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A child's gender can be detected in their speech from age five, research says
University of Minnesota academics say boys and girls pick up speech cues from adults around them, resulting in differencesThe gender of children can be picked up from their speech from as young as five years old, researchers have revealed.While male and female children have no physiological reason for sounding different before puberty, when changes to the larynx kick in, researchers say boys and girls pick up telltale speech cues from adults around them, resulting in perceptible differences in their speech.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 16, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Nicola Davis in Austin Tags: Science Children Society Biology Health Gender World news US news UK news LGBT rights Parents and parenting Life and style Family Source Type: news

Wild rice is the “canary in the coal mine” for lakes and streams – Researchers use it to track water quality
(Natural News) Determining the health of a lake or a stream could be done by looking for the presence of wild rice. According to a team of researchers from the University of Minnesota, wild rice is to these bodies of water as a canary is to a coal mine. Their sensitivity to their surroundings is... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Teens And Gender
NPR's Lulu Garcia-Navarro talks with Nic Rider, post-doctoral fellow at the University of Minnesota whose research shows more teens in the U.S. are identifying as transgender or gender nonconforming. (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - February 11, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DataFlash: Electronic Lab Notebooks
I recently had the opportunity to listen to a webinar about electronic lab notebooks called, “Using electronic laboratory notebooks in the academic life sciences: a group leader’s experience on how they can make research teams more efficient.” Not having used electronic laboratory notebooks (eLN) myself, I was curious about their functionality, whether librarians are involved in their adoption, and whether they contribute to better data management. Paper-based laboratory note books have been used by researchers for centuries as a way to document their observations, experiments and procedures. A perfect ex...
Source: Dragonfly - January 30, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Ann Madhavan Tags: Data Science Technology Data_Science Source Type: news

Potential new birth control for men made with a plant extract that African warriors use as a heart-stopping poison for their arrows – what could possibly go wrong?
(Natural News) The birth control options for men have been slim to none. But researchers from the University of Minnesota and University of Kansas may soon be changing that. They’ve just suggested a new type of male birth control in the form of an oral contraceptive containing a derivative of ouabain. According to ScienceDaily.com, this... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

These Are the Best Foods for a Baby ’s Brain
So much is going on in the first few months of a baby’s life, it’s no surprise that what a baby eats can have an effect on how important structures and connections in the brain develop. To help parents understand what babies need, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) issued a set of recommendations for foods that ensure healthy brain development in babies’ first 1,000 days. In the guidelines, just published in the journal Pediatrics, the AAP’s Committee on Nutrition say that certain nutrients, including protein, zinc, iron, folate, certain vitamins and polyunsaturated fatty acids are critical fo...
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized babies brains babies diet babies nutrition babies supplements baby diet baby food baby food diet best foods for a baby brain health breast milk breastmilk Diet/Nutrition healthytime what do babies eat what do ba Source Type: news

Our Complacency About the Flu Is Killing Us
Everyone’s talking—and rightly so—about this year’s flu season, which is on its way to becoming the worst in 15 years. The news is full of stories about hospitals resorting to tents to accommodate the influx of patients and parents dealing with school closings in nearly every state. We count and mourn the dead. As a family doctor, my heart is with those patients and their families. As a global health professional with four decades of experience in combating epidemics, my mind is on the one critical thing we aren’t talking about at all as we suffer in this flu season: complacency. Put plainly, ...
Source: TIME: Health - January 19, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jonathan D. Quick, MD, MPH Tags: Uncategorized deaths from flu 2018 flu epidemic flu epidemic 2018 flu peak flu season 2018 flu shot effectiveness healthytime how many people have died from the flu new flu symptoms public health why are people dying of the flu Source Type: news

