Scientists pinpoint virus which could be the cause of deadly polio-like illness
University of Minnesota experts say enterovirus-D68 could cause acute flaccid myelitis, which struck at least 28 people in the UK last year, like three-year-old Chloe Stevenson (pictured). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

3D-printed transparent mouse skull could be window to studying Alzheimer's and head injuries
Researchers at the University of Minnesota developed the skull implant as a way of monitoring the surface of the brain in real time as they stimulate different areas. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Kids born via IVF have slightly higher cancer risk linked to parents' fertility issues, study claims
Researchers at the University of Minnesota studied 276,000 children conceived by IVF, and 2.2 million conceived naturally, for a decade. Cancer rates were 17 percent higher in kids conceived with IVF. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Research brief: Largest study of childhood cancer after IVF
(University of Minnesota) University of Minnesota researchers conducted the largest study of childhood cancer after conception by IVF to date. This population-based cohort study had nearly 2.5 times the number of children conceived by IVF than prior studies of the subject in Scandinavia and the United Kingdom. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Air pollution caused by corn production increases mortality rate in US
(University of Minnesota) A new study establishes that environmental damage caused by corn production results in 4,300 premature deaths annually in the United States, representing a monetized cost of $39 billion. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 1, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sometimes it's not good to be green
(University of Minnesota) The greening or eutrophication of the world's lakes will increase the emission of methane into the atmosphere by 30 to 90 percent during the next 100 years, say authors of a March 26, 2019 paper in Nature Communications. This increased methane emission is equivalent to 18-33 percent of annual carbon dioxide emissions from burning fossil fuels. Limiting lake greening is important to preserve fragile water supplies and to avoid acceleration of climate change. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 26, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota to lead $9.7 million NIH grant to improve hearing restoration
(University of Minnesota) The University of Minnesota announced today that it will lead a $9.7 million grant over the next five years from the National Institutes for Health (NIH) BRAIN Initiative to develop a new implantable device and surgical procedure with the goal of restoring more natural hearing to people who are deaf or severely hard-of-hearing. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Noninvasive ultrasound stimulation of spleen could lead to new treatments for inflammatory arthritis
(University of Minnesota) Researchers at the University of Minnesota, in collaboration with researchers at Medtronic, have shown that noninvasive daily ultrasound stimulation of the spleen in mice with inflammatory arthritis resulted in significantly less joint swelling compared to arthritic mice that were not treated. The research is a first step to developing new treatment options for more than a million people in the United States who currently suffer from rheumatoid arthritis. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 14, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New graphene-based device is first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors
(University of Minnesota) Researchers in the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have developed a unique new device using the wonder material graphene that provides the first step toward ultrasensitive biosensors to detect diseases at the molecular level with near perfect efficiency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 7, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Got a sulky teenager? Let them have a lie-in
An extra hour in bed makes adolescents 25 per cent less likely to feel very nervous and tense and about a third less likely to worry about things, a study by the University of Minnesota has found. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - March 5, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Minnesota Resuscitation Consortium Advanced Perfusion & Reperfusion Cardiac Life Support Strategy for Out-of-Hospital Refractory V Fib
Approximately 400,000 people in the United States suffer out-of-hospital cardiac arrest (OHCA) each year. One-third present to EMS with a shockable rhythm (v fib/v tach). Of these patients with an initial shockable rhythm, 50% are refractory to treatment resulting in prolonged duration of resuscitation and poor outcomes.1,2 The Minnesota Resuscitation Consortium (MRC) initiated the Advanced Perfusion and Reperfusion Cardiac Life Support Strategy for Out-of-Hospital Refractory Ventricular Fibrillation (v fib) in December 2015, in an effort to improve survival outcomes for patients suffering refractory v fib arrest. Extracor...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 27, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Jason Bartos, MD, PhD Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation Top Story Exclusive Articles Patient Care Heart of America Source Type: news

