Research brief: How pharmacists contribute meaningfully in primary health care
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota College of Pharmacy Associate Professor Kylee Funk found that pharmacists improve primary care in clinics.   (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The COVID-19 pandemic has been linked with six unhealthy eating behaviors
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A new probe into the lingering impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic revealed correlations to six unhealthy eating behaviors, according to a study by the University of Minnesota Medical School and School of Public Health. Researchers say the most concerning finding indicates a slight increase or the re-emergence of eating disorders, which kill roughly 10,200 people every year -- about one person every 52 minutes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M researchers develop 99.9% accurate genetic test for early detection of Palmer Amaranth
(University of Minnesota) In a recent study, researchers from the University of Minnesota's Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center and Colorado State University have developed a new test for identifying Palmer Amaranth that is more robust, easier to use, and -- most importantly -- has shown 99.9% accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 5, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

COVID-19 patients can be categorized into three groups
(PLOS) In a new study, researchers identify three clinical COVID-19 phenotypes, reflecting patient populations with different comorbidities, complications and clinical outcomes. The three phenotypes are described in a paper published this week in the open-access journal PLOS ONE 1st authors Elizabeth Lusczek and Nicholas Ingraham of University of Minnesota Medical School, US, and colleagues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M Medical School faculty help lead new VA Lung Cancer Screening and Research Network
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Two researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School, who also practice at the Minneapolis VA Health Care System, join the Omaha VA Medical Center to lead the Upper Midwest VA Lung Cancer Screening and Research Network as part of a nationwide VA-funded Lung Precision Oncology Program (LPOP). The $4.5 million grant supports an expansion in lung cancer screenings and research among veterans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 31, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Lab-Made Heart Valves Can Grow Along With Youngest Heart Patients
MONDAY, March 22, 2021 -- Lab-created heart valves that grow with the recipient could spare kids born with heart defects from the repeated valve-replacement surgeries they now endure. University of Minnesota researchers found that lab-created valves... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 22, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

New study implicates disease-driving B cells in fatty liver disease development
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research from the University of Minnesota Medical School suggests that disease-driving B cells, a white blood cell, play a role in the development of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) - the most common chronic liver condition in the U.S. Their findings could lead to targeted therapies for NAFLD, which currently affects a quarter of the nation and has no FDA-approved treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lab-created heart valves can grow with the recipient
(University of Minnesota) Groundbreaking discovery could potentially reduce multiple pediatric heart valve replacement surgeries. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

First Midwest urban long-term ecological research site established in Twin-Cities
(USDA Forest Service - Northern Research Station) The USDA Forest Service is part of a partnership that will establish the first urban long-term ecosystem research (LTER) site in the Midwest. The University of Minnesota is the lead institution, and partners include the University of St. Thomas and The Nature Conservancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 16, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

During Pandemic, Clinical Laboratories Should Be Alert for Drug Resistant Infections That Pose High Risk to COVID-19 Patients
On top of everything else during this pandemic, drug-resistant infections are threatening the most vulnerable patients in COVID-19 ICUs New study by researchers at the University of Minnesota highlights the continuing need for microbiologists and clinical laboratories to stay alert for COVID-19 patients with drug-resistant infections. In their study, researchers highlighted CDC statistics about the […] The post During Pandemic, Clinical Laboratories Should Be Alert for Drug Resistant Infections That Pose High Risk to COVID-19 Patients appeared first on Dark Daily. (Source: Dark Daily)
Source: Dark Daily - March 10, 2021 Category: Laboratory Medicine Authors: Jude Tags: Laboratory Management and Operations Laboratory News Laboratory Operations Laboratory Pathology Laboratory Testing Management & Operations AMR anatomic pathology antibiotic resistant bacteria antimicrobial resistance ARB CDC Center Source Type: news

