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The FDA Is Coming Around to the Idea That Cheese, Microbes, and Mold Can Work Just Fine
Fuzzy ashen mold billows around wheels of cheese stacked on wooden planks at La Ferme de L’Abérieux. Inside its cheese cave nestled in the hills of Cordon, southeastern France, proprietor Albert Bottollier Depois removes one wheel and lowers it to the wide eyes of two children. “Mushrooms,” he says threading his fingers through the cloudy wreath of fungus forming the cheese’s distinctive crust. For a stronger cheese, he’ll even pierce the rind so it seeps in and blooms in the eyes. This is a Tomme de Savoie, one of France’s most distinguished and sought-after cheeses. And yet it h...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Casey Quackenbush / Cordon, France Tags: Uncategorized Cheese Food Safety onetime Source Type: news

Penn First in world to treat patient with new radiation technology
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Doctors at Penn Medicine have become the first in the world to treat a patient with a new treatment platform designed to streamline the way therapeutic radiation is delivered to cancer patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers identify new target, develop new drug for cancer therapies
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Opening up a new pathway to fight cancer, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a way to target an enzyme that is crucial to tumor growth while also blocking the mechanism that has made past attempts to target that enzyme resistant to treatment. Researchers were able to use this finding to develop a drug that successfully inhibits tumor growth of melanoma as well as pancreatic and colorectal cancer in mice. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 20, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Clinical Trials Involve Gene Therapy
Treatment options for malignant mesothelioma may soon include customized gene therapy, according to thoracic surgeon and scientist Dr. Prasad Adusumilli at Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center in New York. Gene therapy involves a laboratory reprogramming of a patient’s own T cells, which are a type of white blood cell, to recognize and destroy the cancer. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) recently approved the first gene therapy specifically for pediatric leukemia, signaling the start of a new approach to cancer treatment in this country. The newly approved treatment is also known as chimeric antigen rece...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 19, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: CAR T cell therapy checkpoint blockade chimeric antigen receptor T cell therapy Dr. Andy Haas Dr. Prasad Adusumilli Dr. Scott Gottlieb FDA Commissioner gene therapy cancer gene therapy for mesothelioma immunotherapy clinical trial mali Source Type: news

Sleep deprivation is an effective anti-depressant for nearly half of depressed patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Sleep deprivation - typically administered in controlled, inpatient settings - rapidly reduces symptoms of depression in roughly half of depression patients, according the first meta-analysis on the subject in nearly 30 years, from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 19, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A True Constitutional Crisis Is Rare in American History. Here ’s Why
Constitutional crisis is a term that’s been thrown around a lot lately in American politics. But, as fans of the founding document celebrate Constitution Day on Monday — in honor of Sunday’s 230th anniversary of its signing — they have an additional reason to celebrate: true examples of such crises have been relatively rare in the nation’s history. Not that everyone agrees on what exactly qualifies as such a crisis. Even experts may draw the line at different points. After all, disagreements are a supposed to be part of the U.S. political system, and emergencies are an unfortunate part of any ...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lily Rothman Tags: Uncategorized Constitution politics Source Type: news

Relationship found between HIV risk and individual and community level educational status
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) African-American men who have sex with men (MSM) remain at heightened risk for HIV infection and account for the largest number of African-Americans living with HIV/AIDS. It has long been understood that there is a clear and persistent association between poverty, transactional sex behavior, and HIV risk. A new University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) study has investigated how educational status relates to HIV risk in this population. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Black babies more likely to have nursing care missed in their NICU stay
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Everybody wants a healthy life for their baby. Black babies are more likely to be born prematurely, which puts them at risk for death and developmental problems. In fact, a third of all infant deaths are preterm-related. The critical period in preterm babies' lives is when they are just born and are in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU). The care they receive is vital to a healthy future. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study: Bald men are perceived as being more dominant
The bald look, adopted by Hollywood superstars Bruce Willis and Vin Diesel, was studied by University of Pennsylvania researchers. They made their conclusion based on three small studies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Bald men are perceived as being more dominant
The bald look, adopted by Hollywood superstars Bruce Willis and Vin Diesel, was studied by University of Pennsylvania researchers. They made their conclusion based on three small studies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Candice Bergen Describes Her Very Color-Coordinated Date With Donald Trump
Famously no-nonsense actress Candice Bergen has a story to tell about the time she went on a blind date with none other than the current U.S. President. During an interview with Harry Connick Jr., Bergen recalled that fateful evening with Donald Trump many years ago. “I was 18,” Bergen said of the time of her date. “He was a nice-looking guy, I mean, he was. And I was in college, and it’s where he was going to be going to college… It was like a blind date. He called me in the dorm. I was bored,” she explained. (Bergen attended the University of Pennsylvania just like Trump, although she...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - September 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raisa Bruner Tags: Uncategorized celebrities Donald Trump Source Type: news

