Preparing future clinicians to intervene in opioid crisis
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Opioid use disorder and overdose have reached unprecedented levels around the world. In the United States, remediation of pain is one of the most common reasons American adults seek healthcare. Therefore, it is vital that clinicians practicing in diverse roles and settings have a clinical understanding of pain and substance use disorders as well as knowledge about public health and opioid policy interventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

1 in 10 COVID-19 patients return to hospital after being sent home from ER
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn study finds patients with low pulse oximetry readings or fever were more than three times as likely to require hospitalization after their initial discharge as compared to other COVID patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Amid pandemic and protests, Americans know much more about their rights
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) In a period defined by an impeachment inquiry, a pandemic, nationwide protests over racial injustice, and a contentious presidential campaign, Americans' knowledge of their First Amendment rights and their ability to name all three branches of the federal government have markedly increased, according to the 2020 Annenberg Constitution Day Civics Survey. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Virtual reality trains public to reverse opioid overdoses
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) The United States has seen a 200% increase in the rate of deaths by opioid overdose in the last 20 years. But many of these deaths were preventable. Naloxone, also called Narcan, is a prescription drug that reverses opioid overdoses, and in more than 40 states -- including Pennsylvania -- there is a standing order policy, which makes it available to anyone, without an individual prescription from a healthcare provider. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Middle-aged individuals may be in a perpetual state of H3N2 flu virus susceptibility
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine researchers have found that middle-aged individuals -- those born in the late 1960s and the 1970s -- may be in a perpetual state of H3N2 influenza virus susceptibility because their antibodies bind to H3N2 viruses but fail to prevent infections, according to a new study led by Scott Hensley, PhD, an associate professor of Microbiology at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The paper was published today in Nature Communications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 11, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

The Great Vaccine Race: Inside the Unprecedented Scramble to Immunize the World Against COVID-19
The cleverest of enemies thrive on surprise attacks. Viruses—and coronaviruses in particular—know this well. Remaining hidden in animal hosts for decades, they mutate steadily, sometimes serendipitously morphing into more effective and efficient infectious agents. When a strain with just the right combination of genetic codes that spell trouble for people makes the leap from animal to human, the ambush begins. Such was the case with SARS-CoV-2, the coronavirus behind COVID-19, and the attack was mostly silent and insidious at first. Many people infected with SARS-CoV-2 remained oblivious as they served as the v...
Source: TIME: Health - September 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Magazine Source Type: news

Penn Medicine researcher receives early career honor from Burroughs Wellcome Fund
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Golnaz Vahedi, PhD, an assistant professor of Genetics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, has received the Investigators in the Pathogenesis of Infectious Disease (PATH) award from the Burroughs Wellcome Fund, an independent foundation based in Research Triangle Park, NC dedicated to advancing the biomedical sciences. Dr. Vahedi is one of 9 recipients selected from 157 nominees nationwide. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers solve decades old mitochondrial mystery that could lead to new disease treatments
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine researchers have solved a decades old mystery around a key molecule fueling the power plant of cells that could be exploited to find new ways to treat diseases, from neurodegenerative disorders to cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Investigational drug stops toxic proteins tied to neurodegenerative diseases
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An investigational drug that targets an instigator of the TDP-43 protein, a well-known hallmark of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD), may reduce the protein's buildup and neurological decline associated with these disorders, suggests a pre-clinical study from researchers at Penn Medicine and Mayo Clinic. Results were published in Science Translational Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

State laws key to HIV prevention efforts
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) HIV prevention remains a public health priority in the United States. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP) is a drug regimen recommended for individuals who have engaged in behaviors that place them at elevated risk for HIV. When used consistently, daily oral PrEP has been shown to reduce HIV transmission by 99 percent. However, despite increases in PrEP awareness and uptake over the past several years, data show that four of five people who could benefit from PrEP did not access the medication in 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid prescriptions for knee surgery vary widely from state to state
(Texas A&M University) New research from Texas A&M University and the University of Pennsylvania on opioid prescribing practices across the country after outpatient knee surgeries found that prescription strength and number of tablets is prescribed highest in Oklahoma and lowest in Vermont. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 8, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Who should get the COVID-19 vaccine first?
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Nineteen global health experts from around the world have proposed a new, three-phase plan for vaccine distribution -- called the Fair Priority Model -- which aims to reduce premature deaths and other irreversible health consequences from COVID-19. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Helping teens with type 1 diabetes improve diabetes control with MyDiaText
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Adolescence is a difficult period of development, made more complex for those with Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). The challenges of managing multiple doses of daily insulin administration, blood glucose monitoring, dietary and exercise requirements, can make self-care difficult and complicate outcomes. Adolescents with T1DM often have poorer diabetes outcomes than others, indicating that glucose control is difficult for them to maintain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inside the Dangerous Mission to Understand What Makes Extremists Tick —and How to Change Their Minds
On a cool winter’s day in early 2014, the American academic Nafees Hamid was invited for tea at the second-story at the Barcelona apartment of a young Moroccan man. It started well enough; they sat down at the kitchen table, chatting amiably in French while two acquaintances of the host sat nearby in the living room. Halfway through the conversation, though, things took a turn. “He started saying things like, ‘Why should we trust any Westerner?’” Hamid recalls. “‘Why would we not kill every one of them? Why should I even trust you—you are an American—sitting here? Why s...
Source: TIME: Science - September 2, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Emily Feldman and Malia Politzer Tags: Uncategorized extremism feature Londontime Source Type: news

NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter
Having trouble viewing this email? View it as a Web page. NIDCR's Fall 2020 E-Newsletter In this issue: NIDCR News Funding Opportunities NIH/HHS News Funding Notices Science Advances Subscribe to NICDR News Grantee News   NIDCR News NIDCR Announces Availability of COVID-19 Research Funding On May 5, NIDCR issued two Notices of Special Interest highlighting the urgent need for research on coronavirus disease 2019. This research may be conducted either via the National Dental PBRN infrastructu...
Source: NIDCR Science News - September 1, 2020 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Study: Anonymized cell phone location data can help monitor COVID-19 growth rates
(Mount Auburn Hospital) In a new study published in JAMA Internal Medicine, researchers from Mount Auburn Hospital and the University of Pennsylvania analyzed anonymous, county-level cell phone location data and incidence of COVID-19. The researchers found that changes in cell phone activity in workplaces, transit stations, retail locations, and at places of residence were associated with COVID-19 incidence. The findings demonstrate that cell phone location data can help public health officials better estimate future trends of the pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell phone location used to estimate COVID-19 growth rates
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cell phone location data shows that in counties where activity declined at workplaces and increased at home, coronavirus infection rates were lower. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 31, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Progress toward a treatment for Krabbe disease
(University of Pennsylvania) The inherited disease, which typically kills children before their second birthday, has no cure, but a University of Pennsylvania study in a canine model offers hope for an effective gene therapy with lasting results. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 26, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Opioid prescription rates for knee surgery vary, but higher strength dosage common
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Examining insurance data, Penn researchers found 36% of patients received an opioid prescription that was stronger than the CDC-recommended dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 25, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

UK/UPenn researchers provide insights into new form of dementia
(University of Kentucky) Working with their colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania, researchers at the University of Kentucky have found that they can differentiate between subtypes of dementia inducing brain disease. " For the first time we created criteria that could differentiate between frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and a common Alzheimer's 'mimic' called LATE disease, " explained Dr. Peter Nelson of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging at the University of Kentucky. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research links Southeast Asia megadrought to drying in Africa
(University of Pennsylvania) Physical evidence found in caves in Laos connects the end of the Green Sahara, when once heavily vegetated Northern Africa became a hyper-arid landscape, and a previously unknown megadrought that crippled Southeast Asia 4,000 to 5,000 years ago. Scientists at the University of California, Irvine, University of Pennsylvania, William Paterson University of New Jersey and other international institutions explain how this major climate transformation led to a shift in human settlement patterns in Southeast Asia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Fewer serious asthma events in Philadelphia area following COVID-19 stay-at-home orders
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Philadelphia and its surrounding counties issued a series of " stay-at-home " orders on March 17, 2020 in an effort to curb the spread of COVID-19. In the months that followed, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) saw a marked decrease in healthcare visits for both outpatient and hospitalized asthma patients. New research from CHOP and the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania suggests the cause may have been fewer rhinovirus infections due to masking, social distancing, and hygiene measures. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Study finds signs of altruism in people's COVID-19 worries
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) A new study demonstrates that people are more concerned about whether their family members could contract COVID-19 or if they are unknowingly spreading the virus themselves than they are with contracting it. The study, conducted by researchers from the Lifespan Brain Institute (LiBI) of Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, also shows how increased resilience is able to reduce rates of anxiety and depression during the pandemic. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 20, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How misinformed vaccine beliefs affect policy views
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) As many as 20% of Americans hold negative views about vaccination. Such misinformed vaccine beliefs are by far the strongest driver of opposition to pro-vaccination public policies - more than political partisanship, education, religiosity or other sociodemographic factors, new research shows. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 20, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pennsylvania ’s new Covid-19 tracker will bolster contact tracing
It ’s being developed in concert with the University of Pennsylvania, MIT, and an Irish app developer. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 18, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Paul J. Gough Source Type: news