These lab-grown blood vessel replacements could benefit dialysis patients
[Image from University of Minnesota]University of Minnesota researchers have developed a blood vessel replacement made of biological materials in a lab. The lab-grown vessels have no living cells at implantation and could be used as a graft for kidney dialysis patients. The lab-engineered blood vessel replacement is the first nonsynthetic, decellularized graft that is repopulated with cells using the recipient’s cells when implanted. The grafts could also be used as coronary and peripheral bypass blood vessel and tubular heart valves. Approximately 480,000 people are on dialysis in the U.S., according to the National...
Source: Mass Device - January 3, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Danielle Kirsh Tags: Implants Regenerative Medicine Research & Development kidney dialysis MedTech University of Minnesota Source Type: news

UCLA faculty voice: What thin people don ’t understand about dieting
UCLAA. Janet TomiyamaA. Janet Tomiyama is an assistant professor of psychology at UCLA. Traci Mann is a professor of psychology at the University of Minnesota. Thiscolumn appeared on the Conversation.Diets do not work.The scientific evidence is clear as can be that cutting calories simply doesn ’t lead to long-term weight loss or health gains.We suspect most dieters have realized this by now too. And yet, here they are again, setting the same weight loss goal this year that they set last year.The only people who don ’t seem to appreciate this are people who have never dieted. It’s particula...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - January 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Pet Dogs May Speed Human Brain Cancer Trials
A new five-year research project at the University of Minnesota will include pet dogs with glioblastoma (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - December 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study warns nothing cuts the risk of dementia
It may seem like there is a pill to fix everything. But a review by the University of Minnesota shows there is no 'magic bullet' for dementia, and anything which pits itself as such is duping the consumer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 19, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

NOTHING cuts the risk of dementia
It may seem like there is a pill to fix everything. But a review by the University of Minnesota shows there is no 'magic bullet' for dementia, and anything which pits itself as such is duping the consumer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Landmark paper on global oceans garners international award
(University of Minnesota) The results made audiences gasp: Five percent of all the nitrogen in the Gulf of Mexico comes from Minnesota and 11 percent comes from Iowa. Few people thought it was possible for such small patches of land to have major effects on enormous bodies of water. These and other eye-popping findings were possible only after the publication of a 1996 paper in Biogeochemistry that is the recipient of ASLO's 2018 John H. Martin Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Professional Develop Award Funds Two Courses on Data Management
The Joint 2017 Midwest Medical Library Association and Michigan Health Sciences Libraries Association Conference received the Professional Development Award from the National Network of Libraries of Medicine Greater Midwest Region to offer two continuing education courses focused on data management. We selected this topic based on the vision of the new Director of the National Library of Medicine, Patricia Flatley Brennan, RN, PhD, who said “I believe the future of health and health care rests on data—genomic data, environmental sensor-generated data, electronic health records data, patient-generated data, rese...
Source: The Cornflower - December 12, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Funding News from the Region Success Stories Training Source Type: news

Allina Health EMS Announces New Hires to Senior Leadership Team
St. Paul, Minnesota. – Allina Health EMS announced today two new hires who have joined its senior leadership team. Joan Mellor will take on the role of Director of External Affairs, and Jim Soukup will join as the Communication Center Director for Allina Health EMS. Mellor previously served as the VP Organizational Planning & Development with Evolution Health, the revolutionary Mobile Integrated Healthcare start-up based in Dallas, Texas. She also previously worked at the Medtronic Foundation, where she led the National Heart Rescue Program and helped to start the Allina Health Heart Safe Community Program two de...
Source: JEMS Administration and Leadership - December 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Allina Health Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Allina Health EMS Announces New Hires to Senior Leadership Team
St. Paul, Minnesota. – Allina Health EMS announced today two new hires who have joined its senior leadership team. Joan Mellor will take on the role of Director of External Affairs, and Jim Soukup will join as the Communication Center Director for Allina Health EMS. Mellor previously served as the VP Organizational Planning & Development with Evolution Health, the revolutionary Mobile Integrated Healthcare start-up based in Dallas, Texas. She also previously worked at the Medtronic Foundation, where she led the National Heart Rescue Program and helped to start the Allina Health Heart Safe Community Program two de...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - December 11, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Allina Health Tags: Administration and Leadership Industry News Source Type: news

