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Penn study identifies new malaria parasites in wild bonobos
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Malaria parasites, although widespread among wild chimpanzees and gorillas, have not been detected in bonobos, a chimp cousin. Although the researchers saw evidence of a new malaria species in bonobos, it was limited to one small area of their range. This work helps the hunt for biological loopholes to potentially exploit the life history of ape pathogens to better understand how they cross over to humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 21, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New Gene Treatment Effective for Some Leukemia Patients
By genetically altering a patient ’ s T-cells to attack more than one site on cancer cells, researchers hope to devise better treatments. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - November 20, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DENISE GRADY Tags: Immunotherapy Leukemia Cancer National Cancer Institute Stanford University University of Pennsylvania June, Carl H Source Type: news

Four Penn professors among 2017 Class of AAAS fellows
(University of Pennsylvania) Four members of the University of Pennsylvania faculty have been named Fellows of the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Election as a AAAS Fellow is an honor bestowed upon members of AAAS, the world's largest general scientific society, by their peers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Winter babies are more at risk of a stroke in later life
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found mothers whose first trimesters were during summer are more likely to have children with irregular heartbeats as they were exposed to air pollution. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Scientists Have Made Their First Attempt at Gene Editing Inside a Human Patient
(OAKLAND, Calif.) — Scientists for the first time have tried editing a gene inside the body in a bold attempt to permanently change a person’s DNA to try to cure a disease. The experiment was done Monday in California on 44-year-old Brian Madeux. Through an IV, he received billions of copies of a corrective gene and a genetic tool to cut his DNA in a precise spot. “It’s kind of humbling” to be the first to test this, said Madeux, who has a metabolic disease called Hunter syndrome. “I’m willing to take that risk. Hopefully it will help me and other people.” Signs of whether i...
Source: TIME.com: Top Science and Health Stories - November 15, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Marilynn Marchione / AP Tags: Uncategorized gene editing Genetics health Innovation onetime overnight Research Source Type: news

The rhetorical signature of Donald J. Trump
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) Here we argue not simply that Trump's norm-shattering rhetoric deviates from that of his predecessors but also that his discursive patterns constitute a double-edged rhetorical identity or signature. This rhetorical signature both certified Trump's authenticity as a change candidate to a constituency eager for the disruption of politics as usual and now complicates his ability to govern in a political system still accustomed to those conventions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 15, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ADHD sufferers are angry and stay up late, study suggests
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found ADHD sufferers swear more frequently and use words such as 'hate' and 'cry'. They also often post between midnight and 6am. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 14, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Psoriasis severity linked to increased risk of type 2 diabetes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) People with psoriasis are at a higher risk to develop type 2 diabetes than those without psoriasis, and the risk increases dramatically based on the severity of the disease. Researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania found people with psoriasis that covers 10 percent of their body or more are 64 percent more likely to develop diabetes than those without psoriasis, independent of traditional risk factors such as body weight. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 14, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Women are less likely to receive CPR than men
A study from the University of Pennsylvania found women are less likely to receive  CPR because people fear improperly touching their breasts - but CPR is done on the sternum between breasts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 13, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What can Twitter reveal about people with ADHD?
