UCLA-led team of scientists discovers why we need sleep
Prolonged sleep deprivation can lead to severe health problems in humans and other animals. But why is sleep so vital to our health? A UCLA-led team of scientists has made a major advance in answering  this question and has shown for the first time that a dramatic change in the purpose of sleep occurs at the age of about 2-and-a-half.Before that age, the brain grows very rapidly. During REM sleep, when vivid dreams occur, the young brain is busy building and strengthening synapses — the structures that connect neurons to one another and allow them to communicate.“Don’t wake babies up during REM sleep...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - September 18, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

John Najarian, Pioneering Transplant Surgeon, Dies at 92
He was known for taking on difficult cases, many involving children. An anti-rejection drug he developed led to a scandal, but he was vindicated. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - September 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Neil Genzlinger Tags: Transplants Surgery and Surgeons Deaths (Obituaries) Food and Drug Administration University of Minnesota Najarian, John S. Source Type: news

College Professors Made Models Showing How Bad COVID-19 Would Be on Campus. Some Administrators Ignored Them
Who thought it would be a good idea to move thousands of teenagers and young adults across the country to college campuses, where, unencumbered by parental supervision, many college kids did what college kids do? Actually, Nigel Goldenfeld and Sergei Maslov, two University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign physics researchers, thought they had it figured out. They created a predictive model for the campus, which showed that with a robust, twice-a-week testing program for students, faculty and staff who are regularly on campus, a mask mandate and an app for contact tracing, COVID-19 cases could be kept below 500 people for th...
Source: TIME: Health - September 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Victoria Knight / Kaiser Health News Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Weight stigma predicts emotional distress and binge eating during COVID-19
(UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity) New research from the UConn Rudd Center for Food Policy and Obesity and the University of Minnesota shows that young adults who experienced weight stigma before the pandemic have higher levels of depressive symptoms, stress, eating as a coping strategy, and are more likely to binge-eat during COVID-19 compared to those who haven't experienced weight stigma. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Engineering speciation events in insects may be used to control harmful pests
(University of Minnesota) This research provides the foundations for scientists to be able to prevent genetically modified organisms from reproducing with wild organisms. Additionally, the research will allow scientists to develop new tools to control populations of disease carrying insects and invasive species in a highly targeted fashion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 8, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers awarded $6.6 million to develop new device to treat mental health disorders
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School have been awarded a $6.6 million grant from the National Institute of Mental Health to develop a new medical device that can treat mental health disorders in a way that has never been done before using brain rhythms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: Researchers 3D print lifelike heart valve models
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the University of Minnesota, with support from Medtronic, have developed a groundbreaking process for multi-material 3D printing of lifelike models of the heart's aortic valve and the surrounding structures that mimic the exact look and feel of a real patient. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 28, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Research brief: How genetics could impact COVID-19 treatments
(University of Minnesota) U of M study looked at how pharmacogenomics could improve the safety and effectiveness of COVID-19 drug therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Failure to 'flatten the curve' may kill more people than we thought
(University of Washington) New research by the University of Minnesota and the University of Washington finds that every six additional ICU beds or seven additional non-ICU beds filled by COVID-19 patients leads to one additional COVID-19 death over the following week. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 24, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New research finds association between COVID-19 hospital use and mortality
(University of Minnesota) Researchers at the University of Minnesota and University of Washington found a statistical relationship between the number of hospital beds (ICU and non-ICU) occupied by COVID-19 patients in a state and reported mortality. Published today in the Journal of General Internal Medicine, this research is believed to be the first to use actual, state-level data to examine this association. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: Bee neighborly -- sharing bees helps more farmers
(University of Minnesota) New paper shows the benefits of cost-sharing the conservation of wild bee habitats on agricultural lands, especially in nearby farming communities, can help overcome the tragedy of the commons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - August 18, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Minorities Hit Hardest by COVID-19, Study Confirms
MONDAY, Aug. 17, 2020 -- A new report adds to data suggesting that the coronavirus pandemic is even tougher on U.S. minorities than it is on whites. The research, from the University of Minnesota, shows that Black and Hispanic Americans, as well as... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 17, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Coronavirus US: Black Americans' hospitalization risk far higher
A new study from the University of Minnesota found that the percentage of black hospitalizations exceeded the percentage of their representative proportion of 12 state populations. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

COVID-19 hospitalizations analysis shows disparities across racial and ethnic groups
(University of Minnesota) Adding to mounting evidence of COVID-19's disproportionate impact on some US communities, a new analysis of hospitalization rates from the University of Minnesota shows Black, Hispanic, American Indian and Alaskan Native populations in the United States are significantly more likely to be hospitalized due to COVID-19 than whites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 17, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

