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Penn Medicine creates Center for Connected Care to streamline telemedicine services
The University of Pennsylvania's Penn Medicine has been an active player in the telehealth game for sometime with multiple telehealth units, but last week it went a step further to announce that it will be centralizing its telemedicine activities into the Penn Medicine Center for Connected Care.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - February 20, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Humans evolving a gene that may stop us drinking alcohol
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania analysed a library of genetic data, finding that new gene variants that have arisen in Asia and Africa seem to protect people against alcoholism. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

African Americans with atrial fibrillation at significantly higher risk for stroke compared to Caucasians with the disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) African Americans with atrial fibrillation (AF) -- a quivering or irregular heartbeat that can lead to a host of dangerous complications -- have a significantly higher risk of stroke than Caucasians with the condition, according to new research published today in HeartRhythm by researchers from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

'Icebreaker' protein opens genome for t cell development, Penn researchers find
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers describe the role of a transcription factor called TCF-1 in targeting the condensed chromatin and regulating the availability of genome sequences in T-cell development. The new connection between TCF-1 and chromatin will aid in developing new therapies using epigenetic drugs to alter T-cell fate in cancer, autoimmune disorders, and infectious diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 20, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Improving family-based comm. Key to enhancing sexual health outcomes of GBQ adolescents
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Studies have shown that talking with teens about sex-related topics is a positive parenting practice that facilitates important sexual health outcomes with heterosexual adolescents. But for LGBTQ youth, the topic of sexuality and sexual health is often ineffectively addressed at home. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Highly mutated protein in skin cancer plays central role in skin cell renewal
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers have shown for the first time that a key protein called KMT2D (and is often mutated in skin cancer) is involved in the epigenetic regulation of gene expression that guide skin cell turnover. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 19, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Member Highlights: North Pocono Public Library, Moscow, PA – learn about this library’s community education series designed to address difficult life planning decisions. Is your organization working on a similar project? Tell us about it! NNLM MAR is always interested in learning about health outreach activities that are happening in Pennsylvania, New York, New Jersey and Delaware. Weekly Funding Tips: Funding Tip 1- Talk it through – through mid-April, NNLM MAR will offer weekly tips for members who inten...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - February 16, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Penn engineers test drug transfer using placenta-on-a-chip
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have demonstrated the feasibility of their 'organ-on-a-chip' platform in studying how drugs are transported across the human placental barrier. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Drug that treats psoriasis also reduces aortic vascular inflammation
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) An antibody used to treat the skin disease psoriasis is also effective at reducing aortic inflammation, a key marker of future risk of major cardiovascular events. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Diplomats in Cuba Suffered Brain Injuries. Experts Still Don ’ t Know Why.
After examining 21 American diplomats said to have been victims of a mysterious “ attack ” in Havana, medical experts found concussion-like damage but no obvious causes. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: GINA KOLATA Tags: Brain Concussions Diplomatic Service, Embassies and Consulates Havana (Cuba) JAMA (Journal of American Medical Assn) State Department University of Pennsylvania Source Type: news

Researchers Probe Mystery of Illnesses in U.S. Cuba Embassy Personnel
But the exact nature of what harmed more than 20 U.S. government personnel stationed in Havana, Cuba, last year remains mysterious, reports a team led by Dr. Douglas Smith of the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: WebMD Health)
Source: WebMD Health - February 15, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

University of Pennsylvania researchers conduct comprehensive evaluation of patients with concussion-like symptoms following reports of audible phenomena in Cuba
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A comprehensive evaluation by clinical researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania identified a neurological syndrome that left US government personnel serving in Havana, Cuba with persistent memory and thinking dysfunction, as well as vision and balance problems after hearing unusual noises in their homes or hotel rooms. The team published their findings in JAMA. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Ovarian cancer actually begins in the fallopian tubes
Lead researcher Dr Ron Drapkin, an associate professor at University of Pennsylvania, says the recent findings will likely lead to advancements in prevention, detection and treatment of the disease (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 14, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Orthofix launches RCStim rotator cuff repair trial
Orthofix (NSDQ:OFIX) said today it launched a study looking to evaluate the use of pulsed electromagnetic field technology with the company’s RCStim device as adjunctive treatment to the surgical repair of rotator cuff tears. The 538-patient study, which has begun enrollment, will evaluate the safety and effectiveness of PEMF technology designed to promote bone growth and whether it can reduce the rate of repaired tendons being subsequently torn, as well as overall improvement in patient outcomes. “Arthroscopic repair of rotator cuff tears can improve pain and functional use of the shoulder but a continuin...
Source: Mass Device - February 13, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Orthopedics Orthofix Source Type: news

