Injection improves vision in a form of childhood blindness
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new treatment for patients with a form of congenital retinal blindness has shown success in improving vision, according to results published today in Nature Medicine led by researchers at the Scheie Eye Institute in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

End-of-life care quality remains a problem -- nurses may be a solution
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Center for Health Outcomes and Policy Research (CHOPR) describes the quality of end of life care in nearly 500 US hospitals, utilizing nearly 13,000 bedside nurses as informants of quality. The study has been published online first. It will also be in a future issue of the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 17, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight Blast off! The National Network of Libraries of Medicine is getting into Summer Reading! A Universe of Stories is coming to public libraries this summer in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the first moon landing. Explore DNA and family history, make stardust, discover astronaut food, and more with our science programs for kids, teens, and adults. Check out the NNLM Summer Reading Manual for program guides created in partnership with the Collaborative Summer Library Program. National Safe Toys and Giving Month: Decembe...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - December 14, 2018 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

UAB names new dean for School of Dentistry
The UAB School of Dentistry has named a new dean after a national search. Russell Taichman will become the school's ninth dean in July 2019. Taichman joins UAB from the University of Michigan School of Dentistry, where he has served as associate dean for research and as the Major Ash Collegiate Professor in the Department of Periodontics and Oral Medicine. He receive d his doctoral degree in dental medicine from the University of Pennsylvania School of Dental Medicine, his doctor of medical science… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - December 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Stethoscopes Covered With Potentially Dangerous Bacteria, Study Finds
BOSTON (CBS) – One of the most universal tools that a doctor carries around is a stethoscope, used to listen to a patient’s heart and lungs. Now researchers at the University of Pennsylvania have discovered the nasty truth about these instruments – that they are covered with potentially dangerous bacteria. The researchers performed DNA testing on stethoscopes used by doctors, nurses, and respiratory therapists in an intensive care unit and found, not only significant numbers of harmless bacteria, but also bacteria that could lead to bad infections like staph aureus. They also found that wiping down the st...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - December 13, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health News Syndicated Local Local TV Source Type: news

Doctors' stethoscopes are 'loaded' with bacteria including hospital superbug MRSA, study warns  
All 40 of the stethoscopes examined in a new University of Pennsylvania study were riddled with bacteria that cause hospital-associated infections, including the deadly MRSA bug. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - December 12, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Risk Analysis releases special issue on communicating about Zika virus
(Society for Risk Analysis) Today, Risk Analysis, an International Journal, published a special issue, 'Communicating About Zika,' which features several articles that were originally presented as works-in-progress at the Zika Communication Summit convened in March 2017 by the Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn plastic surgeons perform world's first robotic bilateral breast reconstruction
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A team of surgeons from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania are the first in the world to use a surgical robot to assist with a bilateral free flap breast reconstruction, allowing patients to recover and be discharged more quickly and without the use of addictive narcotic painkillers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New imaging tools that trace key breast cancer enzymes may help guide therapies
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A set of emerging diagnostic tools may help identify breast cancer patients who are most likely to benefit from therapies that target important enzymes fueling a range of subtypes, including BCRA-mutated and triple negative cancers. New research from two studies conducted by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, are presented on today at the 2018 San Antonio Breast Cancer Symposium. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - December 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The wrong gut bacteria found to cause brain blood vessel LESIONS that lead to strokes and seizures
(Natural News) A recent study published in Nature revealed that intestinal bacteria may alter the brain’s blood vessel structure, which in turn may play a role in the development of malformations that result in stroke or epilepsy. As part of the research, a team of health experts at the University of Pennsylvania examined the probable causes of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - December 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

UCLA researchers discover genes tied to dementia in key early step toward new therapies
A UCLA-led research team has identified genetic processes involved in the neurodegeneration that occurs in dementia — an important step on the path toward developing therapies that could slow or halt the course of the disease.The findings appear today in the journal Nature Medicine.The researchers discovered two major groups of genes involved in mutations that result in an overproduction of a protein called tau, a hallmark of the progressive loss of neurons seen in major forms of dementia. The study was largely done in mouse models of dementia, although the researchers performed additional experiments that indic...
Source: UCLA Newsroom: Health Sciences - December 3, 2018 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

