Is methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus a common pathogen in ventilation-associated pneumonia?: The experience of a tertiary teaching hospital in Jordan
Abstract: Ventilator-associated pneumonia is a life threatening device related infection in intensive care units. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus is considered a common contagious pathogen causing pneumonia and sepsis. To assess the prevalence of S aureus in comparison to other pathogens, and their antibacterial sensitivity profile in ventilator-associated pneumonia. Data regarding ventilator-associated pneumonia of adults admitted to the intensive care unit, at the Jordan University of Science and Technology Hospital, between 2012 and 2018 were extracted from the computerized system. Microorganisms and their s...
Source: Current Awareness Service for Health (CASH) - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The Father Of The Web Is Selling The Source Code As An NFT
The original source code for the World Wide Web, written by British computer scientist Sir Tim Berners-Lee, is being auctioned as a non-fungible token.(Image credit: Fabrice Coffrini/AP) (Source: NPR Health and Science)
Source: NPR Health and Science - June 17, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Josie Fischels Source Type: news

Close-up look at brain uptake of omega-3
(Duke-NUS Medical School) Cryo-electron microscopy and computer simulations uncover how a cellular protein helps transport omega-3 fatty acids to the brain and eye, with implications for drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Most cancer cells grown in a dish have little in common with cancer cells in people
(Johns Hopkins Medicine) In a bid to find or refine laboratory research models for cancer that better compare with what happens in living people, Johns Hopkins Medicine scientists report they have developed a new computer-based technique showing that human cancer cells grown in culture dishes are the least genetically similar to their human sources. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 17, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Highway concrete guardrail lifting scheme and safety performance verification - Zhou R, Xie Y, Qiao J.
In order to achieve the old fence of reuse, improve the safety performance of guardrail, barrier structure does not meet the requirements, make full use of the old concrete guardrail on the basis of heightening, through computer simulation experiment were ... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 17, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

EASY TARGETS: Water and power grid infrastructure across America found vulnerable to cyberattack
(Natural News) The digital security of computer networks controlling the machines that produce and distribute water and power in the U.S. is woefully inadequate. Operators and regulators have placed a low priority on keeping these systems secure, posing a terrifying threat to national security. It only took six hours for the Los Angeles Department of Water... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 16, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FCC: Privacy Act of 1974; Matching Program
Notice from the Federal Communications Commission seeking comment on new computer matching programs between the Federal Communications Commission and the Tennessee Department of Human Services to verify the eligibility of applicants and subscribers to the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program (EBBP). The EBBP was created specifically to assist American families' access to broadband during the COVID-19 pandemic. Comments are due by July 16, 2021. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - June 16, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

FCC: Privacy Act of 1974; Matching Program
Notice from the Federal Communications Commission seeking comment on new computer matching programs between the Federal Communications Commission and the Minnesota Department of Human Services to verify the eligibility of applicants and subscribers to the Emergency Broadband Benefit Program (EBBP). The EBBP was created specifically to assist American families' access to broadband during the COVID-19 pandemic. Comments are due by July 16, 2021. (Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center)
Source: Federal Register updates via the Rural Assistance Center - June 16, 2021 Category: Rural Health Source Type: news

Improving National Defense Against Ransomware (Rick Crawford Commentary)
Ransomware computer crimes have been around for a number of years, but recent attacks have put them squarely in the headlines. (Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care)
Source: Arkansas Business - Health Care - June 15, 2021 Category: American Health Source Type: news