Cabozantinib shows promise as first line treatment for differentiated thyroid cancer
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A kinase inhibitor called cabozantinib could be a viable therapy option for patients with metastatic, radioactive iodine-resistant thyroid cancer. In a trial initiated and led by the Abramson Cancer Center and the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, tumors shrunk in 34 out of 35 patients who took the drug, and more than half of those patients saw the tumor size decrease by more than 30 percent. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn chemists develop motion capture-like technology for tracking protein shape
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania demonstrated a motion capture-like technology that tracks how proteins fold and change shape using fluorescent probes. The research could lead to improvements in drugs used to treat neurodegenerative diseases, as well as new methods of imaging that may also allow for earlier detection. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Funding to lead team-based investigation of gynecologic cancer therapies
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) E. John Wherry, PhD, a cancer and immunology researcher at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and one of the most highly cited investigators in his field, has been awarded a 'Convergence 2.0' research grant by Stand Up to Cancer (SU2C) to investigate immune system response to cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 9, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Clock protein controls daily cycle of gene expression by regulating chromosome loops
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) It's well known that the human body functions on a 24-hour schedule. The up-and-down daily cycles of a long-studied clock protein called Rev-erb coordinates the ebb and flow of gene expression by tightening and loosening loops in chromosomes, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Better knowledge of evolution leads to greater acceptance of the concept
(University of Pennsylvania) Prevailing theories about evolution state that belief in the concept is tied only to a person's politics or religion. But according to new research from the University of Pennsylvania, whether Americans accept or reject the subject also depends on how well they understand it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A Brain Implant Improved Memory, Scientists Report
Electrodes threaded into the brains of epilepsy patients enhanced their recall on word tests by about 15 percent. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: BENEDICT CAREY Tags: Memory Brain Alzheimer's Disease Implants Dementia Traumatic Brain Injury Nature Communications (Journal) University of Pennsylvania Kahana, Michael J Source Type: news

Alzheimer's could be treated with electric shocks to brain
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania sent electric shocks to the area of the brain that processes language and found that patients' memory improved by 15 percent. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Ridesharing may not reduce number of missed medical appointments, Penn study finds
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The high number of low-income patients missing medical appointments because of unreliable transportation has led to partnerships between health care systems and ridesharing companies, such as Uber and Lyft, in an effort to ease travel and boost attendance. However, a new study from Penn Medicine researchers published in JAMA Internal Medicine found that offering a free Lyft ride to Medicaid patients for an upcoming medical appointment did not reduce the rate of missed appointments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Risk assessment tool can now better predict pressure injuries in children
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Pressure-related skin injuries, a nurse-sensitive quality indicator in hospitals, are associated with increased morbidity and higher costs of care. There's been much attention focused on hospital-acquired pressure injuries (HAPI) in the adult population. However, while preventable, immobility-related and medical device-related pressure injuries (MDPI) also occur in hospitalized infants and children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Vet study uncovers therapeutic targets for aggressive triple-negative breast cancers
(University of Pennsylvania) New findings from a study led by researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have made inroads into a strategy to identify triple-negative breast cancers at risk for metastasis, and eventually target these cancers with drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 2, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Language matters in end-of-life conversations
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In general, the term 'medical futility' applies when, based on data and professional experience, no further treatments, procedures or tests will provide benefit and may, in fact, be more burdensome and create undue suffering for the patient and the patient's family. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 2, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Pro Football Players May Die Earlier Than Their Peers, Study Says
The professional football industry has been rocked by plenty of bad press in recent years, from domestic violence charges to studies linking the sport to chronic brain injury. Now, just ahead of this weekend’s Super Bowl, a new study casts another shadow over the game: Career players in the National Football League (NFL) have slightly higher rates of early death than their peers who didn’t play professionally, according to a report published in JAMA. The difference in mortality rate between NFL players and non-NFL players was not statistically significant, meaning that the total number of deaths in the study wa...
Source: TIME: Health - February 1, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan Tags: Uncategorized chronic traumatic encephalopathy concussions cte football players football cte study football injuries football safety healthytime is football dangerous is football safe onetime Research why is football dangerous Source Type: news

Dating partners more violent and account for more domestic violence than spouses
(University of Pennsylvania) More than 80 percent of intimate partner violence reported to local police involves current and former boyfriends and girlfriends, according to research from Susan B. Sorenson of the University of Pennsylvania. That's much higher than married partners: Current and ex-spouses account for less than 15 percent and 4 percent, respectively. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 31, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

