Drivers of inflammation provide valuable targets for new gum disease therapies
(University of Pennsylvania) A subset of T cells contributes to the inflammation and bone loss that characterizes periodontitis, a severe form of gum disease. According to new research, led by the University of Pennsylvania's George Hajishengallis and scientists at the National Institutes of Health, drugs that specifically inhibit these cells may offer an effective therapy for the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New scholars named by program to promote research into the influence of gender on health
(University of Pennsylvania) The University of Pennsylvania's Melanie Kornides, Jennifer Lewey, and C. Alix Timko, also of the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia, are pursuing research that examines the role of sex and gender on health. The work is supported by the Building Interdisciplinary Research Careers in Women's Health program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 16, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Multidisciplinary team to develop stem cell-based approaches to restore vision
(University of Pennsylvania) Gene therapies have had success in treating blindness but can't save areas of the retina where cells have already died. In a new effort, University of Pennsylvania scientists John Wolfe, also of CHOP, and William Beltran, along with David Gamm of the University of Wisconsin-Madison, will attempt to develop a stem-cell-based approach that restores vision. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine and AAL Spark...
The Academy for Advancing Leadership (AAL) partners with University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine (Penn Dental Medicine) to offer an online certification program for clinical dental...(PRWeb October 16, 2018)Read the full story at https://www.prweb.com/releases/university_of_pennsylvania_school_of_dental_medicine_and_aal_spark_innovation_in_dental_education_with_new_online_certification_program/prweb15839914.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - October 16, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Depression could be spotted MONTHS before a formal diagnosis by algorithm scanning social media
Researchers from both the University of Pennsylvania and Stony Brook University believe spotting 'depression-associated language markers' could improve treatment for up to 16million Americans. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Higher Alzheimer's risk for sleepless teens
Neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania found teenage who cut down on sleep were more likely to develop dangerous build-ups in their brain that paved the way to dementia. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Blood test identifies more treatable cancer mutations than tissue biopsy alone
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania found that they could identify significantly more mutations through liquid biopsy instead of a solid tissue biopsy alone. The findings also show that patients whose actionable mutations were detected by the blood based liquid biopsy responded favorably to targeted therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Immune cells in triple-negative breast cancer offer potential therapeutic target
(University of Pennsylvania) New research led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine's Rumela Chakrabarti reveals how immune cells called myeloid-derived immunosuppressor cells contribute to the progression of triple-negative breast cancer, a particularly aggressive form of the disease. Pairing chemotherapy with a drug that blocks these cells may one day help stem the cancer's spread. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How parenting affects antisocial behaviors in children
(University of Pennsylvania) In a recent study of the parental caregiving environment, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania, the University of Michigan and Michigan State University, found that within identical twin pairs, the child who experienced harsher behavior and less parental warmth was at a greater risk for developing antisocial behaviors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Molecular details of protein reveal glimpse into how kidney stones form
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Using the 2017 Nobel Prize-winning technique of cryo-electron microscopy to capture a high-resolution image of an ion channel protein, called TRPV5, that removes calcium from urine, researchers have found fresh clues as to how kidney stones form. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine's OncoLink receives 2018 CPEN Excellence in Patient Education Award
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Cancer Patient Education Network (CPEN) honored the Patient Education Team from Penn Medicine's OncoLink with the 2018 Excellence in Patient Education Award. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