Former ADT technician sentenced to 4+ years in prison for spying on customers, watching their most intimate moments through their own home security cameras
(Natural News) A former home security technician was sentenced by a U.S. district judge to 52 months in federal prison for repeatedly hacking into customers’ video feeds in North Texas. Telesforo Aviles, a 35-year old former ADT employee, pleaded guilty to computer fraud in January. He was sentenced on Thursday, June 9, by U.S. District Judge Brantley... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - June 15, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A study on the estimation of impact velocity of crashed vehicles in tunnel using computer simulation(PC-CRASH) - Han CP, Choi HJ.
In a vehicle-to-vehicle accident, the impact posture, braking status, final stopping position, collision point and collision speed are important factors for accident reconstruction. In particular, the speed of collision is the most important issue. In this... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Blavatnik National Awards for Young Scientists announces the finalists of 2021
(New York Academy of Sciences) The Blavatnik National Awards today named 31 finalists for the world's largest unrestricted prize honoring early-career scientists. The finalists were culled from 298 nominations by 157 U.S. research institutions across 38 states. They have made trailblazing discoveries in wide-ranging fields, from the neuroscience of addiction to the development of gene-editing technologies, from designing next-generation battery storage to understanding the origins of photosynthesis, from making improvements in computer vision to pioneering new frontiers in polymer chemistry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social a...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 15, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

WET conference stresses the importance of health and safety
Health and safety “might not grab the headlines … but that work is vital”. Opening the weekend’s virtual conference for UNISON’s water, environment and transport service group (WET), Ruth Davies (pictured above), the chair of the service group executive, paid tribute to the members who have helped keep the country going in the pandemic. The virus has had a “devastating impact”, she noted. It has been like “nothing we’ve experienced before, and safety has had to be paramount”. But Ms Davies said that it was a “demonstration of the strength of our union and o...
Source: UNISON Health care news - June 14, 2021 Category: UK Health Authors: Amanda Kendal Tags: Article News 2021 Special WET Conference Source Type: news

Coroners call for changes to IT systems after two suicides
Coroners have called for urgent changes to be made to GP computer systems to help prevent suicide after two cases where men took their own lives. (Source: HSJ)
Source: HSJ - June 14, 2021 Category: UK Health Source Type: news

RNA: A new method to discover its high-resolution structure
(Scuola Internazionale Superiore di Studi Avanzati) The structure of a biomolecule can reveal much about its functioning and interaction with the surrounding environment. In a new study by SISSA experimental data were combined with computer simulations of molecular dynamics to examine the conformation of an RNA fragment involved in protein synthesis and its dependence on the salts present in the solution. The research has led to a new method for high-resolution definition of the structures of biomolecules in their physiological environments. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - June 14, 2021 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Das researching use of artificial intelligence
(George Mason University) Sanmay Das, Professor, Computer Science, is conducting an exploratory study in the use of techniques from artificial intelligence (AI) to improve early screening and the delivery of targeted assistance to households that are at risk of future homelessness and child maltreatment. Das and the other members of the research team seek to develop novel methods for allocation of scarce housing support to at-risk households, taking into account considerations of both overall efficiency and fairness. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 14, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

David Eagleman: ‘The working of the brain resembles drug dealers in Albuquerque’
The neuroscientist, broadcaster and author on the evolution of the brain, the mystery of consciousnesss, and why the next generation will be much smarter than usDavid Eagleman, 50, is an American neuroscientist, bestselling author and presenter of the BBC seriesThe Brain, as well as co-founder and chief executive officer of Neosensory, which develops devices for sensory substitution. His area of speciality is brain plasticity, and that is the subject of his new book,Livewired, which examines how experience refashions the brain, and shows that it is a much more adaptable organ than previously thought.For the past half-centu...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - June 13, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Andrew Anthony Tags: Neuroscience Medical research Books Elon Musk Technology Culture Science and nature books Source Type: news

‘A Year Full of Emotions.’ What Kids Learned From the COVID-19 Pandemic
Too many young generations have been shaped by the global crises they faced—Depression-era poverty, Cold War nuclear fears. Add to them the COVID generation. The virus itself may typically go easier on kids than it does adults, but the mind of a child is another thing. It’s dependent on certainty, safety, the comfort of routine. Take all of that away—shutter schools, keep grandparents at a distance, cancel summer camps—and kids suffer. But as the following lightly-edited stories from young people show, they also grow and learn, gain maturity and wisdom. The virus has been tough; plenty of kids, it t...
Source: TIME: Health - June 12, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger and Allison Singer Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 Source Type: news

