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Food may influence cancer spread
Study slowed breast cancer spread by blocking the nutrient asparagine. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

High Detection Rates of High - Grade DCIS Persist
Low - , intermediate - grade DCIS less frequently ID'd in subsequent screening rounds vs. prevalence round (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Gynecology, Oncology, Pathology, Radiology, Journal, Source Type: news

Expenditures Rising for Treating Obesity - Related Illness in U.S.
Proportion of medical expenditures for obesity - related illness varies widely by state (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Cardiology, Endocrinology, Family Medicine, Geriatrics, Gastroenterology, Gynecology, Internal Medicine, Oncology, Orthopedics, Pulmonology, Rheumatology, Journal, Source Type: news

HPV Prevalence 4.9 Percent in Tonsil Tissue of Healthy Adults
Human papillomavirus colocalizes to the biofilm of the tonsillar crypts (Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology)
Source: The Doctors Lounge - Oncology - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Tags: Family Medicine, Gynecology, Infections, Internal Medicine, Nursing, Oncology, ENT, Pathology, Journal, Source Type: news

Breast cancer spread 'could be prevented with diet and drugs combination'
A COMBINATION of diet and drugs could hold the key to preventing the spread of breast cancer, scientists say. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Why More Scientists Are Running For Office in 2018
Getting scientists to become more politically involved has been an ongoing movement this year, with groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Chemical Society encouraging scientists to voice their opinions and even join protests, like the March for Science in April 2017. Now, hundreds of scientists and STEM professionals are running for public office in 2018, for everything from Senate seats to a spot on the local school board. “I’m not a politician, I’m a doctor,” reads the first line of Dr. Jason Westin‘s bio on his campaign website for Texas’s 7t...
Source: TIME: Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized 314 Action CDA climate change EPA evidence-based medicine healthytime jason Westin Mai Khanh Tran onetime public health Science scientists scientists running for office Source Type: news

Why More Scientists Are Running For Office in 2018
Getting scientists to become more politically involved has been an ongoing movement this year, with groups like the American Association for the Advancement of Science and American Chemical Society encouraging scientists to voice their opinions and even join protests, like the March for Science in April 2017. Now, hundreds of scientists and STEM professionals are running for public office in 2018, for everything from Senate seats to a spot on the local school board. “I’m not a politician, I’m a doctor,” reads the first line of Dr. Jason Westin‘s bio on his campaign website for Texas’s 7t...
Source: TIME: Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Authors: Alexandra Sifferlin Tags: Uncategorized 314 Action CDA climate change EPA evidence-based medicine healthytime jason Westin Mai Khanh Tran onetime public health Science scientists scientists running for office Source Type: news

Cell phone radiation study finds more questions than answers
Cell phone radiation and a potential link to cancer risks have left consumers and scientists alike scratching their heads since mobile phones became widely used in the 1990s. (Source: CNN.com - Health)
Source: CNN.com - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Fracking is linked to breast cancer
Researchers from the University of Massachusetts found uncontrolled cell division occurs in mice exposed to chemicals used in fracking, which contaminate water supplies. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cancer victim shares final photos to raise awareness
Amy Redhead, from the West Midlands,was found to have an aggressive form of cancer which had spread to her liver. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Docetaxel for Prostate Cancer:'Win-Win-Win'Docetaxel for Prostate Cancer:'Win-Win-Win '
In both metastatic and nonmetastatic patients, the chemotherapy improved three important outcomes compared with previous standard of care.Medscape Medical News (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Source Type: news

Cancer-Causing HPV Can Hide in the Throat
WEDNESDAY, Feb. 7, 2018 -- Human papilloma virus (HPV) could be lurking in your throat. It's known that strains of the virus can cause cervical cancer. And the virus can also cause certain forms of head and neck cancer, according to researchers... (Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews)
Source: Drugs.com - Daily MedNews - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Mutant, all-female crayfish spreading rapidly through Europe can clone itself
Genome study finds the invasive clonal freshwater crayfish is descended from a single female and reproduces without malesA voracious pest that mutated in a German aquarium and is marching around the world without the need for sexual reproduction may sound like science fiction, but a genetic study has revealed that a rapidly spreading all-female army of crayfish is descended from a single female and reproduces without any males.The clonal freshwater crayfish is regarded as an invasive species which threatens endemic wild species, but its success may help scientists better understand how cancer spreads.Continue reading... (S...
Source: Guardian Unlimited Science - February 7, 2018 Category: Science Authors: Patrick Barkham Tags: Invasive species Animal behaviour Biology Conservation Environment Science World news Source Type: news

