Invasive mussels now control a key nutrient in the American Great Lakes
(University of Minnesota) The spread of quagga mussels across the American Great Lakes has transformed the supply of phosphorus - a key biological nutrient - to the ecosystem, according to research published this week in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Minnesota Partnership awards 5 collaborative research grants for 2021
(University of Minnesota) Mayo and U of M teams will initiate the two-year projects aimed at improving the treatment of diseases that affect Minnesotans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Health Workers Are Going Viral on TikTok for Debunking COVID-19 Myths
At first glance, the December video looks like just the latest rendition of a TikTok trend. On one side of the split screen “duet,” a video game car bounces down a mountain; on the other, the TikTok user “dr.noc” scrambles to talk as much as he can before the car slams into the ground. But while other videos feature stream-of-consciousness chatter, Dr. Noc’s words are precise. Noc, who in real life is Morgan McSweeney, a PhD scientist who researches treatments for diseases like COVID-19, is trying to debunk as many myths about coronavirus vaccines as he can before the final animated explosion....
Source: TIME: Health - January 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Do toddlers learning to spoon-feed seek different information from caregivers' hands & faces?
(Kobe University) When toddlers begin to use a spoon to eat by themselves, what kind of interactions facilitate this behavior? To find out, an international research collaboration led by Kobe University's Professor NONAKA Tetsushi and the University of Minnesota's Professor Thomas A. Stoffregen investigated the interactions between toddlers and their caregivers during mealtimes at a daycare center in Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: Researchers discover new way to deliver DNA-based therapies for diseases
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers in the Department of Chemistry have created a new polymer to deliver DNA and RNA-based therapies for diseases. For the first time in the industry, the researchers were able to see exactly how polymers interact with human cells when delivering medicines into the body. This discovery opens the door for more widespread use of polymers in applications like gene therapy and vaccine development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Exploring the relationship between nitrogen and carbon dioxide in greenhouse gas emissions
(University of Oklahoma) A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary study on a decade-long experiment (1997-2009) at the University of Minnesota found that lower nitrogen levels in soil promoted release of carbon dioxide from soils under high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and could therefore contribute to furthering rising atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New interactive map reveals how full hospitals are in every county of the US
The COVID-19 Hospitalization Tracking Project was created by a team at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research brief: Global trends in nature's contributions to people
(University of Minnesota) A U of M-led study examined the risks to human well-being and prosperity stemming from ongoing environmental degradation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 7, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Study finds metformin reduced COVID-19 death risks in women
University of Minnesota Medical School and UnitedHealth Group (NYSE: UNH) researchers found that metformin was associated with significantly reduced COVID-19 death risks in women in one of the world's largest observational studies of COVID-19 patients. Metformin is an established, generic medication for managing blood sugar levels in patients with type 2 diabetes. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