There's a better way to decipher DNA's epigenetic code to identify disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new method for sequencing the chemical groups attached to the surface of DNA is paving the way for better detection of cancer and other diseases in the blood. These chemical groups mark one of the four DNA 'letters' in the genome, and it is differences in these marks along DNA that control which genes are expressed or silenced. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing used in treating congenital disease before birth
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Guided by CRISPR, prenatal gene editing shows proof-of-concept in treating disease before birth
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) For the first time, scientists have performed prenatal gene editing to prevent a lethal metabolic disorder in laboratory animals, offering the potential to treat human congenital diseases before birth. Published today in Nature Medicine, research from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania offers proof-of-concept for prenatal use of a sophisticated, low-toxicity tool that efficiently edits DNA building blocks in disease-causing genes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Don't Blame Obamacare for the Opioid Crisis: Study
THURSDAY, Oct. 4, 2018 -- A look at past expansions to Medicaid appears to challenge claims that expansion under Obamacare helped fuel the current opioid crisis in the United States. University of Pennsylvania researchers report that Medicaid... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - October 4, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Health - October 4, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

How Scientists Are Treating Breast Cancer Using the Immune System
As a pharmacist, Kathy James considers herself well educated about the importance of getting regular cancer screenings. Even though the 55-year-old had no history of cancer in her family, she never skipped her regular mammograms, and she gave herself regular breast exams. So she was dumbfounded when, during one of those self-exams in May 2017, she felt a marble-size lump in her left breast. A visit to the doctor confirmed it. “The radiologist came in with his hands in his pockets and looked down and said, ‘It doesn’t look good,'” James says. After a biopsy, James and her husband learned she had meta...
Source: TIME: Science - October 4, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized breast cancer news Frontiers of Medicine Source Type: news

Analysis reveals genomic effects of a new cancer treatment now in clinical trials
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A twist on the molecular mechanism of how a new cancer drug works could aid in better identifying the best treatments for patients for an array of cancers. The team identified over 500 sites in DNA that require an enzyme called ATR checkpoint kinase to not break when they are replicated. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rare manufacturing glitch raises concern over CAR-T therapies: study
A single leukemia cell inadvertently got mixed in with a batch of a patient's immune cells that were being manufactured into a CAR-T cell therapy and it acquired resistance to the treatment with deadly results, University of Pennsylvania researchers reported on Monday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Breakthrough Leukemia Treatment Backfires in a Rare Case
The groundbreaking treatment that genetically engineers a patient ’ s own cells to fight leukemia turned lethal in one patient, reversing his remission. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - October 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Leukemia Immune System Immunotherapy Genetic Engineering Cancer Children's Hospital of Philadelphia University of Pennsylvania Novartis AG Whitehead, Emma Kymriah Drugs (Pharmaceuticals) Nature Medicine Marco Ruella Source Type: news

International Symposium on Mesothelioma to Focus on Immunotherapy
The eighth annual International Symposium on Malignant Pleural Mesothelioma Saturday at UCLA will reflect the rapidly evolving philosophy on future treatment of this rare cancer. Change is coming. The Symposium, which was first held in 2011 to help bring awareness to lung-sparing surgery, will highlight groundbreaking discoveries and the latest advances in immunotherapy and gene therapy — believed to be the future of cancer care. The longtime chemotherapy and surgery standard-of-care routine is fading. The symposium at the Luskin Conference Center on the UCLA campus in Los Angeles will help explain why. “There ...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - September 26, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

HPV-related cancer treatment gets boost from new shot
University of Pennsylvania researchers have discovered that an shot activates patients' immune systems so they can fight even late stage HPV-related head and neck cancers, a study reveals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

