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'Virus-cracking' molecules advance fight against hepatitis B
(Indiana University) Indiana University researchers have found that certain molecules -- currently under clinical trial -- are able to 'crack' the protective shell of the hepatitis B virus, suggesting it may be possible to attack the virus after its already taken hold in the body. There is currently no cure for the virus, which can cause liver failure and cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

New algorithm decodes spine oncology treatment
(Michigan Medicine - University of Michigan) Experts explain their approach to treating patients who are living longer with cancer that has spread to the spine, as the options for metastatic spine tumors increase. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Starving liver cancer
(University of Delaware) Scientists at the University of Delaware and the University of Illinois at Chicago have found a new way to kill liver cancer cells and inhibit tumor growth. This research could accelerate the development of new treatments for liver cancer, which is currently difficult to cure. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

A new role for the 'pigments of life'
(Trinity College Dublin) Chemically reconfiguring 'porphyrins' has opened new possibilities for their use in diverse applications in chemistry, biochemistry and energy science. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists discover off-switch for 'molecular machine' active in many diseases
(University of Queensland) A discovery by Queensland scientists could be the key to stopping damage caused by uncontrolled inflammation in a range of common diseases including liver disease, Alzheimer's and gout.University of Queensland researchers have uncovered how an inflammation process automatically switches off in healthy cells, and are now investigating ways to stop it manually when it goes awry. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Insilico to present the advances in deep-learned multimodal biomarkers of aging at NCI
(InSilico Medicine, Inc.) The Cancer Biomarkers Data Commons Meeting (CBDC) Think Tank Meeting will be held at the National Cancer Institute from Feb 8 to 9th, 2018. The Think Tank Meeting will bring together thought leaders from academia, industry, and government to discuss approaches to the development of cancer biomarkers. Alex Zhavoronkov, CEO of Insilico Medicine, will present the advances in deep-learned multimodal biomarkers of aging at the meeting. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

A cyanine dye acid test that won't drown in water
(Michigan Technological University) Near-infrared cyanine dyes are go-to tools for studying the inner workings of cells and investigating the biochemistry of disease, including cancer. But even though they have low toxicity and plenty of applications, these fluorescent dyes have a weakness: Put them in water and they quit working. A new dye overcomes this problem. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Another piece to the puzzle in naked mole rats' long, cancer-free life
(University of Rochester) Cellular senescence is an evolutionary adaptation that prevents damaged cells from dividing out of control and developing into cancer. However, senescence has a negative side: by stopping cell division, it also accelerates aging. In a surprising finding, Rochester biologists have shown that naked mole rats experience the same cellular senescence as much shorter-lived mice, yet they continue to live long, cancer-free lives. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

VCU scientists seek to perfect calculations for comparing cervical cancer radiation doses
(Virginia Commonwealth University) Research from VCU Massey Cancer Center has found that one of the standard practices for comparing cervical cancer radiation therapy treatments may be misleading, and the use of an alternative mathematical formula could be used to more effectively predict and potentially improve outcomes for patients. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Matchmaking for liver cancer care
(University of Delaware) Computer scientists from the University of Delaware and Georgetown University have developed a new system to rapidly determine which cancer drugs are likely to work best given genetic markers for a patent -- the first publicly available system of its kind. This will allow doctors to better access data linking genetic factors and treatment results spread among hundreds of academic journals. This is the first publicly available system of its kind. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 6, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Hot tea may increase esophageal cancer risk for smokers and drinkers, study finds
Smokers and drinkers may want to wait for their cup of tea to cool down. (Source: ABC News: Health)
Source: ABC News: Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: GMA Source Type: news

Apalutamide Slows Metastasis in Prostate Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- Two-year delay in metastatic progression with apalutamide (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - February 6, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Are anti-ageing stem cell jabs really safe?
The 'precursor' cells are increasingly being used in the beauty industry to slow the signs of ageing, despite warnings that they could develop into rogue cells which could even cause cancer. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Men with prostate cancer have access to fewer nurses
For every urological nurse in the NHS there are 166 new prostate cancer cases a year – twice as many as the 86 cases for every breast cancer nurse. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hot Tea + Alcohol or Smoking May Up Esophageal Cancer Risk
Greatest risk for esophageal cancer for those who drink burning hot tea, consume ≥ 15 mg alcohol daily (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