New 2019 guidelines for patients with atrial fibrillation
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Lin Yee Chen, MD, MS, Associate Professor with Tenure, Cardiovascular Division, in the Department of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School was part of a Writing Committee tasked with updating the 2014 guidelines for patients with AFib. The 2019 American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association/Heart Rhythm Society Guidelines for the Management of Patients with Atrial Fibrillation were just published as the standard for the management of Afib in the U.S. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Health Officials Are Worried That ‘Zombie Deer Disease’ Could Someday Spread to Humans
Officials are worried that a prion disease spreading among deer in the U.S. may someday threaten the health of humans. Chronic wasting disease (CWD), which is nicknamed “zombie deer disease,” gets its name from a range of symptoms. For deer, elk and moose, these include stumbling, listlessness, drooling and rapid weight loss. The fatal disease degrades the brains, spines and bodies of the animals it infects, and there are no known treatments or vaccines. No cases of CWD have been recorded in humans. It has not even been definitely proven that humans can be infected by CWD, though some research has suggested it&...
Source: TIME: Health - February 19, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime public health Source Type: news

The Priority and Future of Research in EMS
Allina Health EMS Researcher Lori Boland, MPH At Allina Health EMS, a small research team works inside the St. Paul, Minnesota-based EMS agency, which has more than 600 care providers and serves more than 100 communities in the region. We sat down with Lori Boland, MPH, principal research scientist at Allina Health EMS, to discuss the importance of research in EMS.Lori is a clinical epidemiologist who collaborates with emergency medicine physicians and prehospital clinicians in support of investigator-initiated research in the area of emergency services at Allina Health EMS. She earned her MPH in epidemiology with an empha...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - February 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ryan Kelley, NREMT Tags: EMS Insider Exclusive Articles Operations Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

The Priority and Future of Research in EMS
Allina Health EMS Researcher Lori Boland, MPH At Allina Health EMS, a small research team works inside the St. Paul, Minnesota-based EMS agency, which has more than 600 care providers and serves more than 100 communities in the region. We sat down with Lori Boland, MPH, principal research scientist at Allina Health EMS, to discuss the importance of research in EMS.Lori is a clinical epidemiologist who collaborates with emergency medicine physicians and prehospital clinicians in support of investigator-initiated research in the area of emergency services at Allina Health EMS. She earned her MPH in epidemiology with an empha...
Source: JEMS Operations - February 16, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ryan Kelley, NREMT Tags: EMS Insider Exclusive Articles Operations Administration and Leadership Source Type: news

Sea Grant & ASLO bring helping hands to Puerto Rico
(University of Minnesota) Scientists from 52 countries will be providing hands-on help in Puerto Rico to restore marine and coastal resources damaged during hurricane Maria in 2017 in connection with the annual meeting of the Association for the Sciences of Limnology and Oceanography February 23 to March 2, 2019. The Puerto Rico and Minnesota Sea Grant programs are working together with Puerto Rico-based members of the meeting committee to offer educational and volunteer opportunities focused on environmental restoration. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 14, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

UMN study provides new insight into use of cell replacement therapies to treat muscular dystrophies
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota Medical School continues its legacy of advancing cell replacement therapies with a scientific breakthrough that highlights the promise of cell therapies for muscular dystrophy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study shows endocrine-disrupting chemicals linked to equine metabolic syndrome
(Morris Animal Foundation) Endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) in a horse's environment may play a role in the development of equine metabolic syndrome (EMS). This finding, made by Morris Animal Foundation-funded researchers at The University of Minnesota, could explain some of the variability in EMS severity that can't be explained by other commonly measured factors, such as diet, exercise and season. The study was published in Chemosphere. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers 3D bio-print a model that could lead to improved anticancer drugs and treatments
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota researchers have developed a way to study cancer cells which could lead to new and improved treatment. They have developed a new way to study these cells in a 3D in vitro model (i.e., in a culture dish rather than in a human or animal). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who marry in their early 20s have better sleep in middle age, study finds 
A research team at the University of Minnesota has found those who have positive, lasting relationships in their early adulthood experience less anxiety after the age of 32. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

