Scientists Successfully Attached a Pig Kidney to Human For the First Time
Scientists temporarily attached a pig’s kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but among the hurdles: A sugar in pig cells, foreign to the human body, causes immediate organ rejection. The kidney for this experiment came from a gene-edited animal, engineered to eliminate that sugar and avoid an immune system attack. Surgeons attached the pig kidney to a pair of large blood vessels outside the body of a deceased recipient so they cou...
Source: TIME: Health - October 20, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Research wire Source Type: news

Scientists Successfully Attached a Pig Kidney to Human For the First Time
Scientists temporarily attached a pig’s kidney to a human body and watched it begin to work, a small step in the decades-long quest to one day use animal organs for life-saving transplants. Pigs have been the most recent research focus to address the organ shortage, but among the hurdles: A sugar in pig cells, foreign to the human body, causes immediate organ rejection. The kidney for this experiment came from a gene-edited animal, engineered to eliminate that sugar and avoid an immune system attack. Surgeons attached the pig kidney to a pair of large blood vessels outside the body of a deceased recipient so they cou...
Source: TIME: Science - October 20, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Carla K. Johnson / AP Tags: Uncategorized Research wire Source Type: news

The immunomodulatory activity of Echinacea purpurea (purple coneflower) root extract
In this study, researchers from the University of Minnesota looked at the immunomodulatory activities of Echinacea purpurea (purple coneflower). Their findings were published in the Journal of Medicinal Food. Traditional healers have used E. purpurea for years to treat various illnesses. Its health benefits when it comes to the immune system, however, have not been fully explored. The researchers looked... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - September 29, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Can Cannabis Help Your Gut?
When Joe Silverman developed Crohn’s disease at age 21, the symptoms started out mild. While the sight of blood in his stools initially freaked him out, what really bothered him was the frequent abdominal pain and bloating that occurred as his condition progressed to moderate and then severe. Dietary changes didn’t make a difference, so he began taking prescription oral anti-inflammatory drugs that are often used to treat certain bowel diseases, which alleviated but didn’t eliminate his discomfort. He started using prescription steroid suppositories to cope with flare-ups of the inflammatory bowel disease...
Source: TIME: Health - September 23, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stacey Colino Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

The bias that blinds: why some people get dangerously different medical care
Medical research and practice have long assumed a narrow definition of the ‘default’ human, badly compromising the care of anyone outside that category. How can this be fixed?I met Chris in my first month at a small, hard-partying Catholic high school in north-eastern Wisconsin, where kids jammed cigarettes between the fingers of the school ’s lifesize Jesus statue and skipped mass to eat fries at the fast-food joint across the street. Chris and her circle perched somewhere adjacent to the school’s social hierarchy, and she surveyed the adolescent drama and absurdity with cool, heavy-lidded understa...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - September 21, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Jessica Nordell Tags: Science Health Doctors Medical research Hospitals Women & wellbeing GPs Race Gender Source Type: news

Clinical trial to test whether ivermectin is effective at treating Covid set to begin
The University of Minnesota is getting ready to conduct a clinical trial to find out whether ivermectin, along with two other drugs, is effective in treating COVID-19 (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fecal Transplants: a New Treatment for IBD
Linda Ann Sasser has had ulcerative colitis since she was 20, but it wasn’t until May 2019, about 30 years later, that her condition hit a low point: not only did she have a major flare-up of chronic inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), but on top of it, she had Clostridioides difficile (or C. diff), a highly contagious bacterial infection that causes severe diarrhea and inflammation of the colon. “I became really, really sick with bloody diarrhea 30 times a day and chronic stomach pain,” Sasser says. While hospitalized for 12 days, she was given oral steroid medications, which didn’t help, then IV ste...
Source: TIME: Health - September 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Stacey Colino Tags: Uncategorized Disease feature Source Type: news

First-in-human clinical trial for a vaccine to treat opioid use disorders enrolls first patients
The first patients have been enrolled in a phase 1 randomized placebo-controlled clinical trial to study a therapeutic vaccine for opioid use disorder developed by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School. Funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, the trial will test the safety and potential efficacy of a vaccine that is designed to selectively prevent the euphoric and toxic effects of oxycodone. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - September 7, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

I ’m Supposed To Be in a Wedding. Will I Risk Bringing COVID-19 Home to My Kids?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, A.S. in Wisconsin asks: My best friend is getting married in September and I’m in the wedding. I just found out at least one of the groomsmen has refused to be vaccin...
Source: TIME: Science - August 24, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