Cellphones Pose Little Cancer Risk, Studies Suggest
(Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer)
Source: Cancercompass News: Other Cancer - February 6, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Support for Upfront Immunotherapy in Advanced Renal Cell Cancer Support for Upfront Immunotherapy in Advanced Renal Cell Cancer
Atezolizumab plus bevacizumab improves progression-free survival with greater tolerability than standard sunitinib in advanced kidney cancer in a randomized controlled trial.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Researchers Say Cell Phone Exposure Is Unlikely To Cause Cancer
BOSTON (CBS) – There’s been a lot of concern over the years about whether cell phones cause cancer. Now two new large government studies find there may be a risk but it’s probably small. Researchers exposed rats and mice to radiofrequency radiation for roughly nine hours a day for up to two years. They found a higher incidence of malignant heart tumors in the male rats but not in female rats nor in any of the mice. The rodents with tumors were exposed to radiation levels higher than those with heavy cell phone use, and the risk of cancer appeared pretty small, but more research needs to be done to further...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Cell Phone Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Wine Could Protect Your Brain From Alzheimer ’ s Disease
BOSTON (CBS) – Could a daily nightcap help protect your brain from Alzheimer’s? Researchers at the University of Rochester found that mice exposed to low levels of alcohol showed less inflammation in the brain and were more efficient at removing brain waste, including toxins associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Low levels of alcohol, for this study, amounts to about 2 1/2 glasses a day. A glass of wine is only about 4-5 ounces in total. We know that low to moderate levels of alcohol may help prevent heart disease and cancer and now possibly dementia, but excessive alcohol use can do the opposite. Heavy d...
Source: WBZ-TV - Breaking News, Weather and Sports for Boston, Worcester and New Hampshire - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Health – CBS Boston Tags: Health Local News Syndicated Local Alzheimer's Disease Dr. Mallika Marshall Source Type: news

Pfizer's Xtandi delays prostate cancer spread in early stage disease
(Reuters) - Use of Xtandi in early stage prostate cancer on top of standard hormone therapy reduced the risk of disease spreading or death by 71 percent compared with hormone therapy alone, study results that could lead to significantly increased sales of the Pfizer Inc and Astellas Pharma Inc medicine. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

Gucs 2018 gucs 2018
Read clinically focused news coverage of key developments from GUCS 2018.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Conference Coverage Source Type: news

CDC Director Resigns Amid Reports of Tobacco Stock Trade
The Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) announced on January 31, 2018, that Dr. Brenda Fitzgerald would resign as the Director of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). The statement read, “Dr. Fitzgerald owns certain complex financial interests that have imposed a broad recusal limiting her ability to complete all of her duties as the CDC Director. Due to the nature of these financial interests, Dr. Fitzgerald could not divest from them in a definitive time period.” The decision came a day after Politico reported that she bought stock in a large tobacco company within a month of start...
Source: Public Policy Reports - February 5, 2018 Category: Biology Authors: AIBS Source Type: news

Hot tea tied to higher cancer risk for smokers and drinkers
(Reuters Health) - Drinking scalding hot tea is associated with an increased risk of esophageal tumors in people who also smoke and drink alcohol, two habits that already make many cancers more likely, a Chinese study suggests. (Source: Reuters: Health)
Source: Reuters: Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: healthNews Source Type: news

' Finally, Real Promise' for Prostate Cancers With No Therapy'Finally, Real Promise' for Prostate Cancers With No Therapy
Two drugs have demonstrated clinically significant improvements in delaying the onset of metastatic disease by more than 20 months.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Here ’s How Drinking Hot Tea Could Increase Your Risk of Cancer
Smoking cigarettes and drinking too much alcohol both raise your risk for developing esophageal cancer, which affects the tube connecting the throat to the stomach. Now, a new study published Monday in the Annals of Internal Medicine finds another lifestyle linked to the cancer, this one more surprising: drinking hot tea, if people also smoke and drink alcohol. Among people who regularly smoked cigarettes and drank at least one drink per day, drinking hot tea was linked to a five-times higher risk of developing esophageal cancer, compared to those who didn’t do any of those three habits. In people who didn’t ha...
Source: TIME: Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Jamie Ducharme Tags: Uncategorized Alcohol Cancer Diet/Nutrition do hot beverages cause cancer do hot drinks cause cancer does hot tea cause cancer esophageal cancer esophagus healthytime hot beverages cancer hot drinks cancer hot tea cancer onetime Source Type: news