People who marry in their early 20s have better sleep in middle age, study finds  
A research team at the University of Minnesota has found those who have positive, lasting relationships in their early adulthood experience less anxiety after the age of 32. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Citizen science projects have a surprising new partner -- the computer
(University of Minnesota) Data scientists and citizen science experts partnered with ecologists who often study wildlife populations by deploying camera traps. These camera traps are remote, independent devices, triggered by motion and infrared sensors that provide researchers with images of passing animals. The researchers built skill sets to help computers identify other animals, such as a deer or squirrel, with even fewer images. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 6, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Will Mobile ECPR Change How EMS Treats Cardiac Arrest?
“He not busy being born, is busy dying.”—Bob Dylan (1965) No one is busier dying than a patient in refractory ventricular fibrillation (RVF). These patients have exasperated EMS personnel for decades, and they, sadly, usually die. The treatment traditionally has been to administer ACLS for 30–45 minutes, and the lucky few who get a return of spontaneous circulation (ROSC) get admitted. The survival rate using this approach has been around 8%.1 But, with the advent of adult, extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO), the approach to these patients may be changing. JEMS: ECMO & ECPR The use of EC...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 2, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Ralph J. Frascone, MD, FACEP, FAEMS Tags: Exclusive Articles Cardiac & Resuscitation Top Story Source Type: news

Medical experts restore movement and autonomic function in patients with complete paralysis
(University of Minnesota Medical School) There are more than 290,000 people estimated to be living in the United States with a spinal cord injury. Previously, it has been shown that it is possible to restore some function to young and healthy patients within a few years of injury. Now, researchers show spinal cord stimulation can immediately restore some voluntary movement and autonomic functions such as cardiovascular, bowel, and bladder years after a paralyzing injury without any significant rehabilitation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

It ’s Going to Feel like 50 Below in the Midwest This Week. Here’s What Extreme Cold Does to Your Body
Parts of the Midwest are bracing for their coldest temperatures in decades this week, with Tuesday night conditions predicted to feel like 50 degrees below zero or colder in areas of the Dakotas, Minnesota and Iowa, according to AccuWeather. Temperatures in Chicago are also predicted to dip below negative 25 for the first time since the mid-1980s, AccuWeather says. Health officials have warned residents to stay indoors as much as possible, since the brutal cold can become dangerous in just minutes. But what actually happens to your body in the frigid air? TIME asked Dr. Ronald Furnival, a pediatric emergency physician and ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 28, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime weather Source Type: news

American Nobel Laureate Knew About Chinese Scientist Gene-Editing Babies, But Did Not Report Him, Emails Show
Long before the claim of the world’s first gene-edited babies became public, Chinese researcher He Jiankui shared the news with a U.S. Nobel laureate who objected to the experiment yet remained an adviser to He’s biotech company. The revelation that another prominent scientist knew of the work, which was widely condemned when it was revealed, comes as scientists debate whether and how to alert troubling research, and the need for clearer guidelines. Emails obtained by The Associated Press under a public records request show that Nobel Prize winner Craig Mello of the University of Massachusetts learned about the...
Source: TIME: Science - January 28, 2019 Category: Science Authors: CANDICE CHOI and MARILYNN MARCHIONE / AP Tags: Uncategorized China onetime Source Type: news

Rural Areas Nationwide Are Losing Prenatal and Labor and Delivery Services, and Minnesota Is Part of That Trend
Discussion focuses on rural areas losing prenatal care as well as labor and delivery services across the country, with a particular focus on Minnesota. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - January 28, 2019 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers refine the ability to predict atrial fibrillation-related stroke
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is associated with a five-fold increased risk of stroke. Nearly 3 million Americans are living with AFib. For years, researchers have been looking for ways to reduce the risk of stroke for this patient population. In a recent article published in Circulation, Lin Yee Chen, M.D., M.S., Associate Professor with tenure, Cardiovascular Division, in the Department of Medicine with the University of Minnesota Medical School demonstrates how to improve the prediction of stroke in patients with AFib. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Attend a Conference
American Society for Microbiology’s Conference on Undergraduate Education, May 16-19 in Denver, CO. BioQUEST’s HHMI Quantitative Summer Conference, June 10-16 at Emory University in Atlanta, GA. Annual Association for Biology Laboratory Educators (ABLE) Conference, June 25-28 at the University of Calgary in Alberta, CA. Society for the Advancement of Biology Education Research 2013 National Meeting, July 11-14 at the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities in Minneapolis, MN. National Association of Biology Teachers Professional Development Conference November 20-23 in Atlanta. GA. Annual Meeting of the Associ...
Source: Education Reports - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: March/April Source Type: news