FDA Drug Safety Communication: Update to ongoing safety review of Lantus (insulin glargine) and possible risk of cancer
[1-12-2011] The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is updating the public about its ongoing safety review of Lantus (insulin glargine) and a possible increased risk of cancer. (Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New)
Source: FDA Center for Drug Evaluation and Research - What's New - February 7, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Cancer warning - why you should never ignore a cough that just won’t go away
CANCER symptoms can vary depending on where in the body the tumour is. But, if you have a cough that won ’t go away, you should see a GP. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

AstraZeneca: An Embarrassment Of Riches
2017 was a busy year for AstraZeneca. With 19 major new drug approvals in the US, Europe and Japan, many are looking to the company ’s rise in R&D productivity described by Mene Pangalos, head of its Innovative Medicines and Early Development unit,in a recent Reuters article as “less people, less sites and less money”.With so many launches, it was also a very busy year for Medical Affairs, says Mark Mallon, EVP, Global Product and Portfolio Strategy, Global Medical Affairs and Global Corporate Affairs.“2017 was unprecedented – one of the best company performances in the industry – bu...
Source: EyeForPharma - February 7, 2018 Category: Pharmaceuticals Authors: Adam Chapman Source Type: news

Rochelle Bugg's cancer blog for bereaved children
31-year-old Rochelle blogs to try and help other young people who have lost a loved one. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Hot Tea Linked to Esophageal Cancer Risk
(Source: eMedicineHealth.com)
Source: eMedicineHealth.com - February 7, 2018 Category: General Medicine Source Type: news

Hot Tea Linked to Esophageal Cancer Risk
Title: Hot Tea Linked to Esophageal Cancer RiskCategory: Health NewsCreated: 2/7/2018 12:00:00 AMLast Editorial Review: 2/7/2018 12:00:00 AM (Source: MedicineNet Cancer General)
Source: MedicineNet Cancer General - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Delayed cancer diagnosis leaves family with 'what ifs'
A grandfather faced delays for chemotherapy - only to find out his condition had become terminal. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Cardiff man's eight-month cancer treatment wait
A grandfather who faced delays for chemotherapy is told his condition is terminal. (Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition)
Source: BBC News | Health | UK Edition - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

A Holistic Care Approach to Malignant Melanoma A Holistic Care Approach to Malignant Melanoma
In this editorial, the author underscores the need for a multidisciplinary, collaborative approach to treatment of malignant melanoma, uniting dermatologists, oncologists and researchers.The British Journal of Dermatology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Dermatology Journal Article Source Type: news

Representation of Minorities and Women in Oncology Trials Representation of Minorities and Women in Oncology Trials
Do clinical trials in oncology adequately represent the US population with cancer?Journal of Oncology Practice (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Tumor Biomarkers in Lung Cancer for Detection and Treatment Tumor Biomarkers in Lung Cancer for Detection and Treatment
Review the roles of circulating tumor cells, circulating tumor DNA, microRNA and other biomarkers for lung cancer management.Translational Lung Cancer Research (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Journal Article Source Type: news

Verastem Submits NDA to FDA for Duvelisib for the Treatment of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia/Small Lymphocytic Lymphoma and Follicular Lymphoma
BOSTON--(BUSINESS WIRE)--Feb. 7, 2018-- Verastem, Inc. (NASDAQ: VSTM), focused on discovering and developing drugs to improve the survival and quality of life of cancer patients, today announced it has submitted a New Drug Application (NDA) to the... (Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications)
Source: Drugs.com - New Drug Applications - February 7, 2018 Category: Drugs & Pharmacology Source Type: news

Recreating liver tumors as organoids for faster, more accurate drug screening
(National University of Singapore, Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine) A major challenge in developing liver cancer drugs is that preclinical testing occurs in tumor models that do not accurately reflect human tumor features, causing drug candidates to later fail in clinical testing. Now, Singaporean researchers have grown organoids from liver tumors on specially engineered 3-D scaffolds. These organoids replicate important features of the original tumor, including genetic changes and intra-tumor heterogeneity, and could serve as tumor avatars for high-throughput drug screening. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

