Gene editing could cure cystic fibrosis before birth, study suggests
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania successfully edited the DNA of embryonic mice just days before birth to get rid of genetic defects that cause fatal lung diseases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why Spicy Food Makes Your Nose Run —and Why It’s Great for You
Munch a bit of habanero pepper or hot-sauce-soaked jambalaya, and you’ll notice a tingling numbness in your mouth followed by a burning sensation. If that burning sensation is sufficiently strong, your nose and eyes will start to run, and your mouth and throat will start to generate mucus. You may not be able to feel it, but your stomach and parts of your intestine will also start secreting excess fluid, says Dr. Brett Comer, a surgeon and ear, nose, and throat specialist at the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Why does all this happen? Like spraying water on a filthy car, your body turns on the waterworks...
Source: TIME: Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition Source Type: news

Two US cancer patients treated with controversial CRISPR technology
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania have edited the genes of two adult patients with sarcoma and myeloma using the controversial CRISPR technology, a spokesperson told NPR. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 17, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Smartphone App Helps Predicts Abdominal Incisional Hernia Smartphone App Helps Predicts Abdominal Incisional Hernia
One out of every eight patients who undergo abdominal surgery will develop an incisional hernia and a new smartphone app developed by a team from the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine can accurately predict a patient's risk for IH at the bedside.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines)
Source: Medscape General Surgery Headlines - April 16, 2019 Category: Surgery Tags: General Surgery News Source Type: news

Marijuana Users May Need More Sedation For Medical Procedures
(CNN) — People who regularly use cannabis may need two times the level of sedation required by nonusers when undergoing medical procedures, a small-scale study finds. Fentanyl, midazolam and propofol, three sedation drugs commonly used during endoscopic procedures, were compared in the research. With “continued increase in legalization and use of cannabis, the field of anesthesia and sedation needs further studies with greater depth,” wrote the authors of the study, published Monday in The Journal of the American Osteopathic Association. Wider use follows legalization Marijuana has gained popularity aroun...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News CNN Marijuana Source Type: news

Biden says gov't failed to deal with opioid crisis
Joe Biden addressed a sold-out audience at University of Pennsylvania, joining a panel conversation about the opioid crisis. (Source: PharmaManufacturing.com)
Source: PharmaManufacturing.com - April 12, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

CAR T-Cell Therapy for Mesothelioma Proving Effective in Clinical Trial
Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center believes novel CAR T-cell therapy will be part of future, standard-of-care treatment for malignant pleural mesothelioma. The therapy involves the laboratory reprograming of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — to attack the cancer by targeting mesothelin, a surface protein. CAR T-cell therapy is a form of immunotherapy that could extend mesothelioma survival significantly. “That’s my goal. That’s what we’ve been working toward for many years,” Adusumilli told The Mesothelioma Center at Asbestos.com....
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 11, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

ClinEpiDB data resource releases childhood malnutrition and intestinal disease study
(University of Pennsylvania) A major epidemiology database, ClinEpiDB, has released data, methodology, and documentation from a major study of intestinal infection and malnutrition in children, known as MAL-ED. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - April 10, 2019 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Proton therapy shows efficacy, low toxicity in large cohort of children with high-risk neuroblastoma
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania analyzed the largest cohort to date of pediatric patients with high-risk neuroblastoma treated with proton radiation therapy (PRT), finding both that proton therapy was effective at reducing tumors and demonstrated minimal toxicity to surrounding organs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Empathy and cooperation go hand in hand
(University of Pennsylvania) Despite sometimes selfish instincts, cooperation abounds in human societies. Using mathematical models to explore this complex feature of social behavior, a University of Pennsylvania-led team shows that the act of taking another person's perspective -- a form of empathy -- supports the persistence of cooperation and altruism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Everyday enzymes, now grown in plants
(University of Pennsylvania) Whether we know it or not, enzymes play a role in a range of everyday products, from orange juice to denim jeans. Using his innovative plant-based platform and a new startup company, the University of Pennsylvania's Henry Daniell and colleagues are transforming how these enzymes are made, resulting in cheaper and more environmentally friendly products. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 9, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Mind: To Improve Memory, Tune It Like an Orchestra
A noninvasive technique shows promise in improving the working memory of older adults. But, the scientists note, “ Do not try this at home! ” (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 8, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Brain Age, Chronological Dementia Memory Boston University Nature Neuroscience (Journal) University of California, San Diego University of Pennsylvania Kahana, Michael J Source Type: news