Research brief: School connectedness as a protective factor for ethnic minority adolescents
(University of Minnesota) U of M School of Nursing Professor Eunice Areba found that prevention programs in schools can reduce suicide ideation and attempts among Somali, Latino, Hmong and Non-Hispanic white adolescents. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota scientists discover attacking fungi that show promise against emerald ash borer
(University of Minnesota) New research from the University of Minnesota's Minnesota Invasive Terrestrial Plants and Pests Center (MITPPC) shows a possible path forward in controlling the emerald ash borer - which since its introduction has become the most devastating invasive forest insect in the United States, killing hundreds of millions of ash trees at a cost of hundreds of millions of dollars. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 10, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Strategic air purifier placement reduces virus spread within music classrooms
(American Institute of Physics) The University of Minnesota School of Music was concerned about one-on-one teaching during the COVID-19 pandemic and wondered if it should supplement its ventilation system with portable HEPA air purifiers. So, school officials reached out to Suo Yang, a professor within the College of Science and Engineering, and his team to figure it out. In Physics of Fluids, Yang and the researchers describe their work to predict how virus particles spread within a music classroom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - March 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Key to Building Resilience in a Crisis
Resilience is the ultimate end goal in tough times. We want our children to “learn resilience”; we all want to become “more resilient” ourselves; we hear about resilient communities. But what does resilience actually mean—and how do we cultivate more of it? “Resilience is the capacity of a person, community, family or economy to adapt successfully to challenge,” says Ann Masten, a professor of child at development at the University of Minnesota and author of several books about resilience. “Resilience in people involves many processes and multiple systems, which is one of the...
Source: TIME: Health - March 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Kate Rope Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Atmospheric drying will lead to lower crop yields, shorter trees across the globe
(University of Minnesota) A global observation of an ongoing atmospheric drying -- known by scientists as a rise in vapor pressure deficit -- has been observed worldwide since the early 2000s. In recent years, this concerning phenomenon has been on the rise, and is predicted to amplify even more in the coming decades as climate change intensifies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

2021 University of Minnesota Orthopaedic Trauma Clinical Research Fellowship
A University of Minnesota Orthopaedic Trauma Research Fellowship is currently available. This is a funded position working with Peter A. Cole, MD and Mai Nguyen, MD of the orthopaedic surgery department at Regions Hospital in St. Paul and the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, MN.  The individual in this position will be working in-person, on-site with the orthopaedic faculty and University of Minnesota Ortho Surgery Residents. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - March 4, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota to host webinar - Is COVID-19 changing research ethics?
(University of Minnesota) On Wednesday, March 3, the University of Minnesota will host top national experts to debate how COVID-19 is changing the rules and conduct for research. This webinar on 'Conducting Research in the COVID-19 Pandemic: Ethics in an Emergency' will tackle huge issues. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers develop two new rapid COVID-19 diagnostic tests
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have developed two new rapid diagnostic tests for COVID-19 - one to detect COVID-19 variants and one to help differentiate with other illnesses that have COVID-19-like symptoms. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma Fellowship: 2021-2022
The University of Minnesota/HealthPartners offers an exceptional opportunity for a multi-disciplinary Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma fellowship. This fellowship is a twelve month unique training experience in the operative and clinical management of geriatric orthopaedic trauma patients. The fellowship will emphasize multidisciplinary aspects of geriatric orthopaedic patient care including operative and nonoperative trauma care, peri-prosthetic fracture reconstruction, bone health, and palliative care considerations. This will prepare you to build and efficiently run a geriatric fracture center. This fellowship is certified ...
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - February 18, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Fellowship News Source Type: news

Post-Doctoral Associate - Regions Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - February 17, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota national study aims to improve US transportation system with accessibility data
(University of Minnesota) U of M Accessibility Observatory enters second phase with a new multiyear national pooled-fund study to measure access to destinations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota, Hormel Institute and Mayo Clinic collaborate on new citizen science project
(University of Minnesota) A University of Minnesota-Mayo Clinic partnership has joined with the Zooniverse citizen scientist platform and the Francis Crick Institute in London to leverage world-leading expertise in microscope imaging with the power of citizen science to study the relationship between structure and function in biology to better understand health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 17, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