Study: Too many nutrients make microbes less responsive
(University of Minnesota) Bacteria in lakes play a key role in maintaining water quality by absorbing excess nitrogen and phosphorus. They also help store carbon, which has implications for our climate. But, as it turns out, their ability to do these tasks varies depending on the makeup of the lake in which they live, according to a new study by University of Minnesota researchers that was funded by the National Science Foundation. In short, location matters most. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 11, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers 3-D Print Lifelike Artificial Organ Models
A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - December 7, 2017 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Combating Microbial Terrorists: How to End Our "D éjà vu All Over Again" Preparedness Paradox
University of Minnesota, School of Public Health. 04/13/2017 This one-hour,33-minute webinar, from the Consortium on Laws and Values in Health, Environment and the Life Sciences, discusses how each new infectious disease outbreak prompts a reactive response, short-term resource investments, and eventual codification of lessons learned. But retrospective analyses of opportunities to improve preparedness have not translated into the meaningful long-term investments and actions necessary for success. The speaker describes how health protection science, government leadership, and social mobilization must work together and addr...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

Ending the Pandemic Era: Science at the Animal-Human-Environmental Interface
University of Minnesota, School of Public Health. 02/07/2017 This one-hour, 36-minute webinar, from the Consortium on Laws and Values in Health, Environment and the Life Sciences, describes the work of the PREDICT project and its results, including the establishment of advanced One Health capacity in more than 30 countries and identification of more than 800 previously undetected viruses. It describes additional work that needs to be done in the wake of the PREDICT Consortium's conclusion that only a small proportion of viral threats (estimated to be much less than 1%) have been identified to date. (Video or Multimedia) (S...
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

3D printed organ models are getting way better: Here ’ s how
Researchers attached sensors to the organ models for real-time feedback. [Image courtesy of McAlpine Research Group]University of Minnesota researchers are taking 3D printed organ models to the next level: They look and feel like the real thing, and integrated sensors help surgeons train. There’s even the potential that such artificial models may someday become the real deal – “bionic organs” used to replace damaged biological organs. The Minnesota researchers published their work today in the journal Advanced Materials Technologies. They’re seeking a patent for the technol...
Source: Mass Device - December 6, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Chris Newmarker Tags: News Well Research & Development Surgical 3dprinting mcalpineresearchgroup University of Minnesota Source Type: news

Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models
A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - December 6, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Researchers 3-D print lifelike artificial organ models
(University of Minnesota) A team of researchers led by the University of Minnesota has 3-D printed lifelike artificial organ models that mimic the exact anatomical structure, mechanical properties, and look and feel of real organs. These patient-specific organ models, which include integrated soft sensors, can be used for practice surgeries to improve surgical outcomes in thousands of patients worldwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Finches, Dogs, Lions and Zika: An Ecologist Looks at Emerging Disease
University of Minnesota, School of Public Health. 01/24/2017 This one-hour, 32-minute webinar provides quantitative estimates of levels of pathogen diversity in natural communities, illustrating the relative insignificance of discovering new viruses, and describing the factors that determine successful emergence and subsequent evolution in a well-studied avian pathogen. The speaker also provides an analysis of the current and future dynamics of Zika virus and its response to potential control methods. (Video or Multimedia) (Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health)
Source: Disaster Lit: Resource Guide for Disaster Medicine and Public Health - December 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: The U.S. National Library of Medicine Source Type: news

From Alaska to Amazonia: First global maps of traits that drive vegetation growth
(University of Minnesota) Detailed global maps of key traits in higher plants have been made available for the first time, thanks to work led by researchers from the University of Minnesota's (UMN) College of Food, Agriculture and Natural Resource Sciences (CFANS). (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Researchers develop graphene nano 'tweezers' that can grab individual biomolecules
(University of Minnesota) Researchers from the University of Minnesota College of Science and Engineering have found yet another remarkable use for the wonder material graphene -- tiny electronic 'tweezers' that can grab biomolecules floating in water with incredible efficiency. This capability could lead to a revolutionary handheld disease diagnostic system that could be run on a smart phone. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Running does not make up for poor lifestyle habits
Researchers from the University of Minnesota and Stanford University found that running marathons will not increase or decrease your risk of heart disease. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

