‘It Reopened Some Old Wounds.’ For Some Survivors, Retelling Church Sex Abuse Brings Back PTSD, Anxiety—and Closure
For decades, Tim Lennon repressed memories of the childhood abuse he says he suffered at the hands of a priest. It wasn’t until 1995, when Lennon was in his late 40s and living in San Francisco, that he stumbled across information about clergy sexual abuse and felt decades-old memories come flooding back. “I said, ‘Oh my god, that happened to me,'” Lennon remembers. But even that moment, he says, didn’t prepare him for the memories that resurfaced in 2010 — an avalanche that he believes was triggered by his twin daughters turning 12, the age around which he says he was raped by a priest....
Source: TIME: Health - August 16, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

First mouse model to mimic lung disease could speed discovery of more effective treatments
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A team of researchers from Penn Medicine has developed the first mouse model with an IPF-associated mutation, which induces scarring and other damage similar to what is observed in humans suffering from the condition. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine's Carl June Receives 2018 Albany Prize
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Carl June, M.D., a gene therapy pioneer at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania, will receive the 2018 Albany Medical Center Prize in Medicine and Biomedical Research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How many American cities protect the rights of employed breastfeeding mothers?
(University of Pennsylvania) Research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing and the Children's Hospital of Philadelphia found that, among the 151 largest cities in the United States, only Philadelphia and New York City have local legislation that protects a nursing mother who returns to work outside the home and who wants to continue breastfeeding. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

6 Factors Related to Inclusion in Health Care Workplace ID'd
TUESDAY, Aug. 14, 2018 -- There are six broad factors that can affect inclusion within health care organizations, according to a study published online Aug. 3 in JAMA Network Open. Jaya Aysola, M.D., M.P.H., from the University of Pennsylvania in... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - August 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The medical centers U.S. News ranked as the region's top hospitals
The Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania/Presbyterian Medical was the lone Philadelphia-area medical center to make U.S. News& World Report ’s list of the country's top 20 medical centers. The 2018-19 rankings compared more than 4,500 medical centers nationwide across 25 specialties, procedures and conditions. In this year’s report, a total of 158 hospitals were nationally ranked in at least one specialty For the third consecutive year, the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., took the top… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - August 14, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Improving Surgery for Mesothelioma with Glowing Tumor Technology
Thoracic surgeon Dr. Sunil Singhal at the Abramson Cancer Center has developed glowing tumor technology that should increase the effectiveness of aggressive surgery for malignant pleural mesothelioma. Singhal has shown recently that by adding a contrast agent that makes tumor cells glow, a more complete surgery can be done. This potentially avoids the now almost-inevitable cancer recurrence. “This is a big deal. We could potentially help a lot of patients with this,” Singhal told Asbestos.com. “It could change the entire field [of surgery for mesothelioma].” Singhal and his colleagues from the Abram...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - August 9, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

Cancer cells send out 'drones' to battle immune system from afar
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Checkpoint inhibitor therapies have made metastatic melanoma and other cancers a survivable condition for 20 to 30 percent of treated patients, but clinicians have had very limited ways of knowing which patients will respond. Researchers have uncovered a novel mechanism by which tumors suppress the immune system. Their findings also usher in the possibility that a straightforward blood test could predict and monitor cancer patients' response to immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - August 8, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies program receives gift for scientists in training
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has received a $2 million gift from the Blavatnik Family Foundation to establish the Blavatnik Family Fellowship in Biomedical Research in the Penn Biomedical Graduate Studies (BGS) program. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Inaugural class of Michael Brown Penn-GSK Postdoctoral Award commences
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Four Penn Medicine postdoctoral trainees have been awarded three-year fellowships through a newly established program, the Michael Brown Penn-GSK Postdoctoral Fellowship Award Program from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, in partnership with GlaxoSmithKline (GSK). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Patients who got hepatitis C-infected kidneys cured of the virus
Kiran Shelat, 65, is one of 20 patients who received a hepatitis C-infected kidney and has been cured of the virus in a bold University of Pennsylvania experiment that suggests more organs may be viable. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - August 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn Medicine immunologist receives early career honor from Burroughs Wellcome Fund
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Jorge Henao-Mejia will work to uncover how the gut microbiome gut contributes to obesity and type 2 diabetes, findings which could pave the way from new treatments to reduce the ever-growing number of people diagnosed with these serious medical conditions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Cal U forms alliance for nursing students with Ohio Valley Hospital
California University of Pennsylvania formed an educational alliance with the Ohio Valley Hospital School of Nursing in Kennedy Township. Cal U will provide online coursework for nursing students through the agreement, according to a news release. The university will offer up to 30 credits of non-degree coursework online, completing science and general education requirements while continuing hands-on learning in practical nursing s kills, the release said. A similar partnership with the Washington… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - August 6, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Stacey Federoff Source Type: news