Wide variation across hospitals in nurse staffing is threat to public's health
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) According to a new study published today in BMJ Quality& Safety, many hospitals in New York and Illinois were understaffed right before the first surge of critically ill Covid-19 patients. The study, 'Chronic Hospital Nurse Understaffing Meets COVID-19,' documented staffing ratios that varied from 3 to 10 patients for each nurse on general adult medical and surgical units. ICU nurse staffing was better but also varied significantly across hospitals. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 18, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Chatbots delivering psychotherapy help decrease opioid use after surgery
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A study showed that patients receiving messages from a chatbot used a third fewer opioids after fracture surgery, and their overall pain level fell, too. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Persistent Opioid Use Seen in ~10 Percent of Patients After Cardiac Surgery
TUESDAY, Aug. 11, 2020 -- Persistent opioid use is a common concern after cardiac surgery, according to a study published online June 17 in JAMA Cardiology. Chase R. Brown, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and colleagues... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 11, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Chemotherapy is used to treat less than 25% of people with localized sarcoma
FINDINGSUCLA researchers have found that chemotherapy is not commonly used when treating adults with localized sarcoma, a rare type of cancer of the soft tissues or bone. In a nationwide analysis of nearly 20,000 patients whose cancer had not yet spread to other organs, the scientists learned that only 22% were treated with some form of chemotherapy.The researchers found that even among patients with the largest and most aggressive tumors, less than half (45%) received chemotherapy. The team also found that patients were more likely to be treated with chemotherapy at facilities that perform at least 55 surgeries for sarcom...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - August 6, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Penn medicine receives $4.9 million grant to improve uptake of cancer care best practices
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new grant awarded to the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will help identify methods to improve uptake of state-of-the-science care that can have a significant impact for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 4, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Cancer Institute designates Penn's Abramson Cancer Center as 'exceptional'
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The National Cancer Institute (NCI) has once again rated the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania (ACC) as " exceptional, " the highest possible rating for an NCI-designated comprehensive cancer center. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 4, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Risk for Acute Cerebrovascular Events Low in COVID-19 Patients
MONDAY, Aug. 3, 2020 -- For hospitalized COVID-19 patients, the risk for acute cerebrovascular events is low, according to a study published online July 20 in Stroke. Aaron Rothstein, M.D., from the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia, and... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 3, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Half of low-income communities have no ICU beds
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new Penn Medicine study sheds light on yet another reason why the coronavirus pandemic is disproportionately killing the poor: Residents in low-income neighborhoods lack access to intensive care unit (ICU) beds. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Tackling the bioethics challenges raised by COVID-19
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) The diverse situations experienced by health-care workers during the COVID-19 pandemic often present serious ethical challenges. From the allocation of resources and triage protocols to health-care worker and patient rights and the management of clinical trials, new ethical questions have come to the forefront of today's global public health emergency. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Coronavirus US: Cases in Texas nursing homes DOUBLED in July
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania found nursing homes without cases had 20% fewer deficiencies - such as lack of infection control programs - than facilities that did have cases. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Pregnant Black and Hispanic women five times more likely to be exposed to coronavirus
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Black and Hispanic pregnant women in Philadelphia are five times as likely as white and Asian women to have been exposed to the novel coronavirus, according to a new study led by Scott Hensley, Ph.D., an associate professor of Microbiology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and Karen Marie Puopolo, MD, PhD, an associate professor of Pediatrics and neonatologist at the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 29, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

