Machine learning identifies personalized brain networks in children
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Machine learning is helping Penn Medicine researchers identify the size and shape of brain networks in individual children, which may be useful for understanding psychiatric disorders. In a new study published in the journal Neuron, a multidisciplinary team showed how brain networks unique to each child can predict cognition. The study is the first to show that functional neuroanatomy can vary greatly among kids, and is refined during development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Illuminating interactions between decision-making and the environment
(University of Pennsylvania) Employing a game theory model, University of Pennsylvania researchers demonstrate how strategic decisions influence the environment in which those decisions are made, alterations which in turn influence strategy. Their analysis, which identifies how incentives can tip a strategy from one extreme to another, applies to fields as diverse as fisheries dynamics to climate change policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 19, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene Therapy for Mesothelioma Has ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Mesothelioma Gene Therapy Trial Shows ‘Real Potential’
Gene therapy is moving closer to becoming part of standard-of-care treatment for pleural mesothelioma, according to the latest multicenter clinical trial. The phase III trial, known as the INFINITE clinical research study, is designed to evaluate the intrapleural delivery of an investigational drug — a type of gene therapy — in combination with celecoxib and gemcitabine, anti-inflammatory and chemotherapy drugs, respectively. Researchers hope to stop, or at least slow, the growth of mesothelioma tumor cells with the combination therapy. “This is a very interesting concept,” oncologist Dr. Bernardo G...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 17, 2020 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

10 African Americans Who Have Shaped  Public Health
By Casey Bishopp, Communications officer, IntraHealth International ; Sabra Farquharson, Business development officer, IntraHealth InternationalFebruary 18, 2020We’re celebrating the legacies of ten African Americans in public health this month—shining a light on the invaluable contributions made by these scholars and health workers. According to themost recent report form the Health Resources and Services Administration, African Americans make up 11.6% of the US health workforce, and throughout American history have made invaluable contributions to greater public health in fields s...
Source: IntraHealth International - February 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: cbishopp Source Type: news

Vaccine misinformation and social media
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) People who rely on social media for information were more likely to be misinformed about vaccines than those who rely on traditional media, according to a study by the Annenberg Public Policy Center. The study, based on surveys of nearly 2,500 US adults, found that up to 20% of respondents were at least somewhat misinformed about vaccines. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 17, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Advancing an oral drug for pulmonary arterial hypertension
(University of Pennsylvania) With a protein drug grown in the leaves of lettuce plants, the University of Pennsylvania's Henry Daniell and colleagues hope to provide new treatment options for patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, a rare but deadly disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Philly nursing school leads the nation in NIH research grants, but Pitt not far behind
Penn Nursing is celebrating a three-peat. In fiscal 2019, the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing led the country in National Institutes of Health research funding with $11.3 million in awards. Penn Nursing has now held the top spot in the rankings for three consecutive years, but the University of Pittsburgh was also on the lis t. “Although rankings are not the only measure of our research success, they are a national reflection of our commitment to our mission and progress in advancing… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Answers to microbiome mysteries in the gills of rainbow trout
(University of Pennsylvania) In trout, the University of Pennsylvanias J. Oriol Sunyer and colleagues discovered that a particular type of primitive antibody is essential for fighting microbes that cause disease while preserving others that make up a healthy microbiome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 12, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The many lives of charcoal
(University of Pennsylvania) In sub-Saharan Africa, charcoal dominates as an energy resource for cooking. Catherine Nabukalu, a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania Master of Environmental Studies program, traveled to her native Uganda to study how this fuel is produced, traded, and used. In a new article, she and School of Arts and Sciences' Professor Reto Gier é share information about the livelihoods that depend on charcoal and about its environmental toll. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gene-editing therapy for cancer moves one step closer as scientists engineer patients'
Gene-editing is the next great hope in the ongoing race to find a cure for cancer. Scientists at University of Pennsylvania have shown gene-edited white blood 'T-cells' are safe in patients. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