Advancing transplantation: Hepatitis C-infected organs safe for transplantation when followed by antiviral treatment
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Twenty patients at Penn Medicine have been cured of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) following lifesaving kidney transplants from deceased donors who were infected with the disease, according to a study published today in Annals of Internal Medicine. The researchers also report that the kidney transplants for these 20 patients are functioning just as well as kidneys that are transplanted from similar donors without HCV. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - August 6, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Ensuring equality: Penn develops method to measure and operationalize inclusive culture
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Inclusiveness of workplace culture can be measured by a concrete set of six factors, according to a study published today in JAMA Network Open from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - August 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Machine learning links dimensions of mental illness to abnormalities of brain networks
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study using machine learning has identified brain-based dimensions of mental health disorders, an advance towards much-needed biomarkers to more accurately diagnose and treat patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - August 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FDA approves first non-surgical treatment for 2 rare cancers
The Food and Drug Administration on Tuesday approved the first ever non-surgical treatment for the rare neuroendocrine cancers: pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. The approval for Azedra, a drug developed by Progenics Pharmacecuticals of Tarrytown, N.Y., was based on a multi-center trial led by researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia. “This is a true breakthrough," said Dr. Daniel A. Pryma, an associate professor of radiology and radiation… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - July 31, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Therapy for Rare Cancers receives FDA approval following trials at Penn's Abramson Cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first ever non-surgical treatment for the rare neuroendocrine cancers pheochromocytoma and paraganglioma. The approval was based on a multi-center trial led by researchers in the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania and was granted to Progenics Pharmaceuticals for AZEDRA (iobenguane I131). (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 31, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn cardiovascular disease and translational medicine expert elected to Italian Academy of Science
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Garret FitzGerald, MD, FRS, a professor of Systems Pharmacology and Translational Therapeutics in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, and an international leader in cardiovascular disease research, has been elected as a foreign member of the Accademia Nazionale dei Lincei (Lincean Academy) -- the Italian Academy of Science in Rome. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Red-blood-cell 'hitchhikers' offer new way to transport drugs to specific targets
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new drug-delivery technology which uses red blood cells to shuttle nano-scale drug carriers, called RBC-hitchhiking, has been found in animal models to dramatically increase the concentration of drugs ferried precisely to selected organs, (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Alcohol In Breast Milk May Lead To Lower Cognition In Kids, Study Finds
(CBS Local/CNN)– Children’s exposure to alcohol through breast milk may cause a comparable drop in their cognitive abilities, according to a study published Monday in the journal Pediatrics. “This is the first study in which associations between alcohol exposure through breast milk and cognition in children are examined,” the researchers from Macquarie University in Australia wrote in the report. Previously Undisclosed TSA Program Tracks Unsuspecting Passengers The authors obtained data from a longitudinal study, a continuous study of data over a period of time, of 5,107 Australian infants who were...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - July 30, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News breastfeeding CNN Local TV Source Type: news

Elizabeth Rhoades to receive 2019 BPS Michael and Kate Barany Award
(Biophysical Society) The Biophysical Society (BPS) has named Elizabeth Rhoades, Associate Professor, Department of Chemistry, University of Pennsylvania, as its 2019 Michael and Kate B á r á ny Award winner. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - July 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A New Study Shows Just How Much Doctors Prescribe Opioids
After years of rising use, federal data suggests that opioid prescriptions are beginning to drop off in the U.S., perhaps in an effort to curtail a substance abuse epidemic that continues to get worse. But new research suggests that many doctors are still prescribing these powerful drugs — even for relatively minor injuries. In fact, a quarter of patients treated for ankle sprains between 2011 and 2015 left the hospital with an opioid prescription, according to a paper published in the Annals of Emergency Medicine. To reach that finding, University of Pennsylvania researchers analyzed private insurance claims filed ...
Source: TIME: Health - July 28, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime opioids Source Type: news

