Place-based management can protect coral reefs in a changing climate
(University of Hawaii at Manoa) Scientists from the University of Hawai'i at Mānoa apply new computer models to identify where cesspool conversion and marine conservation efforts will minimize human impacts on coral reefs. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 25, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

W.H.O. Says Limited or No Screen Time for Children Under 5
Infants under 1 year old should not be exposed to electronic screens, and children between the ages of 2 and 4 should not have more than one daily hour of “ sedentary screen time, ” the agency said Wednesday. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 25, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: EMILY S. RUEB Tags: Children and Childhood Computer Monitors Obesity World Health Organization Computers and the Internet Source Type: news

WHO recommends one-hour maximum screen time per day for under-5s
Young children should not spend more than an hour a day watching television and videos or playing computer games and infants less than one year old should not be exposed to electronic screens at all, the World Health Organization (WHO) said on Wednesday. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Computer Program Converts Brain Signals to a Synthetic Voice
A proof-of-principle study raises hopes that technology can give a voice to paralyzed people unable to speak. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - April 24, 2019 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion Source Type: news

Scientists translate brain signals into speech sounds
(NIH/National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke) Scientists used brain signals recorded from epilepsy patients to program a computer to mimic natural speech -- an advancement that could one day have a profound effect on the ability of certain patients to communicate. The study was supported by the National Institutes of Health's Brain Research through Advancing Innovative Technologies (BRAIN) Initiative. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Synthetic speech generated from brain recordings
(University of California - San Francisco) A state-of-the-art brain-machine interface created by UC San Francisco neuroscientists can generate natural-sounding synthetic speech by using brain activity to control a virtual vocal tract -- an anatomically detailed computer simulation including the lips, jaw, tongue, and larynx. The study was conducted in research participants with intact speech, but the technology could one day restore the voices of people who have lost the ability to speak due to paralysis or neurological damage. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 24, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Computers Diagnose PTSD by Analyzing Veterans' Speech Patterns Computers Diagnose PTSD by Analyzing Veterans' Speech Patterns
Voice analysis software can help detect post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans based on their speech, a study suggests.Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - April 24, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Psychiatry News Source Type: news

Americans get more sedentary as computer use surges
New study suggests Americans are becoming increasingly sedentary with computers partly to blame. (Source: CBC | Health)
Source: CBC | Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: News/Health Source Type: news

Americans get more sedentary as computer use surges
(Reuters Health) - Most Americans spend at least two hours a day watching television or videos, and a new study suggests they're becoming more sedentary as they devote more remaining free time to sitting in front of computers. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Prevalence of TV, Video Watching High, Stable 2001 to 2016 in U.S.
TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 -- From 2001 to 2016, the estimated prevalence of watching television or videos for at least two hours/day remained high and stable, while the prevalence of computer use increased, according to a study published in the April... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 23, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Americans getting more inactive, computers partly to blame
New study shows Americans are becoming increasingly sedentary, computers partly to blame (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Health Source Type: news

Computers, not TV, are to blame for increase in US sitting time, study says
There's a key culprit in the battle against sitting. Time spent watching TV and videos has remained consistently high in the United States over the past 15 years, but time sitting at a computer has increased dramatically, new research finds. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Americans Are Sitting at Record Rates. Here ’s Why That’s So Dangerous
Every day, we modern humans stay comfortably seated on our behinds for hours at a time: binge watching shows on Netflix, pecking away on keyboards at work, scrolling through social media feeds. But do people really sit more than they used to? That’s what Yin Cao and an international group of colleagues wanted to find out in their latest study published in JAMA. While studies on sitting behavior in specific groups of people — such as children or working adults with desk jobs — have recorded how sedentary people are, there is little data on how drastically sitting habits have changed over time. “We do...
Source: TIME: Health - April 23, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alice Park Tags: Uncategorized public health Source Type: news