Hot tea 'increases risk of esophageal cancer FIVE-fold'
The new study by scientists in China found drinking tea heated to over 65C was associated with a five-fold increased risk for esophageal cancer when combined with excessive drinking or heavy smoking. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hot Tea and Increased Risk for Esophageal Cancer Hot Tea and Increased Risk for Esophageal Cancer
Researchers report a fivefold increased risk for esophageal cancer when hot tea aficionados smoke or drink alcohol every day.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Hot tea linked to esophageal cancer in smokers, drinkers
If you smoke cigarettes or drink alcohol daily, you may want to consider letting your tea cool before you enjoy it. Drinking tea while it's too hot could increase your risk of esophageal cancer, a new study suggests. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Very hot tea can raise risk of oesophageal cancer, suggests study
Combined with excess alcohol consumption, scaldingly hot tea raises relative risk fivefold, says Chinese researchersVery hot tea combined with heavy alcohol consumption can increase the risk of oesophageal cancer by five-fold, research suggests.The cancer, which starts in the oesophagus, was already known to be linked to drinking alcohol and smoking, but those risks are heightened by the addition of daily cups of “burning hot” tea, scientists discovered.Continue reading... (Source: Guardian Unlimited Science)
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 5, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Press Association Tags: Cancer research Tea China Medical research Science Asia Pacific World news Food & drink Life and style Source Type: news

Hot Tea Drinking Linked with Esophageal Cancer
(MedPage Today) -- F. Perry Wilson, MD, offers his own hot take (Source: MedPage Today Public Health)
Source: MedPage Today Public Health - February 5, 2018 Category: American Health Source Type: news

HPV in Tonsil Biofilm May Play Role in Oropharyngeal Cancer HPV in Tonsil Biofilm May Play Role in Oropharyngeal Cancer
Reuters Health Information (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Medscape Today News Source Type: news

Breyer Capital leads $25 million round for AI/cancer research startup
New York-area startups and venture capitalists are making funding deals with the hopes of creating the next profitable company. Here's one deal announced Monday: Who gets: New York-based Paige.AI, a company devoted to using artificial intelligence to improve diagnosis and treatment of cancer, has closed a new round of funding. Amount raised: $25 million in series A funding. Who invests: Breyer Capital led the effort, which included unnamed investors. B reyer Capital is the firm of early Facebook… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Anthony Noto Source Type: news

Breyer Capital leads $25 million round for AI/cancer research startup
New York-area startups and venture capitalists are making funding deals with the hopes of creating the next profitable company. Here's one deal announced Monday: Who gets: New York-based Paige.AI, a company devoted to using artificial intelligence to improve diagnosis and treatment of cancer, has closed a new round of funding. Amount raised: $25 million in series A funding. Who invests: Breyer Capital led the effort, which included unnamed investors. B reyer Capital is the firm of early Facebook… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Health Management Authors: Anthony Noto Source Type: news

Opinion: Do Not Believe the Hype
Marijuana ointments as cancer treatments remain a distant prospect. (Source: The Scientist)
Source: The Scientist - February 5, 2018 Category: Science Tags: News & Opinion,Opinion Source Type: news

Liver cancer symptoms - seven signs of the DEADLY condition
LIVER cancer symptoms can include stomach pains, vomiting and general weakness. The number of cases have more than doubled since the early 1990s. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

BMS gets boost from immunotherapy cancer trial
US drugmaker hails breakthrough as it reports rising revenues but suffers US tax hit (Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare)
Source: FT.com - Drugs and Healthcare - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Source Type: news

China clears Elekta's Gamma Knife Icon
The China Food and Drug Administration has cleared radiation oncology vendor...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Elekta inks reseller agreement with Equicare Health Elekta teams up with IBM Watson Health Elekta points to new MR/RT research Elekta partners with Alliance for Cancer Care IBA, Elekta join forces on software development (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

FDA ’ s Shuren says cell phone RF exposure is safe in light of NTP animal study
The FDA today reiterated its view that radiofrequency energy exposure associated with cell phone use is safe in light of a new study from the National Toxicology Program, which indicated a carcinogenic effect in rats. The study, conducted by the National Institute of Health’s National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, aimed to evaluate the the effects of high exposure radiofrequency at levels “considerably above the current safety limits for cell phones” to learn more about the effects of radiofrequency energy on animal tissue, according to FDA Center for Devices and Radiological Health Director...
Source: Mass Device - February 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Food & Drug Administration (FDA) Oncology Center for Devices and Radiological Health (CDRH) Source Type: news

Bacteria Identified as Oncogenic Drivers in Heredity Cancer Bacteria Identified as Oncogenic Drivers in Heredity Cancer
Bacterial biofilms have been identified as key drivers in colon cancer formation in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and potentially other forms of colorectal cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

