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Humira does not improve aortic vascular inflammation in psoriasis patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An antibody used to treat the skin disease psoriasis and other chronic autoimmune diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis and inflammatory bowel disease has no effect on aortic inflammation -- a key marker of future risk of major cardiovascular events -- unlike other antibodies that target different aspects of the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dogs born in the summertime more likely to suffer heart disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Dogs born June through August are at higher risk of heart disease than those born other months, rising in July to 74 percent higher risk, according to a study published this week in Scientific Reports from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. A correlation to outdoor air pollution may be the culprit. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CDC: U.S. Birth Rate Hits 30-Year Low, Fertility Rate Falling
NEW YORK (CBS Local) – U.S. birth rates declined last year for women in their teens, 20s and — surprisingly — their 30s, leading to the fewest babies in 30 years, according to a government report released Thursday. Experts said several factors may be combining to drive the declines, including shifting attitudes about motherhood and changing immigration patterns. The provisional report, based on a review of more than 99 percent of the birth certificates filed nationwide, counted 3.853 million births last year. That’s the lowest tally since 1987. Births have been declining since 2014, but 2017 sa...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - May 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health birth rate Fertility Local TV Pregnancy talkers Source Type: news

Stem cell signaling drives mammary gland development and -- maybe -- breast cancer
(University of Pennsylvania) A unique tissue type in many ways, the mammary gland is cloaked in mysteries that scientists puzzle over. In a paper in Science, the University of Pennsylvania's Rumela Chakrabarti and colleagues describe a newly identified connection between mammary stem cells and macrophages, a type of immune cell. The crosstalk between these two cell types is crucial for mammary gland development, and may also figure into the biology of breast cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Ovarian cancer drug shows promise in pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutation
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A targeted therapy that has shown its power in fighting ovarian cancer in women including those with BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations may also help patients with aggressive pancreatic cancer who harbor these mutations and have few or no other treatment options. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 17, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn scientist receives distinguished investigator award for patient-oriented research
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Association for Clinical and Translational Science (ACTS), a non-profit membership association of translational scientists from the nation's leading academic medical centers, has awarded the Edward H. Ahrens Jr. Distinguished Investigator Award for Patient-Oriented Research Translation to Daniel J. Rader, MD, chair of the department of Genetics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study finds that different diseases elicit distinct sets of exhausted T cells
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The battle between the human immune system and long-term, persisting infections and other chronic diseases such as cancer results in a prolonged stalemate. Over time battle-weary T cells become exhausted, giving germs or tumors an edge. Using data from multiple molecular databases, researchers have found nine distinct types of exhausted T cells, which could have implications for fighting chronic infections, autoimmunity, and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Should You Stop Wearing Sunscreen To Get More Vitamin D? Here ’s What a Doctor Says
Last year, a study published in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association made headlines when it asserted that sunscreen use is partially to blame for widespread vitamin D deficiency worldwide. The research raised questions, given that consistently wearing sunscreen is one of the most common pieces of advice from physicians. Should the risk of vitamin D deficiency — which can lead to brittle bones and has been associated with insulin resistance, high blood pressure and decreased immune function, among other issues — overshadow years of that advice? Not according to Dr. Victoria Werth, a professor of d...
Source: TIME: Health - May 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime public health Source Type: news

Parents say intense gun violence in PG-13 movies appropriate for teens 15 and older
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) Parents are more willing to let their children see PG-13 movies with intense gun violence when the violence appears to be 'justified' than when it has no socially redeeming purpose, a study finds. But even when the violence in PG-13 movies appears justified, parents think it is more appropriate for teens at least 15 years old, two years older than the PG-13 rating suggests. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 14, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

His College Knew of His Despair. His Parents Didn ’ t, Until It Was Too Late.
Hamilton College knew that one of its students was in deep distress before he killed himself. His parents believe they should have been told. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: ANEMONA HARTOCOLLIS Tags: Colleges and Universities Suicides and Suicide Attempts Hamilton College Clinton (NY) Mental Health and Disorders Privacy University of Pennsylvania Source Type: news

