Video Game Makers Want to Get Players Off the Couch
Developers are offering a physical twist to keep traditional fans interested and draw new ones who are bored with their workouts. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 17, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Aili McConnon Tags: Computer and Video Games Exercise Mobile Applications Wearable Computing Nintendo Co Ltd Source Type: news

South West to host Europe's largest Arm supercomputer
The region's leading universities, the GW4 Alliance, together with the Met Office, Hewlett Packard Enterprise (HPE), and partners, have been awarded £ 4.1 million by the Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) to create Isambard 2, the largest Arm-based supercomputer in Europe. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - February 17, 2020 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Grants and Awards, Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news

Chinese factory employees forced to return to work amid widening coronavirus outbreak, then get QUARANTINED
(Natural News) The Chinese economy grew at double digits for nearly two decades because the country literally became the world’s factory, producing everything from toys to computer components. But when the coronavirus outbreak began, the Communist government had to quarantine tens of millions of people in an effort to contain it. In doing so, thousands... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 15, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Opportunity for experienced data scientists at the National Library of Medicine: NIH DATA Scholar Program
The National Library of Medicine (NLM) is pleased to announce the Data and Technology Advancement (DATA) National Service Scholar Program, a new opportunity for experienced data and computer scientists and engineers to tackle biomedical data challenges in partnership with NIH Office … Continue reading → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - February 14, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New NLM jobs Source Type: news

New CRISPR-based tool can probe and control several genetic circuits at once
(Stanford School of Engineering) Stanford researchers have devised a biological tool that can not only detect faulty genetic circuits but also " debug " them - like running a patch cord around a computer hardware glitch. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 14, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Low-cost 'smart' diaper can notify caregiver when it's wet
(Massachusetts Institute of Technology) MIT researchers have developed a " smart " diaper embedded with a moisture sensor that can alert a caregiver when a diaper is wet. When the sensor detects dampness in the diaper, it sends a signal to a nearby receiver, which in turn can send a notification to a smartphone or computer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 14, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

AI shortcuts speed up simulations by billions of times
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - February 13, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Hutson, M. Tags: Computers, Mathematics In Depth Source Type: news

iCAD reports Xoft Axxent milestone
Computer-aided detection (CAD) software developer iCAD said that its Xoft Axxent...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: iCAD features AI software for breast imaging at RSNA iCAD features Xoft Axxent upgrades at ASTRO 2019 iCAD to highlight AI for tomosynthesis at ECR iCAD touts clinical results with Xoft Axxent brachytherapy iCAD touts study on radiation therapy savings (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

U.S. Emergency Departments Over-Test for Suspected PE U.S. Emergency Departments Over-Test for Suspected PE
Overuse of computerized tomographic pulmonary angiography (CTPA) to rule out pulmonary embolism (PE) in U.S. emergency departments is costly and puts patients at risk for multiple adverse outcomes, a cross-sectional analysis suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines)
Source: Medscape Radiology Headlines - February 12, 2020 Category: Radiology Tags: Pulmonary Medicine News Source Type: news

Minimally Invasive Surgery Through the Eyes of a Surgeon
One of the best parts of an event like MD&M West is the opportunity to put a cross-section of experts from industry in the same room as engineers and end-users and talk about the biggest trends in medical devices. One such discussion that took place here in Annaheim, CA on Tuesday included an expert robotic surgeon, an expert from Intuitive Sugical (which, as you likely know by now, pioneered robotic surgery a little more than 20 years ago), and a new robotic surgery company that is trying to to take this technology beyond the surgical suite. I shared a few insights from this lively panel discussion here, but prior to...
Source: MDDI - February 11, 2020 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Business Source Type: news

Climate Change is Decimating the Chinstrap Penguins of Antarctica
Chinstrap penguins are exquisitely adapted to their environment. They live and breed in some of the world’s harshest conditions, nesting in the windblown, rocky coves of the Antarctic Peninsula, a strip of land comprising the northernmost part of the frigid continent. In water they are precision hunters, darting after krill, the tiny shrimp-like crustaceans that are their sole food source, utilizing barbed tongues engineered for catching the slipperiest of prey. On land, these 2-2.5-foot-tall flightless birds are prodigious mountaineers, able to scale rocky escarpments in spite of their ungainly waddle. Their perfect...
Source: TIME: Science - February 11, 2020 Category: Science Authors: Aryn Baker / Antarctica Tags: Uncategorized biodiversity climate change embargoed study Source Type: news