What is your risk from smoking? Your network knows!
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study from researchers at Penn's Annenberg School for Communication found that most people, smokers and non-smokers alike, were nowhere near accurate in their answers to questions about smoking's health effects. But critically, the study found a way to help people be more accurate: discussing their ideas with other people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CRISPR-edited immune cells can survive and thrive after infusion into cancer patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Genetically edited immune cells can persist, thrive, and function months after a cancer patient receives them. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Community health worker program yields $2.47 for every $1 invested annually by Medicaid
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Every dollar spent on patients receiving support from Penn Medicine's community health worker (CHW) program resulted in an annual return on investment (ROI) of $2.47 for every dollar invested annually by Medicaid, according to a new study published online today in Health Affairs. The savings are generated by reducing hospitalizations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A roadblock for disease-causing parasites
(University of Pennsylvania) Thread-like parasitic worms cause millions of cases of canine heartworm each year, and more than 100 million cases of lymphatic filariasis, also known as elephantiasis, in humans. In research led by the University of Pennsylvania's Michael Povelones, ramping up the immune response of mosquitoes blocked their ability to transmit these harmful parasites. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 3, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

UPenn scientists receive ACGT grant to accelerate CAR T-Cell clinical trial
(Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy) Alliance for Cancer Gene Therapy awards grant to University of Pennsylvania scientists to use CAR T-cell gene therapy to treat advanced metastatic prostate cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers identify cancer cell defect driving resistance to CAR T cell therapy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Some cancer cells refuse to die, even in the face of powerful cellular immunotherapies like CAR T cell therapy, and new research is shedding light on why. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biomechanics researcher John Drazan receives AAAS Early Career Award for Public Engagement
(American Association for the Advancement of Science) John Drazan, a postdoctoral fellow in the University of Pennsylvania's Human Motion Lab, will receive the 2020 Early Career Award for Public Engagement with Science, presented by the American Association for the Advancement of Science to honor early-career scientists or engineers who demonstrate excellence in their contribution to public engagement with science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 27, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Stand Up To Cancer announces gastric cancer interception research team
(Stand Up To Cancer) A new SU2C team to intercept gastric cancer, led by Andrew T. Chan, MD, MPH, (Harvard Medical School) and Sandra Ryeom, PhD, (University of Pennsylvania) with researchers from University of Chicago, City of Hope, Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center and Samsung Medical Center (Seoul, Korea) will receive $3MM team to seek biomarkers, such DNA and cells shed from the tumor circulating in the blood system, indicating the presence of gastric cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 27, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A brain link to STI/HIV sexual risk
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Data show that young adult women in the United States have high rates of sexually transmitted infections (STIs) that increase their risk of HIV. Though epidemiologic and behavioral factors for risk have been studied, we know very little about brain factors that may be linked to STI/ HIV sexual risk. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

With a protein 'delivery,' parasite can suppress its host's immune response
(University of Pennsylvania) The parasite Toxoplasma gondii need not infect a host immune cell to alter its behavior, according to a new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Veterinary Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

People with obesity who experience self-directed weight shaming benefit from intervention
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) While it's known that weight 'self-stigma' is associated with poor mental and physical health, little is known about how to help people combat it. Now, in a first-of-its-kind study, researchers at Penn Medicine showed that people who received a new stigma-reduction intervention, along with standard behavioral weight loss treatment, devalued themselves less due to their weight compared to participants who only received the weight loss treatment. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 24, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ICUs receive higher satisfaction scores for end-of-life care than other hospital units
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The research challenges a common belief that dying in the ICU is a less favorable experience than dying elsewhere in the hospital. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 23, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Daron Ferris to receive Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Daron G. Ferris, M.D., the Founder of CerviCusco, will receive the 2020 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health for his dedication to cervical cancer prevention among the indigenous women in Cusco, Peru. Ferris created CerviCusco, a nonprofit organization that ensures all women, including those with limited economic resources, have access to high quality and affordable health education and care, including screening, diagnosis, and treatment of cervical cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 22, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain imaging may improve diagnosis and treatment of mental health disorders
(American College of Neuropsychopharmacology) Brain imaging may one day be used to help diagnose mental health disorders--including depression and anxiety--with greater accuracy, according to a new study conducted in a large sample of youth at the University of Pennsylvania and led by Antonia Kaczkurkin, PhD and Theodore Satterthwaite, MD. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