Ending DACA could have dire public health consequences
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The pending termination of DACA may reverse these mental health benefits for the 800,000 DACA beneficiaries, and trigger a public health crisis, according to an essay in the New England Journal of Medicine, co-authored by Atheendar. S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How does a cell maintain its identity during replication?
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Prior to cell division, chromosomes are seemingly a jumbled mess. Researchers have long assumed that genes become " silent " during cell division, not being transcribed into proteins or regulatory molecules. This has left open the question of how genes get properly re-activated after cell division. Now, researchers have found that gene expression actually continues during cell replication. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CHOP and Penn Medicine Join new research network to reduce kidney stone risk
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Children's Hospital of Philadelphia (CHOP) and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have joined together as a single site within the Urinary Stone Disease Research Network (USDRN), which was launched by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the NIH. In total, five sites will collaborate in this nationwide network as it launches a randomized clinical trial, the Prevention of Urinary Stones with Hydration (PUSH) study. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Debunking study suggests ways to counter misinformation and correct 'fake news'
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) A meta-analysis of laboratory debunking studies examines the factors underlying effective messages to counter misinformation in news and correct " fake news. " The study finds that detailed debunking messages are more effective than simply labeling information as wrong, and that debunking is more effective when an audience can be engaged in developing a counterargument. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 12, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Revolutionary eye test can detect early signs of dementia
Scientists at the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found eye changes may signal frontotemporal dementia, also known as frontotemporal lobe degeneration (FTD). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Center City cardiology group switches hospital affiliation
The Center City division of Cardiology Consultants of Philadelphia (CCP) has joined Jefferson Health. The division, previously affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania Health System, has 17 cardiologists who practice at five office locations in the city. Going forward, the group will be referred to as Cardiology Consultants of Philadelphia at Jefferson. The practice has five office locations in Philadelphia. “By joining forces with Jefferson, we are able to offer patients enhanced access… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 8, 2017 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Penn Cancer biologist given National Cancer Institute Outstanding Investigator Award
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) M. Celeste Simon, PhD, who studies cancer cell metabolism, tumor immunology, and the influence of oxygen availability and deprivation on tumor growth, has been given a National Cancer Institute Outstanding Investigator Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 8, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Blocking sweet taste receptors can help body fight off sinus infections
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Sweet taste receptor, known as T1R, can be activated by certain amino acids secreted by bacteria. Researchers took cells from rhinosinusitis patients and isolated the various communities of bacteria that were present. They found cultures of Staphylococcus bacteria produced two D-amino acids called D-Phe and D-Leu, both of which activate T1R sweet receptors and block the release of antimicrobial peptides. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 8, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Eye changes may signal frontotemporal lobe degeneration
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Frontotemporal degeneration (FTD) is a progressive neurodegenerative condition that is present in tens of thousands of Americans, but is often difficult to diagnose accurately. Now in a study published this week online ahead of print in Neurology, researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have found evidence that a simple eye exam and retinal imaging test may help improve that accuracy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Beyond Books: Public libraries address the social determinants of health – September Breezing webinar
Beyond Books: Public libraries address the social determinants of health Breezing Along with the RML Series September 20, 2017 10am MT/11am CT Login information Join Anna Morgan from the Healthy Library Initiative as she discusses public libraries, their influence on social determinants of health, and their importance for community well-being. The Healthy Library Initiative has worked with Philadelphia area public libraries in identifying how the libraries address social determinants of health and how they can build on those programs. To read more about Healthy Library Initiative and what they do, visit http://www.healthyl...
Source: MCR News - September 7, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: liaison Tags: Public Libraries Webinars and Training Source Type: news

Better understanding of 'one of the most complex organs' for better lung treatments
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Details of lung cell molecular pathways that promote or inhibit tissue regeneration were reported by Penn researchers. Their aim is to find new ways to treat lung disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Lower dose of chemotherapy effective for liver cancer patients: Study
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania report that patients with a common type of liver cancer can start treatment with a lower dose of chemotherapy. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 6, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