Apple Starts Leaving Intel Macs Behind in MacOS Monterey
For the first time, some of Apple's own features will only be available on computers with the company's homegrown silicon. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 11, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

The 10 Most Important Health Breakthroughs You Missed During the Pandemic
While most eyes were on COVID-19, researchers have also made groundbreaking advancements in other fields. Here’s a look. The other big vaccine news Public-health officials have long sought a vaccine against malaria, which infects up to 600 million people a year and kills 400,000, mostly children. This year, there was dramatic prog­ress toward that goal. In a study of 450 children in Burkina Faso, published in the Lancet in April, researchers reported that a new malaria vaccine, called R21, is 77% effective—just clearing the World Health Organization’s 75% efficacy standard. However, the sample gro...
Source: TIME: Health - June 10, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jeffrey Kluger Tags: Uncategorized COVID-19 feature Innovation Magazine Source Type: news

His Implanted Microchip Could Help Save Him From a Stroke
WEDNESDAY, June 9, 2021 -- Norman Mayer, 86, walks around with a computer chip in his chest and doesn't think a thing about it. Doctors implanted a tiny heart monitor chip in Mayer's chest after he suffered a mini-stroke in late 2015, to track his... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - June 9, 2021 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

US Senate approves $50bn boost for computer chip and AI technology to counter China
Legislation shows deeply divided parties are largely united on confronting China in the ‘race for technologies of the future’ (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 9, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

iCAD, Sectra sign AI distribution deal
Computer-aided detection (CAD) software developer iCAD has inked a worldwid...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Sectra profit grows despite dip in sales Sectra, Region Kronoberg sign cloud service contract Sectra wins enterprise imaging contract from UC Health iCAD touts breast screening study FDA clears iCAD's ProFound AI for DBT iCAD to provide software to Solis (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - June 8, 2021 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

New study: Developers' skills and top management commitment lead to Agile project success
(Department of Computer Science, Aalborg University) Which are the most compelling success factors of a large-scale Agile software transformation? And how do these factors relate? A new long-term study from Aalborg University highlights the stakeholders' roles in such transformations. The main result is a valuable model for software managers to set up and effectively manage the transformation of organisations. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 8, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Examining the added value of harm reduction strategies to emailed boosters to extend the effects of online interventions for college drinkers - Braitman AL, Strowger M, Lau-Barraco C, Shipley JL, Kelley ML, Carey KB.
OBJECTIVE: Brief computer-delivered interventions (CDIs) reduce college student drinking and related problems but can be less efficacious and enduring than in-person interventions. The present study examined: (a) the utility of emailed personalized booster... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Computers can now predict our preferences directly from our brain
(University of Copenhagen - Faculty of Science) A research team from the University of Copenhagen and University of Helsinki demonstrates it is possible to predict individual preferences based on how a person's brain responses match up to others. This could potentially be used to provide individually tailored media content -- and perhaps even to enlighten us about ourselves. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

NIH grant boosts computational search for cancer drugs
(Rice University) Rice computer scientist Lydia Kavraki won an NIH grant to create a data science-based proteomics toolkit to analyze protein-ligand interactions for new cancer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - June 7, 2021 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Considering the potential and pitfalls of " Dr. GPT-3 " in a clinic near you
(The Hastings Center) Artificial intelligence natural language computer applications are becoming increasingly sophisticated, raising the possibility that they could assume a greater role in health care, including interacting with patients. But before these applications enter the clinic, their potential and pitfalls need thoughtful exploration, states a new article in NPJ Digital Medicine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 7, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

TGen COVID-19 tracking program receives grant from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co.
(The Translational Genomics Research Institute) TGen today announced a substantial grant from Taiwan Semiconductor Manufacturing Co. Ltd. (TSMC), one of the world's largest manufacturers of computer chips, to help TGen sustain Arizona's fight against COVID-19. The TSMC grant will boost TGen efforts to track variants of the SARS-CoV-2 virus, which causes the COVID-19 infection. TGen's program is designed to gain intelligence about the current pandemic, as well as prepare for a next potential regional or global disease outbreak. (Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases)
Source: EurekAlert! - Infectious and Emerging Diseases - June 7, 2021 Category: Infectious Diseases Source Type: news

