How chromosomes 'cheat' for the chance to get into an egg
(University of Pennsylvania) Chromosomes can 'cheat,' biasing the chance that they will make it into a sex cell. A team from the University of Pennsylvania shows how this bias arises in female cells, detecting molecular signals that create an asymmetry in the machinery that drives meiosis, the cell-division process that gives rise to gametes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 2, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Is gun violence contagious?
(University of Pennsylvania) Gun violence is mostly not contagious but rather an endemic issue for particular neighborhoods, according to researchers from the University of Pennsylvania and the University of Oxford. That means place-based interventions like hotspot policing or greening vacant lots have the best chance to improve this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds infertility increases risk of death in women
Research from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine have found that women who have experienced infertility are at an increased risk of death. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why do some viruses linger? Scientists are studying how viruses replicate different kinds of cells, some of which can hide inside the immune system
(Natural News) Some viral infections can continue their existence even though the body that they are trying to penetrate has already triggered an immune response. University of Pennsylvania researchers reveal that acute viral infection cells enriched with defective viral genomes are more likely to survive infection than cells with full-length viral genomes. Viral infections, such... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - November 1, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Penn engineers develop filters that use nanoparticles to prevent slime build-up
(University of Pennsylvania) Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania's School of Engineering and Applied Science have a new way of making membranes that allows them to add in a host of new abilities via functional nanoparticles that adhere to the surface of the mesh. They tested this method by adding antifouling particle that could prevent biofilm build-up. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - November 1, 2017 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Infertility linked to higher risk of death among women
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Women with a history of infertility have a 10 percent increased risk of death compared to those without reported infertility struggles, according to results of a new study from researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. The study, which examined the association between infertility and mortality as well as specific causes of death, also showed that women with a history of infertility have a 20 percent increased risk of cancer-related mortality. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - November 1, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

New treatment found for skin-predominant dermatomysitis
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania Perelman School of Medicine found that the drug anabasum was effective at treating a rare skin condition. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - October 31, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Women and Malnutrition in Africa
In conclusion, it is arguable that there are improved impacts on nutrition if agricultural interventions are targeted to women and when specific work is done around women’s empowerment (for example, through behaviour change communication), mediated through women’s time use, women’s own health and nutrition status, and women’s access to and control over resources as well as intrahousehold decision-making power. That this may be dismissed out of hand is not unlikely either, given the persistence of male dominance.The post Women and Malnutrition in Africa appeared first on Inter Press Service. (Source:...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: Raghav Gaiha and Vani Kulkarni Tags: Africa Aid Climate Change Food & Agriculture Gender Headlines Health Poverty & SDGs TerraViva United Nations Women's Health Source Type: news

New treatment shows promise for patients with rare dermatologic disease
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new treatment for a rare and often incurable condition called dermatomyositis (DM) reduced the severity of the disease in patients whose DM was resistant to other therapies. As part of a randomized, double-blind study, 22 patients were given either a drug called anabasum or a placebo. The 11 patients who got the drug improved during the trial, with less severe skin disease and better patient-reported quality of life and symptom assessments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Uncomfortable sight from an ancient reflex of the eye
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) The eyes are for seeing, but they have other important biological functions, including automatic visual reflexes that go on without awareness. The reflexive system of the human eye also produces a conscious, visual experience, according to a new study from researchers in the Perelman School of Medicine and School of Arts and Sciences at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 31, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Minorities less likely to have breast reconstruction, but not for the reason many think
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Minority women are far less likely to undergo breast reconstruction than white women, even if they live in the same area and have similar insurance. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 30, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

How Genomic Research is Changing Heart Care
Genomic testing is most frequently associated with cancer testing, but this area of research is beginning to make an impact on cardiovascular care. A recent scientific statement by the American Heart Association shined a spotlight on how the expressed genome can potentially be used to diagnose diseases and predict who will develop diseases such as coronary artery disease (CAD), stroke, heart failure, and arrhythmias. According to the statement, scientists now have the ability to address disease at many levels that were inaccessible during the past century. This includes the genome, transcriptome, epigenome, proteome, metab...
Source: MDDI - October 27, 2017 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: IVD Cardiovascular Source Type: news