MD Anderson Retains Top Spot for Cancer Care
U.S. News & World Report ranked the MD Anderson Cancer Center in Houston the No. 1 cancer care hospital in America for the third consecutive year. MD Anderson has been a leader in the treatment of pleural mesothelioma, a contributing factor in maintaining its top billing on the rankings. Memorial Sloan Kettering in New York and Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota, were No. 2 and No. 3, respectively, in the 2017-18 Best Hospitals for Cancer  listing. U.S. News & World Report — a global authority in hospital care — has published the rankings annually for 28 years, helping patients make tough health c...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 6, 2017 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Barnes-Jewis Hospital best mesothelioma cancer centers Cardiology Cleveland Clinic Gastroenterology H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute heart surgery Johns Hopkins Massachusetts General Hospital Mayo Clinic Mayo Clinic- Source Type: news

Liver cancer patients can start with lower dose of chemotherapy and live just as long
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Patients with the most common type of liver cancer who are taking the chemotherapy drug sorafenib can begin their treatment with a lower dose than is currently considered standard, and it will not affect how long they live when compared to patients who start on the full dose. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Art courses could help medical students become better clinical observers
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In an effort to explore ways to improve clinical observation skills among medical students, researchers from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, in collaboration with educators at the Philadelphia Museum of Art, published a study in Ophthalmology that found significant improvement in observational recognition skills among students who took an art observation course and demonstrated that art training could help teach medical students to become better clinical observers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 6, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pill to prevent both heart disease and diabetes
Based on DNA data of more than 250,000 people, the University of Pennsylvania research, published in Nature Genetics, adds to the basic understanding of both deadly ailments. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 4, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes and heart disease linked by genes, reveals Penn-led study
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Now, in a large analysis of genetic data, published in Nature Genetics, a team has first looked into what causes T2D and second clarified how T2D and CHD -- the two diseases that are the leading cause of global morbidity and mortality, are linked. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Psoriasis sufferers are TWICE as likely to die early
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found that patients whose disorder covers more than 10 percent of their body have nearly double the risk of passing away prematurely. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

HealthWatch: A New Gene Therapy For Leukemia; A Study On Carbohydrates
This study does not mean you can now eat a ton of butter and steak without worry, but you probably don’t need to feel guilty about eating some fat. In terms of carbohydrates, the study did not distinguish between refined carbs and complex carbs, so further study is needed. (Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire)
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Healthwatch Local News Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Cancer Research Dr. Mallika Marshall Leukemia Source Type: news

F.D.A. Approves First Gene-Altering Leukemia Treatment, Costing $475,000
The Food and Drug Administration approved the first treatment that genetically alters a patient ’ s own cells to fight cancer. It will cost $475,000. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Leukemia Immune System Genetic Engineering Cancer Children's Hospital of Philadelphia Food and Drug Administration Novartis AG University of Pennsylvania June, Carl H Whitehead, Emma Source Type: news

FDA OKs first-of-its-kind T-cell cancer therapy developed by Penn & CHOP
The Food and Drug Administration approved a personalized cellular therapy treatment for leukemia developed by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Children ’s Hospital of Philadelphia. The T-Cell therapy, which will be marketed by Novartis as Kymriah, was OK'd as treatment for patients up to 25 years of age with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is refractory, or in second or later relapse. In 2012, Penn and Novartis — a Swiss dr ug company that has its U.S headquarters… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - August 30, 2017 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

US clears first gene therapy for childhood leukemia
The CAR-T cell treatment developed by Novartis Pharmaceuticals and the University of Pennsylvania is the first type of gene therapy to hit the U.S. market. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 30, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA approves personalized cellular therapy for advanced leukemia developed by University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In a landmark decision for the field of cancer immunotherapy, the US Food and Drug Administration today approved a personalized cellular therapy developed by the University of Pennsylvania and Children's Hospital of Philadelphia for the treatment of patients up to 25 years of age with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia that is refractory or in second or later relapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

First atlas of B-cell clones in body forms new foundation for infectious disease research
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new 'anatomic atlas' of how B cells -- the immune system's producer of antibodies -- link up to form networks has been charted by researchers. This map will be an important resource for researchers and clinicians studying infectious diseases, the microbiome, vaccine responses, and tissue-specific immunity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine pharmacologist given Founders' Award from ACS
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Ian A. Blair, Ph.D., an internationally recognized expert on applying mass spectrometry, has won the 2017 Founders' Award from the Division of Chemical Toxicology of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Medtronic readies pivotal trial in renal denervation
Medtronic (NYSE:MDT) said today that it’s ready for a run at FDA approval for renal denervation in treating high blood pressure, more than three years after the failure of a high-profile clinical trial. Back in January 2014, Fridley, Minn.-based Medtronic shocked medtech when it announced that the highly anticipated Symplicity HTN-3 trial, examining ablation of the around the renal arteries in treating hypertension, failed to meet its efficacy endpoint. The company suspended enrollment in its other Symplicity trials around the world and later took a $200 million write-down on its renal denervation assets. News o...
Source: Mass Device - August 28, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Cardiovascular Clinical Trials Wall Street Beat Medtronic Renal Source Type: news