Why A.I. Should Be Afraid of Us
Because benevolent bots are suckers. Plus, racism in medical journals, the sperm-count “crisis” and more in the Friday edition of the Science Times newsletter. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 5, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alan Burdick Tags: Artificial Intelligence Driverless and Semiautonomous Vehicles Mobile Applications Empathy Roads and Traffic Computer and Video Games Woebot Labs Westworld (TV Program) your-feed-science your-feed-health Source Type: news

Computer simulations of the brain can predict language recovery in stroke survivors
(Boston University) Speech rehabilitation experts can predict how well a patient will recover from aphasia, a disorder caused by damage to the part of the brain responsible for producing language. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 4, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Supreme Court narrows scope of computer fraud law
Supreme Court limits computer fraud law to those who wrongly gain access to confidential files, not those who misuse data they're... (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Effectiveness of a computerized cognitive training program for reducing head impact kinematics in youth ice hockey players - DiFabio MS, Buckley TA.
Cognitive training (CT) is an effective technique to improve neurological performance, but has not been investigated as a head impact primary prevention strategy. The purpose of this study was to investigate the CT's effectiveness in reducing head impact k... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 3, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

Virtual Reality Therapy Plunges Patients Back Into Trauma. Here Is Why Some Swear by It.
An experimental treatment seems poised to address a dire mental health crisis. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - June 3, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Dani Blum Tags: Anxiety and Stress Veterans Psychology and Psychologists Virtual Reality (Computers) Phobias Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Research Mental Health and Disorders Veterans Affairs Department Source Type: news

Do glasses that block blue light help your eyes?
Sitting behind a computer screen all day can strain your eyes, but do glasses that claim to block blue light really help? Dr. Muriel Schornack, a Mayo Clinic optometrist, says the macula is the area of the retina in your eye that is responsible for processing your clear central vision. The macula can be sensitive [...] (Source: News from Mayo Clinic)
Source: News from Mayo Clinic - June 3, 2021 Category: Databases & Libraries Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence agreement to advance Army modernization efforts
(U.S. Army Research Laboratory) The US Army plans to cooperate in artificial intelligence research with teams led by the University of Maryland, College Park and in partnership with the University of Maryland, Baltimore County. The cooperative agreement brings together a collaborative of nearly 30 diverse experts in engineering, robotics, computer science, operations research, modeling and simulation, and cybersecurity. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

CMU Team develops machine learning platform that mines nature for new drugs
(Carnegie Mellon University) Researchers from Carnegie Mellon University's Computational Biology Department in the School of Computer Science have developed a new process using machine learning algorithms to match the signals of a microbe's metabolites with its genomic signals and identify which likely correspond to a natural product. Knowing that, researchers are better equipped to isolate the natural product to begin developing it for a possible drug and possibly reinvigorate the search for natural product drugs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Declining fish biodiversity poses risks for human nutrition
(Cornell University) All fish are not created equal, at least when it comes to nutritional benefits. This truth has important implications for how declining fish biodiversity can affect human nutrition, according to a computer modeling study led by Cornell and Columbia University researchers. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - June 2, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Bristol researchers create a camera that knows exactly where it is
Researchers from the University of Bristol have demonstrated how a new special type of camera can build a pictorial map of where it has been and use this map to know where it currently is, something that will be incredibly useful in the development of smart sensors, driverless cars and robotics. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - June 1, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Research; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news