Blocking enzyme in normal cells may impede pancreatic cancer, Penn vet team shows
(University of Pennsylvania) New findings from a University of Pennsylvania-led team offer a promising target for future therapies that could potentially root out even the well-hidden metastatic lesions that make pancreatic cancer so deadly. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Mutation in fallopian tube lesions may help catch ovarian cancer years earlier
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Screening for tumor cells in the fallopian tubes of women at high-risk for ovarian cancer may help detect the cancer years before it develops further, suggests a new study published online this week in Nature Communications. The new study traces the origins of high-grade serous ovarian carcinoma, the most frequent type of ovarian cancer that is often diagnosed at advanced stages, back to fallopian tube lesions known as 'p53 signatures' and serous tubal intraepithelial carcinomas (STICs) that harbor the TP53 gene mutations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 26, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Penn researchers awarded $3.75 million to study how mealtimes influence human health
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Disrupting sleep-wake cycles from a predominantly daytime to a delayed eating lifestyle, -- i.e., skipping breakfast and making lunch the first meal of the day, plus eating late dinner, disrupts the body's natural circadian (24-hour) rhythm, the cycle that tells us when to sleep, wake up, eat, and influences hormones and other functions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Mistakes in how proteins of the ear are built contribute to early hearing loss
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers found mutations in a master-switch protein called Epithelial Splicing Regulatory Protein 1 in individuals with a type of congenital hearing loss. In general, what connects most of the unexplained hearing-loss cases is that protein building in the cochlea during development goes awry. The cochlea has the all-important job of transforming mechanical energy in the form of sound waves into electrical signals that run along auditory nerves to the brain. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after Daylight Saving
(University of Pennsylvania) Assaults decrease by 3 percent the Monday after the switch to Daylight Saving Time in the spring, according to findings from researchers Rebecca Umbach, Greg Ridgeway and Adrian Raine of the University of Pennsylvania. In the fall, the opposite takes place, with violence rising by about the same percentage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Blood flow in the developing heart guides maturation of heart valves
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Congenital heart valve defects are the most common type of birth defects, the majority of which have no clear genetic cause, suggesting that epigenetic factors play an important role. Now, researchers have found that the shear force of blood flow against the cells lining the early heart valve sends signals for heart 'cushion' cells to become fully formed valves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 26, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Study finds smokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes are healthier
(University of Pennsylvania) Smokers wrongly believe Natural American Spirit cigarettes to be healthier than other brands due to NAS's advertising claims, according to new research from the Penn Tobacco Center of Regulatory Science (TCORS) at the Annenberg School for Communication. This belief was found among both former and current smokers and was not linked to brand preference. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 24, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Medicare graduate nurse education demonstration increases primary care workforce
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) The Report to Congress on the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Graduate Nurse Education Demonstration has just been released documenting health care workforce gains addressing the nation's shortage of primary care. The $200 million initiative is the first to test whether Medicare funding of graduate clinical education of Advanced Practice Registered Nurses (APRNs) would help meet national health care workforce needs similar to residency training for physicians. The answer is yes. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Researchers discover which brain region motivates behavior change
(University of Pennsylvania) Ever been stuck in a rut? University of Pennsylvania researcher Michael Platt and colleagues found that stimulating a region of the brain called the posterior cingulate cortex can lead to changes in routine behavior. Neurons there ramp up their firing rates, then peak just before a pattern shifts. Knowing this could help businesses better understand how to spur employee innovation, exploration and creativity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 24, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study links mutations in notch gene to role in B cell cancers
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers found that in B cell tumors, mutated overactive versions of the Notch protein directly drive the expression of the Myc gene and many other genes that participate in B cell signaling pathways. Myc is a critical gene in governing cell proliferation and survival. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Proton therapy lowers treatment side effects in pediatric head and neck cancer patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Pediatric patients with head and neck cancer can be treated with proton beam therapy (PBT) instead of traditional photon radiation, and it will result in similar outcomes with less impact on quality of life. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 23, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Moonshot grant will help researchers see two of cancer's key food sources at once
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Imagine trying to take a picture of a runner, but only being able to see her feet. If you could see her whole body, you'd get the full picture of how she uses both legs to put one foot in front of the other to reach top speed. That's the idea behind a cancer imaging project that just received $1.4 million in funding from the National Institutes of Health. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 19, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Need for targeted interventions for breastfeeding difficulties due to obesity
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) A study led by the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing's Diane Spatz, Ph.D., RN-BC, FAAN, the Helen M. Shearer Term Professor of Nutrition, has found that delayed lactogenesis was more prevalent among women who were obese pre-pregnancy and that excessive gestational weight gain was also associated with a delay in lactogenesis II. The study has been published in the Journal of Human Lactation. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn study shows how female immune cells keep their second x chromosome shut off
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new study, a team from the University of Pennsylvania describes how X chromosome inactivation is regulated in the immune system's B cells as they develop in bone marrow and when they encounter antigens. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 18, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn researchers receive $6.4m in NIH funding to create center to transform mental health services
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania will receive $6.4 million in funding from the National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH) to create a new center to improve mental health service delivery through behavioral economics and implementation science (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Insight into the challenges and contributions of nurse bioethicists
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) Nurse bioethicists are a small but special subset of the nursing profession and bioethics community, focusing on the moral complexities that arise in clinical care, research, and health policy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 13, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