(University of Pennsylvania) People with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder   tend to tweet using words like 'hate' or 'disappointed,' messages related to lack of focus, self-regulation, intention and failure and expressions of mental, physical and emotional exhaustion, according to research from the University of Pennsylvania. Better understanding this condition can help clinicians more effectively treat patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study Suggests Women Less Likely to Get CPR From Bystanders
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus  professional responders. "It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fa...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - November 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Study Suggests Women Less Likely to Get CPR From Bystanders
ANAHEIM, Calif. (AP) — Women are less likely than men to get CPR from a bystander and more likely to die, a new study suggests, and researchers think reluctance to touch a woman's chest might be one reason. Only 39 percent of women suffering cardiac arrest in a public place were given CPR versus 45 percent of men, and men were 23 percent more likely to survive, the study found. It involved nearly 20,000 cases around the country and is the first to examine gender differences in receiving heart help from the public versus  professional responders. "It can be kind of daunting thinking about pushing hard and fa...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - November 12, 2017 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Marilynn Marchione, Associated Press Tags: Cardiac & Resuscitation News Source Type: news

Penn study finds men are more likely to receive CPR in public than women
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) When it comes to your likelihood of receiving bystander CPR if you experience a Sudden Cardiac Arrest (SCA) in public, it turns out your gender may play a lifesaving role. According to a new study from researchers in the Center for Resuscitation Science at Penn Medicine, which is being presented at the American Heart Association Scientific Sessions 2017, men are more likely to receive bystander CPR in public than women. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How and why blood clots shrink
(University of California - Riverside) In an article published in Nature Communications, researchers at the University of California, Riverside and the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine used high-powered microscopy and rheometry -- the measurement of how materials become deformed in response to applied force -- to view the blood clotting process in real time and at the cellular level. The findings will be useful in the development of new therapies for clotting disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Taking blood using 'push-pull' method gets accurate results with fewer pokes
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study by University of Pennsylvania veterinary researchers has found that blood samples collected from an intravenous catheter using a special 'mixing' technique are as accurate as those collected via venipuncture, in which a needle is used to access the vein directly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Experts Concerned About Effectiveness Of This Year ’ s Flu Vaccine
(CNN) — Last year’s seasonal flu vaccine effectiveness was just 42%, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention estimated. Even if vaccinated, people had inadequate protection against the flu. This limited effectiveness was due to a mutation that occurred in the influenza A (H3N2) vaccine strain, according to a study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. This vaccine mutation resulted from an egg-based manufacturing process commonly used today. This year’s flu vaccine may also be imperfect, said Scott Hensley, author of the new study and an associate profe...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - November 8, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Flu Flu Vaccine Local TV Source Type: news

Video of blood clot contraction reveals how platelets naturally form unobtrusive clots
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The first view of the physical mechanism of how a blood clot contracts at the level of individual platelets is giving researchers a new look at a natural process that is part of blood clotting. The team describes how specialized proteins in platelets cause clots to shrink in size. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 8, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Flu vaccine may only be 20% effective this winter
H3N2, the same strain which caused havoc in Australia and triggered an influx of flu cases during their winter, has mutated, according to researchers at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 7, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn Medicine launches first clinical trial for uterine transplant in the northeast
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine will conduct the Northeast's first clinical trial of uterine transplants, to provide women with Uterine Factor Infertility (UFI) -- an irreversible form of female infertility that affects as many as 5 percent of women worldwide and 50,000 women in the United States -- with a new path to parenthood. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 7, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

H3N2 mutation in last year's flu vaccine responsible for lowered efficacy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The below average efficacy of last year's influenza vaccine (which was only 20 to 30 percent effective) can be attributed to a mutation in the H3N2 strain, a new study reports. With the mutation, most people receiving the egg-grown vaccine did not have immunity against H3N2 viruses that circulated last year. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - November 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Vitamin D may be key for pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Vitamin D may play a key role in helping some women seeking treatment for polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS)-related infertility get pregnant. PCOS is a hormonal disorder affecting 5 to 10 percent of women of reproductive age. Results of the study show women who were Vitamin D deficient when starting fertility treatments were 40 percent less likely to achieve a pregnancy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 3, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers working to mimic giant clams to enhance the production of biofuel
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are working together to create an artificial system that mimics the process by which giant clams convert sunlight into energy. The research may allow them to enhance the efficiency of biofuel production. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an egg
(University of Pennsylvania) Chromosomes can 'cheat,' biasing the chance that they will make it into a sex cell. A team from the University of Pennsylvania shows how this bias arises in female cells, detecting molecular signals that create an asymmetry in the machinery that drives meiosis, the cell-division process that gives rise to gametes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is gun violence contagious?