Gene Therapy Trial for Mesothelioma Opens Internationally
A long-awaited phase III clinical trial of a novel gene therapy could change malignant pleural mesothelioma treatment in the future. The trial, which will include almost 50 locations around the world, opens this month for mesothelioma patients whose standard treatment has stopped working. The gene therapy drug, called TR002, is also a form of immunotherapy. It will be used in combination with gemcitabine chemotherapy in a second-line setting. “We can’t predict what the outcome will be, but we’re very excited about the potential of this treatment, and the fact there may be another drug in the armamentarium...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

Declassified U2 spy plane images reveal bygone Middle Eastern archaeological features
(University of Pennsylvania) By analyzing thousands of declassified images from Cold War-era U2 spy missions, Emily Hammer of the University of Pennsylvania and Jason Ur of Harvard University discovered archaeological features like prehistoric hunting traps, 3,000-year-old irrigation canals, and hidden 60-year-old marsh villages. They also created an online tool that allows other researchers to identify and access the photos for the first time. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Childhood trauma has lasting effect on brain connectivity in patients with depression
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A study lead by Penn Medicine researchers found that childhood trauma is linked to abnormal connectivity in the brain in adults with major depressive disorder (MDD). The paper, published this week in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS), is the first data-driven study to show symptom-specific, system-level changes in brain network connectivity in MDD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 8, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Tailoring lactation education to the cultural needs of orthodox Jewish families
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In a new article published in The American Journal of Maternal/Child Nursing, nurse researchers examine Orthodox Jewish practices related to the provision of human milk and breastfeeding for a sick newborn. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Unlocking the female bias in lupus
(University of Pennsylvania) The majority of lupus patients are female, and new findings from the University of Pennsylvania shed light on why. The research suggests that female lupus patients don't fully silence their second X chromosome in T cells, leading to an immune response gone awry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Tissue Bank Identifies Survival Factors
This study was on the exploration of risk factors affecting mortality.” The Lancet Respiratory Medicine published the findings early in 2019. Factors Associated with Longer Survival Age under 45 years when diagnosed Female gender Peritoneal mesothelioma subtype Epithelioid histology subtype Treatment including surgery and chemotherapy Stage 1 at time of diagnosis “The identification of these factors could help patients at risk for therapy failure who may benefit from novel interventions, or avoiding treatments that are not effective, or with high mortality risk,” the re...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - April 2, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Daniel King Source Type: news

PARP inhibitors can shrink tumors in pancreatic cancer patients with specific mutations
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Switching pancreatic cancer patients to the PARP inhibitor rucaparib as maintenance therapy may represent new treatment paradigm for pancreatic cancer patients with BRCA mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

2019 Harrington Prize awarded to Dr. Carl June, University of Pennsylvania
(University Hospitals Cleveland Medical Center) The sixth annual Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine awarded to Carl H. June, M.D., of the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine.The Harrington Prize for Innovation in Medicine, established in 2014 by the HarringtonDiscovery Institute at University Hospitals (UH) in Cleveland, Ohio, and the American Society for Clinical Investigation (ASCI), honors physician-scientists who have moved science forward with achievements notable for innovation, creativity and potential for clinical application. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 2, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Study reveals genes associated with heavy drinking and alcoholism
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A large genomic study of nearly 275,000 people led by Penn Medicine researchers revealed new insights into genetic drivers of heavy drinking and alcohol use disorder (AUD), the uncontrollable pattern of alcohol use commonly referred to as alcoholism. In the largest-ever genome-wide association study (GWAS) of both traits in the same population, a team of researchers found 18 genetic variants of significance associated with either heavy alcohol consumption, AUD, or both. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 2, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Leukemia pill cuts death risks by 36% for 21,000 people with a hard-to-treat form of the cancer
Gilteritinib was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration in November 2018. its latest trial, conducted at the University of Pennsylvania found it improves both survival and quality of life. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - April 1, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Targeted drug for leukemia tested at Penn Medicine helps patients live longer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An inhibitor drug that targets a specific mutation in relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) helps patients live almost twice as long as those who receive chemotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - April 1, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