2030 vision: how will technology shape healthcare in the next decade?
From personalised medicine to AI-enabled consultations, the next ten years will see huge advances, writes EMIS Group ’s health tech chief medical officer, Dr Shaun O’Hanlon. Related items fromOnMedica New drive to reduce NHS computer login times Hospital trust signs deal with Babylon to provide consultations online Artificial intelligence: who ’s liable? Artificial intelligence in the NHS: getting the priorities right How GPs can address Babylon ’s burning platform (Source: OnMedica Views)
Source: OnMedica Views - February 11, 2020 Category: Primary Care Source Type: news

Attention based CNN-ConvLSTM for pedestrian attribute recognition - Li Y, Xu H, Bian M, Xiao J.
As a result of its important role in video surveillance, pedestrian attribute recognition has become an attractive facet of computer vision research. Because of the changes in viewpoints, illumination, resolution and occlusion, the task is very challenging... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 10, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Big Pharma’s dream come true: Electronic smart pills contain computer chips that track your compliance
(Natural News) Big Pharma is taking the next big step toward enforcing total compliance. The pharmaceutical industry is introducing a new type of drug – pills that contains computer chips that track your adherence. Pharmaceutical companies spend over $3 billion annually on national TV ads – brainwashing consumers in their own homes. Big Pharma also... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 10, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Coronavirus outbreak raises question: Why are bat viruses so deadly?
(University of California - Berkeley) A UC Berkeley study of cultured bat cells shows that their strong immune responses, constantly primed to respond to viruses, can drive viruses to greater virulence. Modelling bat immune systems on a computer, the researchers showed that when bat cells quickly release interferon upon infection, other cells quickly wall themselves off. This drives viruses to faster reproduction. The increased virulence and infectivity wreak havoc when these viruses infect animals with tamer immune systems, like humans. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - February 10, 2020 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Simulations identify missing link to determine carbon in deep Earth reservoirs
(University of Chicago) How much carbon lies deep in the Earth's water reservoirs? Using complex computer simulations, Pritzker School of Molecular Engineering researcher Giulia Galli studied what happens when carbon dioxide is dissolved in water. Her work provides a step toward better understanding our planet's carbon cycle. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 10, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

W.H.O. Fights a Pandemic Besides Coronavirus: an ‘Infodemic’
Working with the big tech companies, the U.N. health agency has made strides in combating rumors and falsehoods on the internet about the new infection. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 7, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Matt Richtel Tags: your-feed-science Social Media Rumors and Misinformation Online Advertising Computers and the Internet Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Medicine and Health World Health Organization Facebook Inc Pinterest Google Inc Twitter Source Type: news

The Coronavirus Outbreak Could Derail Xi Jinping ’s Dreams of a Chinese Century
It took eight hours for a doctor to see Wu Chen’s mother after she arrived at the hospital. Eight days later, she was dead. The doctor was “99% sure” she had contracted the mysterious pneumonia-like illness sweeping China’s central city of Wuhan, Wu says, but he didn’t have the testing kit to prove it. And despite the 64-year-old’s fever and perilously low oxygen levels, there was no bed for her. Wu tried two more hospitals over the next week, but all were overrun. By Jan. 25, her mother was slumped on the tile floor of an emergency room, gasping for air, drifting in and out of conscious...
Source: TIME: Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized 2019-nCoV China Source Type: news

The Role of Memes in Teen Culture
Memes can provide an opening for parents to talk to adolescents about serious issues like coronavirus or the possibility of war. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 6, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jennifer L.W. Fink Tags: Social Media Teenagers and Adolescence Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Parenting Anxiety and Stress Computer and Video Games Comedy and Humor United States Defense and Military Forces Source Type: news

