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25% of high-grade glioma patients alive 3 years post trial
Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma were treated by the University of Minnesota Medical School. Median survival was 14.4 months, compared with the typical 8 months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could a blood test in middle age predict dementia risk?
Conclusion Inflammation in the body is a response to injury or disease. But if the body is constantly in an inflammatory state, it can harm blood vessels and lead to heart disease. This study suggests high levels of inflammation over the long term might also damage the brain. That's not surprising – what's good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and we already know exercising, avoiding high blood pressure and eating healthily may help protect the brain. Studies like this will help researchers work out more precisely what's happening in the brain when people experience memory loss or dementia. But this study...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Feel fuller longer with fungi for breakfast; researchers say mushrooms will help you lose weight and fight dementia
(Natural News) Fungi for breakfast? A new study suggests that eating mushrooms for breakfast keeps you from getting hungry, thus helping you lose weight, as reported by The Daily Mail. Researchers from the University of Minnesota matched common mushrooms and meat according to their levels of protein, which is the most satiating macronutrient, and calories.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trials
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The vessel, that could be used as an "off the shelf" graft for kidney dialysis patients, performed well in a recent study with nonhuman primates. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

25% of high-grade glioma patients live 3 years after trail
Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma were treated by the University of Minnesota Medical School. Median survival was 14.4 months, compared with the typical 8 months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A high-fat diet encourages the growth of fungi in the gut, which makes for an unhealthy microbiota and contributes to obesity, study finds
(Natural News) A study finds that eating a diet high in fat not only gives you extra calories, but also changes the growth of fungi in the gut, which makes for an unhealthy microbiota and contributes to weight gain or obesity, as reported by the Science Daily. Researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trials
(University of Minnesota) Researchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The vessel, that could be used as an " off the shelf " graft for kidney dialysis patients, performed well in a recent study with nonhuman primates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NNLM Professional Development Awardee, Noreen Mulcahy attends Pure Information, the 2017 Midwest Chapter/MLA Conference
Noreen Mulcahy The NNLM Professional Development Award made it possible for me to attend Pure Information, the 2017 Midwest Chapter/MLA Conference in Ypsilanti, MI.  The event was held from Saturday, October 14-Monday, October 16 at the Marriott at Eagle Crest. As part of the award, I had the opportunity to take the class Data Management for Librarians, presented by Caitlin Bakker, Research Services Liaison, University of Minnesota Twin Cities.  She discussed how librarians can incorporate research data services to clients.  Some hands-on exercises gave participants the opportunity to develop data management...
Source: The Cornflower - October 30, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Data Science Funding Success Stories Source Type: news

Cancer trial led by University of Minnesota Medical School's Dr. Clark Chen shows promise
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New data from a Phase I clinical trial led by Clark Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Lyle French Chair in Neurosurgery and Head of the University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Neurosurgery shows more than a quarter of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma, a form of brain cancer, were alive more than three years after treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Eating mushrooms at breakfast may help you feel fuller
Conclusions Though of interest, this study doesn't provide strong evidence that you should eat mushrooms if you want to lose weight. The study has a number of limitations: It's a short-term study that didn't look at effects on weight. It showed that people reported feeling fuller after eating mushrooms, but there were few signs this actually led to them eating less. As the researchers openly acknowledge, there could be other explanations for the findings. To match the protein content in mince required a much larger volume of mushrooms, and therefore a larger sandwich that would have taken more time and effort to chew. ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Mushrooms stave off hunger pangs and help people feel full
University of Minnesota researchers claim that mushrooms for breakfast, perhaps on toast or in an omelette, stave off hunger pangs and leads to a greater feeling of fullness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMN Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) receives NIH R01 grant
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Aging to understand Alzheimer's disease in the context of the aging brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN receives grant from Helmsley Charitable Trust to test 'super ambulances'
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota has received a grant of $892,462 from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust's Rural Healthcare Program to explore the feasibility of equipping ambulances that function as mobile emergency departments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Connected Devices Seek to Tackle Drug Noncompliance
Noncompliance with drug regimens continues to be a significant healthcare concern. “Today, 60% of patients fail to comply with their medication regimen,” Sai Shankar, director business development - connected devices for Aptar Pharma, tells MD+DI.   Aptar Pharma believes that turning metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) and dry-powder inhalers (DPIs) into connected devices could have an impact. “This can improve patient engagement and significantly increase dose adherence and improve patient health outcomes, as patients manage their treatments more effectively,” says Shankar. “Connected ...
Source: MDDI - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