Diabetes drugs act as powerful curb for immune cells in controlling inflammation
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A common class of drugs used to treat diabetes has been found to exert a powerful check on macrophages by controlling the metabolic fuel they use to generate energy. Keeping macrophages from going overboard on the job may inhibit the onset of obesity and diabetes following tissue inflammation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Nudging' doctors to prescribe cholesterol-lowering statins triples prescription rates
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Pairing an online patient dashboard with 'nudges' to doctors tripled statin prescribing rates in a clinical trial led by Penn Medicine researchers. The study used two nudges, active choice framing to prompt physicians to make a decision on prescriptions, and peer comparison feedback which provided physicians with information on their performance relative to other physicians. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 27, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Obesity and diabetes may lead to Alzheimer ’s by wearing down the LIVER
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and the Veterans Affairs Medical Center have blamed reduced levels of lipids created in the liver, considered integral to cell membranes in the brain. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Map reveals where in the US opioids are dished out for minor injuries
A new study from the University of Pennsylvania has found that 'high-prescribing states' are three times more likely to give you an opioid prescription than 'low-prescribing states'. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 24, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Chance of being prescribed opioids for minor injury differs dramatically by where you live
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Patients who sought care for a sprained ankle in states that were found to be 'high prescribers' of opioids were approximately three times more likely to receive a prescription for the drugs than those treated in 'low-prescribing' states, according to new research. Additional results of the study show that patients who received prescriptions for long courses of the drugs were five times more likely to fill additional opioid prescriptions over the next 6 months than those who received just a few days' supply. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 24, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Largest genetic database on Alzheimer's disease now re-open for business
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The National Institute on Aging Genetics of Alzheimer's Disease Data Storage Site will begin making large-scale DNA sequence data available to investigators. The goal is to make Alzheimer's disease-relevant genetic data available to as many investigators as possible to accelerate research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 23, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

J & J, UPenn announce launch of Philly JLabs healthcare incubator
Johnson & Johnson (NYSE:JNJ) said this week that it, alongside the University of Pennsylvania, have launched a new J&J Innovation JLabs incubator in Philadelphia. The new JPod incubator will be located within the University of Pennsylvania’s Pennovation Center with a goal of accelerating the development of early-stage healthcare solutions from the local area. As part of the launch of the incubator, JLabs and the Pennovation Center are also launching the Jpod @ Philaedlphia Quickfire Challenge, through which individuals or teams can submit products for a chance to win access to educational programs and me...
Source: Mass Device - July 20, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Research & Development johnsonandjohnson Source Type: news

Turning Vacant Lots Into Green Spaces Can Improve Mental Health. Here ’s How
Researchers have long touted the mood-boosting effects of green space and spending time outdoors — and a new study emphasizes just how much of an impact your environment can have on your mental health. The paper, published Friday in JAMA Network Open, found an association between urban restoration efforts in Philadelphia and the mental health of city residents. “Cleaning and greening” urban lots in Philadelphia was linked to a drop in neighborhood residents feeling depressed or worthless, and a slight uptick in overall resident mental health, the study says. “Vacant lot greening is a very simple str...
Source: TIME: Health - July 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized healthytime Mental Health/Psychology onetime Source Type: news

Greening vacant lots reduces feelings of depression in city dwellers, Penn study finds
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Greening vacant urban land significantly reduces feelings of depression and improves overall mental health for the surrounding residents, researchers show in a new randomized, controlled study published in JAMA Network Open. The findings have implications for cities across the United States, where 15 percent of land is deemed " vacant " and often blighted or filled with trash and overgrown vegetation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

An aerial, as opposed to ground-level, view of time
Do today and yesterday and tomorrow loom large in your thinking, with the more distant past and future barely visible on the horizon? That ’s not unusual in today’s time-pressed world — and it seems a recipe for angst.Suppose, instead, you looked down on your life, or at least your calendar, from high overhead; and all your days, future and past, were equally visible and real to you, sort of like the sketches above. Might feelings of anxiety and guilt — and other negativity — recede, as you glimpsed a broader view of all you’ve done and all you’ll have time for going forward?That &...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - July 19, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Penn, Johnson & Johnson team up to accelerate innovation
The University of Pennsylvania has entered into a collaboration with  Johnson& Johnson Innovation to create and open the first JPOD location in the United States. Called JPOD@Philadelphia, the networking hub will feature a secure telecommunications conferencing system to connect researchers and entrepreneurs within the Pennovation Center and region to the Johnson& Johnson Innovation network. The goal of the JPOD@Philadelphia, according to the organizations, is to "identify and accelerate the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - July 18, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