My Kids Are in Daycare. How Should That Affect My Family ’s Social Distancing Strategy?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, Mike from Wisconsin asks: “My wife and I have two kids, both in daycare full-time. Is it safe for kids who are in daycare/school together to get together outside of s...
Source: TIME: Health - February 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 Source Type: news

Scientists uncover four new facts about early SARS-CoV-2 infections
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers studied SARS-CoV-2 infections at individual cellular levels and made four major discoveries about the virus, including one that validates the effectiveness of remdesivir - an FDA-approved antiviral drug - as a form of treatment for severe COVID-19 disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New study discovers possible early detection method for elusive ovarian cancer
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School found a way to detect the presence of ovarian cancer in patients using Pap test samples, normally used to detect cervical cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 9, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Advanced simulations reveal how air conditioning spreads COVID-19 aerosols
(American Institute of Physics) A restaurant outbreak in China was widely reported as strong evidence of airflow-induced transmission of COVID-19, but it lacked a detailed investigation about exactly how transmission occurred. In Physics of Fluids, researchers at the University of Minnesota report using advanced simulation methods to capture the complex flows that occur when the cold airflow from air conditioners interacts with the hot plume from a dining table and the transport of virus-loading particles within such flows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 9, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Researchers uncover hidden hunting tactics of wolves in Minnesota's Northwoods
(University of Minnesota) In a new paper published in the journalBehavioral Ecology, researchers from the University of Minnesota and the Voyageurs Wolf Project--which studies wolves in the Greater Voyageurs Ecosystem in the northwoods of Minnesota--show that wolves have evolved ambush hunting tactics specifically tailored for catching and killing beavers. The study challenges the classic concept that wolves are solely cursorial predators. Instead, wolf-hunting strategies appear highly flexible, and they are able to switch between hunting modes (cursorial and ambush hunting) depending on their prey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 9, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is It Time to Wear a Better Mask for COVID-19? We Asked the Experts
Face masks are much more than a symbol. Over the last year, we’ve learned that countries and regions that encourage or require masking seem to do better at slowing the spread of COVID-19 than places that don’t, and new evidence suggests that masking may protect both the wearer and the people around them. Many TIME readers have recently reached out with questions about masks—which kind of mask should they wear? How do they wear them correctly? Should they be double-masking? And so on. So we asked the masking experts for tips based on the latest research. Is It Time to Upgrade Your Mask? Early in the pande...
Source: TIME: Health - February 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

U of M study shows enhanced accuracy of CMV detection method in newborn screening
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Mark Schleiss, MD, pediatric infectious disease physician with the University of Minnesota Medical School and M Health Fairview, led a study that used improved techniques to show that the dried blood spot taken at birth can, in fact, find CMV infection in the newborn with almost 90% accuracy. The study was recently published in JAMA Pediatrics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Many States Don ’t Know Who’s Getting COVID-19 Vaccines. That’s a Huge Problem for Equity
As part of its COVID-19 vaccination efforts, the state of Virginia last week assembled a 12-person crack squad to a banal but vital task: data entry. Workers at many of the state’s vaccination sites, especially those in remote areas with limited internet connectivity, have been failing to input information about the people getting inoculated into the state’s database. The new team’s job is to help fix the problem, which has left gaps in state health officials’ understanding of who has been getting the shot—and who has not. “We’ve got to fix the data quality, data accuracy issue,&rd...
Source: TIME: Health - January 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Can Minnesota support a sustainable aquaculture industry?
(University of Minnesota) A new three-year, $250,000 project led by the University of Minnesota Sea Grant program seeks to determine the potential for a sustainable food-fish aquaculture industry in Minnesota. " Potential food-fish farmers planning to enter the industry are interested in credible data that will help them decide which production strategies and species are best suited for profitability, " said Amy Schrank, project lead and University of Minnesota Sea Grant fisheries and aquaculture extension educator. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Invasive mussels now control a key nutrient in the American Great Lakes
(University of Minnesota) The spread of quagga mussels across the American Great Lakes has transformed the supply of phosphorus - a key biological nutrient - to the ecosystem, according to research published this week in PNAS. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 26, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Minnesota Partnership awards 5 collaborative research grants for 2021
(University of Minnesota) Mayo and U of M teams will initiate the two-year projects aimed at improving the treatment of diseases that affect Minnesotans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Latest News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Operations - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Vaccine Rollout Confirms Public Health Officials ’ Warnings
By MICHELLE R. SMITH and CANDICE CHOI Associated Press PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Public health officials sounded the alarm for months, complaining that they did not have enough support or money to get COVID-19 vaccines quickly into arms. Now the slower-than-expected start to the largest vaccination effort in U.S. history is proving them right. As they work to ramp up the shots, state and local public health departments across the U.S. cite a variety of obstacles, most notably a lack of leadership from the federal government. Many officials worry that they are losing precious time at the height of the pandemic, an...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - January 11, 2021 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: AP News Coronavirus Medicine Source Type: news