How Power Outages Can Affect Mental Health
It’s been two weeks since Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, plunging it into darkness. Today, around 95% of Puerto Rico’s electric grid remains down, and that outage could last for months. Being without power comes with obvious physical health risks, especially for hospitals and nursing homes, which rely on power for dialysis and oxygen machines, refrigerated insulin medication and more. Being in the dark impairs safety and security, too. But blackouts also take a lasting toll on people’s mental health, experts say. This often-ignored issue is slowly gaining more recognition in disaster response...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin and Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized blackout healthytime hurricane Hurricane Maria mental health power outage PTSD public health Puerto Rico Source Type: news

Novel platform for investigating quiescence in dormancy-capable cancer cells
(World Scientific) A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities has reported a novel encapsulation approach to identify dormant cancer cells and maintain them in a quiescent state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

UMN Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research receives NIH U01 grant
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's BRAIN Initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

16 Ways to Get People to Like You Immediately, According to Psychology
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shana Lebowitz / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

Have You Considered the Potential of Deep Design?
How much time do medical product designers spend on understanding clinical processes? Perhaps not enough. Product designers “often don’t see their devices as part of a system,” says Kathleen Harder, PhD, director of the Center for Design in Health at the University of Minnesota. But there can be adverse ripple effects with devices, she warns. Harder also serves as director of graduate studies in the Human Factors Program at University of Minnesota. For more than 15 years, she has worked with clinicians to test ideas that guide users toward desired behaviors in healthcare delivery. With a background as an ...
Source: MDDI - September 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

UMN researchers find recipe for forest restoration
(University of Minnesota) A new study led by graduate student Leland Werden and associate professor Jennifer Powers of the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences has uncovered some valuable information on ways to maximize the success of replanting efforts, bringing new hope for restoring these threatened ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers replicate FSH muscular dystrophy in mice
(University of Minnesota) A new study published in the journal Nature Communications describes a breakthrough in research related to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The debilitating genetic disease -- which has no approved treatment -- affects an estimated 38,000 Americans and causes muscle degeneration. Scientists inserted into mice a gene called DUX4, which is believed to cause FSHD in humans. When they activated the gene in mice skeletal muscle cells, the animals developed a muscular dystrophy with key features of FSHD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most American women unaware of overdiagnosis of breast cancer
New research by the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, shows most women are not aware of the potential of overdiagnosis and overtreatment for breast cancer. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Sleepy teenage brains need school to start later
Kyla Wahlstrom, a CDC-funded senior research fellow in policy at the University of Minnesota, explains why high schoolers should get a lie-in - according to science. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Univ. of Minnesota publishes "nonbinary gender pronouns" writing guide to butcher the English language on behalf of crybullies and snowflakes
(Natural News) If it’s ever seemed to you as though liberals speak in their own nonsensical language, fasten your seatbelt, because we’re about to confirm it once and for all. In the spirit of tolerance and political correctness, the University of Minnesota (UMN) has offered students a resource guide so that they can learn how... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Outreach On A Stick
The Minnesota State Fair, often referred to as the “Great Minnesota Get-Together,” is one of the most popular late summer destinations in the region. The fair attracts nearly 2 million guests annually over the twelve days leading up to and through Labor Day.   One fun aspect about the fair is how many foods can be devised to be eaten “on a stick” (mac ‘n cheese or spaghetti & meatballs on a stick anyone?).   The Health Sciences Libraries at the University of Minnesota has had a presence at the Minnesota State Fair in one form or another since the mid-2000.  &n...
Source: The Cornflower - September 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Blog Outreach Source Type: news

U of M Medical School's Duluth campus gets $10 million gift
The University of Minnesota Medical School's Duluth campus has received a $10 million gift to create a Native American Center of Excellence. The Duluth News Tribune reports that the gift is the largest in the history of the University of Minnesota Medical School's Duluth campus. It came from an anonymous donor and will be paid over five years. The center will expand the school's emphasis on training Native American medical students. The News Tribune's report said that Native Americans comprise… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 7, 2017 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Dan DeBaun Source Type: news

U study provides new insight toward reducing racial bias in courtroom
(University of Minnesota) The study, titled 'Minority Mens Rea' and published in the Hastings Law Journal, offers positive news for a criminal justice system that has become keenly aware of the need for improved responses to race biases. Ultimately, Shen hopes further research will help the legal system better understand how implicit racial biases lead, or don't lead, to unjust outcomes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 30, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M startup nabs funding to help researchers mine the microbiome
A University of Minnesota spinoff that analyzes tiny organisms is getting bigger after closing on a round of seed funding. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 25, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Nigeria: Gates Foundation, U.S. Varsity Praise Nigeria for Accurate Immunisation Data Reporting
[Guardian] The Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation (BMGF), the University of Minnesota and the United States Centre for Infectious Disease Research and Policy have commended Nigeria for transparency in the latest world annual report of data on routine immunisation and polio eradication. (Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine)
Source: AllAfrica News: Health and Medicine - July 31, 2017 Category: African Health Source Type: news