University of Minnesota and academic collaborators receive $26 million for NSF engineering research center
(University of Minnesota) Engineering Research Center for Advanced Technologies for the Preservation of Biological Systems to be established at the University of Minnesota. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UC Riverside joins new NSF center for the preservation of biological systems
(University of California - Riverside) UC Riverside is one of four universities collaborating on a $26 million NSF Engineering Research Center grant. The center, led by the University of Minnesota and Massachusetts General Hospital, is called Advanced Technologies for the Preservation of Biological Systems, or ATP-Bio. It will contribute to the development of technology to bring biological systems back from suspended animation. The grant is UC Riverside's first successful bid for an Engineering Research Center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study Reveals How Coronavirus Travels Indoors
FRIDAY, July 31, 2020 -- A new study explains how the coronavirus hitches a ride on droplets released when you cough, sneeze, talk or speak, and travels around a room. The University of Minnesota scientists hope their work will help schools and... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - July 31, 2020 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Poor Dental Health May Increase Risk for Incident Dementia, MCI
WEDNESDAY, July 29, 2020 -- Individuals with severe periodontal disease or edentulism have an increased risk for incident dementia, according to a study published online July 29 in Neurology. Ryan T. Demmer, Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - July 29, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

2nd bone density test doesn ’t help gauge fracture risk in postmenopausal women
FINDINGSFor postmenopausal women who have undergone an initial bone mineral density test, having a standard second assessment three years after the first does not improve physicians ’ ability to determine their risk of osteoporosis-related hip, spine, forearm and shoulder fractures, a study has found.In addition, the study authors say, the initial testis more predictive of fracture risk than the second test, regardless of race, ethnicity and age.BACKGROUNDPhysicians routinely perform afollow-upbone density tests in postmenopausalwomen approximately three years after the first test todetect any loss in bone mass and t...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 28, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Seems to Spare Most Kids From Illness, but Its Effect on Their Mental Health Is Deepening
Pandemics can be indiscriminate, with viruses making no distinctions among the victims they attack and those they spare. If you’re human, you’ll do. COVID-19 has been different, particularly when it comes to age. The disease has shown a special animus for older people, with those 65-plus considered at especially high risk for hospitalization and death, and those 18 and below catching a semblance of an epidemiological break. Though a small share of adolescents have suffered severe cases, most who contract the disease in that age cohort are likelier to experience milder symptoms or none at all. But if COVID-19 is...
Source: TIME: Health - July 23, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine Source Type: news

Research brief: Researchers 3D print a working heart pump with real human cells
(University of Minnesota) In a groundbreaking new study, researchers at the University of Minnesota have 3D printed a functioning centimeter-scale human heart pump in the lab. The discovery could have major implications for studying heart disease, the leading cause of death in the United States killing more than 600,000 people a year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 15, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

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A University of Minnesota professor tells CNN's Anderson Cooper about the "emerging evidence" that the coronavirus can be spread through airborne transmission. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - July 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Pandemic ’s Big Mystery: How Deadly Is the Coronavirus?
Even with more than 500,000 dead worldwide, scientists are struggling to learn how often the virus kills. Here ’s why. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - July 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Donald G. McNeil Jr. Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Influenza Epidemic (1918-19) Coronavirus Reopenings Deaths (Fatalities) Third World and Developing Countries Centers for Disease Control and Prevention World Health Organization University of Minnesota Source Type: news

In reversal, U of M tells students to wear masks
The University of Minnesota will require faces masks in most indoor areas and public spaces, a tougher stance than the college took just weeks ago when it laid out plans to restart in-person classes later this summer. The Star Tribune reports on the announcement by the U of M, which told students and faculty of the rule on Monday. Visitors to campus will also be required to wear masks. The few exceptions include students while they're in assigned apartments or dorms, alone in an office or study… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - June 30, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Mark Reilly Source Type: news

Research shows quality of prostate MRI is highly variable among institutions
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A recent multi-site study published in Radiology was designed to gauge the difference in imaging quality for prostate MRI by looking retrospectively at performance across 26 institutions and found that the positive predictive value of the test for prostate cancer was highly variable at different sites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gilead ’s $2,340 Price for Coronavirus Drug Remdesivir Draws Criticism
The maker of a drug shown to shorten recovery time for severely ill COVID-19 patients says it will charge $2,340 for a typical treatment course for people covered by government health programs in the United States and other developed countries. Gilead Sciences announced the price Monday for remdesivir, and said the price would be $3,120 for patients with private insurance. The amount that patients pay out of pocket depends on insurance, income and other factors. “We’re in uncharted territory with pricing a new medicine, a novel medicine, in a pandemic,” Gilead’s chief executive, Dan O’Day, tol...
Source: TIME: Science - June 29, 2020 Category: Science Authors: MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 News News Desk Source Type: news