Depleted metabolic enzymes promote tumor growth in kidney cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) By integrating data on the function of essential metabolic enzymes with genetic, protein, and metabolic abnormalities associated with " clear cell " renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC), researchers have determined that enzymes important in multiple pathways are universally depleted in ccRCC tumors. Kidney cancer, one of the ten most prevalent malignancies in the world, has increased in incidence over the last decade, likely due to rising obesity rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 10, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Two Penn clinicians among this tear's Melanoma Research Foundation honorees
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) is honoring two Penn clinicians for their tireless work in caring for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn experts call for safeguards if Medicaid work requirement policies prevail
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) When the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) announced controversial policies inviting states to establish work requirements as a condition to receive Medicaid, many in the medical community opposed it. If these measures continue to be approved, CMS should act to minimize the potential harms they could cause to Medicaid recipients, two Penn Medicine experts in law and ethics argue in a new JAMA Viewpoint published this week, that lays out basic safeguards to help guide the states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two Penn clinicians among this year's Melanoma Research Foundation honorees
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Melanoma Research Foundation (MRF) is honoring two Penn clinicians for their tireless work in caring for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Reduced Opioids After Spinal Surgery With ERAS Protocol Reduced Opioids After Spinal Surgery With ERAS Protocol
An'enhanced recovery after surgery'(ERAS) protocol at the University of Pennsylvania showed an unexpected benefit in reducing opioid use after spinal or peripheral nerve surgery.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - May 8, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Neurology & Neurosurgery News Source Type: news

A national conversation is essential to addressing challenging needs of an aging population
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Over 40 percent of all older adults in the United States are living with four or more chronic illnesses, receive care from a fragmented health care system, and are struggling with rising costs and uneven quality. To confront this national crisis, more than 50 health system leaders, policy makers, innovators, and scholars convened last week to identify actionable recommendations designed to transform care delivery for older adults with complex health and social needs and support their family caregivers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - May 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five Strategies to Reduce Acute Care for Cancer Patients ID'd
THURSDAY, May 3, 2018 -- Five major strategies exist for reducing acute care for patients with cancer, according to a review published online April 17 in the Journal of Oncology Practice. Nathan R. Handley, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - May 3, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight All of Us Launch: The All of Us Research Program is ready to launch nationally on May 6! The official launch will be held in seven communities throughout the United States. Join MAR for the launch event in NYC or watch the broadcast live. HSLANJ Group Licensing Initiative: The deadline to participate in the Health Sciences Library Association of New Jersey (HSLANJ) Spring 2018 Group Licensing Offer has been extended to May 10. NNLM MAR members are eligible for this cost-saving opportunity! National Network of Libraries of M...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - May 3, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Penn performs first-in-world robot-assisted spinal surgery
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn neurosurgeons and otolaryngologists performed the first robot-assisted spinal surgery. The robotic arms made it possible for the team to successfully remove a rare tumor in the patient's neck. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 3, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Nation's first cardiac ablation with mapping system recently cleared by the FDA performed at Penn Medicine
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) After eight years of failed treatment for persistent atrial fibrillation (AF), Janet Szilagyi, 78 of Clayton, New Jersey, became the first patient in the United States to undergo cardiac ablation -- a procedure in which an electrophysiologist will scar or destroy tissue in the heart that's allowing incorrect electrical signals to cause an abnormal heart rhythm -- using an intraoperative imaging and mapping system recently cleared by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - May 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

HUP performs more cancer surgeries than any other Philadelphia hospitals
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania (HUP) performed the most cancer surgeries among Philadelphia hospitals during fiscal 2017 in all but two of the 11 cancer types evaluated in a report released Wednesday by the Pennsylvania Health Care Cost Containment Council. The report, which covers the period from July 1, 2016 to June 30, 2017, was compiled by the council to serve as resource to help cancer patients and their families make decisions about cancer surgical care in Pennsylvania. Hospital… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - May 2, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Breakthrough cancer therapy developed at Penn receives 2nd FDA approval
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a second indication for a revolutionary cancer therapy initially developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center. The FDA cleared Kymriah, a personalized cellular therapy marketed by Novartis, for use in patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The FDA specifically approved Kymriah for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL) who are ineligible fo r… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - May 1, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Breakthrough cancer therapy developed at Penn receives 2nd FDA approval
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved a second indication for a revolutionary cancer therapy initially developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center. The FDA cleared Kymriah, a personalized cellular therapy marketed by Novartis, for use in patients with advanced non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. The FDA specifically approved Kymriah for the treatment of certain adult patients with relapsed or refractory diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. The American Cancer … (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - May 1, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

FDA approves CAR T therapy for large B-cell lymphoma developed at Penn
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has expanded approval for a personalized cellular therapy developed at the University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center, this time for the treatment of adult patients with relapsed or refractory large B-Cell lymphoma after two or more lines of systemic therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Innovative vaccine offers canine cancer patients a shot at a longer, happier life
(University of Pennsylvania) Nicola Mason of the School of Veterinary Medicine is leading a multi-institutional clinical trial evaluating an immunotherapy approach to treat dogs with osteosarcoma, a cancer of the bone. A new $775,000 grant from the Morris Animal Foundation will help her build on her past successes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - May 1, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Student developers of blood cell counting device win 2018 Penn Startup Challenge
Sanguis, a medical device company founded by three University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine students who became best friends after meeting on their first day of school, won the second annual Penn Wharton Entrepreneurship Startup Challenge. As the "Perelman Grand Prize" winner, Sanguis received $30,000 plus another $15,000 in legal, accounting,& strategy services. The company – founded by Divyansh Agarwal, Prateek Agarwal and Daniel Zhang – has developed what it describes as "the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 30, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Penn Medicine-led study reveals potential for more precise diagnosis and treatment of TBI
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Patients who've suffered from traumatic brain injuries have changes in tiny blood vessels in their brains that researchers believe are linked to a range of cognitive symptoms, according to new findings presented at the 2018 AAN Annual Meeting. The findings may help doctors pinpoint specific types of TBIs and tailor personalized therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