I ’m Supposed To Be in a Wedding. Will I Risk Bringing COVID-19 Home to My Kids?
Welcome to COVID Questions, TIME’s advice column. We’re trying to make living through the pandemic a little easier, with expert-backed answers to your toughest coronavirus-related dilemmas. While we can’t and don’t offer medical advice—those questions should go to your doctor—we hope this column will help you sort through this stressful and confusing time. Got a question? Write to us at covidquestions@time.com. Today, A.S. in Wisconsin asks: My best friend is getting married in September and I’m in the wedding. I just found out at least one of the groomsmen has refused to be vaccin...
Source: TIME: Health - August 24, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID Questions COVID-19 healthscienceclimate Source Type: news

Odds for an Eating Disorder May Vary by Income
FRIDAY, Aug. 13, 2021 -- Young Americans from low-income homes are more likely than those whose families are better off to be unhappy with the way they look and to have an eating disorder, a new study finds. University of Minnesota researchers... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - August 13, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Navigating a Neuroscience Career for Scientists of Color
On August 5, 2021, NIMH will host a webinar on navigating a neuroscience career for scientists of color with a rising star in neuroscience, Dr. Damien Fair. Dr. Fair is currently a founding co-director of the Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - August 9, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

New study provides clues to decades-old mystery about cell movement
(University of Minnesota) A new study, led by University of Minnesota Twin Cities engineering researchers, shows that the stiffness of protein fibers in tissues, like collagen, are a key component in controlling the movement of cells. The groundbreaking discovery provides the first proof of a theory from the early 1980s and could have a major impact on fields that study cell movement from regenerative medicine to cancer research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Lab Research Scientist (Researcher 2) - University of Minnesota
This position is primarily responsible for performing assays in various projects and includes validating methods, monitoring quality control, and managing project timelines for multiple projects simultaneously. In addition, the individual is also responsible for administrative and scientific responsibilities including literature research and review, grant submissions, project report preparation, and budgeting. Overall, the incumbent will be responsible for supporting the laboratory manager technically and administratively. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - July 21, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Post-Doctoral Associate - University of Minnesota
Postdoctoral fellowship positions are available immediately in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathology at the University of Minnesota to investigate molecular mechanisms that regulate cardiac hypertrophy and remodeling in response to stresses. The main objective is to determine how canonical Wnt/ beta-catenin signaling interacts with TCF7L2 isoforms regulate cardiac gene expression and structural remodeling.  Gene expression and epigenetic modifications will be investigated and interpreted in the context of TCF7L2 isoform recruitment. Candidates should provide curriculum vitae, a statement of research...
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - July 21, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Health care providers missing opportunities to talk about sexual health with young people
(University of Minnesota) Led by the University of Minnesota, a study found that a majority of adolescents and their parents considered health care provider discussions about sexual health important, but less than one-third reported conversing with a health professional. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study highlights socioeconomic, racial differences in the financing of medical education
(University of Minnesota Medical School) National data analyzed by University of Minnesota Medical School researchers show that nearly 40 percent of all funds used to pay for medical school are expected to come from family or personal sources and scholarships. The prevalence of these sources, however, varies widely by race and socioeconomic status. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 20, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Discrimination and safety concerns barriers to accessing healthy food for food-insecure young adults
(Elsevier) University of Minnesota School of Public Health researchers recently completed a study to determine how food-insecure young (emerging) adults (18-29 years of age) adapted their eating and child feeding behaviors during the COVID-19 pandemic. The researchers also sought to identify barriers to food access and opportunities to improve local access to resources for emerging adults. Their study results are published in the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 19, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientific Meeting » Navigating a Neuroscience Career for Scientists of Color
On August 5, 2021, NIMH will host a webinar on navigating a neuroscience career for scientists of color with a rising star in neuroscience, Dr. Damien Fair. Dr. Fair is currently a founding co-director of the Masonic Institute for the Developing Brain and professor in the Department of Pediatrics at the University of Minnesota Medical School. (Source: National Institute of Mental Health)
Source: National Institute of Mental Health - July 13, 2021 Category: Psychiatry Authors: National Institute of Mental Health Source Type: news

Study: Racial/ethnic and language inequities in ways patients obtain COVID-19 testing
(University of Minnesota) A recent study from researchers at the University of Minnesota and Hennepin Healthcare Research Institute is among the first to examine how different socio-demographic groups used telehealth, outpatient (i.e., clinic), emergency department and inpatient (i.e., hospital) care to test for SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 13, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Role of host genetics on gut microbiome is near-universal, but environmentally-dependent
(University of Minnesota) In new research from the University of Minnesota, University of Notre Dame and Duke University, scientists found that genetics nearly always plays a role in the composition of the gut microbiome of wild baboons. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 12, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Tokyo ’s Plan to Avoid Pandemic Disaster During the Olympics
The Olympics and COVID-19 were never going to be compatible. The cardinal rule when it comes to controlling an infectious disease is to limit the contact people have with one another. Yet the very essence of the two weeks of competition, which begin on July 23 in Tokyo, is to invite the world to meet, greet and engage in friendly—and often socially not so distant—contests. An estimated 70,000 athletes, coaches, staff, officials and media will be descending on Tokyo from July to August for the Olympic and Paralympic Games—at a time when infections in the city are rising again. On July 8, the government d...
Source: TIME: Health - July 8, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Magazine olympics overnight Tokyo Olympics Source Type: news