A web-based, computer-tailored intervention to reduce alcohol consumption and binge drinking among Spanish adolescents: cluster randomized controlled trial - Mart ínez-Montilla JM, Mercken L, de Vries H, Candel M, Lima-Rodríguez JS, Lima-Serrano M.
BACKGROUND: Alcohol consumption, including binge drinking (BD) and heavy episodic drinking (HED), is one of the leading risk factors among Spanish adolescents leading to significant social, health, and economic consequences. Reduction of BD and HED in adol... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Computer simulation for understanding brain cancer growth
(Newcastle University) Scientists have developed a computer simulation, BioDynaMo that can be used on standard laptops or desktop computers and provides a software platform which can be used to easily create, run and visualise 3D agent-based biological simulations for brain cancers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2020 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Literature online: Research into reading habits almost in real time
(University of Basel) Young people make intensive use of digital networks to read, write and comment on literary texts. But their reading behavior varies considerably depending on whether the title is from the world of popular or classic literature, as revealed by a new study that takes the reading platform Wattpad as an example. This computer-aided analysis under the direction of the University of Basel was published in the journal PLOS ONE. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - February 6, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Autism screening rate soars with use of CHICA system developed by Regenstrief and IU
(Regenstrief Institute) Universal early screening for autism is recommended for all children but is not routinely performed. A new study from Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University School of Medicine researchers, published in JAMA Network Open, reports that the system they designed and developed called CHICA (short for Child Health Improvement through Computer Automation), increased the autism screening rate at 24 months of age from zero to 100%. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 5, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NLM announces Curation at Scale Workshop
Data curation plays a critical role in today’s biomedical research and ensures scientific data will be accessible for future research and reuse. To improve the speed and scope of manual curation, computer automation/assistance is becoming increasingly desired.  The National Library … Continue reading → (Source: NCBI Insights)
Source: NCBI Insights - February 4, 2020 Category: Databases & Libraries Authors: NCBI Staff Tags: What's New Source Type: news

China, Desperate to Stop Coronavirus, Turns Neighbor Against Neighbor
The authorities hunt for people from Wuhan, the center of the outbreak, encouraging citizens to inform on others. Even those without symptoms are being ostracized. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Paul Mozur Tags: China Wuhan (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Surveillance of Citizens by Government Computers and the Internet Epidemics Source Type: news

How Monkeys Taught Me to Appreciate Teen Sleepovers
One of our chief jobs as parents is to encourage our kids to make and maintain strong friendships. It is one of the skills they will need most in life. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - February 4, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Lydia Denworth Tags: Friendship Teenagers and Adolescence Research Computer and Video Games Social Media Parenting Families and Family Life Source Type: news

Enhance Your Interdisciplinary and Team Science Skills
Reports abound from professional societies, the Academies, government agencies, and researchers calling attention to the fact that science is increasingly an interdisciplinary, transdisciplinary, inter-institutional, and international endeavor. In short, science has become a “team sport.” There is a real and present need to better prepare scientists for success in this new collaborative environment. The American Institute of Biological Sciences is responding to this call with a new program for scientists, educators, and individuals who work with or participate in scientific teams. Team science is increasingly...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 4, 2020 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Scientists use computer simulations to understand the possibility of hyperspace travel via black holes
(Natural News) One of the most common tropes in science fiction involves the use of black holes as portals to other dimensions or points in time. A recent study suggests that such a scenario may be closer to reality than it is to fantasy. While scientists have predominantly believed that using black holes – a region of... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 3, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The quick and the dead: a paradigm for studying friendly fire - Munnik A, N äswall K, Woodward G, Helton WS.
The Sustained Attention to Response Task (SART) is a computer based Go-No-Go response task. Participants respond to frequently occurring neutral stimuli and withhold responses to rare target stimuli. Researchers have suggested the inhibition demands of the... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 3, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Occupational Issues Source Type: news

Organising to defeat the far right
“We live in very dangerous times. For years, there was a consensus right across the political spectrum that we must keep the fascists out of the political mainstream. That clearly is changing,” said Brian Robinson from Stand Against Racism and Inequality (pictured). “The rise of populist leaders like Donald Trump and Boris Johnson, and Jair Bolsonaro in Brazil – as well as an increased vote for fascist parties in Germany, Sweden, Italy and many other countries – has emboldened racists. “The EU referendum result has given confidence to right wing leaders and groups,” continued Mr Ro...
Source: UNISON Health care news - February 2, 2020 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News 2020 Black Members Conference anti-fascism anti-racism challenging racism Source Type: news