Postdoctoral Fellowship Opportunity
The University of Minnesota Rural Health Research Center (RHRC) invites scholars from diverse backgrounds to apply for their Rural Health Equity Postdoctoral Fellowship. One scholar will receive the opportunity to co-lead, with RHRC faculty or staff, a one-year rural health focused project specified by the Federal Office of Rural Health Policy, as well as lead an additional one-year project in their second year. Applications are due by July 20, 2020. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - June 29, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Excessive sugar intake linked with unhealthy fat deposits
(European Society of Cardiology) Sugar consumption is linked with larger fat deposits around the heart and in the abdomen, which are risky for health. That's the finding of a study published today in the European Journal of Preventive Cardiology, a journal of the European Society of Cardiology (ESC). " When we consume too much sugar the excess is converted to fat and stored, " said study author Ms. So Yun Yi, a PhD student at the University of Minnesota School of Public Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 28, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota Medical School finds promising treatment to slow kidney disease doesn't prove out in clinical trial
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A new study from the University of Minnesota Medical School found that allopurinol, an inexpensive generic drug that reduces uric acid levels, did not show benefits in protecting from loss of filtering function in the kidney. The findings were recently published in the New England Journal of Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Common medication may protect diabetic women from coronavirus 
In one of the world's largest coronavirus studies to-date, University of Minnesota researchers found that metformin may stem inflammation for diabetic and obese women to lower their death risks. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 24, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Middle-Income and Rural Families Disproportionately Grapple with Child-care Deserts, New Analysis Shows
Researchers at the University of Minnesota and the Center for American Progress (CAP) have released an interactive map showing areas considered to be child care deserts, or locations where the demand for child care is greater than the availability of child care. Discusses the impact that COVID-19 has had on child care facilities and potential funding to help with the burden. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - June 22, 2020 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

UMN report shows sexually transmitted infections continue to rise among MN youth
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The 2020 Minnesota Adolescent Sexual Health Report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) reports that while pregnancy and birth rates continue to decline to historic lows for 15 to 19-year-olds, Minnesota youth are contracting sexually transmitted infections (STI) at alarmingly high rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 22, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Public Health Experts Reject President ’s View of Fading Pandemic
Contrary to Trump ’s recent comments, specialists say, recent increases are real, and the virus is like a “forest fire” that will burn as long as there is fuel. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 21, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: James Gorman Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Coronavirus Reopenings Masks Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Homeland Security Department University of Minnesota Harvard University Johns Hopkins University Gottlieb, Scott (1972- ) Trump, Donald J W Source Type: news

Research brief: New discovery allows 3D printing of sensors directly on expanding organs
(University of Minnesota) In groundbreaking new research, mechanical engineers and computer scientists at the University of Minnesota have developed a 3D printing technique that uses motion capture technology, similar to that used in Hollywood movies, to print electronic sensors directly on organs that are expanding and contracting. The new 3D printing technique could have future applications in diagnosing and monitoring the lungs of patients with COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 17, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Events Like Trump Rally Are ‘Perfect Storm’ for Viral Spread, Experts Say
Social gatherings and campaign rallies like those planned by President Trump could spread infections this summer. People should wear masks and continue social distancing, public health researchers say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pam Belluck Tags: States (US) Coronavirus Reopenings Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Masks Fox News Channel National Broadcasting Co University of Minnesota Boston University Osterholm, Michael T your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Trump Rally Is the ‘Perfect Storm Setup,’ for Viral Spread, Disease Expert Says
Campaign rallies like those planned by Trump and other social gatherings could spread infections this summer. People should adhere to wearing masks and continue social distancing, public health researchers say. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Pam Belluck Tags: States (US) Coronavirus Reopenings Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Demonstrations, Protests and Riots Masks Fox News Channel National Broadcasting Co University of Minnesota Boston University Osterholm, Michael T your-feed-healthcare Source Type: news

Hydroxychloroquine taken by Trump does not prevent people from contracting coronavirus
A new study from the University of Minnesota of 107 people who fell ill after being exposed to someone with coronavirus, 47 were given hydroxychloroquine and 56 were given a placebo. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - June 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