CD40 combination therapy can shrink pancreatic tumors
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new combination of immunotherapy and chemotherapy for pancreatic cancer caused tumors to shrink in the majority of evaluable patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 31, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Doctors more likely to prescribe preventive therapy if prompted by EMR
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine study shows technology tied to patient records pushing doctors toward a new therapy was more effective than just peer education. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 29, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A bad bout of flu triggers 'taste bud cells' to grow in the lungs
(University of Pennsylvania) When researchers from the University of Pennsylvania examined mice that had recovered from severe influenza, they came upon a surprising discovery: Taste bud cells had grown in the animals' lungs. The team believes the cells may play a role in immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 28, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Penn Nursing study links nurse work environments and outcomes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Nurses play critical roles in patient safety and are often the last line of defense against medical errors and unsafe practices. Considerable research has explored the relationship between the nurse work environment and a variety of patient and nurse quality and safety outcomes. But until now, no synthesis of this body of research has been made to clearly articulate the association between nurse work environments and health care quality, safety and patient and clinician well-being. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mailing colorectal cancer screening kit found effective, regardless of financial incentive
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Roughly a quarter of patients overdue for colorectal cancer screening mailed completed kits back within two months, even if they weren't given any kind of financial incentive. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Naltrexone implant helps HIV patients with opioid dependence prevent relapse
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study, published this month in Lancet HIV by Penn Medicine researchers, shows that a naltrexone implant placed under the skin was more effective at helping HIV-positive patients with an opioid addiction reduce relapse and have better HIV-related outcomes compared to the oral drug. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 21, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Health System names new CEO
The University of Pennsylvania Health System has found its new CEO in-house. Kevin Mahoney, currently executive vice president and chief administrative officer for the health system, is being promoted to fill the vacancy created by the departure of longtime CEO Ralph Muller, who last year announced he will be stepping down from the post this summer. Mahoney will take over as CEO on July 1. “Kevin has an unrivaled breadth of experience and depth of knowledge of health care in an integrated academic… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - March 20, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Depression Is More than a Stigma
Manoj K. Pandey is Lecturer in Economics, Australian National University; Vani S. Kulkarni is Lecturer in Sociology, University of Pennsylvania; and Raghav Gaiha is (Hon. ) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of ManchesterBy Manoj K. Pandey, Vani S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaCanberra, Philadelphia and Manchester, Mar 20 2019 (IPS) Depression is often distinguished from other non-communicable diseases or NCDs (e.g., cancer, diabetes, cardio-vascular diseases, hypertension) because of the stigma attached to it. Among other consequences, those suffering from depression are often denied access...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - March 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Manoj K. Pandey - and Raghav Gaiha Tags: Featured Global Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Nursing work environment shapes relationship between EHR & quality of care
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In the decade since the federal government's electronic health record (EHR) initiatives first became law, nearly all US hospitals have adopted some form of EHR technology. Now, focus is on how a comprehensive EHR can enhance outcomes. Yet, little is known about the sociotechnical factors that can shape the relationship between advanced EHR adoption and quality of care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 15, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Treatment Combines Proton and Photodynamic Therapy
Intraoperative photodynamic therapy combined with novel proton radiation improved survival time significantly for recent patients with advanced-stage pleural mesothelioma. The study — the first to measure the impact of this combination — involved 10 consecutive patients treated at the University of Pennsylvania’s Abramson Cancer Center. The treatment regimen resulted in a 90 percent, two-year disease control rate and an impressive 30.3-month median overall survival from the time of diagnosis. All 10 patients were diagnosed before treatment began with stage 3 or stage 4 disease, which typically results in ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - March 12, 2019 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

College campuses are thinking about lactation spaces -- but could be doing more
(University of Pennsylvania) Breastfeeding mothers in higher-education environments can typically find a place to pump, but only recently have institutions begun to prioritize access to this resource. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

When green 'fixes' actually increase the carbon footprint
(University of Pennsylvania) When tech companies move into a city, they often encourage a sustainability mindset. However, new research from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Georgia, Southwestern University, and Portland State, shows that they can also lead to gentrification and emissions that stay the same or increase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH renews $13M contract with Penn's gene therapy program
The National Institutes of Health has once again renewed a five-year contract with the University of Pennsylvania's gene therapy program, which will receive $13 million to support the advancement of gene-therapy research to the clinic. The contract was awarded by National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to what operates as the Gene Therapy Program Preclinical Vector Core in the Perelman School of Medicine at Penn. The contract will support the preclinical vector production, analytics, and immunology… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Health Management Authors: John George Source Type: news

NIH renews $13M contract with Penn's gene therapy program
The National Institutes of Health has once again renewed a five-year contract with the University of Pennsylvania's gene therapy program, which will receive $13 million to support the advancement of gene-therapy research to the clinic. The contract was awarded by National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute to what operates as the Gene Therapy Program Preclinical Vector Core in the Perelman School of Medicine at Penn. The contract will support the preclinical vector production, analytics, and immunology… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - March 7, 2019 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