Upcoming Biology Education Conferences
The Life Discovery-Doing Science Conference is being organized by the Ecological Society of America, Botanical Society of America, Society for the Study of Evolution, and the Society for Economic Botany. March 15-16, 2013. St. Paul, MN. Develop new classroom materials with innovative biology educators at the BioQUEST Summer Workshop. June 10 - 16, 2013 Emory University Atlanta, GA Participate in hands-on workshops at the 2013 Annual Association for Biology Laboratory Educators (ABLE) Conference. June 25-28. Alberta, CA. Share your research and gain new knowledge at the Society for the Advancement of Biology ...
Source: Education Reports - January 24, 2019 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Tags: January/February Source Type: news

Proteus debuts digital cancer drug
Proteus Digital Health said today that the first cancer patients were treated using its digital oncology therapy, which combines oral chemotherapy with an ingestible sensor. Patients with stage 3 and 4 colorectal cancer at the University of Minnesota Health and Fairview Health Services were treated with digital capecitabine. The Redwood City, Calif.-based company plans to use its sensor-drug combination to record and share data such as the time and dose of chemotherapy that a patient ingests. Get the full story at our sister site, Drug Delivery Business News. The post Proteus debuts digital cancer drug appeared first ...
Source: Mass Device - January 17, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Sarah Faulkner Tags: Drug-Device Combinations Featured mHealth (Mobile Health) Oncology Pharmaceuticals Proteus Digital Health Source Type: news

Inspire Medical Systems scores win with Blue Cross Blue Shield Association
Inspire Medical Systems – creator of a pacemaker-like system to treat obstructive sleep apnea – said today that the Blue Cross Blue Shield Association’s Evidence Street issued a positive assessment of Inspire therapy to its members. BCBSA is a national federation of 36 Blue Cross and Blue Shield companies. The report from BCBSA, according to Inspire (Maple Grove, Minn.), found sufficient evidence that an Inspire-type therapy provided meaningful improvement in the net health outcome for sleep apnea patients falling under certain criteria: over 22 years old (as well as 10- to 21-year-olds with Dow...
Source: Mass Device - January 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: Business/Financial News Neuromodulation/Neurostimulation News Well Blue Cross Blue Shield Inspire Medical Systems Inc. Reimbursement sleep apnea Source Type: news

UMN Medical School Researchers discover how to treat diastolic heart failure
(University of Minnesota Medical School) Research out of University Minnesota Medical School and published in the Journal of Clinical Investigation Insight uncovers what causes diastolic heart failure and how it can be treated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

More than 80% of us fail our New Year's resolutions by Valentine's Day
Research by the University of Minnesota show 80 percent of us fall off the aspirational wagon before Valentine's Day. Researchers explain why, and offer some tips to keep going longer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - January 9, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Another Jon Entine? Climate change "expert" arrested for brutally beating, choking fiance and dragging her by hair across apartment
(Natural News) A leading climate change apologist and tenured professor at the University of Minnesota was recently taken into police custody after he was basically caught in the act of beating, choking, and dragging his fiance across the room by her hair during a violent outburst. Widely recognized as one of the big dogs perpetrating... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 4, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMN medical school researchers study abnormal blood glucose levels of discharged patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers decided to delve into an area where little data currently exists. They wanted to know what happens after these patients with abnormal blood glucose measurements are discharged? Are uncontrolled blood glucose levels associated with worse outcomes after patients are discharged from the hospital? Surprisingly, despite a large body of literature around management of blood glucose in the hospital -- there are few studies that attempt to answer this question. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers give new insight to muscular dystrophy patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New research by University of Minnesota scientists has revealed the three dimensional structure of the DUX4 protein, which is responsible for the disease, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). Unlike the majority of genetic diseases, FSHD is not caused by a protein that is missing or not functioning properly. Rather it is caused when a functioning, normal, protein shows up in a place where it doesn't belong (in muscles). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why feeling empathy could lead former drug users to relapse
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Empathy, the awareness of another's feelings and emotions, is a key feature in normal social interactions. But new research from the University of Minnesota suggests that empathy can have detrimental effects on an individual -- and can push former drug users to relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pushing 3D Printing Forward
Researchers and students have demonstrated that inks can be used instead of thermoplastic filaments to 3D print functional biomedical devices. Michael McAlpine, Benjamin Mayhugh Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering at the University of Minnesota, described such advances in the ESC Minneapolis keynote, “3D Printing Functional Materials & Devices.” A lot of the inks McAlpine’s group uses are nanometer-scale particle inks printed at a line-width scale of 10 microns and above for printing devices at the macro level. They have developed software as well as a hig...
Source: MDDI - December 4, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: MD & M Minneapolis 3-D Printing Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Geriatric Trauma Fellowship Opening: 2020-2021
The University of Minnesota/Regions Hospital offers an exceptional opportunity for a multi-disciplinary Geriatric Orthopaedic Trauma fellowship, under fellowship director, Dr. Julie Switzer.  We have this position available for the 2020-2021 academic year and beyond.  This fellowship is a twelve month unique training experience in the operative and clinical management of geriatric orthopaedic trauma patients. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - December 3, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota Adult Reconstruction Trauma Fellowship: 2020-2021
Regions Hospital/University of Minnesota is seeking a qualified candidate to fill one Combined Adult Reconstruction/Orthopaedic Trauma position for 2020-2021 academic year, beginning on August 1, 2020. (Source: Orthogate - Latest News)
Source: Orthogate - Latest News - December 3, 2018 Category: Orthopaedics Tags: Featured Job Opportunities News Source Type: news