25% of high-grade glioma patients alive 3 years post trial
Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma were treated by the University of Minnesota Medical School. Median survival was 14.4 months, compared with the typical 8 months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Could a blood test in middle age predict dementia risk?
Conclusion Inflammation in the body is a response to injury or disease. But if the body is constantly in an inflammatory state, it can harm blood vessels and lead to heart disease. This study suggests high levels of inflammation over the long term might also damage the brain. That's not surprising – what's good for the heart is usually good for the brain, and we already know exercising, avoiding high blood pressure and eating healthily may help protect the brain. Studies like this will help researchers work out more precisely what's happening in the brain when people experience memory loss or dementia. But this study...
Source: NHS News Feed - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Lifestyle/exercise Source Type: news

Feel fuller longer with fungi for breakfast; researchers say mushrooms will help you lose weight and fight dementia
(Natural News) Fungi for breakfast? A new study suggests that eating mushrooms for breakfast keeps you from getting hungry, thus helping you lose weight, as reported by The Daily Mail. Researchers from the University of Minnesota matched common mushrooms and meat according to their levels of protein, which is the most satiating macronutrient, and calories.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 2, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trials
Researchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The vessel, that could be used as an "off the shelf" graft for kidney dialysis patients, performed well in a recent study with nonhuman primates. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - November 2, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

25% of high-grade glioma patients live 3 years after trail
Patients with recurrent high-grade glioma were treated by the University of Minnesota Medical School. Median survival was 14.4 months, compared with the typical 8 months. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A high-fat diet encourages the growth of fungi in the gut, which makes for an unhealthy microbiota and contributes to obesity, study finds
(Natural News) A study finds that eating a diet high in fat not only gives you extra calories, but also changes the growth of fungi in the gut, which makes for an unhealthy microbiota and contributes to weight gain or obesity, as reported by the Science Daily. Researchers from the University of Minnesota conducted the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

New tissue-engineered blood vessel replacements one step closer to human trials
(University of Minnesota) Researchers at the University of Minnesota have created a new lab-grown blood vessel replacement that is composed completely of biological materials, but surprisingly doesn't contain any living cells at implantation. The vessel, that could be used as an " off the shelf " graft for kidney dialysis patients, performed well in a recent study with nonhuman primates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NNLM Professional Development Awardee, Noreen Mulcahy attends Pure Information, the 2017 Midwest Chapter/MLA Conference
Noreen Mulcahy The NNLM Professional Development Award made it possible for me to attend Pure Information, the 2017 Midwest Chapter/MLA Conference in Ypsilanti, MI.  The event was held from Saturday, October 14-Monday, October 16 at the Marriott at Eagle Crest. As part of the award, I had the opportunity to take the class Data Management for Librarians, presented by Caitlin Bakker, Research Services Liaison, University of Minnesota Twin Cities.  She discussed how librarians can incorporate research data services to clients.  Some hands-on exercises gave participants the opportunity to develop data management...
Source: The Cornflower - October 30, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: hspielbauer Tags: Data Science Funding Success Stories Source Type: news

Cancer trial led by University of Minnesota Medical School's Dr. Clark Chen shows promise
(University of Minnesota Medical School) New data from a Phase I clinical trial led by Clark Chen, M.D., Ph.D., Lyle French Chair in Neurosurgery and Head of the University of Minnesota Medical School Department of Neurosurgery shows more than a quarter of patients with recurrent high-grade glioma, a form of brain cancer, were alive more than three years after treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Eating mushrooms at breakfast may help you feel fuller
Conclusions Though of interest, this study doesn't provide strong evidence that you should eat mushrooms if you want to lose weight. The study has a number of limitations: It's a short-term study that didn't look at effects on weight. It showed that people reported feeling fuller after eating mushrooms, but there were few signs this actually led to them eating less. As the researchers openly acknowledge, there could be other explanations for the findings. To match the protein content in mince required a much larger volume of mushrooms, and therefore a larger sandwich that would have taken more time and effort to chew. ...
Source: NHS News Feed - October 23, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Food/diet Source Type: news