New England Researchers Hope Voice Assistants Can Spot Signs Of Dementia
CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — An effort to use voice-assistant devices like Amazon’s Alexa to detect signs of memory problems in people has gotten a boost with a grant from the federal government. Researchers from Dartmouth-Hitchcock and the University of Massachusetts Boston will get a four-year $1.2 million grant from the National Institute on Aging. The team hopes to develop a system that would use machine and deep learning techniques to detect changes in speech patterns to determine if someone is a risk of developing dementia or Alzheimer’s. “We are tackling a significant and complicated data-science que...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health dartmouth-hitchcock Dementia Science UMass Boston Source Type: news

Home-based cognitive training in pediatric patients with acquired brain injury: preliminary results on efficacy of a randomized clinical trial - Corti C, Urgesi C, Poggi G, Strazzer S, Borgatti R, Bardoni A.
Cognitive rehabilitation may compensate for cognitive deficits of children with acquired brain injury (ABI), capitalizing on the use-dependent plasticity of a developing brain. Remote computerized cognitive training (CCT) may be delivered to patients in ec... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Alcohol-specific computerized interventions to alter cognitive biases: a systematic review of effects on experimental tasks, drinking behavior, and neuronal activation - Batschelet HM, Stein M, Tschuemperlin RM, Soravia LM, Moggi F.
Background: In patients with alcohol use disorder, novel interventions to increase abstinence have attracted growing attention. Interventions aimed at modifying cognitive biases linked to alcohol use [i.e. cognitive bias modification (CBM)] may serv... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - February 1, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Alcohol and Other Drugs Source Type: news

Cordless phones and EMF: How to protect yourself from harmful electromagnetic fields
(Natural News) Modern society has grown to become very reliant on the conveniences of technology. However, very few are aware of the negative effects that electronic devices present. Cell phones, Wi-Fi routers, microwaves, computers and other electronic appliances emit a stream of invisible energy called electromagnetic field (EMF) that can bring harm to human health.... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - February 1, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Travelers Say Coronavirus Outbreak In China Won ’ t Deter Plans
BOSTON (CBS) – The White House on Friday declared a public health emergency in response to the coronavirus outbreak in China. Passengers returning from Hubei province, the center of the outbreak, will be required to undergo 14 days of quarantine. Travelers returning from other parts of China will be screened and potentially monitored by their local health departments at home. The U.S. also announced that all flights from China will be funneled to seven major airports where passengers can be screened. The airports include New York’s Kennedy Airport, Atlanta, Chicago’s O’Hare, LAX, San Francisco, Sea...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Syndicated CBSN Boston Syndicated Local Coronavirus Logan Airpot Source Type: news

Outcome metrics in pediatric sports medicine: do PROMIS computer-adaptive testing metrics correlate with pedi-IKDC? - Schafer KA, Minaie A, Nepple JJ.
BACKGROUND: A modified version of the International Knee Documentation Committee (IKDC), the Pedi-IKDC, is a validated patient-reported outcome measure in pediatric patients with knee pain. However, this questionnaire is lengthy and can fatigue patients, l... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Human factors in police mobile computer terminals: A systematic review and survey of recent literature, guideline formulation, and future research directions - Zahabi M, Pankok C, Park J.
The objectives of this research were to: (1) identify Mobile Computer Terminal (MCT) human factors issues, (2) formulate guidelines and an enhanced MCT for improving interface design and implementation in police patrols, and (3) identify areas of future re... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - January 31, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Distraction, Fatigue, Chronobiology, Vigilance, Workload Source Type: news

Doctors on TikTok Try to Go Viral
They have M.D.s, but are they up for this challenge? (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 31, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Emma Goldberg Tags: TikTok (ByteDance) Doctors Rumors and Misinformation Social Media Mobile Applications Computers and the Internet Children and Childhood Medicine and Health Sex Education Vaccination and Immunization E-Cigarettes your-feed-science Source Type: news