Alcohol intake may be key to long-term weight loss for people with Diabetes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) A new study from the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing (Penn Nursing) suggests that alcohol consumption may attenuate long-term weight loss in adults with Type 2 diabetes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 3, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Global trial shows CAR T therapy can lead to durable remissions in non-Hodgkin's lymphoma
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) In an update to a global clinical trial stretching from Philadelphia to four continents, the chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy Kymriah ® (tisagenlecleucel, formerly CTL019) led to long-lasting remissions in patients with relapsed/refractory (r/r) diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL). (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - December 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bigger brains are smarter, but not by much
(University of Pennsylvania) Using a large dataset and controlling for a variety of factors, including sex, age, height, socioeconomic status, and genetic ancestry, Gideon Nave of the Wharton School and Philipp Koellinger of Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam found that people with larger brains rated higher on measures of intelligence and educational attainment. Size was far from everything, however, explaining only about two percent of the variation in smarts. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

‘They Will Be Studied for the Rest of Their Lives.’ How China’s Gene-Edited Twins Could Be Forever Changed By Controversial CRISPR Work
For now, they’re known as Lulu and Nana, pseudonyms that are meant to give them some amount of anonymity amid the international uproar over their birth. As the first babies born after their genomes were edited (while they were embryos, by the genetics tool CRISPR) the twin girls, born in Shenzhen, China are the subject of scientific and public scrutiny that will only escalate as they get older. He Jiankui, a professor at the Southern University of Science and Technology, stunned the world when he claimed, both in a video posted by his lab and in an interview with a journalist, that he used CRISPR to disable a gene in...
Source: TIME: Health - November 29, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized crispr Genetics healthytime onetime Source Type: news

FDA approves new targeted drug for leukemia tested at University of Pennsylvania
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved the first ever inhibitor drug specifically approved for treating patients with relapsed or refractory acute myeloid leukemia (AML) with a mutation in the Fms-like tyrosine kinase 3 (FLT3) gene. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 28, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Next for Disabling Back Pain? New Discs From Patients' Own Cells
TUESDAY, Nov. 27, 2018 -- People with disabling back pain may one day receive replacement spinal discs grown from their own stem cells, researchers say. Preliminary results in goats are encouraging, according to the University of Pennsylvania... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - November 27, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

CAR T studies highlight Abramson Cancer Center research at ASH Annual Meeting
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn researchers will present findings at the 60th American Society of Hematology Annual Meeting and Exposition in San Diego, including studies that evaluate CAR T combinations, how the timing of CAR T therapy may impact its effectiveness, and which patients who currently aren't eligible for CAR T therapy should have greater access. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Does teen cannabis use lead to behavior problems -- or vice versa?
(Annenberg Public Policy Center of the University of Pennsylvania) New research led by the Annenberg Public Policy Center finds that cannabis use among teens doesn't appear to lead to greater conduct problems or greater affiliation with other teens who smoke cannabis. Instead, it's adolescents with conduct problems or whose friends use cannabis who are more likely to gravitate toward cannabis use. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Here ’s Why People Are Obsessed With Popping Pimples
You know it’s a bad idea to pop your pimples. Dermatologists say so. “If the inflamed or infected material”—i.e., the pimple pus—“is not easily extruded with a little pressure, you could force it deep and spread the extent of the inflammation, and even cause permanent scarring and pitting of the skin,” says Dr. Michael Olding, a dermatologist and chief of plastic surgery at the George Washington University School of Medicine and Health Sciences. But despite these warnings, many find it hard to resist evicting the unsightly little squatters that set up shop in their skin. One dermat...
Source: TIME: Health - November 21, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Markham Heid Tags: Uncategorized Research Source Type: news

Modeling the most common form of vision loss in older adults
(University of Pennsylvania) Age-related macular degeneration is the leading cause of vision loss in people older than 50. University of Pennsylvania biochemist Kathleen Boesze-Battaglia and colleagues have developed a model system that mimics many features of the human condition, giving scientists a platform to gain a deeper understanding of risk factors and possible treatments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 21, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Abramson Developing CAR T-Cell Therapy for Mesothelioma
The National Cancer Institute awarded a five-year, $10.7 million grant to the Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania to develop CAR T-cell therapy for mesothelioma and lung cancer. The hopes are high for a breakthrough. The program involves a laboratory modification of a patient’s T cells — a type of white blood cell — that prompts the immune system to attack cancer cells. The therapy also is known as chimeric antigen receptor T-cell therapy. It already is revolutionizing the way some blood and bone marrow cancers are treated. The grant is designed to investigate whether this type of gen...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - November 20, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Source Type: news