Older Adults Going Back to School for Second Career - AARP
2 days ago ... Are you ready for your second act? The University of Minnesota is launching a new program aimed at older adults nearing or in retirement who  ... (Source: AARP.org News)
Source: AARP.org News - July 28, 2017 Category: American Health Source Type: news

BTI receives DARPA 'Insect Allies' Award
(Boyce Thompson Institute) Researchers at the Boyce Thompson Institute (BTI), the University of Minnesota, the University of California, Davis, and Iowa State University have received a four-year $10.3 million award to engineer insect-vectored viruses to express genes in maize that can help in combatting disease, drought, and other yield-reducing stresses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 27, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Virtual reality helps doctors separate conjoined twins
Physicians at the University of Minnesota Masonic Children's Hospital in Minneapolis...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Virtual, augmented reality may remake medical imaging Virtual reality takes prenatal imaging to new heights 'Virtual heart' can guide who should get ICD implants Case report: Conjoined twins -- thoraco-omphalopagus (type A) CT, 3D printing help team separate conjoined girls (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - July 26, 2017 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

2017 Hooley Awards Winners Announced at ImageTrend Connect
LAKEVILLE, MINN. - ImageTrend, Inc. announced the winners of the 2017 Hooley™ Awards. Nominees were narrowed down to a field of nine finalists – three in each of three categories – from which the winners were selected by a panel of third-party judges. Judges cast votes via secret ballot for each category. ImageTrend extends congratulations to the nominees, finalists and winners of the Third Annual Hooley Awards. The Fourth Annual Hooley Awards will be presented during ImageTrend Connect in 2018. For more details, visit www.ImageTrend.com/Connect. Innovation Award To recognize those who are serving in a ne...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - July 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

2017 Hooley Awards Winners Announced at ImageTrend Connect
LAKEVILLE, MINN. - ImageTrend, Inc. announced the winners of the 2017 Hooley™ Awards. Nominees were narrowed down to a field of nine finalists – three in each of three categories – from which the winners were selected by a panel of third-party judges. Judges cast votes via secret ballot for each category. ImageTrend extends congratulations to the nominees, finalists and winners of the Third Annual Hooley Awards. The Fourth Annual Hooley Awards will be presented during ImageTrend Connect in 2018. For more details, visit www.ImageTrend.com/Connect. Innovation Award To recognize those who are serving in a ne...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 21, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma Fellow 2019-2020
Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota is seeking a qualified candidate to fill one Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship position for 2019-2020 academic year, beginning on August 1, 2019.   (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - July 15, 2017 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Fellowship News Source Type: news

Third Annual Hooley Awards Finalists Announced
LAKEVILLE, MINN. - ImageTrend, Inc. announced the nine finalists for this year’s Hooley Awards. The winners will be announced at the company’s ImageTrend Connect 2017 conference on July 19, 2017. The Hooley Awards recognize innovators and thought leaders, honoring their involvement, creativity and passion in three categories: Innovation, Service and New Frontier. “Great thinkers lead the way toward improvements in public health and safety, better data and a better tomorrow,” commented Mike McBrady, President and CEO of ImageTrend. “We hope to highlight their achievements and honor the work the...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - July 14, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Third Annual Hooley Awards Finalists Announced
LAKEVILLE, MINN. - ImageTrend, Inc. announced the nine finalists for this year’s Hooley Awards. The winners will be announced at the company’s ImageTrend Connect 2017 conference on July 19, 2017. The Hooley Awards recognize innovators and thought leaders, honoring their involvement, creativity and passion in three categories: Innovation, Service and New Frontier. “Great thinkers lead the way toward improvements in public health and safety, better data and a better tomorrow,” commented Mike McBrady, President and CEO of ImageTrend. “We hope to highlight their achievements and honor the work the...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - July 14, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: ImageTrend Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

U of M health-technology spinoff sold to big pharmacy chain
University of Minnesota spinoff Medication Management Systems Inc. has been sold to a fast-growing company that operates pharmacies inside mental-health centers. The buyer is Tukwila, Wash.-based Genoa, a QoL Healthcare Company. Terms of the deal weren't disclosed. St. Louis Park-based Medication Management Systems was the first startup to spin out of the University of Minnesota's venture center. Launched in 2006, the company makes software for managing a nd monitoring drug regimens with a focus… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 13, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Katharine Grayson Source Type: news