Bone marrow protein may be target for improving stem cell transplants
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study led by University of Pennsylvania and Technical University of Dresden scientists has identified an important regulator of hematopoeisis, the process of making new blood cells. Targeting it, the researchers noted, could be an effective way to improve stem cell transplants for both donors and recipients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Update your membership record today! If you have completed the renewal process before Friday, July 21, you can expect to receive your membership certificate by the end of August. If you have not yet verified that your organization’s record is up-to-date, check out our Membership renewal flyer for more information. National Preparedness Month begins September 1! Visit the Ready Campaign web page to learn about this year’s theme, “Disasters Don’t Plan Ahead. You Can” and check out the 2017 promot...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - August 25, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Penn ethicist proposes new category for psychiatric patients to justify instances of compulsory treatment
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The 'involuntary treatment' of unwilling psychiatric patients has long been accepted as necessary in some cases, for the sake of patients and society, though it can raise serious ethical concerns as well as legal barriers. In a Viewpoint essay published online today in JAMA, ethicist Dominic Sisti, PhD, argues that some of the concerns about treating patients without their consent would be alleviated if the mental health profession recognized an important distinction among these cases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Atheists are 'angry' but more likely to listen to reason
A study of 12,815 US and UK Facebook users led by the University of Pennsylvania found the use of positive emotion was more associated with religious people (stock image). (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 22, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Retaining one normal BRCA gene in breast, ovarian cancers influences patient survival
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers found a relationship between the genetics of tumors with germline BRCA1/2 mutations and whether the tumor retains the normal copy of the BRCA1/2 gene, and risk for primary resistance to a common chemotherapy that works by destroying cancer cells' DNA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 22, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

High moral reasoning associated with increased activity in the human brain's reward system
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Individuals who have a high level of moral reasoning show increased activity in the brain's frontostriatal reward system, both during periods of rest and while performing a sequential risk taking and decision making task according to a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine, the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania, Shanghai International Studies University in Shanghai, China, and Charit é Universit ä tsmedizin in Berlin, Germany. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine receives NIH training grants for genomic medicine
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The University of Pennsylvania is the first institution with more than one training grant from the National Human Genome Research Institute, now with three. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 21, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn biologists show how plants turn off genes they don't need
(University of Pennsylvania) New research led by University of Pennsylvania biologists and published this week in the journal Nature Genetics has identified small sequences in plant DNA that act as signposts for shutting off gene activity, directing the placement of proteins that silence gene expression. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Research reveals potential target for alcohol liver disease
(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Drinking too much alcohol can damage the liver, but investigators have discovered a protective response in the organ that might be targeted to help treat alcoholic liver disease. The team -- led by researchers at Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center, in collaboration with colleagues at the University of Pennsylvania -- also found that the same protective response may be involved in aversion to alcohol and could therefore help in the treatment of alcoholism. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New meta-analysis shows peer influence doubles smoking risk for adolescents
(University of Pennsylvania) Having friends who smoke doubles the risk that youth ages 10 to 19 will pick up the habit, finds new meta-analysis of 75 longitudinal teen smoking studies. This influence is more powerful in collectivistic cultures than in individualistic ones. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 21, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Want to stay skinny? Step on the weighing scales each day!
Standing on the scales produced 'unexpected' effects of encouraging people to cut back on junk food, scientists at Drexel University and the University of Pennsylvania said. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 18, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn and Cornell Unis study teens' risky behavior
A review by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Cornell University suggests teenage risk taking and the experience gained from it play a role in adolescent development. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 16, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why teens take risks: It's not a deficit in brain development
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) A popular theory in neuroscience proposes that slow development of the prefrontal cortex explains teenagers' seemingly impulsive and risky behavior. But an extensive literature review finds that much of the evidence for that theory misinterprets adolescent exploratory behavior as impulsive and that much of what appears to be impulsivity is behavior that is often guided by the desire to learn about the world. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news