HALF of US adults do absolutely no exercise and 25% don't stand for 8 hours
A new study led by the University of Pennsylvania has found that one in four US adults sit more than eight hours per day, four in 10 adults are physically inactive and one in 10 adults are both. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - November 20, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Louisville company acquires a portion of UPMC Enterprises' business
Louisville-based Waystar has purchased of a portion of a business affiliated with the University of Pennsylvania Medical Center. The health care revenue cycle management and technology company will take over the transaction services division of Ovation Revenue Cycle Services LLC. The company is part of a portfolio of companies managed by UPMC's innovation division, which is called UPMC Enterprises. Terms of the deal were n ot disclosed, according to a news release. The transaction services division… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: Chris Larson Source Type: news

Montco-based National Comprehensive Cancer Center adds another local member
The Plymouth Meeting-based National Comprehensive Cancer Network is getting another local member. The Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania said Tuesday it is joining the NCCN as its 28th member institution. The Abramson Cancer Center's membership includes the Hospital of the University of Pennsylvania, Penn Presbyterian Medical Center, Pennsylvania Hospital and Children’ s Hospital of Philadelphia. Founded in 1995, the NCCN's members are top academic cancer centers from across… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 20, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Abramson Cancer Center joins National Comprehensive Cancer Network
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The Abramson Cancer Center at the University of Pennsylvania announced today that it is joining the National Comprehensive Cancer Network ® as its 28th member institution. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 20, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

To resolve inflammation, location matters
(University of Pennsylvania) A single protein can both restrain the initiation of inflammation and help to actively resolve it, according to new research led by George Hajishengallis of the University of Pennsylvania and Triantafyllos Chavakis of Technical University of Dresden. They found that the type of cell that secretes the protein determines which activity the protein promotes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 19, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Anti-Malaria drugs have shown promise in treating cancer, and now researchers know why
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Anti-malaria drugs known as chloroquines have been repurposed to treat cancer for decades, but until now no one knew exactly what the chloroquines were targeting when they attack a tumor. Now, researchers from the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania say they have identified that target -- an enzyme called PPT1. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - November 15, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Meet Lia: At-Home Pregnancy Steps Into The 21st Century
Can entrepreneurship be taught? It's a conversation I find myself having this talk quite often and my answer will unsurprisingly be yes. I give you, Anna Simpson and Bethany Edwards, co-founders of Lia Diagnostics and graduates of the University of Pennsylvania's Integrated Product Design program. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - November 14, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Karl Ulrich, Contributor Source Type: news

Penn Study shows regular behavioral counseling leads to clinically significant weight loss
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Intensive behavioral therapy (IBT), which provides diet and physical activity counseling, is proven to help adults with obesity achieve meaningful weight loss in six to 12 months. A new Penn Medicine study, published today in Obesity, the journal of the Obesity Society, is the first randomized controlled evaluation of the efficacy of IBT when implemented under the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) coverage guidelines (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 13, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Nursing science could help reduce firearm violence and its impact
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Firearm violence is a significant public health problem worldwide. In the United States, firearms are used to kill almost 100 people daily. Yet despite the staggering impact of firearm violence, there is limited research directed at preventing or addressing its impact on individuals, families and communities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Yelp reviews reveal strengths and weaknesses of emergency departments and urgent care
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Comparing five- and one-star Yelp reviews, a Penn Medicine research team found what patients consider to be the strengths and weaknesses of hospital emergency departments and urgent care centers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 9, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

University of Pennsylvania cell therapy spinoff raises $38M
Cabaletta Bio Inc., a biopharmaceutical startup spun out of the University of Pennsylvania, has raised $38 million in an equity financing and signed an exclusive license agreement with Penn related to T cell therapy. In addition, the Radnor-based company has entered into two multiyear sponsored research agreements with Penn for the discovery and development of engineered T cell therapy products for B cell-mediated autoimmune diseases. The engineered T cell technology uses what are known as chimeric autoant ibody receptors… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - November 8, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: John George Source Type: news