DNA vaccine leads to immune responses in HPV-related head and neck cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A therapeutic vaccine can boost antibodies and T cells, helping them infiltrate tumors and fight off human papillomavirus (HPV)-related head and neck cancer. Researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania tested the immunotherapy approach in two groups of patients with advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCCa) and found 86 percent showed elevated T cell activity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 21, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Philly refinery fails to include public input in cleanup efforts
This report recommends steps to correct Sunoco's oversight, as well as the need to explore cleanup standards more stringent than those appropriate for ongoing refinery operations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nomadic hunter-gatherers show that cooperation is flexible, not fixed
(University of Pennsylvania) Why do humans cooperate? For six years, researchers from the University of Pennsylvania have worked to answer this great puzzle, focusing on the Hadza, a nomadic hunter-gatherer population in Tanzania. New findings suggest that cooperation is flexible, not fixed. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn, Rutgers researchers land $18M to study tobacco product marketing
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and Rutgers University have received an $18 million grant to study tobacco marketing. The grant was awarded by the Food and Drug Administration and the National Institutes of Health to support research at the Penn's Perelman School and the Rutgers School of Public Health. The funding is part of the ongoing interagency Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science program established by the FDA and NIH. The center is focused on the effects tja advertising,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - September 19, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Penn researchers: Class of neurological disorders share 3D genome folding pattern
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have found a new common thread linking nearly all of the trinucleotide repeat expansion diseases, which include ALS, Huntington's Disease and Fragile X Syndrome, involving the complicated 3D patterns that the DNA is folded into in order to fit in the nucleus of the cell. Nearly all of the short tandem repeats known to grow unstable in disease are located at the boundaries that separate neighboring folded domains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers receive $18 million grant for Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new $18 million grant to Penn Medicine researchers will allow them to take aim at the effects of tobacco marketing. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and National Institutes of Health (NIH) have renewed their commitment to the Tobacco Centers of Regulatory Science (TCORS) program and awarded a second cohort (TCORS 2.0) of centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu shot rates in clinics drop as day progresses, but nudges help give them a boost
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Primary care clinics experienced a significant decline in influenza vaccinations as the day progressed, researchers from Penn Medicine report in a new study published in JAMA Open Network. However, 'nudging' clinical staff to order vaccines using a behavioral economics technique known as 'active choice' may help curb some of that drop off, the study suggests. The study is the first to show how clinic appointment times can influence influenza vaccination rates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 14, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Meet the Health Care Innovators 2018: It was Penn Medicine's year
This 2018 Philadelphia Business Journal Health Care Innovators/Doctors of Distinction awards program was dominated by the University of Pennsylvania Health System. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - September 13, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

New center will study the complex genomics within individual cells
(University of Pennsylvania) Junhyong Kim and James Eberwine of the University of Pennsylvania are leading a multi-disciplinary team in developing cutting-edge technologies that can assess the genetic material inside individual compartments of single cells. The new Center for Sub-Cellular Genomics aims to revolutionize and personalize therapies for diseases such as bipolar disorder, autism, and Alzheimer's disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

For the first time, a neural link between altruism and empathy toward strangers
(University of Pennsylvania) Using fMRI scans of a brain region called the anterior insula, University of Pennsylvania and Georgetown University researchers discovered that people who donated a kidney to an anonymous recipient were more sensitive to a stranger's fear and pain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Regrowing dental tissue with stem cells from baby teeth
(University of Pennsylvania) In a clinical trial led by Songtao Shi of the University of Pennsylvania and colleagues in China, stem cells extracted from children's baby teeth were used to regrow the living tissue in teeth damaged by injury. The promising findings highlight the potential of dental stem cells, which could one day be used in a wide range of dental procedures or even for treating certain systemic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Analyzing roadside dust to identify potential health concerns
(University of Pennsylvania) Car and truck pollution isn't confined to the exhaust that comes from their tail pipes. Particles from tires, brakes, and road material also wind up in the air, according to studies led by the University of Pennsylvania's Reto Gier é . " To understand the potential health implications, " he says, " it's really important to understand what's on the road. " (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 10, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Are Audiobooks As Good For You As Reading? Here ’s What Experts Say
Even for people who love books, finding the opportunity to read can be a challenge. Many, then, rely on audiobooks, a convenient alternative to old-fashioned reading. You can listen to the latest bestseller while commuting or cleaning up the house. But is listening to a book really the same as reading one? “I was a fan of audiobooks, but I always viewed them as cheating,” says Beth Rogowsky, an associate professor of education at Bloomsburg University of Pennsylvania. For a 2016 study, Rogowsky put her assumptions to the test. One group in her study listened to sections of Unbroken, a nonfiction book about Worl...
Source: TIME: Health - September 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Research Source Type: news