Americans Sitting More Than Ever, and Tech Is to Blame
TUESDAY, April 23, 2019 -- America's couch potatoes are becoming ever more deeply rooted, and computers are the reason why. The amount of time people spend sitting around has increased in recent years, driven largely by more leisure time spent with... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - April 23, 2019 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Kids As Young As 5 Make Superficial Judgments Based On Appearance
BOSTON (CBS) — Harvard researchers found that children as young as five make superficial judgments about others based on their facial features, much like adults do. Adults often make snap judgments about other people based simply on how their mouth is set or the shape of their brow. This can influence who we vote for, who we hire, and who may get a harsher punishment. Now researchers have found that by the age of five, children do the same. They had 350 children ages 3 to 13 look at computer-generated faces designed to look trustworthy or not, dominant or submissive, competent or incompetent. The kids almost always m...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Boston News Health Healthwatch Seen On WBZ-TV Syndicated Local Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Computerized intervention to prevent drug use among at-risk adolescents in Central Asia: preliminary family-level findings from a pilot mixed methods trial - Ismayilova L, Terlikbayevab A, Rozentalb Y.
BACKGROUND: The rapidly growing rates of HIV infection in Kazakhstan are largely driven by injection drug use. The study adapts a family-focused evidence-based HIV and substance use prevention intervention for at-risk adolescents from communities in Almaty... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Age: Adolescents Source Type: news

At War: The Military Wants Better Tests for PTSD. Speech Analysis Could Be the Answer.
Using computerized voice analysis, a new study found 18 features of speech that identify markers of PTSD in veterans. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: DAVE PHILIPPS Tags: Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Veterans Psychology and Psychologists Mental Health and Disorders United States Defense and Military Forces Voice Recognition Systems Defense Department SRI International Depression and Anxiety (Journal) Source Type: news

Mass media celebration of woman scientist credited for black hole image was bogus... even SCIENCE is now pushing a liberal agenda
(Natural News) In its rush to politicize on the basis of gender, the world’s first computer-generated image of a “black hole,” the mainstream media has once again been caught propagating politically-correct “fake news” by falsely attributing the image’s creation to a female whose algorithms weren’t even used to generate said image. For days, Left Cult... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 22, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence can diagnose PTSD by analyzing voices
(NYU Langone Health / NYU School of Medicine) A specially designed computer program can help to diagnose post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in veterans by analyzing their voices. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 22, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Training computers to think more like scientists
Michael Keiser, PhD, and Kangway Chuang, PhD, want to use machine learning to speed the pace of drug discovery. By digging into the work of another lab, the pair realized how machine learning could lead scientists astray —and came up with methods to avoid its worst pitfalls. (Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News)
Source: UCSF School of Pharmacy News - April 20, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Source Type: news

A computer vision-based roadside occupation surveillance system for intelligent transport in smart cities - Ho GTS, Tsang YP, Wu CH, Wong WH, Choy KL.
In digital and green city initiatives, smart mobility is a key aspect of developing smart cities and it is important for built-up areas worldwide. Double-parking and busy roadside activities such as frequent loading and unloading of trucks, have a negative... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 19, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Jurisprudence, Laws, Legislation, Policies, Rules Source Type: news

Here ’ s Soylent ’ s New Product. It ’ s Food.
The Silicon Valley food-drink of choice is now a ‘ complete nutrition platform. ’ The beverage plot thickens. (Source: NYT Health)
Source: NYT Health - April 18, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: JONAH ENGEL BROMWICH and JOHN HERRMAN Tags: Food Computers and the Internet Innovation Car Services and Livery Cabs your-feed-selfcare Source Type: news

Phoenix attorney's family donates $10M to help ASU build X-ray laser lab
How a random conversation during an airline flight led to a major donation to help ASU develop the first-of-its kind laser that has potential applications in medicine, renewable energy and the computer industry. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Physician Practices headlines - April 18, 2019 Category: American Health Authors: Angela Gonzales Source Type: news