Mushrooms stave off hunger pangs and help people feel full
University of Minnesota researchers claim that mushrooms for breakfast, perhaps on toast or in an omelette, stave off hunger pangs and leads to a greater feeling of fullness. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UMN Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) receives NIH R01 grant
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research (CMRR) has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's National Institute on Aging to understand Alzheimer's disease in the context of the aging brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UMN receives grant from Helmsley Charitable Trust to test 'super ambulances'
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota has received a grant of $892,462 from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust's Rural Healthcare Program to explore the feasibility of equipping ambulances that function as mobile emergency departments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Connected Devices Seek to Tackle Drug Noncompliance
Noncompliance with drug regimens continues to be a significant healthcare concern. “Today, 60% of patients fail to comply with their medication regimen,” Sai Shankar, director business development - connected devices for Aptar Pharma, tells MD+DI.   Aptar Pharma believes that turning metered-dose inhalers (MDIs) and dry-powder inhalers (DPIs) into connected devices could have an impact. “This can improve patient engagement and significantly increase dose adherence and improve patient health outcomes, as patients manage their treatments more effectively,” says Shankar. “Connected ...
Source: MDDI - October 10, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

How Power Outages Can Affect Mental Health
It’s been two weeks since Hurricane Maria swept through Puerto Rico, plunging it into darkness. Today, around 95% of Puerto Rico’s electric grid remains down, and that outage could last for months. Being without power comes with obvious physical health risks, especially for hospitals and nursing homes, which rely on power for dialysis and oxygen machines, refrigerated insulin medication and more. Being in the dark impairs safety and security, too. But blackouts also take a lasting toll on people’s mental health, experts say. This often-ignored issue is slowly gaining more recognition in disaster response...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - October 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin and Karl Vick Tags: Uncategorized blackout healthytime hurricane Hurricane Maria mental health power outage PTSD public health Puerto Rico Source Type: news

Novel platform for investigating quiescence in dormancy-capable cancer cells
(World Scientific) A team of researchers from the University of Minnesota-Twin Cities has reported a novel encapsulation approach to identify dormant cancer cells and maintain them in a quiescent state. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 2, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

UMN Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research receives NIH U01 grant
(University of Minnesota Medical School) The University of Minnesota Medical School's Center for Magnetic Resonance Research has been awarded a grant from the National Institutes of Health's BRAIN Initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

16 Ways to Get People to Like You Immediately, According to Psychology
This article originally appeared on BusinessInsider.com (Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories)
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Shana Lebowitz / Business Insider Tags: Uncategorized onetime psychology Source Type: news

Have You Considered the Potential of Deep Design?
How much time do medical product designers spend on understanding clinical processes? Perhaps not enough. Product designers “often don’t see their devices as part of a system,” says Kathleen Harder, PhD, director of the Center for Design in Health at the University of Minnesota. But there can be adverse ripple effects with devices, she warns. Harder also serves as director of graduate studies in the Human Factors Program at University of Minnesota. For more than 15 years, she has worked with clinicians to test ideas that guide users toward desired behaviors in healthcare delivery. With a background as an ...
Source: MDDI - September 22, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Daphne Allen Tags: R & D Source Type: news

UMN researchers find recipe for forest restoration
(University of Minnesota) A new study led by graduate student Leland Werden and associate professor Jennifer Powers of the University of Minnesota College of Biological Sciences has uncovered some valuable information on ways to maximize the success of replanting efforts, bringing new hope for restoring these threatened ecosystems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - September 21, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

University of Minnesota researchers replicate FSH muscular dystrophy in mice
(University of Minnesota) A new study published in the journal Nature Communications describes a breakthrough in research related to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD). The debilitating genetic disease -- which has no approved treatment -- affects an estimated 38,000 Americans and causes muscle degeneration. Scientists inserted into mice a gene called DUX4, which is believed to cause FSHD in humans. When they activated the gene in mice skeletal muscle cells, the animals developed a muscular dystrophy with key features of FSHD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news