New decision support tool improves discharge outcomes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) In an effort to lessen readmission risk after discharge and achieve the best possible outcomes for patients, hospital-based clinicians are more intentionally planning discharge of those who require post-acute care (PAC). Yet, although hospital clinicians strive to effectively refer patients who require PAC, their discharge-planning processes often vary greatly and typically are not evidence-based. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Social media use increases depression and loneliness
(University of Pennsylvania) Facebook, Snapchat, and Instagram may not be great for personal well-being. In the first experimental study examining use of multiple platforms, Melissa G. Hunt of the University of Pennsylvania shows a causal link between time spent on these social media and increased depression and loneliness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - November 8, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Dry conditions may have helped a new type of plant gain a foothold on Earth
(University of Pennsylvania) Plants reap energy from the sun using two photosynthesis pathways, C3 and C4. A new study led by University of Pennsylvania biologists suggests that water availability drove the expansion of C4 species, which may help to explain how different plant lineages came to be distributed on the planet today (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Penn and CHOP receive $1.84 million to study ways to curb cell phone use while driving
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A team from Penn and CHOP have received a major grant from the Federal Highway Administration, an agency within the United States Department of Transportation, to help curb distracted driving. The team will investigate strategies -- such as redesigning insurance discounts -- for reducing cell phone use while driving. The $2.3 million project, which includes $1.84 million in federal funds in addition to contributed funding from several participating organizations, is one of the largest federally-funded research projects to address driving and cell phone use. (Source: EurekAler...
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine, Wharton School team up to navigate new terrain
Penn Medicine and the Wharton School of the University of Pennsylvania are creating an executive health care leadership program that is being launched to provide health care executives, clinicians and scientists with the tools they need to lead health care organizations at a time when changes and advancements in science, technology, and economics are reshaping the practice of medicine. “Health care leaders today need a broader skill set [today],” said Dr. J. Larry Jameson, executive vice president… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - November 2, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Cocaine-fentanyl overdoses underscore need for more 'test strips' and rapid response
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine emergency department physicians are calling for more readily available testing strips to identify the presence of fentanyl in patients experiencing a drug overdose, and a rapid, coordinated response among health care providers and city agencies to help curb overdoses and identify high potency high risk drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Not just for children: Study shows high prevalence of atopic dermatitis among US adults
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) As many as 16.5 million adults in America suffer from a skin disease known as atopic dermatitis, an inflammatory disease that results in red, itchy skin. The estimate comes from a new study from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, which also projected 6.6 million of these adults have disease that would be classified as moderate to severe, leading to a decrease in quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New Penn Medicine Center brings immunotherapy research to brain tumor treatment
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Penn Medicine is announcing a new Translational Center of Excellence focused on glioblastoma. The team will investigate new immune therapies for glioblastoma and design and test new CAR T cell therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 30, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How plants cope with stress
(University of Pennsylvania) With climate change comes drought, and with drought comes higher salt concentrations in the soil. A team led by University of Pennsylvania scientists have identified a mechanism by which plants respond to salt stress, a pathway that could be targeted to engineer more adaptable crops. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - October 30, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

The value of a health scheme
This article was first published in The Hindu.The post The value of a health scheme appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health)
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 26, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Vani Kulkarni Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

Cigarette pictorial warning labels most effective when including body parts, testimonials
(University of Pennsylvania) As the United States moves toward implementing image-based warning labels on cigarette packs, label designers must consider what types of pictorial warnings will be most effective. New research from the Annenberg School at the University of Pennsylvania examines individual features to determine effectiveness, finding that diseased body parts like gangrene feet and testimonials from real smokers have the greatest impact. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 26, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn researchers land $10.7M grant to study CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors
The University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center had received a $10.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study CAR-T cells in solid tumors The five-year grant from the NCI's will support new experimental approaches in lung cancer and mesothelioma being conducted by Penn researchers at its translational center of excellence for lung cancer immunology “Although CAR-T cells have been revolutionized the treatment of leukemia and bone marrow cancers, we have not yet had the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - October 22, 2018 Category: American Health Authors: John George Source Type: news

Penn researchers land $10.7M grant to study CAR-T cell therapy in solid tumors
The University of Pennsylvania's Abramson Cancer Center had received a $10.7 million grant from the National Cancer Institute to study CAR-T cells in solid tumors The five-year grant from the NCI's will support new experimental approaches in lung cancer and mesothelioma being conducted by Penn researchers at its translational center of excellence for lung cancer immunology “Although CAR-T cells have been revolutionized the treatment of leukemia and bone marrow cancers, we have not yet had the… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - October 22, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: John George Source Type: news

Community Health Workers Can Reduce Hospitalizations by 65 Percent and Double Patient Satisfaction with Primary Care
Details the results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. It found that Community Health Workers (CHWs) can help reduce hospital stays by 65% and double the rate of patient satisfaction with primary care. (Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: News stories via the Rural Assistance Center - October 22, 2018 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Abramson Cancer Center receives $10.7 million to study CAR T cells in solid tumors
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new program project grant from the National Cancer Institute (NCI) will fund research by the Translational Center of Excellence for Lung Cancer Immunology at the Abramson Cancer Center of the University of Pennsylvania to improve the effectiveness of chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T cell therapy at fighting solid tumors. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Future fertility: Giving hope to men who received childhood cancer treatment
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers have discovered a way to grow human stem cells destined to become mature sperm in an effort to provide fertility options later in life to males who are diagnosed with cancer and undergo chemotherapy and radiation as children. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - October 22, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news