Making digital tissue imaging better
(Case Western Reserve University) A low-tech problem troubles the high-tech world of digital pathology imaging: There are no reliable standards for the quality of digitized tissue slides comprising the source material for computers reading and analyzing vast numbers of images. Poor-quality slides get mixed in with accurate slides, potentially confusing a computer program trying to learn what a cancerous cell looks like. Researchers from Case Western Reserve University are trying to fix this, sharing an open-source quality control standard. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 18, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Could computer games help farmers adapt to climate change?
(De Gruyter) Researchers from Sweden and Finland have developed the interactive web-based Maladaptation Game, which can be used to better understand how Nordic farmers make decisions regarding environmental changes and how they negotiate the negative impacts of potentially damaging decisions. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 18, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

A simulation investigation of fire smoke behavior above urban street canyon - Tao C, Wang K, Liu Q, He P.
This paper presents computer simulation investigations on the fire smoke movement above street canyons under a velocity condition. Two buildings with different aspect ratios, when the range of windward building height is 5 ~ 17 m and the leeward building h... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Fire scenario influence on fire resistance of reinforced concrete frame structure - Cvetkovska M, Knezevic M, Xu Q, Chifliganec C, Lazarevska M, Gavriloska AT.
Understanding the performance and the response of the frame structures in fire is of a particular importance for structural fire design. The specialized computer program SAFIR enables analysis of different types of structures, constructed with different st... (Source: SafetyLit)
Source: SafetyLit - April 17, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Tags: Burns, Electricity, Explosions, Fire, Scalds Source Type: news

Heart patch could limit muscle damage in heart attack aftermath
(Brown University) Guided by computer simulations, an international team of researchers has developed an adhesive patch that can provide support for damaged heart tissue, potentially reducing the stretching of heart muscle that's common after a heart attack. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Improving quantum computers
(American Chemical Society) For decades, experts have predicted that quantum computers will someday perform difficult tasks, such as simulating complex chemical systems, that can't be done by conventional computers. But so far, these machines haven't lived up to their potential because of error-prone hardware. That's why scientists are working to improve the qubit -- the basic hardware element of quantum computers, according to an article in Chemical& Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 17, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

4 reasons why Big Tech is hazardous to our lives
(Natural News) The ability of major corporations to monitor and manipulate our almost every move is becoming more and more real by the day. No, I am not some Ludditeadvocating an abandonment of the wonderful advancements of technology we enjoy (like the computer I am typing on right now). I am, however, very concerned about the... (Source: NaturalNews.com)
Source: NaturalNews.com - April 16, 2019 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Artificial Intelligence Powering Boom in Israel's Digital Health Sector
AI medical use cases include but are not limited to decision support tools for physicians, medical imaging analysis using computer vision, and big data analytics for population health management. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - April 16, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Amir Mizroch, Contributor Source Type: news

Computer games for fish uncover why some prey lead and others follow
For the first time, researchers have shed new light on the evolution of different social roles within animal groups by exploring how fish predators target and attack groups of virtual prey. The study, led by the universities of Bristol and Oxford and published today [Monday 15 April] in the journal PNAS, found leaders in groups of animals are more vulnerable to attack from predators. (Source: University of Bristol news)
Source: University of Bristol news - April 15, 2019 Category: Universities & Medical Training Tags: International, Research; Faculty of Life Sciences, Faculty of Life Sciences, School of Biological Sciences; Press Release Source Type: news

Ultrasound CADx software can stratify thyroid nodules
Although it doesn't perform as well as a sonography expert, ultrasound computer-aided...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: AIUM: Both thermal ablation methods work for thyroid Advanced US techniques = better thyroid nodule diagnosis AI bolsters diagnostic accuracy of thyroid ultrasound CAD helps less-experienced rads diagnose thyroid cancer Is ultrasound needed for thyroid cancer follow-up? (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - April 15, 2019 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

How our capacity for wonder was challenged by the black hole image | Tim Adams
We marvelled at the first image of an event horizon 55m light years away, but struggled to grasp its majesty and dimensionsA few years ago, during a period of insomnia, I briefly got into the habit of contributing to the online projectGalaxy Zoo. I would log on to a website that presented, one after another, singular images of tens of thousands of galaxies observed by the Hubble telescope, each billions of light years away. There were so many of these images that cosmologists had opened them up to thousands of amateur volunteers to help narrow down the field of those galaxies that warranted closer study.Peering at my dimme...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - April 14, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Tim Adams Tags: Black holes Astronomy Space Science Women Life and style Albert Einstein UK news Source Type: news