3-D packaging of DNA regulates cell identity
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study suggests that the ability of a stem cell to differentiate into cardiac muscle (and by extension other cell types) depends on what portions of the genome are available for activation, which is controlled by the location of DNA in a cell's nucleus. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 12, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Norovirus evades immune system by hiding out in rare gut cells
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new mouse study shows that, even in immunized animals, noroviruses can escape the immune system and still spread by hiding out in an extremely rare type of cell in the gut. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 11, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Pregnancy-related heart failure strikes black women twice as often as those of other races
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) African American women were found to be twice as likely to be diagnosed with peripartum cardiomyopathy as compared to women of Caucasian, Hispanic/Latina, Asian, and other ethnic backgrounds, according to a new study -- the largest of its kind -- published today in JAMA Cardiology by researchers from the Perelman school of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 11, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

In global first, Penn using glowing tumor dye to identify cancerous lymph nodes
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Surgeons at Penn Medicine are using a fluorescent dye that makes cancerous cells glow in hopes of identifying suspicious lymph nodes during head and neck cancer procedures. Led by Jason G. Newman, MD, FACS, an associate professor of Otorhinolaryngology in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, the study is the first in the world to look at the effectiveness of intraoperative molecular imaging (IMI) of lymph nodes in patients with head and neck cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 10, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn team shows how seemingly acute viral infections can persist
(University of Pennsylvania) Led by Carolina L ó pez of the University of Pennsylvania, a multi-disciplinary research team has resolved a paradox of viral infection. They've identified how a viral product can both trigger an immune response aimed at eliminating the virus or, conversely, allow the virus to survive and persist. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - October 6, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Cell stress response sheds light on treating inflammation-related cancer, aging
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) Stress -- defined broadly -- can have a profoundly deleterious effect on the human body. Even individual cells have their own way of dealing with environmental strains such as ultraviolet radiation from the sun or germs. One response to stress -- called senescence -- can trigger cells to stop dividing in cases of cancer and aging. This may hold promise for treating inflammation-related disorders. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - October 4, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

DNA-based Zika vaccine candidate found safe and effective at inducing immune response
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new generation DNA-based Zika vaccine is the first to demonstrate both safety and the ability to elicit an immune response against Zika in humans, according to new research from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania, conducted in partnership with The Wistar Institute, Inovio Pharmaceuticals, and GeneOne Life Science, Inc. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 4, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

FitBit rivalry helps families get active
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania found relatives taking part in exercise-based rivalries take significantly more steps every day and are more likely to achieve their fitness goals. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - October 3, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Game time: To increase exercise, study shows gaming strategies and a buddy are key
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) New research shows families who used activity trackers with specially designed gaming elements increased daily step counts by nearly one mile per day and achieved daily fitness goals 27 percent more than families who did not. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - October 2, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Weekly Postings
See something of interest? Please share our postings with colleagues in your institutions! Spotlight The University of Pittsburgh Health Sciences Library System (HSLS) invites applications for the newly created position of All of Us Community Engagement Coordinator for the Middle Atlantic Region of the National Network of Libraries of Medicine (NNLM MAR). View the full posting for more information about the position. Check out the Summer 2017 edition of The MAReport! In this issue, Education & Health Literacy Coordinator Michelle Burda talks about NNLM MAR’s ongoing partnership with the Delaware Medical Rese...
Source: NN/LM Middle Atlantic Region Blog - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: Hannah Sinemus Tags: Weekly Postings Source Type: news

Study finds black children less likely to see doctor for eczema
Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania found that black children are less likely to see a doctor for eczema despite being more severe among minorities. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - September 29, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Stanford, MIT and Harvard top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the most innovative universities
Stanford University, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and Harvard University top the third annual Reuters Top 100 ranking of the world’s most innovative universities. The Reuters Top 100 aims to identify and rank the educational institutions doing the most to advance science, invent new technologies, and power new markets and industries. Compiled in partnership with Clarivate Analytics, the ranking is based on proprietary data and analysis of numerous indicators including patent filings and research paper citations. The most innovative university in the world, for the third consecutive year, is Stanford Univ...
Source: News from STM - September 29, 2017 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: STM Publishing News Tags: Featured World Source Type: news