GlycoNet, partners fund $3.5 million in health research
(Canadian Glycomics Network) The Canadian Glycomics Network (GlycoNet) along with partner institutions recently awarded more than $3.5 million in grants to fund exploratory research in the area of glycomics to benefit human health. The funds are distributed to more than 36 researchers at 18 institutions across Canada. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Exposure to chemicals used during fracking may cause pre-cancerous lesions in mice
(University of Missouri-Columbia) Today, researchers at the University of Missouri and the University of Massachusetts released a study that found that female mice exposed to mixtures of chemicals used in fracking operations during prenatal development had abnormal mammary glands in adulthood. Additionally, some of the mice developed pre-cancerous mammary lesions that may suggest they will be more sensitive to chemicals that cause cancer. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Scientists crack structure of enzyme complex linked to cancer
(University of California - Riverside) A research team led by a biochemist at the University of California, Riverside has solved the crystal structure for an enzyme that plays a key role in DNA methylation, the process by which methyl groups are added to the DNA molecule. The breakthrough reveals how the enzyme recognizes and methylates its substrates. In humans, errors in methylation have been associated with various diseases, including cancer. DNA methylation also critically influences plant and animal development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Diet may influence the spread of a deadly type of breast cancer, study finds
(Cedars-Sinai Medical Center) A single protein building block commonly found in food may hold a key to preventing the spread of an often-deadly type of breast cancer, according to a new multicenter study published today in the medical journal Nature. Investigators found that by limiting an amino acid called asparagine in laboratory mice with triple-negative breast cancer, they could dramatically reduce the ability of the cancer to travel to distant sites in the body. Among other techniques, the team used dietary restrictions to limit asparagine. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Scientists halt breast cancer spread
(Cancer Research UK) Scientists have discovered that an amino acid called asparagine is essential for breast cancer spread, and by restricting it, cancer cells stopped invading other parts of the body in mice, according to research part-funded by Cancer Research UK and published in the journal Nature today. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Insight into chromatin therapies for breast cancer could aid personalized medicine
(Boston University School of Medicine) Most traditional chemotherapy for cancer has dangerous side effects, but new research is finding ways to develop 'targeted agents' that reduce the side effects and are better tailored to individual patient needs. While these innovations are exciting, a new study shows how certain cancer inhibitors need to be examined more carefully to better understand fine-grained effects and counter-effects, which could yield more effective and safer therapies. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

UPMC researchers solving treatment resistance in most common breast cancer
(University of Pittsburgh Schools of the Health Sciences) For the first time researchers have identified recurrent ESR1 fusion proteins in human breast cancer, to understand how they function and help lead to improved treatments for the disease. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

The American College of Rheumatology recommends biosimilar use in new white paper
(American College of Rheumatology) The ACR has published a new white paper that provides a comprehensive overview of the scientific, clinical, economic and prescribing issues pertaining to biosimilar use. The paper encourages providers to incorporate these drugs into treatment plans of patients with rheumatic diseases. (Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer)
Source: EurekAlert! - Cancer - February 7, 2018 Category: Cancer & Oncology Source Type: news

Versatile sensor against tumor initiating cells
(Institute for Basic Science) The IBS researchers developed the first fluorescent sensor to visualize TICs. Functional in lung, central nervous system, melanoma, breast, renal, ovarian, colon, and prostate cancer cell cultures, this could become a useful tool for biopsy-free post-treatment assessment and anti-TIC drug development. (Source: EurekAlert! - Biology)
Source: EurekAlert! - Biology - February 7, 2018 Category: Biology Source Type: news

Breast cancer patients often mispredict well-being after mastectomy
(JAMA Network) Women with breast cancer who underwent a mastectomy without breast reconstruction generally underestimated their future quality of life, while those who had immediate reconstruction generally overestimated it. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

PBS and SU2C announce 100 HS students selected for 2018 Class of Emperor Science awards
(Entertainment Industry Foundation) 100 high school students from 28 states were named winners in the third year of PBS' and SU2C's Emperor Science Award. This program empowers high school students to become the next generation of scientists as they explore careers in cancer research. The award includes a unique multi-week mentoring opportunity with an esteemed university scientist, a Google Chromebook computer to enhance studies and facilitate communication with their mentor, and a $1,500 stipend for expenses. (Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health)
Source: EurekAlert! - Medicine and Health - February 7, 2018 Category: International Medicine & Public Health Source Type: news

Time of Death: New AI Technology Tries To Predict and Prevent Death
If you could know the exact day you die, would you want to? The question may not be as far-fetched as you might think, thanks to a new algorithm designed to analyze digital medical records and compare them to real-time health data to calculate the risk of impending health events. The FDA cleared technology from Excel Medical, known as the WAVE Clinical Platform, is being billed as the world’s first patient surveillance and predictive algorithm platform. The device was designed as an always-on remote monitoring platform that can track real-time data, such as vital signs, and use that information in conj...
Source: MDDI - February 7, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Kristopher Sturgis Tags: Digital Health Source Type: news

Men with cancer live for 25% longer if given a drug early
British researchers showed men with the cancer live 25 per cent longer if given docetaxel – an established chemotherapy drug – early on in their treatment. (Source: the Mail online | Health)
Source: the Mail online | Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

FDA Expands Indication for Anemia Drug Feraheme FDA Expands Indication for Anemia Drug Feraheme
Ferumoxytol injection is now indicated for all eligible adults with iron deficiency anemia who have failed to respond to oral iron.FDA Approvals (Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines)
Source: Medscape Medical News Headlines - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology News Alert Source Type: news