Health Workers Are Going Viral on TikTok for Debunking COVID-19 Myths
At first glance, the December video looks like just the latest rendition of a TikTok trend. On one side of the split screen “duet,” a video game car bounces down a mountain; on the other, the TikTok user “dr.noc” scrambles to talk as much as he can before the car slams into the ground. But while other videos feature stream-of-consciousness chatter, Dr. Noc’s words are precise. Noc, who in real life is Morgan McSweeney, a PhD scientist who researches treatments for diseases like COVID-19, is trying to debunk as many myths about coronavirus vaccines as he can before the final animated explosion....
Source: TIME: Health - January 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

Do toddlers learning to spoon-feed seek different information from caregivers' hands & faces?
(Kobe University) When toddlers begin to use a spoon to eat by themselves, what kind of interactions facilitate this behavior? To find out, an international research collaboration led by Kobe University's Professor NONAKA Tetsushi and the University of Minnesota's Professor Thomas A. Stoffregen investigated the interactions between toddlers and their caregivers during mealtimes at a daycare center in Japan. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research brief: Researchers discover new way to deliver DNA-based therapies for diseases
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota Twin Cities researchers in the Department of Chemistry have created a new polymer to deliver DNA and RNA-based therapies for diseases. For the first time in the industry, the researchers were able to see exactly how polymers interact with human cells when delivering medicines into the body. This discovery opens the door for more widespread use of polymers in applications like gene therapy and vaccine development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - December 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Latest News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Operations - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Leadership Mindset with an Emphasis in EMS, Part Three
Conclusion “Half of what is taught in medical school is wrong, but nobody knows which half. –  Lucy Hornstein, MD.”15 The same could be said about leadership as well. Many leadership fads have been developed over time and may have had their place, but as times and trends change, so does leadership. As leaders in EMS, it’s crucial to adapt to the new generations of employees and identifying the best ways to work for and with them. The story of the blind men and the elephant is a good story to remember as leaders to say not all things that appear to be true necessarily are.   ...
Source: JEMS Special Topics - December 17, 2020 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: JEMS Staff Tags: Administration and Leadership Exclusives Adminstration & Leadership EMS Source Type: news

Exploring the relationship between nitrogen and carbon dioxide in greenhouse gas emissions
(University of Oklahoma) A University of Oklahoma-led interdisciplinary study on a decade-long experiment (1997-2009) at the University of Minnesota found that lower nitrogen levels in soil promoted release of carbon dioxide from soils under high levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, and could therefore contribute to furthering rising atmospheric greenhouse gases and climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 14, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

New interactive map reveals how full hospitals are in every county of the US
The COVID-19 Hospitalization Tracking Project was created by a team at the Carlson School of Management at the University of Minnesota. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news