T cell biomarker predicts which CLL patients will respond to CAR T cell therapy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine researchers may have found the reason why some patients with advanced chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) don't respond to chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy, and the answer is tied to how primed patients' immune systems are before the therapy is administered. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A potential new weapon in the addiction battle: FDA-approved diabetes and obesity drugs
Cocaine and other drugs of abuse hijack the natural reward circuits in the brain. In part, that's why it's so hard to quit using these substances. Moreover, relapse rates hover between 40 and 60 percent, similar to rates for other chronic conditions like hypertension and Type 1 diabetes. University of Pennsylvania behavioral pharmacologist and neuroscientist Heath Schmidt studies how long-term exposure to drugs such as cocaine, nicotine, and prescription opioids affects the brain and how these changes promote relapse in someone who has kicked the habit. (Source: World Pharma News)
Source: World Pharma News - April 27, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

A potential new weapon in the addiction battle: FDA-approved diabetes and obesity drugs
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals that FDA-approved drugs to treat diabetes and obesity may reduce cocaine relapse and help people who are addicted break the habit. Such medications work by targeting receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1, a hormone in the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black-oriented films can be highly profitable when marketed to all audiences, study finds
(University of Pennsylvania) Hollywood tends to market black-oriented media, and media oriented around other people of color, to only audiences of color. However, a study of 1,900 adolescents shows that black and white teens both consider Black-oriented content as being 'for them,' but white adolescents are less likely to know black-oriented content exists. Researchers say this means black-oriented media can be highly profitable if marketed to all audiences. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PARP-1 may be key to effectiveness of PARP inhibitors, and now researchers can image it
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine researchers have used CRISPR/Cas9 gene editing technology to isolate a key genetic feature that could cause resistance to PARP inhibitors in patients with ovarian cancer -- and they've also proven they have a way to see that feature using PET imaging. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn bioinformatics researcher receives grant from Chan Zuckerberg Initiative
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The award will support Casey Greene's work on the Human Cell Atlas, a global effort to map every type of cell in the human body as a resource for investigating health and disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers elected American Statistical Association Fellows
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Two biostatisticians from the Center for Clinical Epidemiology and Biostatistics and professors of Biostatistics in Biostatistics and Epidemiology Mingyao Li, PhD, and Sharon Xie, PhD, have been elected fellows of the American Statistical Association, the largest professional organization for statisticians in the United States. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bacteria boost antifungal drug resistance in severe childhood tooth decay
(University of Pennsylvania) Some young children experience severe tooth decay that resist normal therapies. New research led by Dongyeop Kim and Hyun (Michel) Koo of Penn's School of Dental Medicine shows how plaque's protective matrix can shield fungal cells from the drugs intended to kill them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Aspire, Penn Medicine team up on $300M fund with built-in accelerators
Private equity firm Aspire Universal and  Penn Medicine Lancaster General Health (LG Health, the community hospital portion of the University of Pennsylvania Health System) have partnered to create a new $300 million fund called the Aspire Ventures Precision Medicine Fund. Each is contributing $15 million to the fund and Aspire is in the process of raising the remainder. (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - April 24, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Five ways to help cancer patients avoid the emergency room
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Unnecessary emergency department visits and hospitalizations are debilitating for patients with cancer and far too common -- and costly -- for the United States health care system. To reverse the trend, researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center, the Leonard Davis Institute of Health Economics, and the Wharton School, all at the University of Pennsylvania, have identified the five best practices to reduce unnecessary emergency department (ED) visits and hospitalizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Special series examines the use of pasteurized donor human milk for vulnerable infants
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) If the use of mother's own milk is contraindicated (such as with a HIV positive mothers) or if a mother is unable to produce enough milk to meet her infant's needs, pasteurized donor human milk (PDHM) is the recommended alternative. In 2016, 5.25 million ounces of PDHM were distributed to hospitals caring for vulnerable infants across the United States and Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How do you get teens to stop cellphone use while driving? Survey says, show them the money
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Teens who admit to texting while driving may be convinced to reduce risky cellphone use behind the wheel when presented with financial incentives such as auto-insurance apps that monitor driving behavior, according to a new survey. However, while more than 90 percent of teens surveyed said they were willing to give up sending or reading text messages, almost half indicated that they would want to retain some control over phone functions such as music and navigation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Behind the Photo That Made People Think Earth Day Was Founded by a Convicted Killer
Ever since 20 million people took to American streets on April 22, 1970, over the lack of regulation of corporations’ pollution, Earth Day has been an annual chance to motivate citizens to do something good for the planet. The protests and the movement of which they were part helped lead to the creation that year of the new Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), to do just that, and President Bill Clinton later awarded a Presidential Medal of Freedom to environmentalist and U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson for leading the charge in founding Earth Day. Even so, some confusion remains over who founded Earth Day — and ...
Source: TIME: Science - April 20, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Olivia B. Waxman Tags: Uncategorized Environment Source Type: news