Combo Bests Targeted Agent in mRCC
(MedPage Today) -- Improved PFS with first-line atezolizumab and bevacizumab pairing (Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology)
Source: MedPage Today Hematology/Oncology - February 7, 2018 Category: Hematology Source Type: news

Cancer risk: Thousands of people potentially delaying early disease diagnosis
THOUSANDS of people are potentially delaying early cancer diagnosis because they are too busy to attend vital medical check-ups and screenings, new research reveals. The YouGov Survey also shows as many as fifteen percent of people refer to "doctor google" over their own GP to check for cancer symptoms. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 7, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Study: Early Identification Needed for Mesothelioma Advances
Professor John Cherrie at Heriot-Watt University in the United Kingdom believes future treatment advances and improved patient outcomes for mesothelioma rests with a formula to better identify and screen high-risk patients. It could make an early diagnosis of the asbestos-related cancer much more common. Cherrie said the current standard — which typically results in a late-stage diagnosis and a poor prognosis — prevents novel treatment studies and the development of any pre-emergent strategy to combat the aggressive cancer. “We don’t pretend to have a medical cure that will help immediately, but un...
Source: Asbestos and Mesothelioma News - February 6, 2018 Category: Environmental Health Authors: Matt Mauney Tags: Activity emission potential biomarkers for mesothelioma chemoprophylaxis strategies early diagnosis mesothelioma Early identification of mesothelioma early screening asbestos Heriot-Watt University high-risk mesothelioma indwelling pleural Source Type: news

An Exceptional Case: IL-17 and Immune Checkpoint Inhibition An Exceptional Case: IL-17 and Immune Checkpoint Inhibition
A case report suggests that IL-17 plays an important role in immune checkpoint inhibition, argues Dr David Kerr.Medscape Oncology (Source: Medscape Today Headlines)
Source: Medscape Today Headlines - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Tags: Hematology-Oncology Commentary Source Type: news

AI pathology company Paige.AI raises $25M in funding
Paige.AI, a health technology company that applies artificial intelligence to pathology for cancer diagnosis and treatment, recently announced it landed $25 million in Series A funding, led by Jim Breyer of Breyer Capital.   (Source: mobihealthnews)
Source: mobihealthnews - February 6, 2018 Category: Information Technology Source Type: news

Cambridge biotech Enumeral files for bankruptcy, sells cancer drugs
The nine-year-old company generated some buzz in 2014 by signing a partnership deal with Merck, but never tested its experimental treatments in a human trial. (Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines)
Source: bizjournals.com Health Care:Biotechnology headlines - February 6, 2018 Category: Biotechnology Authors: Max Stendahl Source Type: news

IBS cure? Vitamin D could prevent painful bloating and diarrhoea
VITAMIN D deficiency has been linked to cancer and inflammatory bowel disease. But, taking the supplements could ease painful IBS symptoms, it ’s been revealed. (Source: Daily Express - Health)
Source: Daily Express - Health - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news

Varian Medical acquires Mobius Medical Systems
Varian Medical (NYSE:VAR) said yesterday it bought radiation oncology quality assurance software maker Mobius Medical Systems for an undisclosed amount. The Palo Alto, Calif.-based company said the acquisition will be beneficial to its portfolio of patient treatment plan QA and machine QA technologies, and that integration of the Mobius’ technologies will enable advanced QA processes to be “seamlessly combined into treatment workflows.” Mobius’ QA software is currently in use at over 1,000 sites globally, and includes the Mobius3D dose verification and IMRT/VMAT treatment delivery system, ...
Source: Mass Device - February 6, 2018 Category: Medical Devices Authors: Fink Densford Tags: Business/Financial News Mergers & Acquisitions Software / IT mobiusmedicalsystems Varian Medical Systems Source Type: news

Whole-body MRI gains momentum for oncology cases
Whole-body MRI is an emerging clinical tool for accurate and early assessment...Read more on AuntMinnie.comRelated Reading: Multiparametric MRI can help avoid renal mass biopsies MRI confirms prostate cancer with lower dose of GBCA Biomarker test could direct MRI use for prostate cancer Is ferumoxytol the alternative to gadolinium MRI agents? Short breast MRI protocol works for cancer detection (Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines)
Source: AuntMinnie.com Headlines - February 6, 2018 Category: Radiology Source Type: news

Hot tea a factor in increased esophageal cancer: Study
The consumption of hot tea and excessive alcohol or tobacco use has been linked to increased risk for esophageal cancer, according to new research in China. (Source: Health News - UPI.com)
Source: Health News - UPI.com - February 6, 2018 Category: Consumer Health News Source Type: news