Black children less likely to see doctor for eczema despite being more severely affected
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A new study shows white children in America are more likely to see a doctor for treatment of eczema than black children, despite the fact that the disease is likely more severe among minorities. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 29, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Confronted with bacteria, infected cells die so others can live, Penn study finds
(University of Pennsylvania) In a new study, a team of researchers led by Igor E. Brodsky of the University of Pennsylvania, identified a 'back-up alarm' system in host cells that responds to a pathogen's attempt to subvert the immune system. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - September 29, 2017 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

New regions of the human genome linked to skin color variation in some African populations
Bethesda, Md., Fri., September 28, 2017 - In the first study of its kind, an international team of genomics researchers has identified new regions of the human genome that are associated with skin color variation in some African populations, opening new avenues for research on skin diseases and cancer in all populations. These findings may help researchers determine if humans with certain DNA sequences are more or less susceptible to DNA damage caused by ultraviolet radiation (UVR) or respond to cellular stress differently. National Institutes of Health researchers contributed to this effort, led by Sarah Tishkoff, Ph.D., ...
Source: NHGRI Press Releases - September 28, 2017 Category: Genetics & Stem Cells Source Type: news

Care for the elderly needs to be better targeted by the health system and social networks
Vani S. Kulkarni is a Lecturer in Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, U.S.; Raghav Gaiha is (Hon.) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, U.K.By Vani S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaPHILADELPHIA and NEW DELHI, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)The National Health Policy (NHP), 2017 is unable to see the wood for the trees. Life and death questions are dealt with perfunctorily or simply overlooked. For example, it overlooks the rapid rise in the share of the old (60 years or more), and associated morbidities, especially sharply rising non-communicable diseases (NCDs) and disabilities. With rising...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: S Kulkami Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Human Rights Source Type: news

Falling off the health-care radar
Vani S. Kulkarni is a Lecturer in Sociology, University of Pennsylvania, U.S.; Raghav Gaiha is (Hon.) Professorial Research Fellow, Global Development Institute, University of Manchester, U.K.By Vani S. Kulkarni and Raghav GaihaPHILADELPHIA and NEW DELHI, Sep 28 2017 (IPS)Care for the elderly needs to be better targeted by the health system and social networks. The National Health Policy (NHP), 2017 is unable to see the wood for the trees. Life and death questions are dealt with perfunctorily or simply overlooked. For example, it overlooks the rapid rise in the share of the old (60 years or more), and associated morbiditie...
Source: IPS Inter Press Service - Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Authors: S Kulkami Tags: Aid Asia-Pacific Headlines Health Human Rights TerraViva United Nations Source Type: news

How brain develops before birth is tightly controlled by RNA modification
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A chemical tag added to RNA during embryonic development regulates how the early brain grows. When this development goes awry, problems happen and may cause psychiatric disorders in people. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Understanding connection between HIV transmission & racial/ethnic/geographical differences
(University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing) The health effects of where people live, work, and interact are well documented, as are the value of neighborhood-level structural interventions designed to improve health. But place-based characteristics that contribute to disparities in HIV transmission and disease burden are poorly understood, possibly resulting in less-effective HIV risk reduction interventions and programming. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 28, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Penn Medicine develops model to predict ER visits in lung cancer patients
(University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine) A pilot program that uses big data to predict which lung cancer patients will require a trip to an emergency department (ED) successfully anticipated a third of all ED visits over a two week trial period, and was further able to identify which patients were at high risk and low risk of requiring such care. The predictive model was designed by researchers at the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - September 27, 2017 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Melanoma cells rewire to resist drug treatment, Penn-Wistar team finds
(University of Pennsylvania) A study out this week in Nature, led by scientists from the University of Pennsylvania and The Wistar Institute, reveals why relapses after treatment for metastatic melanoma occur. While combination therapies block off the principal pathway that cancer cells use to fuel their growth, the cells come to bypass this blockade and, like vehicles on a detour route, make use of additional pathways to continue growing and spreading. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - September 27, 2017 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

8 out of 10 Fitbits users stick with device for 6 months
Researchers from the University of Pennsylvania say the devices motivate users to increase their exercise levels. Design elements such as points and financial rewards help keep people on track. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - September 26, 2017 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news