WHO Resumes Study of Hydroxychloroquine for Treating COVID-19
On June 3, the World Health Organization (WHO) resumed a study looking into whether the malaria drug hydroxychloroquine could be effective in treating COVID-19. Last week, the WHO temporarily stopped people from enrolling in the trial, part of a larger study called Solidarity that is investigating a number of different potential coronavirus therapies, over concerns about the hydroxychloroquine’s adverse effects on the heart. That followed the publication of a Lancet study on May 22, involving more than 96,000 people, which found that the drug did not improve survival among patients hospitalized with COVID-19, and tha...
Source: TIME: Health - June 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Open-Source Release Allows Manufacturers Worldwide to Produce the UMN & #039;s Low-Cost Ventilator
There has been no shortage of innovation and collaboration across the industry to provide critical medical solutions in response to the coronavirus pandemic, but developing a much-needed device is only half the battle. To truly make an impact, innovators need to make their technology available to as many patients as possible. With that end-goal in mind, some organizations are open-sourcing their designs in an effort to ramp up production and distribution. The latest example of this trend comes out of the University of Minnesota (UMN) Bakken Medical Device Center. In early April, MD+DI reported that ...
Source: MDDI - June 3, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: COVID-19 Contract Manufacturing Source Type: news

UMN trial shows hydroxychloroquine has no benefit over placebo in preventing COVID-19
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Today, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers published the results from the first randomized clinical trial testing hydroxychloroquine for the post-exposure prevention of COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Killing coronavirus with handheld ultraviolet light device may be feasible
(Penn State) A personal, handheld device emitting high-intensity ultraviolet light to disinfect areas by killing the novel coronavirus is now feasible, according to researchers at Penn State, the University of Minnesota and two Japanese universities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 1, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Using brain imaging to demonstrate weaker neural suppression for those with autism
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A University of Minnesota Medical School researcher recently published an article in Nature Communications that shows the differences in visual motion perception in autism spectrum disorder are accompanied by weaker neural suppression in the visual cortex of the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC: Antibody Tests For COVID-19 Wrong Up To Half The Time
(CNN) — Antibody tests used to determine if people have been infected in the past with COVID-19 might be wrong up to half the time, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention said in new guidance posted on its website. Antibody tests, often called serologic tests, look for evidence of an immune response to infection. “Antibodies in some persons can be detected within the first week of illness onset,” the CDC says. They are not accurate enough to use to make important policy decisions, the CDC said. “Serologic test results should not be used to make decisions about grouping persons residing in...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 27, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Covid-19 Boston, MA Health Healthcare Status Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Antibody Tests CNN Coronavirus Source Type: news

There Isn ’t a COVID-19 Vaccine Yet. But Some Are Already Skeptical About It
Amid the American flags, “Make America Great Again” hats and “freedom is essential” posters appearing at recent protests against coronavirus lockdowns in Sacramento, Calif., another familiar slogan has materialized: “We do not consent.” It’s long been a popular rallying cry among antivaccine activists, who claim without evidence that vaccines cause autism or other conditions. As the COVID-19 pandemic rages on, those activists have become intertwined with demonstrators who want businesses to reopen despite public health experts’ warnings. Offline, the “anti-vaxxers&rdquo...
Source: TIME: Health - May 18, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers study radiation resistance in brain cancer cells
(University of Minnesota Medical School) In a vertical climb to avoid collision with a towering mountain, a plane ejects cargo to gain altitude. Investigators at the University of Minnesota showed that cancer cells perform similar feats in escaping the killing effects of radiation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research Brief: A new approach to averting inflammation caused by COVID-19
(University of Minnesota) U of M Twin Cities student Molly Gilligan studies the body's inflammatory response to the SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 12, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

GI Symptoms Seen in Less Than 10 Percent of COVID-19 Patients
THURSDAY, May 7, 2020 -- Gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms are seen in less than 10 percent of patients with COVID-19, according to a meta-analysis published online May 4 in Gastroenterology. Shahnaz Sultan, M.D., from the University of Minnesota in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 7, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Analysis suggests states need to plan for second wave of COVID-19
Leaders across the United States should plan for a worst-case scenario, second wave to the COVID-19 pandemic, including no vaccine availability or herd immunity, say experts at the University of Minnesota. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - May 2, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota Medical School professor named to National Academy of Sciences
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Marc Jenkins, PhD, director of the Center for Immunology and Regents' and Distinguished McKnight Professor in the Department of Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Minnesota Medical School, has been elected to the National Academy of Sciences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

COVID-19: The CIDRAP Viewpoint: Part 1: The Future of the COVID-19 Pandemic: Lessons Learned from Pandemic Influenza
Source: Center for Infectious Disease Research and Policy [University of Minnesota] (CIDRAP). Published: 4/30/2020. This nine-page report discusses how we can potentially learn from past influenza pandemics as we attempt to determine a vision for the future of the COVID-19 pandemic. Identifying key similarities and differences in the epidemiology of COVID-19 and pandemic influenza can help envisioning several possible scenarios for the course of the COVID-19 pandemic. (PDF) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - April 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news