Viral Outbreaks Are Here to Stay. This is How Humans Will Fight Back
The year of the rat is off to an ominous start. “We just stay home and don’t go out,” says Mr. Dong. The 33-year-old researcher, who provided only one name, has no other options. He, his wife and their 3-month-old daughter live in Wuhan, the epicenter of an unfolding global health crisis. They’re treating the forced time at home as a holiday, though he says, “this is different than any of them before.” Families like his huddle in their homes, fearful that if they venture out, they will get sick. Since the first cases of a previously unknown pneumonia-like illness emerged in December, Wuh...
Source: TIME: Health - January 30, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park and Charlie Campbell Tags: Uncategorized Source Type: news

A New Method of Artificial Intelligence Inspired by the Functioning of the Human Brain
Despite the immense progress in the field of AI in recent years, we are still very far from human intelligence. Indeed, if current AI techniques allow to train computer agents to perform certain tasks better than humans when they are trained specifically for them, the performance of these same agents is often very disappointing when they are put in conditions (even slightly) different from those experienced during training. (Source: eHealth News EU)
Source: eHealth News EU - January 30, 2020 Category: Information Technology Tags: Featured Research Research and Development Source Type: news

Researchers build a better lung model
(Boston University School of Medicine) Using a combination of pluripotent stem cells (cells that can potentially produce any cell or tissue type) and machine learning (artificial intelligence that allows computers to learn automatically), researchers have improved how they generate lung cells. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computer servers now able to retrieve data much faster
(University of Waterloo) Computer scientists at the University of Waterloo have found a novel approach that significantly improves the storage efficiency and output speed of computer systems. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 30, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

How to head off a Red Bull habit -- study
(Flinders University) Regular consumers of popular caffeinated energy drinks may need help kicking the habit. New research at Flinders University in Australia, published in the international journal PLOS One, put a form of cognitive incentive retraining -- a form of computer-based training aimed at reducing decision-making biases in purchasing energy drinks -- to the test on more than 200 regular consumers of energy drinks aged between 18 and 25. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 29, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Biophysicists find 'extra' component in molecular motor
(Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology) Researchers discovered an additional component in ATP synthase, a molecular machine that produces the energy-conserving compound. They obtained a first-ever high-resolution structure of the C ring from spinach chloroplasts. As the 3D computer model of it was taking shape, the biophysicists spotted additional circle-shaped elements inside the C ring.While the discovery is interesting in and of itself, researchers have yet to determine why the C ring hosts quinones and how they get there. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - January 29, 2020 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Coronavirus Crisis Exposes Cracks in China ’s Facade of Unity
With anger rising over the response to the coronavirus outbreak, even some with ties to China ’s leaders have called for acknowledging divisions, not papering them over. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 29, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Li Yuan Tags: China Hubei Province (China) Wuhan (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Politics and Government Propaganda Medicine and Health Censorship News and News Media Computers and the Internet Social Media Source Type: news

Virus Crisis Exposes Cracks in China ’s Facade of Unity
With anger rising over the response to the outbreak, even some with ties to China ’s leaders have called for acknowledging divisions, not papering them over. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Li Yuan Tags: China Hubei Province (China) Wuhan (China) Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Politics and Government Propaganda Medicine and Health Censorship News and News Media Computers and the Internet Social Media Source Type: news

Computerized Systems Used in Clinical Investigations
Guidance for Industry - Computerized Systems Used in Clinical Investigations, Compliance (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - January 28, 2020 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Authors: FDA Source Type: news

As Virus Spreads, Anger Floods Chinese Social Media
The sheer volume of criticism of the government, and the sometimes clever ways that critics dodge censors, are testing Beijing ’s ability to control the narrative. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - January 28, 2020 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Raymond Zhong Tags: China Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Politics and Government Computers and the Internet Social Media Epidemics Censorship Polls and Public Opinion Wang Huning (1955- ) Wuhan (China) Source Type: news

New cancer center established at Johns Hopkins University
(The Mark Foundation for Cancer Research) Bringing together the tools of astronomy image analysis, pathology, computer science, cancer genomics, and immunogenomics to solve problems in oncology, the new center will find innovative solutions that can expand the number of cancer patients who benefit from immunotherapy. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

The great e-scooter hack
(University of Texas at San Antonio) New research out of UTSA finds e-scooters have risks beyond the perils of potential collisions. Computer science experts at UTSA have published the first review of the security and privacy risks posed by e-scooters and their related software services and applications. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - January 27, 2020 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news