Policy, legal approaches key to health equity in precision medicine
(University of Minnesota) Genomics has a diversity problem. Despite the dazzling promise of genetically-tailored treatments and therapies, fundamental questions remain about whether precision medicine will advance health equity or make disparities worse. On Nov. 29, 2018, a national conference and webcast at Meharry Medical College in Nashville will be the first to focus on the role law and policy must play to ensure precision medicine increases health equity and access. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers work to improve dermatologic care for sexual and gender minority patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota researchers recently published an opinion piece in JAMA Dermatology focused on standardizing collection of sexual orientation and gender identity in dermatology clinical settings. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers stop 'sneaky' cancer cells in their tracks
(University of Minnesota) A new study by University of Minnesota biomedical engineers shows how they stopped cancer cells from moving and spreading, even when the cells changed their movements. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN researchers discover important connection between cells in the liver
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers have made a discovery which could lead to a new way of thinking about how disease pathogenesis in the liver is regulated, which is important for understanding the condition nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), which is incredibly common and growing. It is apparent that about 30 percent of Americans and are at risk to advance to more severe conditions such as nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), cirrhosis, cardiovascular disease, or even liver cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New strategy discovered toward possible prevention of cancers tied to mono
(University of Minnesota) Researchers have discovered a possible path forward in preventing the development of cancers tied to two viruses, including the virus that causes infectious mononucleosis --more commonly known as mono or the 'kissing disease' -- that infects millions of people around the globe each year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Sex addiction more common than previously thought: 1 in 10 men and 1 in 12 women are hooked
A University of Minnesota study found that 10 percent of men and six percent of women struggle to control intrusive sexual urges - rates far higher than psychiatrists previously estimated. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 9, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMN researchers study the impact of insurance coverage on transferred patients
(University of Minnesota Medical School) University of Minnesota Medical School researchers seek to identify the relationship between insurance coverage and the mortality rate of patients transferred between hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are E-Cigarettes Safe? Here ’s What the Science Says
In 1965, when Herbert Gilbert was granted the first patent on a smoke- and tobacco-­free cigarette, he wrote that the product would “provide a safe and harmless means for and method of smoking.” More than 60 years later, however, modern iterations of Gilbert’s invention have sparked debate in the public-health community. E-cigarettes, which have grown increasingly popular in the past five years, were designed as a tool to help people quit ­smoking—and by doing so they should drastically reduce rates of lung cancer and other diseases. But the question is, does that potential outweigh their po...
Source: TIME: Health - November 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Research Brief: Opioid-Affected Births to Rural Residents Are Increasing in Both Rural and Urban Hospitals
This study looked at where rural mothers with opioid use disorder gave birth and examined the characteristics of opioid-affected births to rural mothers based on whether they occurred in rural hospitals, urban non-teaching hospitals, or urban teaching hospitals. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 29, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news