Army, UPENN uncover ways to better predict viral information
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) Neuroscientists at the University of Pennsylvania and the U.S. Army Research Laboratory have forecasted what content will get passed along repeatedly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine innovators receive International Award for work to treat childhood blindness
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Three Penn Medicine ophthalmology innovators received the 2018 Ant ó nio Champalimaud Vision Award for their revolutionary work leading to the first successful gene therapy to cure an inherited cause of childhood blindness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 4, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Can social media networks reduce political polarization on climate change?
(University of Pennsylvania) Political bias often leads to polarization on topics like climate change. But a new study from Damon Centola of the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication has shown that exposure to anonymous, bipartisan social networks can make a striking difference, leading both liberals and conservatives to improve their forecasting of climate-change trends. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Stigmatizing views and myths about psoriasis are pervasive in the United States
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The stigma associated with the autoimmune disease psoriasis may lead people to avoid patients who show signs of the condition, including not wanting to date, shake hands, or have people in their homes if they suffer from the disease. New multidisciplinary research involving both psychologists and dermatologists from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania is the first to examine how common this stigma may be among the general population of the United States as well as among medical students. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People who don't read the news better at predicting which articles will go viral
(University of Pennsylvania) Using fMRI data, researchers found that the brain activity of people who don't frequently read the news better predicted the popularity of New York Times Health articles. Frequent readers, by contrast, responded positively to all articles. When seeking to have content go viral, say the authors, look beyond the most committed readers or advocates. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pioneers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia greet European Commission's approval of Kymriah
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) Oncologists from Children's Hospital of Philadelphia today celebrated a watershed moment in medicine: approval by the European Commission of Kymriah (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) -- the first-ever US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved personalized CAR T-cell gene immunotherapy for aggressive blood cancers, pioneered together with Novartis and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Additional inhibitor can help anti-VEGF therapy overcome resistance in deadly brain cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Adding another inhibitor to therapies that cut off a tumor's access to blood vessels could be the key to helping those therapies overcome resistance in glioblastoma, a deadly form of brain cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 27, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Testing the reproducibility of social science research
(University of Pennsylvania) A team co-led by Gideon Nave of Penn's Wharton School replicated 21 high-profile social science studies and found discrepancies with the original research, including eight studies that failed to find significant evidence for the original finding. Researchers betting in prediction markets, however, were quite accurate at predicting which findings would replicate and which would not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Care access not main driver of racial disparities in kidney disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Although black and Hispanic veterans with chronic kidney disease (CKD) are more likely than white patients to see a kidney specialist--a nephrologist--they are more likely to suffer disease progression from early stage to advanced kidney disease, reports a study published this month in the Journal of the American Society of Nephrology from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn nursing professor wins prestigious award for book about children and drug safety
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Cynthia Connolly's, Ph.D., RN, FAAN, book, Children and Drug Safety: Balancing Risk and Protection in Twentieth Century America, just received the distinguished Arthur J. Viseltear Prize. This award is given each year by the American Public Health Association (APHA) to a historian who has made outstanding contributions to the history of public health, either through a body of scholarship or through a recent book (published within the previous two years). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hope for a universal flu vaccine as scientists invent lifetime jab
Experts at the University of Pennsylvania have created a new jab which they say could protect against multiple strains of the flu virus by targeting a part of the virus which does not mutate. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 22, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Candidate for universal flu vaccine protects against multiple strains
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A universal flu vaccine that protects people against most influenza strains is one step closer to reality, with a study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The candidate vaccine, described in Nature Communications this week, elicited a strong antibody response to a structure on the surface of flu viruses, called the hemagglutinin (HA) stalk. It protected mice from infection by various flu strains. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 22, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn radiation oncology invests in virtual reality
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) From a mindfulness experience to patient education and medical training, Penn Radiation Oncology announces plans to invest in VR. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news