Fight, flight, or freeze
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) There's increasing physiological evidence connecting breathing patterns with the brain regions that control mood and emotion. Now researchers have added neurons associated with the olfactory system to the connection between behavior and breathing. Connecting patterns in these interactions may help explain why practices such as meditation and yoga that rely on rhythmic breathing can help people overcome anxiety-based illnesses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn spinout Tmunity Therapeutics raises another $35M
University of Pennsylvania spinoff company Tmunity Therapeutics Inc. has raised an additional $35 million from Kleiner Perkins and affiliates, bringing the total amount of its series A equity financing to $135 million. Founded in 2015, Tmunity is developing next-generation T cell immunotherapies for fighting cancer and other diseases. Its scientific founders include Dr. Carl H. June, a CAR-T Pioneer who led the team at Penn that developed the personalized cellular therapy treatment for leukemia,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - April 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Wistar receives Clinical Research Forum Award for DNA-based Zika research
(The Wistar Institute) The Wistar Institute and partners at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, and GeneOne Life Science were recognized among the Top 10 Clinical Research Achievement Awards by the Clinical Research Forum for their ground-breaking phase 1 DNA-based Zika vaccine research -- the first trial of a Zika vaccine in humans, which proved safe and effective. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 19, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Penn Medicine's Carl June named one of Time Magazine's most influential people
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) TIME named University of Pennsylvania cancer and HIV gene therapy pioneer Carl June, MD, to the 2018 TIME 100, its annual list of the 100 most influential people in the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Spouses Can Boost Early Detection For Melanoma Patients, Study Says
CHICAGO (AP) — There’s an extra bonus to marriage for melanoma patients: They tend to be diagnosed in earlier more treatable stages than patients who are unmarried, widowed or divorced, a new study says. Spouses may be apt to notice suspicious moles on their partners that could signal melanoma, the most dangerous type skin cancer. More importantly, they may also be more inclined to nag their partners to get those moles checked out, the researchers said. The findings suggest that unmarried people should ask relatives or friends to do skin checks or seek frequent skin exams with dermatologists. Why marriage might...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Local TV Melanoma Skin Cancer Source Type: news

Cannabis slows teen brains but a 'three-day detox' combats this
Cannabis does make young people's brains function more poorly, but if they take even just 72 hours off from marijuana, their minds recover, University of Pennsylvania research suggests. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

How Smoking Pot May Hurt the Teenage Brain
As access to legal marijuana continues to expand, both for recreational and medical uses, researchers say there are still plenty of unanswered questions about how increased use might affect the still-developing brains of adolescents and young adults. Studies so far have found that marijuana can affect short-term thinking skills in adults, including attention, memory and other higher cognitive functions. In the latest review of the studies on younger people, scientists found similar effects, but also revealed some surprising hints about how lasting those effects might be. In a study published in JAMA Psychiatry, J. Cobb Sco...
Source: TIME: Health - April 18, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized Brain healthytime Source Type: news

Three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A group led by the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania has proposed three solutions to maximize the clinical benefit and affordability of targeted cancer drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Could statins ease deadly heart condition in rare neuromuscular disease?
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Decreased HDL and ApoA-l levels in the general population are associated with an increased risk of death from cardiomyopathy and heart failure. Researchers found the FA patients had serum ApoA-I levels lower than healthy control subjects. In preclinical studies using cell models that mimicked liver cells of patients with the rare disease Friedreich's ataxia (FA), a widely used cholesterol-lowering drug increased a precursor of HDL (high-density lipoprotein), the " good cholesterol. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researcher co-directs National Lung Cancer Screening Center
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, along with the Institute for Health Research at Kaiser Permanente Colorado, Kaiser Permanente Hawaii, the Henry Ford Health System in Detroit, and Marshfield Clinic Health System in Wisconsin, have received a five-year, $15.5 million National Cancer Institute (NCI) grant to improve lung cancer screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news