Research brief: New fossil sheds light on the evolution of how dinosaurs breathed
(University of Minnesota) Using an exceptionally preserved fossil from South Africa, a particle accelerator, and high-powered x-rays, an international team including a University of Minnesota researcher has discovered that not all dinosaurs breathed in the same way. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 6, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Clinical Research Coordinator (Res Pro 2)- Departments of Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota.   Clinical Research Coordinator8352P2- Clinical Research Coordinator- Research Professional 2 (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - June 25, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Race, ethnicity not a factor in recent weapon-carrying behaviors at US schools
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A study led by researchers at the University of Minnesota Medical School sheds new light on boys' weapon-carrying behaviors at U.S. high schools. The results indicate that weapon-carrying is not tied to students' race or ethnicity but rather their schools' social climates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 24, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Minnesota Medical School report details the effects of COVID-19 on adolescent sexual health
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A new report from the University of Minnesota Medical School's Healthy Youth Development - Prevention Research Center (HYD-PRC) highlights that Minnesota youth continue to contract sexually transmitted infections (STIs) at alarmingly high rates, despite the COVID-19 pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 23, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New machine learning methods could improve environmental predictions
(University of Minnesota) The study predicts flow and temperature in river networks. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 22, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Incidence Rates of Pediatric Cancers Vary by Race, Ethnicity
MONDAY, June 21, 2021 -- Incidence rates of pediatric cancers vary according to race and ethnicity, according to a study published online June 21 in Cancer. Erin L. Marcotte, Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota in Minneapolis, and colleagues... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - June 21, 2021 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Exposure to pollutants, increased free-radical damage speeds up aging
(West Virginia University) A new study from West Virginia University researcher Eric E. Kelley -- in collaboration with the University of Minnesota -- suggests that unrepaired DNA damage can increase the speed of aging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 21, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers find losartan is not effective in reducing hospitalization from mild COVID-19
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers determined that the common blood pressure medication, losartan, is not effective in reducing hospitalization for mildly-ill COVID-19 outpatients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Two U of M Medical School studies provide new evidence to battle drug price increases
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Two recent studies led by researchers from the University of Minnesota Medical School add new evidence to the impact of how drug price increases affect US patients and the overall cost of health care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 18, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The Delta Variant Could Soon Become the Dominant COVID-19 Strain. Here ’s What You Need to Know
The COVID-19 pandemic is increasingly becoming an arms race among the emerging variants of the virus, and at the moment, there’s no question which one is winning: the Delta variant—formally known as B.1.617.2—one of four strains to have emerged originally in India. It was just last month that the World Health Organization labeled Delta a “variant of concern”—joining with the Alpha strain, which emerged in the U.K.; the Beta strain, from South Africa; and the Gamma strain, first seen in Brazil. But Delta is fast becoming the most worrisome of the bunch. Health officials are sounding the a...
Source: TIME: Health - June 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alejandro de la Garza and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

The Delta Variant Could Soon Become the Dominant COVID-19 Strain. Here ’s What You Need to Know
The COVID-19 pandemic is increasingly becoming an arms race among the emerging variants of the virus, and at the moment, there’s no question which one is winning: the Delta variant—formally known as B.1.617.2—one of four strains to have emerged originally in India. It was just last month that the World Health Organization labeled Delta a “variant of concern”—joining with the Alpha strain, which emerged in the U.K.; the Beta strain, from South Africa; and the Gamma strain, first seen in Brazil. But Delta is fast becoming the most worrisome of the bunch. Health officials are sounding the a...
Source: TIME: Science - June 15, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Alejandro de la Garza and Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

‘I Truly Did Find My Calling.’ Meet the Young People Shaping Health Care’s Post-Pandemic Future
The COVID-19 pandemic has been exhausting for the world’s health care workers, who have spent the last year-plus putting their lives on the line to keep the rest of us safe and healthy. Now, their tireless efforts are inspiring a new generation to join their ranks: applications to U.S. medical schools shot up nearly 20% in fall 2021, according to the Association of American Medical Colleges. Individual schools are reporting similar spikes—New York University’s Rory Meyers College of Nursing saw a 33% increase in applications this year over the previous year, for instance. To learn more about the people wh...
Source: TIME: Health - June 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Tara Law Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