No clear evidence of increase in adolescent suicide after '13 Reasons Why'
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) Contrary to the findings of a 2019 study that associated the release of the Netflix series '13 Reasons Why' with an increase in monthly suicide rates among adolescent boys, a reanalysis of the data by the Annenberg Public Policy Center finds no evidence of contagion. The reanalysis, published today in PLOS ONE, found that after controlling for the dramatic increase in adolescent suicide in recent years, the show's release had no clear effect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 16, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Second U.S. Baby to Be Born From a Dead Donor ’s Uterus Is Delivered
Researchers at Penn Medicine in Philadelphia said the procedure could pave a new path to parenthood for women with uterine factor infertility. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emily S. Rueb Tags: Transplants Infertility Uterus Pregnancy and Childbirth University of Pennsylvania Philadelphia (Pa) Source Type: news

Researchers find fast way to deliver radiation therapy to cancer patients
Researchers at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania may have found a safe and effective way to deliver an entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second, using FLASH radiotherapy. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - January 9, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn shows giving entire course of radiation treatment in less than a second is feasible
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cancer patients may one day be able to get their entire course of radiation therapy in less than a second rather than coming in for treatment over the course of several weeks, and researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania have taken the first steps toward making it a reality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 9, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn study paves way for new vaccines to protect infants against infections
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new Penn Medicine study puts researchers within closer reach of vaccines that can protect infants against infections by overcoming a mother's antibodies, which are known to shut down immune defenses initiated by conventional vaccines. That hurdle largely explains why vaccinations for infectious diseases like influenza and measles not given until six to 12 months of age. Findings from the preclinical study were published online today in Science Translational Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 8, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

A new link between fear, imitation, and antisocial behavior in children
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from Rebecca Waller of the University of Pennsylvania and Nicholas Wagner of Boston University found that children who were fearless, lacked social connection, and didn't participate in 'arbitrary imitation' -- copying acts that had no inherent function -- were more likely to develop antisocial behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Five Ways To Improve Your Mental Health In 2020
(CNN) — It’s a difficult birth for this new decade. The year 2020 kicks off under the shadow of divisive politics, international security threats, a spate of hate crimes, and a planet in environmental peril, plus all the reasons we’re stressed individually: work, health problems, life changes and more. No wonder so many of us are anxious or depressed. But you can take scientifically validated steps to improve your mental outlook, and — because the mind and body are entwined — these behaviors also will improve your overall health. 1. Practice optimism The studies are positive: Looking on the br...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health CNN Mental Health Source Type: news

Research identifies changes in neural circuits underlying self-control during adolescence
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn researchers applied tools from network science to identify how anatomical connections in the brain develop to support neural activity underlying executive function. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bystander CPR less likely for people living in Hispanic neighborhoods
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) People living in predominately Hispanic neighborhoods are less likely to receive CPR from a bystander following an out-of-hospital cardiac arrest compared to people living in non-Hispanic neighborhoods, researchers from Penn Medicine and the Duke University of School of Medicine reported in the journal Circulation. This same group also had a lower likelihood of survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 2, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn spinout developing cancer treatments raises $1M
Pinpoint Therapeutics, a University of Pennsylvania spinout focused on developing cancer treatments, has raised $1 million in debt financing. The debt sale was disclosed in documents filed with the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission. Pinpoint was founded in 2018 by researchers Ravi Amaravadi and Jeffrey D. Winkler from Penn's Abramson Cancer Center to commercialize their technology for developing potential new cancer treatments. The Abramson researchers have identified an enzyme, called PPT1,… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Three local life sciences companies raise nearly $200M in 2019 IPOs
Three area life sciences companies went public in 2019, raising a combined $186 million in IPOs completed during a two-week span in late October and early November. University of Pennsylvania spinout Cabaletta Bio of Philadelphia raised $74.8 million in October, selling 6.8 million shares of common stock at $11 per share. Cabaletta is developing a potential cell therapy treatment for mucosal pemphigus vulgaris, a rare skin disorder that causes painful blis ters and sores on mucous membranes. Founded… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 30, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