GE develops software for Olympic Winter Games
GE Healthcare has developed new software for the Olympic Winter Games designed...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: GE Healthcare shows growth, profit in 2017 CEO comments spur talk of GE breakup GE's DaTscan awarded Canadian approval GE, Roche partner on oncology decision support GE inks consulting deal with Lifespan (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Bacteria Identified as Oncogenic Drivers in Hereditary Cancer Bacteria Identified as Oncogenic Drivers in Hereditary Cancer
Bacterial biofilms have been identified as key drivers in colon cancer formation in patients with familial adenomatous polyposis and potentially other forms of colorectal cancer.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Varian acquires Mobius Medical
Varian Medical Systems has acquired privately held radiation oncology software...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Varian inks deal to acquire Sirtex for $1.3B Varian posts double-digit Q1 gain Varian pursues partnership in China FDA clears Mobius Medical's conebeam CT module Mobius sets up shop in Europe Aspyra partners with Mobius (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Melanoma Rates Rising for Boomers, Falling Among Young
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Dermatology, Oncology, Pediatrics, Preventive Medicine, News, Source Type: news

Cellphones Pose Little Cancer Risk, Studies Suggest
(Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Family Medicine, Neurology, Oncology, Research, News, Source Type: news

IV Bevacizumab Effective for Severe HHT - Related Bleeding
Drop in RBC transfusion requirements, epistaxis severity in hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 5, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gastroenterology, Oncology, Pharmacy, Journal, Source Type: news

Winship Cancer Institute names director of new Center for Cancer Immunology
Emory University's Winship Cancer Institute named Madhav V. Dhodapkhar director of its new Center for Cancer Immunology Dhodapkhar is an expert in cancer immunology and translational immunotherapy. He joins Winship from Yale University School of Medicine, where he served as chief of hematology, the Arthur H. and Isabel Bunker Professor of Medicine (Hematology) and professor of immunobiology for the past decade. He was also co-director of the Cancer Immunology Program at the Yale Cancer Center.  The… (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Pharmaceuticals headlines - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Ellie Hensley Source Type: news

Patients to Address Court in Doctor's Opioid Kickback Scheme
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Victims of a scheme in which a doctor prescribed them a highly addictive opioid spray in exchange for kickbacks are expected to tell a federal judge how their lives were affected, including stories of overdoses, monthslong withdrawals, weight loss and broken bones from falling while on the powerful drug. Jerrold Rosenberg told one patient, "Stop crying, you're acting like a child," when she complained of severe side effects, which included losing 40 pounds and repeated vomiting for years, according to an excerpt of grand jury testimony filed by prosecutors in the case. Thursday's hea...
Source: JEMS Patient Care - February 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle R. Smith, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Patients to Address Court in Doctor's Opioid Kickback Scheme
PROVIDENCE, R.I. (AP) — Victims of a scheme in which a doctor prescribed them a highly addictive opioid spray in exchange for kickbacks are expected to tell a federal judge how their lives were affected, including stories of overdoses, monthslong withdrawals, weight loss and broken bones from falling while on the powerful drug. Jerrold Rosenberg told one patient, "Stop crying, you're acting like a child," when she complained of severe side effects, which included losing 40 pounds and repeated vomiting for years, according to an excerpt of grand jury testimony filed by prosecutors in the case. Thursday's hea...
Source: JEMS: Journal of Emergency Medical Services News - February 5, 2018 Category: Emergency Medicine Authors: Michelle R. Smith, Associated Press Tags: Patient Care News Source Type: news

Second Sight touts 1st-in-human Orion cortical implant
Second Sight Medical (NSDQ:EYES) today announced the first trial implantation of its Orion cortical visual prosthesis system and updated on implantations of its Argus device and enrollment in an upcoming study. The first implantation procedure was performed late last month by Dr. Nader Pouratian at the Ronald Reagan UCLA Medical Center, the Sylmar, Calif.-based company said, as part of an FDA-cleared feasibility trial it won approval to launch last November. The Orion cortical visual prosthesis system is designed to convert images captured by a miniature video camera, mounted on a patient’s glasses, into a ...
Source: Mass Device - February 5, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Clinical Trials Optical/Ophthalmic Second Sight Source Type: news

Genprex Launch IPO For Trials Of New Gene Therapy Lung Cancer Treatment
The company is raising capital to pay the costs of further clinical trials, as the cost of these trials is very high. The earliest that Oncoprex could be available to patients is two years after raising the capital in this IPO. (Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News)
Source: Forbes.com Healthcare News - February 5, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Rod Turner, Contributor Tags: NYSE:MRK NYSE:BMY Source Type: news