Ever Seen
The powerful Hubble Space Telescope recently helped scientists make a stunning observation: the most distant star ever seen, 9 billion light years away. Astronomers affiliated with the University of California, Berkeley were able to observe the star, dubbed Icarus, thanks to a rare cosmic phenomenon called gravitational lensing, which bends light from distant galaxies to allow researchers to make out individual stars that are typically too far away to see. “You can see individual galaxies out there, but this star is at least 100 times farther away than the next individual star we can study, except for supernova expl...
Source: TIME: Science - April 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Aric Jenkins Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

UPDATE: Boston Scientific touts win in UK-based patent spat with Edwards Lifesciences
Updated to include commentary from Edwards Lifesciences Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) said today it won a victory in a U.K.-based patent spat with Edwards Lifesciences (NYSE:EW), though Edwards argued that the win was a mixed-bag. Marlborough, Mass.-based Boston Scientific said that the U.K. Court of Appeals dismissed an appeal from Edwards and upheld an earlier decision that its Sapien 3 infringes on a Boston Scientific patent. In the decision, the appeals court found that all claims on a single Boston Scientific patent were valid, the company said. Boston Scientific added that it plans to appeal a U.S. Patent Of...
Source: Mass Device - March 28, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Cardiovascular Legal News Patent Infringement Boston Scientific Edwards Lifesciences Source Type: news

Online Training Global Health: Module 5 - Bacterial, Mycobacterial and Fungal Infections
Friday, December 1, 2017 (All day)  to Saturday, June 30, 2018 (All day)This " Bacterial, Mycobacterial and Fungal Infections "  module is part of the University of Minnesota Department of Medicine Online Global Health Course.Courses& Workshops (Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates)
Source: The Aspergillus Website - updates - March 28, 2018 Category: Respiratory Medicine Authors: GAtherton Source Type: news

Boston Scientific, Mayo Clinic back new Minneapolis medtech incubator
Boston Scientific (NYSE:BSX) is joining the Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota in backing startup accelerator Gener8tor as it launches a medtech focused incubator in Minneapolis, according to a new report from the Minneapolis Star Tribune. The newly launched accelerator will operate under a seven-week program that will support six new startups with a focus on medical technology, requiring no fees or equity and offered three times a year, according to the report. Initial entrants into the incubator include wearable-focused medical tape maker ExpressionMed, cardiac rhythm and neuromod dev Kobara Medical, interv...
Source: Mass Device - March 27, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Boston Scientific Mayo Clinic Source Type: news

UMN Medical School study uncovers new findings on antimicrobial drug synergy
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New data from a study led by researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School could change how future antimicrobial drug combinations are discovered and developed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research Brief: Older adults often prescribed meds linked to higher side effect risks
(University of Minnesota) Drugs with high-risk anticholinergic properties can lead to risks of developing serious adverse events, such as cognitive impairment, falls, dementia, and even mortality in older adults. Yet, relatively little is known about prescribing trends of high-risk anticholinergic medications in the United States of America.Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy conducted a repeated cross-sectional analysis of the 2006-2015 National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey to understand more. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New research shows fertilization drives global lake emissions of greenhouse gases
(University of Minnesota) A paper published this week in the journal Limnology and Oceanography Letters is the first to show that lake size and nutrients drive how much greenhouse gases are emitted globally from lakes into the atmosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A baby is born with opioid withdrawal every 15 minutes in US
As the opioid crisis rages on across the US, the number of babies born with opioid withdrawal has risen by five-fold, driving up Medicaid costs by billions of dollars, a University of Minnesota study shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A baby is born with opioid withdrawal every 15 minutes, costing US $2.5 billion
As the opioid crisis rages on across the US, the number of babies born with opioid withdrawal has risen by five-fold, driving up Medicaid costs by billions of dollars, a University of Minnesota study shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Weight loss surgery cuts obese teens' heart disease risks in HALF
Before surgery, obese teenagers were at an eight percent risk of heart disease, but operations like gastric bypass can reduce that risk to just four percent, a University of Minnesota study shows. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news