U.S. News names Philadelphia area's best hospitals, ranks one among nation's top 20
Nine Philadelphia hospitals and health systems received top-50 national rankings in this year's U.S. News& World Report ​Best Hospitals​ report released Tuesday. The Hospitals of the University of Pennsylvania-Penn Presbyterian Medical Center was the only medical center in the region to make the "Honor Roll" as one of the top 20 in the country. HUP/PPMC ranked 15th overall with 12 top-50 national rankings in spe cialties, led by a ninth-place ranking in ear, nose and throat and 11th place in… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - July 28, 2020 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Proposed framework for integrating chatbots into health care
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) While chatbots are becoming more widespread in health care, it's important to implement them thoughtfully and constantly evaluate them in a variety of ways, Penn authors argue. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A new approach to aiding black male trauma survivors
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Many Black men suffer symptoms of traumatic stress in the aftermath of traumatic injury, and they also often carry social concerns, including experiences of discrimination and stigma. Yet despite their significant needs, underserved populations often have limited access to behavioral health care as well as a lack of financial resources to pay for such care. Because of these barriers, many trauma survivors do not seek professional behavioral health care and instead rely on informal or alternative sources of care. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Self-eating' process of stem cells may be the key to new regenerative therapies
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The self-eating process in embryonic stem cells known as chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA) and a related metabolite may serve as promising new therapeutic targets to repair or regenerate damaged cells and organs, Penn Medicine researchers show in a new study published online in Science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 23, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

US military improved mortality since World War II, but there have been alarming exceptions
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Although wound survivability has increased over the last 80 years, the U.S. military's medical corps suffered some periods of backsliding during conflicts, recent analysis shows (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 21, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Two COVID-19 Clinical Trials Seek to Enroll Pregnant Women
Upon seeing pregnant women sick with COVID-19 at a University of Pennsylvania hospital, researchers there wrote trial protocols for blood transfusions to treat the disease that include expecting... (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - July 21, 2020 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Advancing knowledge on archaea
(University of Pennsylvania) An open-source data platform for researchers studying archaea is paving the way for new insights and educational opportunities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 20, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Doctors motivated by both health, malpractice concerns when ordering additional tests
FINDINGSA UCLA-led studyhas found that dermatopathologists, who specialize in diagnosing skin diseases at the microscopic level, are motivated both by patient safety concerns and by malpractice fears— often simultaneously —when ordering multiple tests and obtaining second opinions, with a higher proportion of these doctors reporting patient safety as a concern.When ordering additional microscopic tests for patients, 90% of the dermatopathologists surveyed cited patient safety as a concern and 71% of them reported malpractice fears. Similarly, when obtaining second reviews from a consulting pathologist or recomm...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Rare mutation of TP53 gene leaves people at higher risk for multiple cancers
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers detail the potential implications of a specific TP53 mutation, including an association with a specific type of Li-Fraumeni syndrome, an inherited predisposition to a wide range of cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 16, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn researchers find three distinct immune responses for sicker COVID-19 patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers from the Penn Institute of Immunology discovered three distinct immune responses to the SARS-CoV2 infection that could help predict the trajectory of disease in severe COVID-19 patients and may ultimately inform how to best treat them. A second study from researchers at Penn uncovered new details about the innate, or initial, response to SARS-CoV2. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

States slow to implement stay-at-home orders saw higher rates of COVID-19 deaths
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Researchers from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the University of Pennsylvania's Perelman School of Medicine have conducted one of the first studies to measure the efficacy of social distancing in the early days of the COVID-19 pandemic. They found that states that were slow to implement such orders saw higher COVID-19 death rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 15, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Palliative nursing's role during COVID-19 and beyond
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) As a rapid influx of patients overwhelmed health systems during the coronavirus pandemic, palliative nurses played dual roles supporting patients, patient families, and colleagues. Two researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) are among those detailing the important role palliative care has in responding during the COVID-19 pandemic and in future public health crises. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - July 14, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

COVID-19 and the heart: Searching for the location of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor
(Masonic Medical Research Institute) Nearly 20% of COVID-19-associated deaths are from cardiac complications, yet the mechanisms from which these complications arise have remained a topic of debate in the cardiology community. One hypothesis centers on the infection of the heart itself. To address this, MMRI Assistant Professor Dr. Nathan Tucker, in collaboration with the Broad Institute, the University of Pennsylvania, and Bayer US, report the distribution of the SARS-CoV-2 receptor in a manuscript published in Circulation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Coronavirus Outbreaks Linked to Fraternity Houses are a Warning for College Campuses
Recent coronavirus outbreaks have been linked to fraternities at universities in Washington, California and Mississippi, and experts say it’s an example of what’s to come as many colleges reopen for in-person classes beginning in August. At least 136 fraternity house residents and nine other students at the University of Washington in Seattle had tested positive for COVID-19 as of July 10 in what officials called a “Greek Row outbreak.” It “provides lessons for students as they consider their return to campus this fall,” said Dr. Geoffrey Gottlieb, chair of the university’s Advisor...
Source: TIME: Health - July 13, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katie Reilly Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Education Source Type: news