University of Minnesota Medical School identifies placental protein as possible birthweight regulator
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New findings from the University of Minnesota Medical School are helping uncover why some people are more likely to be overweight and develop Type 2 diabetes -- and it starts in the womb. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 10, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Oral health needs among youth with a history of foster care
(University of Minnesota) A new study from the University of Minnesota published in The Journal of the American Dental Association compared the self-identified oral health needs and access to dental care among youth who have and have not experienced foster care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Preclinical study suggests new approach to reduce COVID-19 death among the elderly
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research from the University of Minnesota Medical School and colleagues at the Mayo Clinic reveals a possible new approach to preventing death and severe disease in elderly people infected with SARS-CoV-2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Senolytics reduce COVID-19 symptoms in preclinical studies
(Mayo Clinic) Mayo Clinic researchers and colleagues at the University of Minnesota showed that COVID-19 exacerbates the damaging impact of senescent cells in the body. In preclinical studies, the senolytic drugs discovered at Mayo significantly reduced inflammation, illness, and mortality from COVID infection in older mice. The findings appear in the journal Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M Medical School researcher awarded $5M to reduce childhood obesity disparities
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A research team led by the University of Minnesota Medical School has been awarded a $5 million grant from the National Institute of Health (NIH) to conduct a clinical trial that hopes to identify the most effective approach to reduce racial and ethnic disparities in childhood obesity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

U of M Medical School receives $1.5M for nation's first ivermectin COVID-19 clinical trial
(University of Minnesota Medical School) An ongoing COVID-19 clinical trial studying the outpatient use of metformin, a generic medication for type 2 diabetes, has expanded and will now be the nation's first to include fluvoxamine, an antidepressant, and ivermectin, an antiparasitic, as possible treatment options to prevent hospitalization and " long COVID. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 25, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Data Visualization Journey
In November 2019, I was awarded a scholarship by NNLM-PNR (Pacific Northwest: Alaska, Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Washington) to attend a data visualization workshop titled “Accessing, Analyzing, and Visualizing IPUMS Data” in Denver, CO. The workshop, hosted by PolicyViz, was facilitated by Jonathan Schwabish, Urban Institute; David Van Riper, IPUMS; and Jose Pacas, IPUMS. I was eager to attend as I was on a journey to learn two new skill sets: data visualization and teaching data visualization to others – and the experience did not disappoint. First, the venue chosen was very cool – General Assembly r...
Source: The Cornflower - May 24, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Miles Dietz-Castel Tags: Blog Source Type: news

Socioeconomic status non-factor in worse COVID-19 for racial, ethnic groups in Twin Cities
(University of Minnesota Medical School) A research team, led by the University of Minnesota Medical School, found that regardless of socioeconomic status, Twin Cities residents of underrepresented racial and ethnic backgrounds endure worse COVID-19 outcomes compared to people who are white. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - May 18, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Research Professional 4 Supervisor - UMN Department of Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota. Research Project Manager will serve as a strong operational dyad partner to the Vice Chair of Development (VCD) for the Department of Orthopedic Surgery at the UMMC campus. They will have oversi...
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - May 14, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

New research optimizes body's own immune system to fight cancer
(University of Minnesota) First-of-its-kind study shows how engineered immune cells move faster to attack the tumor (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 14, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Research/Education Administrator (Research Pro 2) - UMN Department of Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - May 13, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Communications/Web Specialist- UMN Department of Orthopedic Surgery
The UMN has suspended hiring for most positions. However, we will continue hiring for positions critical to the University's mission and operations at this time. Applications are being accepted for this position and you are encouraged to apply. In-person interviews are suspended indefinitely and will be replaced by interviews in a virtual format. Thank you for your continued interest in working at the University of Minnesota.   (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - May 13, 2021 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

University of Minnesota Medical School researchers identify target for senolytic drugs
(University of Minnesota Medical School) In a study recently published in Nature, University of Minnesota Medical School researchers found that senescent immune cells are the most dangerous type of senescent cell. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 12, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Novel late-stage colorectal cancer treatment proves effective in preclinical models
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers say " tumor-secreted exosomes " help some cancer cells to evade immune response of current FDA-approved treatment options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New method preserves viable fruit fly embryos in liquid nitrogen
(University of Minnesota) A University of Minnesota team has developed a first-of-its-kind method that cryopreserves fruit fly (Drosophila melanogaster) embryos so they can be successfully recovered and developed into adult insects. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 27, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

As the U.S. Moves Toward Post-Pandemic Life, COVID-19 Is Still Devastating the World —Especially India
The pandemic won’t end for anyone until it ends for everyone. That sentiment has been repeated so many times, by so many people, it’s easy to forget it’s not just a cliche—particularly if you live in one of the wealthy countries, like the U.S. and Israel, that has made significant moves toward what feels like an end to the COVID-19 era. Israel, for example, has fully vaccinated more than half of its population and about 90% of its adults 50 and older are now immune to the virus—enough that the country is “busting loose” and “partying like it’s 2019,” as the Washin...
Source: TIME: Health - April 26, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news