James Wilson, MD, PhD, from the University of Pennsylvania, Joins the...
The Rett Syndrome Research Trust (RSRT) is pleased to announce that James Wilson, MD, PhD, director of the University of Pennsylvania Gene Therapy Program and the Rose H. Weiss Orphan Disease Center,...(PRWeb January 26, 2018)Read the full story at http://www.prweb.com/releases/2018/01/prweb15132993.htm (Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals)
Source: PRWeb: Medical Pharmaceuticals - January 26, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

The Best Kind of Breakfast to Eat, According to Metabolism Experts
This article originally appeared on CookingLight.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 25, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Zee Krstic / Cooking Light Tags: Uncategorized Diet/Nutrition healthytime onetime Source Type: news

Understanding emotional responses to traumatic injury key to planning & treatment efforts
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Injuries are a major public health problem in the United States, accounting for nearly 60 percent of all deaths among Americans between the ages of 1 and 44 years. Survivors of traumatic injuries often face significant physical and mental health challenges, including depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 25, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Gilead, Parker Institute grab stakes in Penn immunotherapy spinout's $100 million round
Gilead Sciences Inc. took another step toward building out its immunotherapy program as part of a $100 million Series A financing for a Philadelphia company. The San Francisco-based Parker Institute for Cancer Immunotherapy, which has championed new research and alliances around ways to use the body's immune system to beat back cancer, also participated in the private stock sale for University of Pennsylvania spinout Tmunity Therapeutics Inc. Co-found ed in 2015 by Penn T-cell therapy pioneer Dr.… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

9 Things to Do When You Can ’t Sleep Because Your Mind Is Racing
This article originally appeared on Health.com (Source: TIME: Health)
Source: TIME: Health - January 23, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Amanda MacMillan / Health Tags: Uncategorized healthytime onetime sleep Source Type: news

Penn immunotherapy spin-out raises $100M
Tmunity Therapeutics Inc., a Philadelphia-based developer of immunotherapy treatments that was spun out of the University of Pennsylvania, raised $100 million in a private stock sale. The company was co-founded in 2015 by Penn T cell therapy pioneer Dr. Carl June. The company is developing a diversified portfolio of novel treatments that involve re-engineering a person's own T cells, a key part of the immune system, to boost his or her ability to fight disease. June led Penn’ s development of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: John George Source Type: news

Penn immunotherapy spin-out raises $100M
Tmunity Therapeutics Inc., a Philadelphia-based developer of immunotherapy treatments that was spun out of the University of Pennsylvania, raised $100 million in a private stock sale. The company was co-founded in 2015 by Penn T cell therapy pioneer Dr. Carl June. The company is developing a diversified portfolio of novel treatments that involve re-engineering a person's own T cells, a key part of the immune system, to boost his or her ability to fight disease. June led Penn’ s development of… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - January 23, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Vandana Gopikumar to receive 2018 Penn Nursing Renfield Award for Global Women's Health
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Vandana Gopikumar, PhD, Co-Founder of The Banyan and The Banyan Academy of Leadership in Mental Health will receive the 2018 Penn Nursing Renfield Foundation Award for Global Women's Health for her work in helping women with mental health problems in India. She co-founded both organizations with Vaishnavi Jayakumar. Gopikumar will receive the award - which comes with a $100,000 cash prize - during an event at the University of Pennsylvania on March 21, 2018. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Americans are getting more ZZZZs
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Although more than one in three Americans still don't get enough sleep, a new analysis shows first signs of success in the fight for more shut eye. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 18, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

De Gruyter reaches 1000th open access book milestone
At the beginning of the year, De Gruyter reached the milestone of 1000 open access books on degruyter.com. The books, primarily in English, but also in German and other European languages, have been published by De Gruyter and its imprints, and also by publishing partners – such as Transcript and the Institut für Zeitgeschichte (Institute of Contemporary History) – as a result of cooperation agreements. Highlights of recent open access books that are accessible to anyone with an internet connection include: “Golda Meir:  A Political Biography” by Miron Medzini, a former spokesman for Gold...
Source: News from STM - January 17, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Editorial Featured Source Type: news

Exposing hypocrisy can effectively reduce collective blame of Muslims for individual violent acts
(University of Pennsylvania) White Americans were less likely to blame all Muslims for acts of terror committed by a Muslim when they were first asked to think about how much they were responsible for terrorist acts committed by other Whites. By highlighting the hypocrisy in a non-threatening way, the participants' prejudice toward Muslims declined, even a month after the intervention. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CMS mulls expanded MRI coverage for CRM patients
The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services is thinking about extending coverage for magnetic resonance imaging scans to patients with cardiac rhythm management devices after reviewing studies showing that MRI scans are safe. If finalized the decision would allow Medicare patients with implanted MR-conditional devices such as pacemakers or defibrillators to have their MRI scans covered by the national healthcare program. “We propose that the evidence is sufficient to conclude that magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for Medicare beneficiaries with an implanted pacemaker (PM), implantable cardioverter defibrillator ...
Source: Mass Device - January 16, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Brad Perriello Tags: Wall Street Beat Cardiac Rhythm Management Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Source Type: news