Clear sight in the data fog with PAGA
(Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen - German Research Center for Environmental Health) Experimental molecular assays with single-cell resolution generate big and complex data. Researchers at Helmholtz Zentrum M ü nchen and the Technical University of Munich are now presenting their computer algorithm PAGA*. They create data-driven, easily interpretable maps that reveal cellular processes and fates in complex contexts. Their paper has been published in Genome Biology. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - April 12, 2019 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Myoelectric Computer Interface Beneficial for Stroke Survivors
THURSDAY, April 11, 2019 -- A myoelectric computer interface (MyoCI) training paradigm that provides intuitive feedback about muscle activation patterns is well tolerated and can reduce abnormal coactivation among stroke survivors, according to a... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 11, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence for future agile manufacturing
(Karlsruher Institut f ü r Technologie (KIT)) Clients request customized solutions, product lifecycles become shorter, new business models result: Industrial production has to keep pace with these dynamic changes. At Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), an interdisciplinary group of researchers from mechanical engineering, electrical engineering, information technology, and computer science is now working on an agile production system that autonomously and dynamically adapts to changing product specifications in remanufacturing. This AgiProbot project is funded by the Carl Zeiss Foundation with€3 million. (So...
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 11, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Photo Of Scientist Creating Her Historic Black Hole Image Goes Viral
Katie Bouman, a computer scientist, earned praise for her part in creating the visual. Her post on the moment she loaded the image is captivating, too. (Source: Science - The Huffington Post)
Source: Science - The Huffington Post - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Meet Katie Bouman, One Woman Who Helped Make the World ’s First Image of a Black Hole
The space was tiny and hot. On a fateful day last summer, Katie Bouman and three fellow researchers filed into a small room at Harvard University, safe from prying eyes, in order to see an image that had been years in the making. Researchers from all over the world had combined forces to gather masses of astronomical data — enough to fill a half ton of hard drives — that they hoped to turn into the world’s first image of a black hole. In order to do that, the team needed algorithms that could distill all that noisy, messy information into one comprehensible picture. And Bouman, whose expertise is not in a...
Source: TIME: Science - April 11, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Katy Steinmetz Tags: Uncategorized onetime space Source Type: news

Beware of Illegally Marketed Concussion Tech
FDA raised concern on Wednesday about devices and apps marketed to consumers that claim to help assess, diagnose, or manage a head injury, including concussion and traumatic brain injury. Only a limited number of devices have received the agency's blessing to date and all of them require an evaluation by a healthcare professional. “I want to be clear, there are currently no devices to aid in assessing concussion that should be used by consumers on their own. Using such devices can result in an incorrect diagnosis after a head injury that could lead a person with a serious injury to return to t...
Source: MDDI - April 10, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Amanda Pedersen Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Who will win the Game of Thrones?
(Technical University of Munich (TUM)) Shortly before the curtain drops on the hit HBO show Game of Thrones (GoT), students attending a computer science seminar at the Technical University of Munich (TUM) embarked on an unusual scientific mission: predicting which character has the best chance to sit the coveted Iron Throne. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 10, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

ISIS-Inspired Man Plotted Truck Attack at Maryland ’s National Harbor
WASHINGTON (WUSA9) — Federal prosecutors say a man inspired by the Islamic State group stole a U-Haul truck with plans to drive it into a crowd at National Harbor, the popular dining and entertainment hang out just outside of Washington, D.C. The allegation was made in a court filing Monday as prosecutors in Maryland urged a judge to keep the defendant, Rondell Henry, 28, detained on a charge of driving a stolen vehicle across state lines. Authorities say Henry admitted that he wanted to create "panic and chaos" and that his plans for a truck attack were modeled after a deadly attack in Nice, France in July...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - April 9, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Tags: Major Incidents News Terrorism & Active Shooter Mass Casualty Incidents Source Type: news