Researchers revolutionize vital conservation tool with use of gold nanotechnology and lasers
(University of Minnesota) In a new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Smithsonian Conservation Biology Institute (SCBI) provide the first-ever reproducible evidence for the successful cryopreservation of zebrafish embryos. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stepping off Campus to Provide Health Information Training for Public Librarians
Katherine Chew, the NNLM/GMR Outreach Librarian for Minnesota from the University of Minnesota spent her May providing two health information workshops for public librarians from the Ramsey County public library system.  Katherine was able to connect with the person responsible for professional development at Ramsey County and given a choice of potential workshops, the Ramsey County librarians chose to participate in workshops geared towards providing health information to foreign born populations and how to connect older adults to quality health information.  The workshops took place at the Roseville Public Libr...
Source: The Cornflower - July 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Outreach Source Type: news

Citizen science brings monarch butterfly parasitoids to light
(Entomological Society of America) Thanks to citizen volunteers, scientists now know more than ever about the flies that attack monarch butterfly caterpillars. Since 1999, volunteers participating in the Monarch Larva Monitoring Project have collected and raised more than 20,000 monarch eggs and caterpillars, and they've recorded incidents of those specimens being parasitized by fly larvae. Findings from this long-running collaboration with researchers at the University of Minnesota are newly published in the Annals of the Entomological Society of America. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 10, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A winning smile avoids showing too many teeth, researchers say
US scientists have investigated the makeup of the perfect smile, saying the findings could be useful for clinicians working to restore facial movementIf you want your smile to appear pleasant, you might want to avoid a dazzling beam, research suggests. A study by scientists in the US has found that wide smiles with a high angle and showing a lot of teeth are not the best at creating a positive impression.“A lot of people don’t understand how important their smiles are and how important this aspect of communication we do with each other every day is,” said Stephen Guy, a co-author of the research from the ...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 28, 2017 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis Tags: Research US news Science Source Type: news

The science behind the perfect smile
Researchers from the University of Minnesota used computer-animated 3D faces to pinpoint the most successful smile. Their findings suggest Julia Roberts has the perfect smile. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 28, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Belief in free will predicts criminal punishment support, disapproval of unethical actions
(University of Minnesota) In countries with transparent governments and low levels of corruption, the belief in free will -- that is, believing that people's outcomes are tied to choices and personal responsibility -- predicts someone's intolerance of unethical behavior along with a greater desire to see criminals harshly punished for their actions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U study finds recognition technology a step closer to use in courtroom
(University of Minnesota) A report by University of Minnesota Law Professor Francis Shen, the study's lead author and director of the Neurolaw Lab, finds that brain-based memory recognition technology may be one step closer to court. The findings suggest American jurors can appropriately integrate the evidence in their evaluations of criminal defendants, which could ultimately lead to an additional expert witness on the stand. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans are taking too many vitamin D supplements
There has been a surge of Americans taking extremely high vitamin D doses, which can lead to kidney stones, cancer and fractures, according to an University of Minnesota in Minneapolis study. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiology research breakthroughs you need to know
[Image courtesy of Harvard]Recent months have seen a host of important cardiology research breakthroughs related to new cardio devices and diagnostics, tissue engineering and the overall understanding of heart disease and its treatment. For example,  a customizable robotic heart sleeve – developed at Harvard University and Boston Children’s Hospital – has demonstrated advantages over other heart assist devices such as VADs when it comes to aiding the beating of a failing heart. Editors Chris Newmarker and Danielle Kirsh from MassDevice’s Medical Design & Outsourcing explain about the roboti...
Source: Mass Device - June 13, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Cardiac Assist Devices Cardiac Implants Cardiovascular Research & Development Boston Children's Hospital cardiology Harvard Medtronic Prevencio Stanford University University of Leicester University of Minnesota universityofalabama Source Type: news

Patient's Education Level May Be Key to Heart Risk
MONDAY, June 12, 2017 -- How far people go in school seems to be linked to their odds for heart disease, new research suggests. A team led by Dr. Yasuhiko Kubota, of the University of Minnesota, tracked data from nearly 14,000 white and black... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 12, 2017 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cope's gray treefrogs meet the cocktail party problem
(University of Minnesota) Our auditory system is able to home in on the message being conveyed by the person you're talking with even in a noisy room full of people. The secret to rising above the noise -- a dilemma known in the world of sound science as 'the cocktail party problem' -- turns out to lie in its ability to discern patterns in the background noise and selectively ignore such patterns, according to a new study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 7, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news