How the vaginal microbiome may affect HIV prevention
(PLOS) Healthy Lactobacillus bacteria in the vagina are critical for women's health, but the accumulation of additional bacterial genera can imbalance the vaginal ecosystem. Such an imbalance may result in bacterial metabolism of drugs designed to prevent HIV infection, thereby decreasing their effectiveness and enhancing risks to women, according to a study published December 3, 2020 in the open-access journal PLOS Pathogens by Dr. Nichole Klatt of the University of Minnesota Medical School, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study finds metformin reduced COVID-19 death risks in women
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School and UnitedHealth Group researchers found that metformin was associated with significantly reduced COVID-19 death risks in women in one of the world's largest observational studies of COVID-19 patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How U.S. Medical Schools Are Training a Post-Pandemic Generation of Doctors
In February 2019, the Kaiser Permanente health system announced a new kind of medical school. The school would be built “from the ground up” to prepare students for the complexities of the U.S. medical system. The curriculum would emphasize cultural competency, patient and provider well-being, and the elimination of socioeconomic disparities in the medical system. Students would see patients right away, and hands-on learning would replace many lectures. What’s more, the first five graduating classes would pay nothing to attend; Kaiser hoped this would attract a student body more diverse than the typical U...
Source: TIME: Health - November 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Differences in well-being amongst Somali, Latino and Hmong adolescents
(University of Minnesota) U of M School of Nursing researchers found that acculturation was positively associated with substance use and negatively with academic achievement in adolescence. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The U.S. COVID-19 Outbreak Is Worse Than It ’s Ever Been. Why Aren’t We Acting Like It?
Nothing about the current COVID-19 explosion should come as a surprise. As the virus spread throughout summer and fall, experts repeatedly warned winter would be worse. They cautioned that a cold-weather return to indoor socializing, particularly around the holidays, could turn a steady burn into a wildfire. Throw in a lame-duck President, wildly differing approaches by the states and a pervasive sense of quarantine fatigue, and the wildfire could easily become an inferno. So it has. The U.S. is now locked in a deadly cycle of setting, then shattering, records for new cases and hospitalizations. On Nov. 13, a staggering 17...
Source: TIME: Health - November 19, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Cover Story COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Minnesota cardiac arrest resuscitation treatment demonstrated 100% success rate in cannulation
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota Minnesota Mobile Resuscitation Consortium proves high survival rates in a peer-reviewed study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 13, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Joe Biden and Kamala Harris Announce Their COVID-19 Advisory Board
On Nov. 9, the Biden-Harris transition team announced the members of its COVID-19 advisory board, and met with them for several hours in a virtual conference before President-elect Joe Biden made remarks stressing the importance of mask wearing as a continued “weapon” in the fight against COVID-19. “As we work toward a safe and effective vaccine, the single most effective way to stop the spread of COVID-19: wear a mask,” Biden said, as he held up his own mask. “The head of the CDC [Centers for Disease Control] warned this fall that for the foreseeable future, a mask remains the most potent wea...
Source: TIME: Health - November 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Biden names Michael Osterholm to COVID-19 Advisory Board
President-elect Joe Biden on Monday announced the members of his coronavirus advisory board, a group that will help manage the nation's response to the Covid-19 pandemic. The board will include Michael Osterholm, the director for the Center of Infectious Disease Research and Policy at the University of Minnesota, who's become a nationally recognized figure since the pandemic began spreading in the United States earlier this year. The advisory board will be chaired by Dr. David Kessler, the FDA… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - November 9, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

Reducing global food system emissions key to meeting climate goals
(University of Minnesota) Reducing fossil fuel use is essential to stopping climate change, but that goal will remain out of reach unless global agriculture and eating habits are also transformed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 5, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota/HealthPartners Geriatric Trauma Fellowship Opening: 2022-2023
University of Minnesota/HealthPartners offers an exceptional opportunity for a multi-disciplinary Geriatric Orthopedic Trauma fellowship, under fellowship director, Dr. Julie Switzer.  We have this position available for the 2022-2023 academic year and beyond.  This fellowship is a twelve month unique training experience in the operative and clinical management of geriatric orthopedic trauma patients. Qualified candidates are current PGY4 (or beyond) orthopedic residents in an accredited US orthopedic residency program and available to obtain a Minnesota medical license by July 2022. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - November 2, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Mayo Clinic, University of Minnesota Rochester announce Mayo Clinic Invest In Success Scholars program
ROCHESTER, Minn. -- Mayo Clinic and the University of Minnesota Rochester announce the launch of the Mayo Clinic Invest In Success Scholars program. This program aims to increase learning opportunities for students seeking a career in health care.  "Mayo Clinic is investing in creating our future workforce that will cure, connect and transform health [...] (Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News)
Source: Mayo Clinic Minnesota News - October 29, 2020 Category: Hospital Management Source Type: news

Is There Any Safe Way to Socialize Inside This Winter?
For months, there’s been a relatively easy way to socialize safely during the pandemic: take it outside. But now, with cold weather creeping into many parts of the world, park picnics, socially distant walks and outdoor dining are about to get less appealing for lots of people. Experts have warned for months that indoor gatherings are prime places for the virus to spread—but does that mean there’s no way to see anyone aside from your housemates this winter? Here’s what five experts said about indoor socializing. Why is outside safer than in? SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, can spread whe...
Source: TIME: Health - October 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Welcome to the Rural Wave: Rural Cases Are Likely to Keep Climbing
Analyzes the rate of new COVID-19 infections in metropolitan and nonmetropolitan areas. Includes an interview with Carrie Henning-Smith with the University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center, who describes the rural infection rates as ominous. Describes how the rise in infections could be due to "COVID fatigue," explaining that some find it difficult to be cautious as the pandemic wears on. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 23, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