Insurance company requirements place heavy administrative burden on physicians seeking to prescribe new cholesterol-lowering drugs
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A rare glimpse into the prior authorization requirements implemented by public and private insurance providers across the country has found substantial administrative burden for a new class of medications for patients with high cholesterol that places them at high risk for heart attack or stroke, according to new research. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers identify new treatment target for melanoma
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania have identified a new therapeutic target for the treatment of melanoma. For decades, research has associated female sex and a history of previous pregnancy with better outcomes after a melanoma diagnosis. Now, a research team from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania says it may have determined the reason for the melanoma-protective effect. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine Orthopaedics and Princeton Orthopedic Associates forge strategy
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In continued collaboration, Penn Medicine and Princeton Orthopedic Associates formalize their relationship under the Penn Medicine Orthopaedic Specialty Network (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 16, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Improvements in mortality rates are slowed by rise in obesity in the United States
(University of Pennsylvania) With medical advances and efforts to curb smoking, one might expect that US life expectancy would improve. Yet there's been a reduction in the rate of improvement in American mortality during the last three decades. Penn researchers say a rise in obesity is to blame, slowing declines in death rates by a half-percentage point per year. The scientists estimate that rising obesity was about twice as important for mortality trends as a decline in smoking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 15, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Trouble sleeping? Eat more fish – research suggests a connection between omega 3s and enhanced cognitive performance in school children via better sleep
(Natural News) A study revealed that children who eat plenty of fish are more likely to achieve cognitive performance boost and sleep better compared with those who rarely or never consume fish. A team of scientists from the University of Pennsylvania evaluated the effect of better sleep among children who ate more fish on cognitive... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - January 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Past exposures shape immune response in pediatric acute respiratory infections
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) By analyzing immune cells of children who came to the emergency department with flu symptoms, researchers found that the suite of genes these early-response cells expressed was shaped by factors such as age and previous exposures to viruses. Better understanding how early infections influence long-term immune response has implications for the diagnosis and treatment of young patients who suffer from acute respiratory tract infections. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - January 12, 2018 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Penn-led team uncovers the physiology behind the hour-long mating call of midshipman fish
(University of Pennsylvania) A new study led by University of Pennsylvania researchers provides an explanation for how Pacific midshipman fish can generate a mating call that emits continuously from their bodies for a full hour, entailing 360,000 muscle contractions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 12, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

By altering bone marrow, training can prepare innate immune system for future challenges
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new paper, published in Cell, researchers at the University of Pennsylvania collaborated with an international team to show how the innate immune system, which responds more generally to dangers detected in the body, can be trained to 'remember' past threats and respond more robustly to future challenges. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - January 11, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New Dental Material Can Resist Biofilm Growth And Kills Bacteria
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have developed an antibacterial resin for dental procedures such as cavity fillings. They hope that the material can provide improved fillings that resist tooth decay and last longer. Conventional materials for dental fillings are prone to being covered in plaque, a sticky biofilm that can lead to tooth decay and filling failure. Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania are working on developing something better. “Dental biomaterials such as these,” said Geelsu Hwang, a researcher involved in the study, “need to achieve two goals: first, they should kill ...
Source: Dental Technology Blog - January 10, 2018 Category: Dentistry Source Type: news

Done deal: Princeton HealthCare joins Penn Medicine
The University of Pennsylvania Health System ’s biggest push ever into New Jersey became official Tuesday with its addition of Princeton HealthCare System. “The joining together of Princeton HealthCare System and Penn Medicine represents an exciting new chapter in Penn Medicine’s growth,” said Ralph W. Muller, CEO of the Penn Health S ystem. “[Princeton Healthcare] has an impressive reputation for providing high-quality care to patients close to home, and innovating in many types of community-based… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - January 8, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Molecular imaging technique identifies lung nodules for resection in osteosarcoma patient
(SPIE--International Society for Optics and Photonics) Utility of near-infrared molecular imaging in a patient undergoing pulmonary metastasectomy for osteosarcoma has been reported by researchers from Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania and Purdue University. The work is reported in an article in the Journal of Biomedical Optics published this week by SPIE, the international society for optics and photonics. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 5, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news