When automotive assembly plants close, deaths from opioid overdoses rise
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Closing of local automotive assembly plants may lead to increases in deaths from opioid overdose, according to a study led by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and the Massachusetts General Hospital. The findings highlight fading economic opportunity as a driving factor in the ongoing national opioid epidemic, and build on previous research that links declining participation in the labor force to increased opioid use in the U.S. The findings are published today in JAMA Internal Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Direct-to-consumer fertility tests confuse and mislead consumers, Penn study shows
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Direct-to-consumer hormone-based 'fertility testing' for women is viewed by consumers as both an alternative, empowering tool for family planning, and a confusing and misleading one, according to the results of a new study from Penn Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 30, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Proton therapy as effective as standard radiation with fewer side effects
(Washington University School of Medicine) Cancer patients who receive high-tech proton therapy experience similar cure rates and fewer serious side effects compared with those who undergo traditional X-ray radiation therapy, according to a study led by Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 27, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Proton therapy lowers risk of side effects in cancer compared to traditional radiation
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Proton therapy leads to significantly lower risk of side effects severe enough to lead to unplanned hospitalizations for cancer patients when compared with traditional radiation, while cure rates between the two groups are almost identical. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 26, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Brain tumor organoids may be key to time-sensitive treatments for glioblastomas
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Lab-grown brain organoids developed from a patient's own glioblastoma, the most aggressive and common form of brain cancer, may hold the answers on how to best treat it. A new study in Cell from researchers at Penn Medicine showed how glioblastoma organoids could serve as effective models to rapidly test personalized treatment strategies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 26, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Using a material's 'memory' to encode unique physical properties
(University of Pennsylvania) As materials age, they 'remember' prior stresses and external forces, which scientists and engineers can then use to create new materials with unique properties. The finding is the result of a collaborative study between physicists at the University of Chicago and the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - December 20, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A new role for a triple-negative breast cancer target
(University of Pennsylvania) A team led by Rumela Chakrabarti of the University of Pennsylvania has made new discoveries into how a key protein involved in triple-negative breast cancer functions in puberty. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers predict 10-year breast cancer recurrence with MRI scans
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) According to a new study from researchers at Penn Medicine, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and radiomics could help to characterize the heterogeneity of cancer cells within a tumor and allow for a better understanding of the causes and progression of a person's individual disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Acute leukemia patients treated with common therapy have increased risk for heart failure
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) or acute myeloid leukemia (AML) who are treated with anthracyclines are at a heightened risk of heart failure -- most often within one year of exposure to the chemotherapy treatment, according to a new study led by researchers at Penn Medicine. To help identify a patient's risk for heart failure following the treatment, researchers developed a risk score (0 to 21) based on clinical and echographic variables. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 17, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Defective sperm epigenome may cause male infertility, study suggests
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania may have discovered the cause of some cases of infertility problems, and discovered potential clues on how to correct it. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - December 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Victory: Novartis withdraws an abusive patent for an over-priced cancer medication
On 3 July 2019, Doctors of the World and Public Eye, represented by Lionel Vial, filed a patent opposition at the European Patent Office against a patent covering Kymriah®. Kymriah® is a gene cancer therapy from Novartis, for which the French Social Security is billed €320,000 per patient. The aim was to denounce an abusive patent that aimed to strengthen a monopoly, allowing an exorbitant price to be imposed. At the end of November 2019, Novartis announced that it was withdrawing this patent and asked for it to be revoked. Novartis withdraws one of the patent covering Kymriah®, a victory achieved by&nbs...
Source: Doctors of the World News - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Martina Villa Tags: Uncategorised Source Type: news

Penn researchers uncover defective sperm epigenome that leads to male infertility
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) One out of eight couples has trouble conceiving, with a quarter of those cases caused by unexplained male infertility. Research has linked that to defective sperm that fail to 'evict' proteins called histones from DNA during development. However, the mechanisms behind that eviction and where this is happening has remained unclear. Now, researchers show, using newer genome-wide DNA sequencing tools, the precise genetic locations of those retained histones, and a key gene regulating it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - December 16, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

BCMA-targeted immunotherapy can lead to durable responses in multiple myeloma
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An experimental, off-the-shelf immunotherapy that combines a targeted antibody and chemotherapy can lead to potentially durable responses in multiple myeloma patients whose disease has relapsed or is resistant to other standard therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 16, 2019 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news