(University of Pennsylvania) Gun violence is mostly not contagious but rather an endemic issue for particular neighborhoods, according to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oxford. That means place-based interventions like hotspot policing or greening vacant lots have the best chance to improve this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds infertility increases risk of death in women
Research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that women who have experienced infertility are at an increased risk of death. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why do some viruses linger? Scientists are studying how viruses replicate different kinds of cells, some of which can hide inside the immune system
(Natural News) Some viral infections can continue their existence even though the body that they are trying to penetrate has already triggered an immune response. University of Pennsylvania researchers reveal that acute viral infection cells enriched with defective viral genomes are more likely to survive infection than cells with full-length viral genomes. Viral infections, such... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn engineers develop filters that use nanoparticles to prevent slime build-up
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have a new way of making membranes that allows them to add in a host of new abilities via functional nanoparticles that adhere to the surface of the mesh. They tested this method by adding antifouling particle that could prevent biofilm build-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Infertility linked to higher risk of death among women
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Women with a history of infertility have a 10 percent increased risk of death compared to those without reported infertility struggles, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, which examined the association between infertility and mortality as well as specific causes of death, also showed that women with a history of infertility have a 20 percent increased risk of cancer-related mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment found for skin-predominant dermatomysitis
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine found that the drug anabasum was effective at treating a rare skin condition. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women and Malnutrition in Africa
In conclusion, it is arguable that there are improved impacts on nutrition if agricultural interventions are targeted to women and when specific work is done around women’s empowerment (for example, through behaviour change communication), mediated through women’s time use, women’s own health and nutrition status, and women’s access to and control over resources as well as intrahousehold decision-making power. That this may be dismissed out of hand is not unlikely either, given the persistence of male dominance.The post Women and Malnutrition in Africa appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source:...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Raghav Gaiha and Vani Kulkarni Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

New treatment shows promise for patients with rare dermatologic disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new treatment for a rare and often incurable condition called dermatomyositis (DM) reduced the severity of the disease in patients whose DM was resistant to other therapies. As part of a randomized, double-blind study, 22 patients were given either a drug called anabasum or a placebo. The 11 patients who got the drug improved during the trial, with less severe skin disease and better patient-reported quality of life and symptom assessments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uncomfortable sight from an ancient reflex of the eye
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The eyes are for seeing, but they have other important biological functions, including automatic visual reflexes that go on without awareness. The reflexive system of the human eye also produces a conscious, visual experience, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Minorities less likely to have breast reconstruction, but not for the reason many think
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Minority women are far less likely to undergo breast reconstruction than white women, even if they live in the same area and have similar insurance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Genomic Research is Changing Heart Care
Genomic testing is most frequently associated with cancer testing, but this area of research is beginning to make an impact on cardiovascular care. A recent scientific statement by the American Heart Association shined a spotlight on how the expressed genome can potentially be used to diagnose diseases and predict who will develop diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, heart failure, and arrhythmias. According to the statement, scientists now have the ability to address disease at many levels that were inaccessible during the past century. This includes the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, proteome, metab...