Cancer patients may experience delayed skin effects of anti-PD-1 therapy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Cancer patients receiving anti-PD-1 therapies who develop lesions, eczema, psoriasis, or other forms of auto-immune diseases affecting the skin may experience those adverse reactions on a delay -- sometimes even after treatment has concluded. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 18, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mobility Plan Gets Hospitalized Patients Moving Mobility Plan Gets Hospitalized Patients Moving
Hospitalists at the University of Pennsylvania outline the mobility plan used at their institution to decrease the adverse effects of bedrest among hospitalized patients.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hospital Medicine News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug could be modified to stop patients feeling sick and vomiting
Researchers at University of Pennsylvania and Syracuse University found when a Type 2 diabetes drug is modified with vitamin B-12 it could reduce vomiting rates by up to 78 per cent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 17, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Diabetes drug with better side-effect tolerance could improve treatment
(Society for the Study of Ingestive Behavior) Improved medications for Type 2 diabetes are one step closer thanks to a new discovery reported this week by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania and Syracuse University. By modifying the key ingredient in current diabetes drugs, the researchers produced a compound that was effective for hyperglycemia in animal trials, yet without the most problematic side effects of current drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

About half of parents use cell phones while driving with young children in the car
(Children's Hospital of Philadelphia) A new study from a team of researchers at Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing found that in the previous three months, about half of parents talked on a cell phone while driving when their children between the ages of 4 and 10 were in the car, while one in three read text messages and one in seven used social media. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding the social dynamics that cause cooperation to thrive, or fail
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new report in the journal Nature Communications, Erol Ak ç ay, a biologist at the University of Pennsylvania, addresses the question of how an evolving social network influences the likelihood of cooperation in a theoretical social group. He finds that, although networks where connected individuals are closely related are more likely to cooperate, such groups can trigger a feedback loop that alters the structure of the network and leads to cooperation's collapse. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Why randomized trials for proton therapy are difficult to complete (and what we can do about it)
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Commercial insurance medical policies that do not cover treatment with proton therapy can make it difficult for patients to participate in randomized clinical trials funded by the NCI, part of the National Institutes of Health, that are evaluating the therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 11, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn's Brian Capell, MD, PhD, wins Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Brian C. Capell, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, a core faculty member of the Penn Epigenetics Institute, and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, has been awarded a prestigious Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award for 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study finds mutation driving deadlier brain tumors and potential therapy to stop it
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A poorly understood mutation in the brain cancer glioblastoma (GBM) is now being implicated for the first time as the driver of rare but deadlier cases of the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn's Brian Capell, M.D., Ph.D., wins Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Brian C. Capell, M.D., Ph.D., an assistant professor of Dermatology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, a core faculty member of the Penn Epigenetics Institute, and a member of the Abramson Cancer Center, has been awarded a prestigious Damon Runyon Clinical Investigator Award for 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - July 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Rethinking neurodegenerative disease treatment: Target multiple pathological proteins
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Targeting multiple proteins at once may be the real key to treating neurodegenerative diseases, according to a recent study published in Brain by Penn Medicine researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Progress in addressing a severe skin disease that affects dogs and humans
(University of Pennsylvania) Both dogs and humans can suffer from ichthyosis, a disorder in which the skin becomes very dry, scaly, and prone to secondary infections. A team led by Penn's Elizabeth Mauldin uncovered new details about one form of the disease and took a step toward developing a topical therapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Testosterone pushes men to buy expensive luxury brands
The study, from experts at the University of Pennsylvania, is the first to show that our body chemistry has a strong influence over whether we prefer cheap goods or pricey products. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Men with more testosterone prefer luxury items like Rolex watches or Armani suits
The study, from experts at the University of Pennsylvania, is the first to show that our body chemistry has a strong influence over whether we prefer cheap goods or pricey products. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 3, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Boosting testosterone makes men prefer higher-status products
(University of Pennsylvania) Status symbols, like a luxury car or brand-name denim, may not function any better than their lower-status counterparts, but they do convey a message about the owner's position on the social ladder. A new study led by Gideon Nave of the University of Pennsylvania's Wharton School found that a single dose of testosterone was enough to boost men's preference for higher-status goods, pointing to a biological basis for consumer behavior. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - July 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Brain zaps could control sex pests, study finds
A new study, led by the University of Pennsylvania, has found that stimulating the front of the brain via electrical currents decreases the intent to commit violent acts. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - July 2, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news