For Alex Trebek, the Toughest Question: Can He Face Down Pancreatic Cancer?
The iconic talk show host has been handed a frightening diagnosis. Here ’ s what it means. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - March 7, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Pancreatic Cancer Pancreas Surgery and Surgeons Chemotherapy Tumors Deaths (Fatalities) Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center University of Pennsylvania Trebek, Alex Source Type: news

Dogs Are Great for Your Health. But There ’s a Little-Known Risk of Owning One
The health benefits of having a pet — especially a dog — are well-established. Dog owners have been shown to live longer, healthier lives than people without pups, in part because caring for a dog encourages physical activity. And pets of all types have been shown to lower their owners’ stress levels and improve their mental health. But a new research letter published in JAMA offers a look at a potential downside of pet ownership. Among older adults, fractures linked to dog-walking are surprisingly common and growing more frequent, according to the research. Researchers examined data from the National El...
Source: TIME: Health - March 6, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Bone fractures increasing as seniors walk dogs to stay active
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Between 2004 and 2017, dog-walking-related fractures in people 65-or-older more than doubled. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

States with strict gun laws see more homicides when they border states with lax ones
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Gun-related homicide rates in states with strict gun laws increase when neighboring states have less restrictive laws as a result of gun trafficking across state lines, suggests a new study from Penn Medicine. A review of gun tracing data also revealed that 65 percent of the guns recovered in the most restrictive states originated from other states. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - March 6, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cancer most frequently spreads to the liver; here's why
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) When cancer spreads to another organ, it most commonly moves to the liver, and now researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they know why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - March 6, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Stopping the Spread of Bedbugs Might Begin With Landlords
TUESDAY, March 5, 2019 -- Laws that make landlords come clean about bedbugs would stem the spread of the bloodsucking critters and save landlords money in the long run. So claims a new study in which a University of Pennsylvania team used different... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - March 5, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Cells use sugars to communicate at the molecular level
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania reveals how cells communicate at the molecular level. They found that sugar molecules play a key role in cellular communication, serving as the 'channels' that cells and proteins use to talk to one another. This work also provides researchers with a new tool to study other living systems in incredible detail, enabling future breakthroughs in fields from materials science to nanomedicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - March 1, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Online intervention shows promise in HIV prevention
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) A team led by Jos é Bauermeister, Ph.D., M.P.H., Presidential Professor of Nursing and Director of the Program on Sexuality, Technology,& Action Research (PSTAR), at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) designed the My Desires& Expectations (myDEx) tool to address cognitive and emotional factors that influence YGBMSM sexual decision-making when seeking partners online. myDEx was pilot tested in a randomized trial over 90 days with 180 YGBMSM participants. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 26, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery predicts outcomes in melanoma patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A single dose of a PD-1 inhibitor before surgery for melanoma can put patients in remission. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 25, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Simple Strategies On How To Break Bad Habits
BOSTON (CBS) – By mid-February, many people have given up on their New Year’s resolutions, but researchers say while it takes more than sheer willpower to make lasting changes, there are some strategies you can use to break your bad habits. Behavioral science experts at Harvard and The Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania say it’s becoming increasingly difficult to practice self-control, with junk food becoming tastier and cheaper and technology at our fingertips to both entertain and tempt us. But they say putting in place incentives and obstacles can help us stay on track. Examples or obstac...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Is it Bad to Sleep with Wet Hair?
If you shower before bed, you’ve probably wondered whether sleeping with damp hair is a problem. Maybe you’ve heard it could make you sick, or that it can damage your hair or skin. What’s the truth? Let’s address the “it can make you sick” myth first. “This idea seems to fit into the old bit of folklore that getting yourself chilled and wet will cause you to come down with a cold,” says Dr. William Schaffner, a professor of medicine in the Division of Infectious Diseases at Vanderbilt University Medical Center. While this idea persists, Schaffner says it was long ago disprove...
Source: TIME: Health - February 20, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Health-related Google searches doubled in week before ER visits
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Patients are often willing to share their Google search histories with medical researchers, revealing that many people do searches on their condition well before deciding to go to the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers key to advance care planning with cancer clinical trial patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Cancer clinical trials are an important option for patients with cancer. Yet, once a trial ends, patients still need care plans. Little is known at what point during clinical trial transitions to initiate advance planning discussions or how to educate research teams to communicate with and prepare patient-participants and their families for the next steps after they leave a cancer clinical trial. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news