Source: MDDI - October 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: IVD Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Blocking enzyme in normal cells may impede pancreatic cancer, Penn vet team shows
(University of Pennsylvania) New findings from a University of Pennsylvania-led team offer a promising target for future therapies that could potentially root out even the well-hidden metastatic lesions that make pancreatic cancer so deadly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mutation in fallopian tube lesions may help catch ovarian cancer years earlier
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Screening for tumor cells in the fallopian tubes of women at high-risk for ovarian cancer may help detect the cancer years before it develops further, suggests a new study published online this week in Nature Communications. The new study traces the origins of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most frequent type of ovarian cancer that is often diagnosed at advanced stages, back to fallopian tube lesions known as 'p53 signatures' and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) that harbor the TP53 gene mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn researchers awarded $3.75 million to study how mealtimes influence human health
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Disrupting sleep-wake cycles from a predominantly daytime to a delayed eating lifestyle, -- i.e., skipping breakfast and making lunch the first meal of the day, plus eating late dinner, disrupts the body's natural circadian (24-hour) rhythm, the cycle that tells us when to sleep, wake up, eat, and influences hormones and other functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mistakes in how proteins of the ear are built contribute to early hearing loss
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers found mutations in a master-switch protein called Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 in individuals with a type of congenital hearing loss. In general, what connects most of the unexplained hearing-loss cases is that protein building in the cochlea during development goes awry. The cochlea has the all-important job of transforming mechanical energy in the form of sound waves into electrical signals that run along auditory nerves to the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after Daylight Saving
(University of Pennsylvania) Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after the switch to Daylight Saving Time in the spring, according to findings from researchers Rebecca Umbach, Greg Ridgeway and Adrian Raine of the University of Pennsylvania. In the fall, the opposite takes place, with violence rising by about the same percentage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood flow in the developing heart guides maturation of heart valves
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Congenital heart valve defects are the most common type of birth defects, the majority of which have no clear genetic cause, suggesting that epigenetic factors play an important role. Now, researchers have found that the shear force of blood flow against the cells lining the early heart valve sends signals for heart 'cushion' cells to become fully formed valves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds smokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes are healthier
(University of Pennsylvania) Smokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes to be healthier than other brands due to NAS's advertising claims, according to new research from the Penn Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS) at the Annenberg School for Communication. This belief was found among both former and current smokers and was not linked to brand preference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medicare graduate nurse education demonstration increases primary care workforce
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) The Report to Congress on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration has just been released documenting health care workforce gains addressing the nation's shortage of primary care. The $200 million initiative is the first to test whether Medicare funding of graduate clinical education of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) would help meet national health care workforce needs similar to residency training for physicians. The answer is yes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover which brain region motivates behavior change
(University of Pennsylvania) Ever been stuck in a rut? University of Pennsylvania researcher Michael Platt and colleagues found that stimulating a region of the brain called the posterior cingulate cortex can lead to changes in routine behavior. Neurons there ramp up their firing rates, then peak just before a pattern shifts. Knowing this could help businesses better understand how to spur employee innovation, exploration and creativity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study links mutations in notch gene to role in B cell cancers
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers found that in B cell tumors, mutated overactive versions of the Notch protein directly drive the expression of the Myc gene and many other genes that participate in B cell signaling pathways. Myc is a critical gene in governing cell proliferation and survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Proton therapy lowers treatment side effects in pediatric head and neck cancer patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Pediatric patients with head and neck cancer can be treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) instead of traditional photon radiation, and it will result in similar outcomes with less impact on quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Moonshot grant will help researchers see two of cancer's key food sources at once
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Imagine trying to take a picture of a runner, but only being able to see her feet. If you could see her whole body, you'd get the full picture of how she uses both legs to put one foot in front of the other to reach top speed. That's the idea behind a cancer imaging project that just received $1.4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Need for targeted interventions for breastfeeding difficulties due to obesity
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) A study led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Diane Spatz, Ph.D., RN-BC, FAAN, the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, has found that delayed lactogenesis was more prevalent among women who were obese pre-pregnancy and that excessive gestational weight gain was also associated with a delay in lactogenesis II. The study has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study shows how female immune cells keep their second x chromosome shut off
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new study, a team from the University of Pennsylvania describes how X chromosome inactivation is regulated in the immune system's B cells as they develop in bone marrow and when they encounter antigens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers receive $6.4m in NIH funding to create center to transform mental health services
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will receive $6.4 million in funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to create a new center to improve mental health service delivery through behavioral economics and implementation science (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into the challenges and contributions of nurse bioethicists
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Nurse bioethicists are a small but special subset of the nursing profession and bioethics community, focusing on the moral complexities that arise in clinical care, research, and health policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news