U of M trial shows hydroxychloroquine does not prevent COVID-19 in health care workers
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that taking hydroxychloroquine once or twice weekly did not prevent the development of COVID-19 in health care workers better than the placebo. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 21, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Director of Rural Health Research Center Wins Prestigious Public Policy Award
Katy Kozhimannil, PhD, the director of the Rural Health Research Center and professor at the University of Minnesota, was awarded the Heinz Award for Public Policy from the Heinz Family Foundation. Details her research which has driven policy change regarding rural childbirth care and maternal mortality, the impact of doula care on birth outcomes, and structural racism and community health. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 20, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Infectious Disease Expert: The 'Darkest Of The Entire Pandemic' Has Yet To Come
Michael Osterholm, an expert at the University of Minnesota, stressed that a lack of public confidence is largely to blame. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - October 18, 2020 Category: Science Source Type: news

New research could help millions who suffer from 'ringing in the ears'
(University of Minnesota) In the largest clinical trial of its kind, researchers show that combining sound and electrical stimulation of the tongue can significantly reduce tinnitus, commonly described as 'ringing in the ears.' They also found that therapeutic effects can be sustained for up to 12 months post-treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers 3D print unique micro-scale fluid channels used for medical testing
(University of Minnesota) In a groundbreaking new study, researchers have 3D printed unique fluid channels at the micron scale that could automate production of diagnostics, sensors, and assays used for a variety of medical tests and other applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 9, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M Medical School selected as Capacity Building Center for National Lab Network
(University of Minnesota) The U of M team received a five-year, $6.7 million grant to support their part of the network's research effort. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why This Year ’s Flu Vaccine Will Be So Vital in the Fight Against COVID-19
While the world awaits a proven COVID-19 vaccine, medical experts are turning their attention to a shot that’s long been a key component in the public health toolbox: the flu vaccine. Experts hope this year’s flu shot can help prevent an influenza epidemic paired with another wave of coronavirus, which could overwhelm hospitals and lead to general confusion, given that it can be difficult to tell a COVID-19 infection from a case of the flu. This flu season is also something of a dress rehearsal for the eventual rollout of a COVID-19 vaccine amid the ongoing pandemic, allowing doctors, nurses and pharmacists a c...
Source: TIME: Health - October 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Researchers develop AI for COVID-19 on chest x-ray
Researchers from the University of Minnesota have developed an artificial intelligence...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AI boosts rads' COVID-19 x-ray diagnosis performance Serial chest x-ray for COVID-19 comparable to CT COVID-19 has major impact on radiology operations Does experience matter in chest x-rays for COVID-19? SARS-CoV-2 has characteristic appearance on x-ray (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - October 1, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

BlueCube Bio wins MN Cup grand prize
(Calliope) On September 22, 2020, the University of Minnesota's Carlson School of Management named BlueCube Bio the $50,000 grand-prize winner of the 2020 MN Cup. This highly competitive, prestigious honor recognizes organizations state-wide for their excellence in entrepreneurism and investment pitching.By transforming cryopreservation techniques using nontoxic materials, BlueCube Bio increases the efficacy of cellular therapies by reducing the side-effects associated with infusing life-threatening preservation chemicals into a patient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 1, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota develops AI algorithm to analyze chest X-rays for COVID-19
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota recently developed and validated an artificial intelligence algorithm that can evaluate chest X-rays to diagnose possible cases of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 1, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Minnesota scientists find coronavirus in samples of beach water for the first time
Researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School have been testing water samples at eight beaches along Lake Superior since July and found trace amounts at four beaches this month. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Extra visit time with patients may explain wage gap for female physicians
(Brigham and Women's Hospital) A new study led by researchers from Brigham and Women's Hospital and the University of Minnesota, Minneapolis sheds light on why female primary care physicians receive lower wages than their male counterparts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than 90% of Americans say front-line health workers should get a coronavirus vaccine first
A new survey, conducted by the University of Minnesota School of Public Health, found that 91% of Americans say front-line workers should be inoculated against COVID-19 first. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New method developed to help scientists understand how the brain processes color
(University of Minnesota) Through the development of new technology, University of Minnesota researchers have developed a method that allows scientists to understand how a fruit fly's brain responds to seeing color. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Post-Doctoral Associate- Department of Orthopedic Surgery
 The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - September 28, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Clinical Research Coordinator (Research Pro 2)- Dept of Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - September 28, 2020 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news