The automatic detection of pedestrians under the high-density conditions by deep learning techniques - Jin CJ, Shi X, Hui T, Li D, Ma K.
The automatic detection and tracking of pedestrians under high-density conditions is a challenging task for both computer vision fields and pedestrian flow studies. Collecting pedestrian data is a fundamental task for the modeling and practical implementat... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Enhancing railway maintenance safety using open-source computer vision - Shin D, Jin J, Kim J.
As high-speed railways continue to be constructed, more maintenance work is needed to ensure smooth operation. However, this leads to frequent accidents involving maintenance workers at the tracks. Although the number of such accidents is decreasing, there... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Computer vision-based wildfire smoke detection using UAVs - Rahman EU, Khan MA, Algarni F, Zhang Y, Irfan Uddin M, Ullah I, Ahmad HI.
This paper presents a new methodology based on texture and color for the detection and monitoring of different sources of forest fire smoke using unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). A novel dataset has been gathered comprised of thin smoke and dense smoke gen... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - June 1, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Digital forensics experts prone to bias, study shows
Participants found more or less evidence on hard drive depending on what contextual information they hadDevices such as phones, laptops and flash drives are becoming increasingly central to police investigations, but the reliability of digital forensics experts ’ evidence has been called into question.A study found that experts tended to find more or less evidence on a suspect ’s computer hard drive to implicate or exonerate them depending on the contextual information about the investigation that they were given.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - May 31, 2021 Category: Science Authors: Linda Geddes Science correspondent Tags: Forensic science UK criminal justice Technology Law World news Source Type: news

Intel's latest 11th-gen CPU lets ultraportables hit 5GHz
Thin and light computers will finally cross the 5GHz barrier with Intel's latest flagship 11th-gen U-series chip.. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - May 31, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Reassessing Boundaries
Over the past year, many of us have played our different roles — professional, parent, student — all from the same space, home. Now, we’re reassessing how much to share as we emerge into the public sphere. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 30, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Katherine Cusumano Tags: Quarantine (Life and Culture) Anxiety and Stress Workplace Environment Social Media Computers and the Internet Source Type: news

What is Person-Centered Care?
Dear Dr. Jeff: Our mission statement asserts a commitment to “person-centered care,” as have those of every long-term care facility and chain for which I have worked. I have never really understood what this means, particularly in an era of computerized health records with automatic default orders, mandatory check boxes on templated practitioner notes, ad mission and periodic assessments all tailored to the Minimum Data Set, insurance- and algorithm-generated lengths of stay, vendor-created menu cycles that repeat every two weeks, and standardized infection control practices that treat all residents as potentia...
Source: Caring for the Ages - May 29, 2021 Category: Health Management Authors: Jeffrey Nichols Tags: Dear DR. Jeff Source Type: news

U.S. Is Said to Have Unexamined Intelligence to Pore Over on Virus Origins
Intelligence officials have told the White House that computer analysis may shed light on the mystery. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 28, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Julian E. Barnes and David E. Sanger Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Espionage and Intelligence Services United States Politics and Government Office of the Director of National Intelligence Wuhan Institute of Virology (China) Biden, Joseph R Jr Trump, Donald J Wuhan (China) Laborato Source Type: news

Railway fastener defects detection under various illumination conditions using fuzzy C-means part model - He B, Luo J, Ou Y, Xiong Y, Li B.
To ensure the safe operation of railways, computer vision and pattern recognition technology have been gradually applied to the routine inspection of railway track infrastructure. Rails are fixed to sleepers by railway fasteners, which are important compon... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - May 28, 2021 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Engineering, Physics, Structural Soundness and Failure Source Type: news

Why Apple and Google ’s Virus Alert Apps Had Limited Success
The virus-tracing effort raises questions about the power of Big Tech to set global standards for public health tools. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - May 27, 2021 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Natasha Singer Tags: Coronavirus (2019-nCoV) Mobile Applications Contact Tracing (Public Health) Bluetooth Wireless Technology Computers and the Internet Privacy Apple Inc Google Inc exposure notification proximity detection Source Type: news

Bristol first to host series of workshops focusing on 6G research in the UK
The Minister for Digital Infrastructure has launched a series of events based on 6G research in the UK, the first hosted by the University of Bristol. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - May 26, 2021 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: Announcements; Faculty of Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, School of Computer Science, Electrical and Electronic Engineering, and Engineering Maths; Press Release Source Type: news