Vuzix Partners with VSee Lab Inc. to Deliver a Telehealth and Telemedicine Smart Glasses Solution
ROCHESTER, N.Y. - Vuzix® Corporation (NASDAQ: VUZI), ("Vuzix" or, the "Company"), a leading supplier of Smart Glasses and Augmented Reality (AR) technology and products, is pleased to announce a strategic partnership with VSee Lab Inc. ("VSee"), a San Jose-based video telehealth company, to introduce a telehealth and telemedicine smart glasses solution for Vuzix' M300XL and Vuzix Blade Smart Glasses. VSee provides a HIPAA-compliant video telehealth and telemedicine video conferencing solution that is used by more than 1,000 telemedicine companies operating a...
Source: JEMS Operations - April 9, 2019 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Vuzix Corporation (press release) Tags: Press Releases Operations Source Type: news

How artificial intelligence can help in the fight against human trafficking
(Lehigh University) Code 8.7, a two-day conference, brought together computer science researchers and technologists with policy experts, law enforcement officials, activists and survivors involved in the fight against human trafficking. (Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science)
Source: EurekAlert! - Social and Behavioral Science - April 9, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Model Can Predict Sepsis Risk for Emergency Medical Admissions
MONDAY, April 8, 2019 -- A computer-aided National Early Warning Score (cNEWS) model accurately predicts sepsis for emergency medical admissions, according to a study published online April 8 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical... (Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News)
Source: Drugs.com - Pharma News - April 8, 2019 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

Lessons Learned from 23andMe Inc. v Ancestry.com
The current trajectory of innovation is resulting in the convergence of biological and electronic discoveries into hybrid technologies that incorporate aspects of both scientific disciplines. Wearables replete with biological sensors and analysis as well as the use of complex electronics, software, and algorithms in biological sciences are just some examples of these hybrid inventions. As these types of technologies become more and more prevalent, consideration of how patent protection applies to them becomes increasingly important, particularly with developing application-drafting strategies to best protect them. United S...
Source: MDDI - April 5, 2019 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Aaron J. Capron and Nicholas D. Petrella Tags: Regulatory and Compliance Source Type: news

Scientists develop methods to validate gene regulation networks
(New York University) A team of biologists and computer scientists has mapped out a network of interactions for how plant genes coordinate their response to nitrogen, a crucial nutrient and the main component of fertilizer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 5, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

National Science Foundation names Jennifer Dionne and Mark Braverman its 2019 Alan T. Waterman awardees
The National Science Foundation (NSF) has named materials scientist Jennifer Dionne and computer scientist Mark Braverman the recipients of this year's Alan T. Waterman Award. The Waterman Award annually recognizes an outstanding young researcher in any field of science or engineering supported by NSF. Researchers 40 years of age or younger, or up to 10 years post Ph.D., are eligible. This year, two outstanding researchers ... More at https://www.nsf.gov/news/news_summ.jsp?cntn_id=298217&WT.mc_id=USNSF_51&WT.mc_ev=click This is an NSF News item. (Source: NSF News)
Source: NSF News - April 5, 2019 Category: Science Source Type: news

Artificial intelligence approach optimizes embryo selection for IVF
(Weill Cornell Medicine) The team, consisting of embryologists, reproductive medicine clinicians, computer scientists, and precision medicine experts, trained an artificial intelligence algorithm to discriminate between poor and good embryo quality. In a collaboration between the Center for Reproductive Medicine and the Englander Institute for Precision Medicine at Weill Cornell Medicine, the investigators spent more than six months reviewing approximately 50,000 anonymized images, representing 10,148 human embryos, collected by time-lapse photography over seven years. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - April 4, 2019 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Invasive birds spread native seeds
(Source: ScienceNOW)
Source: ScienceNOW - April 4, 2019 Category: Science Authors: Sugden, A. M. Tags: Computers, Mathematics, Ecology twis Source Type: news